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LIFE & LEISURE => Leisure Activities (Sports, Travel, Pets, Cooking, Gardens, etc) => Topic started by: jack on April 20, 2006, 06:32:11 PM

Title: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on April 20, 2006, 06:32:11 PM
A SPACE FOR RECIPES YOU LOVE TO SHARE...

easy recipes with lots of bang for the work are probably best for this crowd, since we spend so darn much time on line.

share away..

jack
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on April 20, 2006, 06:49:35 PM
I'll be the first.. throw this in the crock pot and you can sit online all day!!   :D

 low carb cheap recipe --- Adobo Chicken
   
Ingredients:  3 pounds meat (thighs)
1/2 cup soy sauce -- Kikkoman
1/2 cup white vinegar
1 small onion -- sliced
3 cloves garlic -- chopped
 
Combine all ingredients in a pot or crock pot and cook. The longer it simmers, the more tender the meat will
be. The recipe is also very forgiving. If you don't like garlic, leave it out. If you want to try it with ginger or hot peppers
or anything else that you fancy, toss it in. Just don't mess with the soy/vinegar ratio. And don't add any water because it makes lots of gravy


Make a cole slaw and there are lots of left overs

Sherry
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on April 20, 2006, 06:58:33 PM
Another good cheapy!

Rotisserie/"Deli" Chicken   

Ingredients:

1 whole chicken
tin foil (any "weight")
spray cooking oil
seasoning of your choice (see my note*)


Spray the bottom of the crockpot with olive oil non-stick cooking spray. Next, take pieces of tin foil (aluminum foil) and ball them up, placing them in the bottom of the crockpot. The chicken is going to "sit" on the foil balls. Cover the bottom of the crockpot with tinfoil balls. Spray the chicken with the olive oil spray and season with Lawry's seasoned salt.
Bake on high for 4 hours.

**Notes: The tin foil and the time/temp are "non-negotiables"

I have used butter flavored cooking spray as well as different seasonings and it has tasted great. I have used lemon pepper seasoning and McCormick's brand "Rotisserie Chicken Seasoning."

This does look like one of the whole rotisserie chicken's that the grocery store sells.

This will give ya 4 hours on the computer! in the Diner of course!!

Sherry
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on April 20, 2006, 07:04:04 PM
thanks sherry...

ideal for the target group here.  and easy to pass off as hard work, as in look dear, i have been slaving over a hot stove all day for you <sliding the monitor back into its normal position, and backing away>
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on April 21, 2006, 09:09:16 PM
Ok.. here is another quickie.  I work the graveyard shift and by the time I get up around 3pm everyone wants dinner at 5.  Making a dinner after being awake for 2 hours isn't always on the top of my list.  To stretch budgets and for folks that choose not to partake of meat... 

REAL MEN DO EAT QUICHE!!!

MEXICAN QUICHE
8 ounces cheddar cheese, shredded
4 ounce can chopped green chiles
1/2 cup cream
3 eggs
1/8 teaspoon cumin
1/8 teaspoon chili powder
1/8 teaspoon salt

Grease a large glass pie plate. Beat the eggs with the cream and seasonings. Put the cheese in the bottom of the pie plate; sprinkle chiles evenly over the cheese. Slowly pour the egg mixture evenly over the cheese. Bake at 350º for 30-35 minutes until knife inserted in the center comes out clean.

Makes 6 servings
Can be frozen

Spruce up a bag of store bought salad mix  and viola'

This is so quick and easy.  Remember a basic quiche is eggs and cream and some type of cheese.... be inventive  :)

(BTW Jack only 2 carbs per serving)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: maturben on April 23, 2006, 04:54:51 PM
just stumbled across this new thread and being a foodie I'm delighted.  We might end up with a cookbook!  Title suggestion---"No More Beans" ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on April 24, 2006, 08:36:25 PM
just stumbled across this new thread and being a foodie I'm delighted.  We might end up with a cookbook!  Title suggestion---"No More Beans" ;D

I like your title!

Sherry
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: dante on April 25, 2006, 07:41:30 PM
"Jack I Swear."  You'll do anything to keep a discussion going.....LOL :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Daphne and Chloe on April 27, 2006, 03:52:26 PM
This bread pudding recipe is made with soy milk. No dairy milk or eggs. I can't tell you how good it is. I don't make it very often because it's gone in no time. It's good warm and cold. I love it for breakfast. Don't over cook it. I omit the nuts and raisins but I'll write the recipe as it is in the book.

BREAD PUDDING

4 Cups cubed day old wheat or white bread.

3 Cups soy milk

3/4 Cup sugar

1 Tablespoon vanilla extract

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon   (I actually use a little more because I love cinnamon)

1 Cup raisins (optional)

1/2 Cup chopped almonds (optional)

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Put the bread into a 9-inch square baking pan or a 2 1/2 quart casserole dish lightly oiled. Stir the remaining ingredients together in a seperate bowl and pour over the bread. Stir to mix. bake 30 minutes. Serve warm or cool.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: maturben on April 27, 2006, 04:26:28 PM
Daphne and Chloe----I love bread pudding! Coupla questions:  what about lightly toasting the bread first?  have you ever served it with real maple syrup? 
I think this would be good as part of a brunch selection. 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nick_F on April 27, 2006, 04:50:02 PM
OMG Bread Pudding.....

YUM!

Thank You!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Daphne and Chloe on April 27, 2006, 06:44:56 PM
I'm glad you like the bread pudding recipe. I was afraid people would say ick soy! :)  but it really is good. I lightly pack the bread cubes when I measure (forgot to mention that). Yes I have toasted the bread a little if it's too fresh. You can cube it and put it on a cookie sheet in the oven for a few minutes to save time.

And I will try it with real maple syrup. That sounds great! I never thought of that. Thanks.

Cholesterol free recipe  :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on April 28, 2006, 06:09:15 AM
Daphne and Chloe,

I'm a bread pudding fanatic.  I can't wait to make this.  Thank you so much.  Gotta find something yummy to share with everyone!  Paella?  Leg of Lamb with Curry Couscous?  hmmm...

B xo
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on April 28, 2006, 06:23:18 AM
I'm hoping to get a good strawberry pie recipe in here since we serve it so often in the Diner...

ANyone?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: bestfilmever on April 29, 2006, 02:59:49 AM
LEMON DELIGHT

      1  STICK OLEO
      1  CUP FLOUR
      1  CUP CHOPPED WALNUTS
      1  8 OUNCE CREAM CHEESE
      1  CUP POWDERED SUGAR - SIFT
      1  CUP COOL WHIP FROM SMALL CONTAINER OF COOL WHIP
      2  SMALL BOXES INSTANT PUDDING (ANY FLAVOR - HERE LEMMON)
      3 CUPS MILK

CRUST - OLEO, FLOUR, AND NUTS  MIX - PUT IN 9 X13 UN GREASED DISH
          BAKE 350 DEGREES FOR 15-20 MINUTES - LET COOL

1ST LAYER - BEAT CREAM CHEESE AND POWDERED SUGAR TILL SMOOTH - ADD COOL WHIP
         SPREAD ON CRUST AFTER COOLED

2ND LAYER - COMBINE PUDDING AND MILK

3RD LAYER - REST OF COOL WHIP FROM CONTAINER ON TOP

HOPE YOU ENJOY! :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: clarabell on April 30, 2006, 01:57:21 PM
I never thought about using soy in bread pudding, but what a great idea! thanks :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: goobles on May 01, 2006, 08:33:07 AM
This banana bread recipe has been a hit with my hubby's office colleagues.  I like to add a little ground nutmeg, cinammon and clove.

To-Die-For Banana-Nut Bread presented by Virginia Highland Bed and Breakfast   

1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup refined sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 egg
2 cups mashed ripe bananas
2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1 cup nuts
1/4 cup maple syrup

Cream butter with sugar. Add egg. Add bananas and mix until smooth. Combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Add to creamed mixture and stir until moist. Add nuts and maple syrup, mixing, until smooth throughout. Pour batter into greased loaf pan. Bake at 350 for 70 minutes. Cool 10 minutes. Pour on glaze and Enjoy!

Glaze: Mix 1 cup powdered sugar, 1/4 cup brown sugar, and 1/8 cup maple syrup.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Virginia Highland Bed and Breakfast
Atlanta, Georgia
I got this from http://www.bbonline.com/recipe/
 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 01, 2006, 02:30:21 PM
I got this from a low-carb site that I visit often. It is not my recipe but it is sooo.. good


(http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g287/Shrry/green_enchilada_chicken_casserole.jpg)


GREEN "ENCHILADA" CHICKEN CASSEROLE
4 cups cubed cooked chicken or turkey
2 teaspoons Seasoning for Tacos
8 ounces cream cheese
1 tablespoon minced chives, optional
7 ounce can Green Mexican Salsa
4 ounce can chopped green chiles
6 ounces Monterey jack cheese, shredded
4 green onions, chopped

Grease an 11x7" baking pan. Put chicken in pan and toss with taco seasoning to coat. Soften cream cheese and whisk well with the chives and green sauce in a medium bowl. Stir in the chiles. Pour sauce evenly over chicken; top with cheese. Bake at 350º 25 minutes, until hot and bubbly. Remove from oven and immediately sprinkle with green onions.

Makes 6-8 servings

Per 1/6 recipe: 432 Calories; 29g Fat; 38g Protein; 5g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 4g Net Carbs
Per 1/8 recipe: 324 Calories; 22g Fat; 28g Protein; 4g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 3g Net Carbs
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on May 01, 2006, 09:19:32 PM
hey sherry, do you have any of these cool recipes that don't go in the oven?  i do not use my oven for anything but storage.  i usually can translate to microwave but it is harder that way. 

thanks,

jack
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on May 01, 2006, 09:43:49 PM
Wilted Onions

A hot mixture is poured over sliced onions for a relish; or on bread for a sandwich if you really like onions ( nice with that chewy pugliese from Costco); or on top of a chop. Or under some chicken in the Crockpot.   Or whatever.

Ingredients:
1/2 Cup each of water, oil, and white vinegar*
2 teaspoons salt
bit of pepper
1 tablespoon sugar
3 or 4 drops Tabasco.

--------
One or two sliced onions. I slice them fairly thin (using one of those box-type gadgets you slide the onion over).  Even one onion makes a lot.

Instructions: heat the above to boiling (microwave is fine), and pour over the onions.  When the mix is cool, put in a jar and store in fridge.  Supposed to keep 2 or 3 weeks, but it's tasted fine for longer than that.

*This isn't brain surgery.  I've used rice vinegar as well as plain white, or a mix of the two.  And canola oil, or part olive oil.  I like to use sweet onions.  Used a red onion once simply because it was on hand; the result was a slightly strange pink, but stilll tasty. You could leave out the Tabasco.  And I've been meaning to try adding herbs to the mix. Wonder what would be good with onions...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on May 02, 2006, 05:48:18 AM
This banana bread recipe has been a hit with my hubby's office colleagues.  I like to add a little ground nutmeg, cinammon and clove.

SSE,

That sounds delish!  I'm going to make it this weekend (for me.  ;D)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on May 02, 2006, 05:50:57 AM
Wilted Onions

A hot mixture is poured over sliced onions for a relish; or on bread for a sandwich if you really like onions ( nice with that chewy pugliese from Costco); or on top of a chop. Or under some chicken in the Crockpot.   Or whatever.

Ingredients:
1/2 Cup each of water, oil, and white vinegar*
2 teaspoons salt
bit of pepper
1 tablespoon sugar
3 or 4 drops Tabasco.

--------
One or two sliced onions. I slice them fairly thin (using one of those box-type gadgets you slide the onion over).  Even one onion makes a lot.

Instructions: heat the above to boiling (microwave is fine), and pour over the onions.  When the mix is cool, put in a jar and store in fridge.  Supposed to keep 2 or 3 weeks, but it's tasted fine for longer than that.

*This isn't brain surgery.  I've used rice vinegar as well as plain white, or a mix of the two.  And canola oil, or part olive oil.  I like to use sweet onions.  Used a red onion once simply because it was on hand; the result was a slightly strange pink, but stilll tasty. You could leave out the Tabasco.  And I've been meaning to try adding herbs to the mix. Wonder what would be good with onions...
Sage with chicken/turkey.  rosemary and mint with lamb.  oregano/marjoram/parsley/(garlic!) with beef.  dill with [strong-flavored] fish.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 03, 2006, 09:22:57 PM
A very quick salad for those of us that lo-carb and don't get enuf of our veggies in.

Small pieces of broccoli
small pieces of cauliflower
Cheddar cheese cut into small cubes (could use shredded)
Bacon - shredded
sunflower seeds (optional)

toss this with a vinegar/splenda/mayo dressing.   4 carbs max per serving


I am the original lazy cook but I do ok.  This is so good!

I buy the small bags of broccoli/caluiflower mix they sell at the store for veggie trays and use that.
I fry a whole pound of bacon at one time and keep it in the frig for when I need it.

Shry
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on May 03, 2006, 09:42:07 PM
sherry...
 
i have a variation on virtually the same recipe.  the hot version.

i microwave steam my veggies, either singley or in the same combo, place in casserole dish, sprinkle VERY LIBERALLY with pre-cooked crumbled bacon (i buy the Hormel's version in the jumbo package form the big box store and keep in fridge,  it stores well, compares favorably in price per cooked weight and substantially reduces the fat), overtop that with cubed cheddar and or the pre-shredded kind (jumbo bag of which i always have in the fridge), seeds are optional,  and then pop back in the micro until the cheddar is thoroughly melted through.  makes a whole meal for me, or a side dish for 3 or 4.

yummy, and virtually negligible carbs after fiber is discounted.

you can also steam cauliflower until soft, beat or puree thoroughly add butter or smart balance to taste as you puree, a touch of salt or salt sub and lots of seasoned pepper or coarse ground black pepper and serve in lieu of potatoes.  i like to add a good bit of grated parmesan.  i like this with pork loin chops cooked with sesame oil, or with cumin and garlic.

jack         
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 03, 2006, 09:48:14 PM
Jack, throw in some bacon bits and a hand of shredded cheese with the mashed cauliflower

yummmmee....

Shry
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 03, 2006, 09:48:39 PM
Do you want some sweets that are low carb??
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 03, 2006, 09:56:35 PM
no bake lemon cheesecake

this is really tasty

1 box sf lemon pudding
1 block cream cheese 8 0z
1 cup water 1 cup half n half *could of use 2 cups hoods carb milk*


put in pie pan,chill.

You could add some fresh berries of your choice on top.

Of course this isn't a Famous New York Style or even a ripped off version of the Cheescake factory..
but it does the job!

 ;)
shry
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on May 04, 2006, 11:52:47 PM
I found this thingy in an article about healthy breakfasts for people who don't like to eat in the mornings. It's ideal for the forumite lifestyle, since you make it in the time it takes to load a youtube vid, and you gulp it down without using cumbersome forks, spoons, or other instruments that take motor skills and distract you from reading and writing. It's crammed with nutrients - lots of protein, no added sugar - and will keep you from getting hungry for at least a couple of hours. And of course, it's very tasty! I have at least one of these a day now instead of cookies or ice cream.

Swedish breakfast milkshake

1 tablespoon soy flour
2 teaspoons cocoa powder
1 tablespoon peanut butter
1 smallish, ripe banana
3 decilitres milk (1 1/4 cups)

Put everything in a mixer and blend it.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Edit: found out how many decilitres there are to a cup   :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: goobles on May 05, 2006, 06:19:44 AM
SSE,

That sounds delish!  I'm going to make it this weekend (for me.  ;D)

It is quite yummy!  I especially love the maple syrup icing and the use of brown sugar in the bread.  The loaf is usually gone by the end of the day at my hubby's office.

The bed and breakfast website has a lot of yummy-looking recipes on it.  I can't wait to try some of the other treats.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nick_F on May 05, 2006, 08:45:48 AM
Too much yummy sweet stuff, hows about something not sweet...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: rick-in on May 05, 2006, 03:52:23 PM
Sherry - RobsGalPal

Thank you for the great lo carb recipies - they all sound just great!  I printed every one of them. I am going to cook all weekend!

With appreciation,

Rick
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 05, 2006, 04:39:06 PM
Laurentia how much is a decilitres??

thanks!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 05, 2006, 04:41:48 PM
Rick,

 I have lots of low carb recipes.  I just don't know what kind of stuff folks like. 

I try to think outside my usual stuff.


Sherry
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on May 05, 2006, 07:59:32 PM
and i have been inventinglo carb treats for myself for years now, but have never bothered to codify the results.  one tip though if you are going to switch long term to low carb eating (and there isn't much point to just doing it short term), take a serious time out to go through your local supermarket.  i picked up every single food i like and checking the carbhydrate count, minus the dietary fiber of course.  i found lots of surprises, food that i hadn't thought of that made great low carb meals or infredients of meals.  like ricotta cheese, or even cream cheese.  all kinds of meats, eggs, even whipped cream (made with splenda, of course.  i found some cereals that were very low in carbs, too.     

some of the treats i have come up with i will get out here, as soon as i get the time to commit them to post.

jack
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on May 06, 2006, 02:38:29 AM
Laurentia how much is a decilitres??

thanks!

According to a converting site I found, it's 0.42 cups, so 3 dl will be about 1 1/4 cups. Tablespoons and teaspoons seem to be the same worldwide - yay!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 06, 2006, 08:25:02 AM
Laurentia how much is a decilitres??

thanks!

According to a converting site I found, it's 0.42 cups, so 3 dl will be about 1 1/4 cups. Tablespoons and teaspoons seem to be the same worldwide - yay!

Thanks,

I'm gonna try your recipe!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on May 07, 2006, 06:45:36 PM
Oven Barbecued Brisket

(serves 12)

1/2 10 oz bottle Worcestershire sauce
1/8 cup hot pepper sauce
1/2 stick butter
1 c. cider vinegar
1/2 T. ground black pepper
1 t. salt (kosher or sea salt)
1 t. red pepper flakes (optional)

4-6 garlic cloves, pressed
1 beef brisket (apprx. 4 lbs.)

combine first seven ingredients in saucepan over medium heat and bring to a boil while stirring.  Lower heat and simmer for 10 minutes, still stirring.  Let cool until ready to use - the sauce will keep for several days.

The day before you plan to serve, rub additional salt on brisket along with the garlic paste.  Put in a foil lined roasting pan and cover generously with sauce.  pull up edges of foil and seal into packet.  Let marinate overnight in fridge.  Next day, remove brisket from fridge and let come to room temperature for about 2 hours.  preheat oven to 325.  Roast the brisket in foil for 5 hours.  Remove brisket from oven and open the foil packet - return brisket to oven for approx. 1/2 hour more until sauce is absorbed. 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 07, 2006, 06:49:52 PM
 I buy the snack size baggies and measure the portion in each one. Toss them in the freezer
and they are ready to go. 


NUTTY CRUNCH

2 ounces walnuts
4 ounces pecans
2 ounces almonds (I like sliced)
2 ounces unsweetened coconut, 1/2 cup
2-4 tablespoons flax meal
1-2 ounces unsalted sunflower kernels
2 tablespoons butter, melted
1/3 cup granular Splenda or equivalent
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
Pinch salt, optional
1/2-1 teaspoon cinnamon

Coarsely chop the nuts; put in a medium bowl. Stir in coconut, flax meal and sunflower kernels. In small bowl, mix butter, sweetener, vanilla and salt. Pour over nuts and toss to mix well. Spread on large jelly roll pan and bake at 300º about 10-15 minutes, stirring every few minutes, until lightly toasted. Watch closely so it doesn't burn. Mix in the cinnamon; cool. Store in airtight container in fridge.

Makes about 2 cups
Can be frozen

With granular Splenda:
Per 1/3 cup: 344 Calories; 33g Fat; 7g Protein; 10g Carbohydrate; 6g Dietary Fiber; 4g Net Carbs
Per 1/4 cup: 258 Calories; 25g Fat; 6g Protein; 8g Carbohydrate; 4g Dietary Fiber; 4g Net Carbs
Per 2 tablespoons: 129 Calories; 12g Fat; 3g Protein; 4g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 2g Net Carbs

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 07, 2006, 06:57:51 PM
Quick and easy!!
Thats me.... no comments are necessary!!    :D

I buy a Low carb pasta (Dreamfields)

I cook the whole box at one time and then place it in a ziploc bag in the frig  unseasoned.

Day 1: take a cup of it with a slice of cheese and nuke it for mac and cheese.
Day 2: macaroni salad ( made with the boiled eggs already peeled in a ziploc)
Day 3: toss in a meat sauce for a goulash type of meal

etc.... you get the idea!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 07, 2006, 07:00:48 PM
Shredded Mexican Beef

1 tri tip roast ( any will do since you are gonna crock it)
1/2 C medium strength jar salsa
1-2 tsp. fresh minced garlic (or equivalent strength powder)
salt
pepper

Sprinkle liberally salt and pepper all over the roast. Rub with the garlic. Put the roast in the crock pot and pour the salsa over the roast. Cook on low until meat is shreddable. (about 10-12 hours) then shred with two forks and stir everything well. Let the sauce cook down. I like to let the meat get a bit crispy.

This is great as taco and tostado filling or great with each serving having 1 oz of melted cheese and a dollop of sour cream and some olives. This is also great served with low carb tortillas.

This makes 6 4 oz servings with about 1.2 carbs per serving
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 07, 2006, 07:06:23 PM
Breakfast for most of us is a grab it and go or a forget it!

These are fantastic for breakfast or just to go snack:

Breakfast Meatballs:

2 lbs sausage
1 lb ground beef
3 eggs
2 TBS instant minced onion
1/2 lb shredded cheddar cheese
black pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine all ingredients and mix well. Roll into 1-1/2" balls and place on cookie sheet. Bake 20-25 minutes. Makes about 50 meatballs. They freeze well after cooking for an anytime snack.

One meatball (approx.)
Calories: 87
Carbs: 0.137
Protein: 5.36

ps.
jack you could fry them
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on May 07, 2006, 07:08:17 PM
Eazy Italian Beef

1 beef chuck roast or brisket - trim some of the excess fat off
1 sliced med. onion
2-4 cloves garlic sliced thin
1 jar sliced pepperoncini
about 1/2 C. water

throw everything into crock pot - cook on low for 8-10 hours or high for 3-4.
(it's better slow cooked)

serve on italian rolls with the au jus on the side.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 07, 2006, 07:15:20 PM
Most everyone love Wings.

preheat oven to 400 degrees.

place wings on a "Pam" sprayed cookie sheet and bake approx 30 mins.
Flip and do another 30 mins.  I like my wings crispy. 
(If the skin is soft UCK!)

Remove from oven and place in a large bowl.
Pour a generous amount of franks Hot sauce over them and enjoy. ( I like them just like this) 
You can place them back in the oven for a few sec. to dry them out a bit.
You can some add butter to the sauce if it is too hot for you.

Serve with Ranch or Blue cheese dressing.
Very low calorie and lo carb and easy to eat in the diner!

 ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 07, 2006, 07:16:48 PM
The Italian beef is sooo... good!!

 :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 07, 2006, 07:29:36 PM
This is not my recipe but it is soo.. very good

Mexicalli Chicken


Preheat oven to 400 degrees

base

1 1/2 pound of boneless skinless chicken tenders
1 can (4 oz) of diced green chiles
1 can (10 oz) of diced tomato's w/green chiles (I used the Rotel brand)
Salt & Pepper (whatever amt. you're used too)

In a 8x8 baking dish lay the chicken tenders and top with the diced green chiles and the diced tomatos w/green chiles. Add salt and pepper. Bake for about 40 minutes. While chicken is baking...prepare the topping

topping

4 oz of cream cheese (softened)
2 large eggs
1/4 cup of sour cream
2 Cups of Shredded Cheese (Mexican 4 cheese blend variety)
1/2 teaspoon of ground cumin

Mix all the above ingredients well

After about 40 minutes, remove chicken from oven and drain off any liquid. Pour the topping over the top of the baked chicken and spread evenly. Bake for another 10-15 or until topping is set.

Optional: Garnish with chilled sour cream, chopped green onions and or avocado wedges.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: iver on May 07, 2006, 09:35:18 PM
Hi, cooking friends!
My once-a-year biggest social effort is a summer party at my cabin on a forested mountainside north of Oslo, Norway. This year the party is going to have a Brokeback Mountain theme! I have already prepared the invitation, I'll e-mail it to anybody who will PM me their e-mail address.
There are plenty of sheep grazing in the area in summer. There are also a lot of moose, but summer is not the season for shooting them, so the menu will be lamb and beans, and I expect between 30 and 40 people this year.
The cooking will have to be done on an outside fire since I don't have sufficient electric cooking capacity for that many people. So the lambs are going to be roasted on the outside fire, and I prefer them to be spiced with lots of garlic, rosemary and thyme and basted with a marinade of red wine and olive oil.  Here comes the question. What kind of beans should be served with the lamb? According to Mediterranean cooking tradition it should probably be white beans in a tomato sauce, but I have a feeling that's not what Ennis and Jack were eating. So, my question to you American cooks, I need a good recipe for beans that would go with roasted lamb and that is sufficiently American for Ennis and Jack to have eaten it on Brokeback Mountain. I will be grateful for any response.
Iver
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on May 07, 2006, 11:05:46 PM
Hej, Iver, fellow Scandinavian!

As I'm vegetarian and my cooking is pretty much about beans, I instantly thought of this recipe. I don't know what lamb tastes like, but I have a feeling that this might work. It's Italian rather than American, I'm afraid, and I have to admit I can't really see Ennis preparing this. But it's very tasty. Original recipe says it's good with bacon, too.

Fancy tomato beans

1 1/2 dl olive oil (that's a good 1/2 cup, I think)
10 fresh sage leaves or 1 1/2 tablespoon dried sage
2 - 3 cloves of garlic
2 cans of white beans
1 1/2 dl dry white wine (same amount as the olive oil)
2 tablespoons tomato purée (the kind of concentrated tomato paste that comes in tubes)
salt and black pepper

Heat oil in casserole or pan, fry garlic and sage lightly. Add beans, wine and tomato paste, simmer for 10-15 minutes (cover the pan/casserole). Add salt and pepper to taste.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on May 07, 2006, 11:25:04 PM
this is getting SOOOO good.

lots of adaptable recipes, and the first human i know (sherry) who cooks the same kind of meals i eat.  and let me tell you, as simple as it is seems lost on earth (carb) eaters.  i get all these "what special food do you need" questions.

are you reqady for some company sherry?       
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 08, 2006, 03:03:35 AM
CUBAN AVOCADO SALAD
(serves one)

peel and slice a ripe but firm haas avocado and arrange on plate.
cut and slice some red onion and arrange on top of avocado.
drizzle with olive oil and lemon juice (or red wine vinegar).
sprinkle with a bit of sea salt and fresh cracked pepper.

DONE! it doesn't get much easier than this does it?
this salad is served at cuban places around L.A.
i sometimes add some italian seasoning too.
don't try this if the avocado is mushy!
(make guacomole instead, i guess)
PS: this is really yummy too with
orange or grapefruit sections
or slivers of roasted beets.
you can add some feta.
be creative! love the
glorious avocado,
it is healthful!

:D

(http://foodallergens.ifr.ac.uk/foodimages/avocado.jpg)

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 08, 2006, 06:47:19 AM
okay so i know some of you liken guacamole and avocado to... green vomit was it? :D so here's a recipe for guacamole that doesn't use that horrid fruit. ;D 

the added bonus is that it's much lower in fat. this is a variation on a recipe i had years ago, and i haven't made it since (because i love avocados) but it was pretty darn good. you can also "stretch" avocados by using the sweet peas in your traditional guacamole recipe.

Peas. They're a good thing!

-----------------------------------------------------
(http://www.golivewire.com/images/avatars/PeaPod.gif)
SWEET PEA GUACAMOLE

1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
2 tablespoons lime juice
2 tablespoons canned chopped green chili peppers
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 pound frozen sweet peas, thawed
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 cup finely chopped red onions
1 tomato, chopped
Freshly ground black pepper
Hot Sauce to taste

In a blender or food processor, combine the cilantro, lime juice, chili peppers and oil. Add the peas, salt and cumin. Puree until smooth. Pour into a serving bowl and stir in the onions and tomatoes. Season with the black pepper and add hot sauce to taste. Refrigerate until ready to serve.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 08, 2006, 07:22:18 AM
MY BOYFRIEND'S FAVORITE CHICKEN STRIPS

butterfly chicken breasts then slice against the grain to create near-julienne strips. they should look sorta like thin-cut french fries. place in large bowl, add some crushed garlic, toss lightly to mix. after a bit, dredge the chicken strips seasoned flour (i use sea salt, cracked pepper, italian seasonings, paprika).

heat 1/4" olive oil in large skillet till almost smoking and fry chicken in batches. do not overcrowd. turn a couple of times until the strips are golden brown. drain on toweling, keep warm until ready to serve.

note: keep oil in skillet hot to avoid greasy chicken strips. add more oil as necessary between the batches of chicken.

garnish the cooked chicken with some fresh chopped italian parsely and serve with lemon wedges. don't sprinkle with lemon juice until right before serving or you will lose the crispness of the light flour coating.

this is nice served with a cuban avocado salad and sparkling raspberry lemonade...  :D

(try a similar recipe using fresh squid and peanut oil, subsituting cilantro for the parsley, and fry with a few small, dried red chili peppers)

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on May 08, 2006, 07:27:25 AM
Hej, Iver, fellow Scandinavian!

As I'm vegetarian and my cooking is pretty much about beans, I instantly thought of this recipe. I don't know what lamb tastes like, but I have a feeling that this might work. It's Italian rather than American, I'm afraid, and I have to admit I can't really see Ennis preparing this. But it's very tasty. Original recipe says it's good with bacon, too.

Fancy tomato beans

1 1/2 dl olive oil (that's a good 1/2 cup, I think)
10 fresh sage leaves or 1 1/2 tablespoon dried sage
2 - 3 cloves of garlic
2 cans of white beans
1 1/2 dl dry white wine (same amount as the olive oil)
2 tablespoons tomato purée (the kind of concentrated tomato paste that comes in tubes)
salt and black pepper

Heat oil in casserole or pan, fry garlic and sage lightly. Add beans, wine and tomato paste, simmer for 10-15 minutes (cover the pan/casserole). Add salt and pepper to taste.



Hei kjaerre venner!!!

Those beans sound deilig - but I would substitute rosemary and/or mint for the sage as you are roasting lamb.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on May 08, 2006, 07:28:25 AM
Peas. They're a good thing!


visualize whirled peas!

 ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on May 08, 2006, 07:37:08 AM
this is more of a snack tip than a recipe, but since i made it for myself last night, i thought i would share it.

quantities are negotiable.  i took about 3/4 cup of ricotta cheese (i prefer whole milk ricotta, but skim will do) and drizzled it liberally with low carb maple syrup, added about 1/4 cup finely chopped walnuts and stirred well.  you can add a teaspoon or two of cream or half and half to smooth out the texture if needed.

i don't count so good, but the carb count is acceptably low, and it really settles that sweet tooth.

this can be varied using just spenda and vanilla, which makes a filling suggestive of canoles, or low carb blueberry syrup with a 1/4 cup blueberries added for taste and texture.

i am sure you can think of countless variations, just as i have.  ricotta is our friend  ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nick_F on May 08, 2006, 08:21:06 AM
I love all the lo carb snack ideas here, thanks!

Now where did i put that time that i need to do this stuff........?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Lola on May 08, 2006, 09:43:33 AM
(http://cdn.weightwatchers.ca/images/4105/dynamic/foodandrecipes/2006/03/individualhamfrittatas2_lg.jpg)

Individual Ham, Cheese and Veggie Frittatas


POINTS® Value | 2
Servings | 8
Preparation Time | 15 min
Cooking Time | 0 min
Level of Difficulty | Easy


breakfast | Whip up a batch of these mini frittatas on a Sunday night and you’ve got breakfast ready to go for the work week. Just pop them in the microwave for a few seconds and enjoy.


Ingredients


2 sprays cooking spray
1 pound frozen hash brown potatoes, thawed
4 large egg(s), beaten
1 Tbsp fat-free skim milk
1/8 tsp table salt, or to taste
1/8 tsp black pepper, or to taste
2 oz cooked lean ham, finely chopped
1/8 cup sweet red pepper(s), finely chopped (2 Tbsp)
1/8 cup green pepper, finely chopped (2 Tbsp)
2 Tbsp onion(s), finely chopped
1/2 cup low-fat shredded cheddar cheese


Instructions


Preheat oven to 350°F. Coat 8 muffin tin holes with cooking spray. Spread potatoes around bottom and press potato up sides of each muffin hole; place in oven and cook for 10 minutes.


Meanwhile, beat eggs and milk together in a medium bowl; season with salt and pepper. Add ham, peppers, onion and cheese to bowl; mix to combine.


Remove potatoes from oven (after cooking for 10 minutes) and press potatoes down firmly with a spoon so that they are spread out like mini piecrusts (potatoes should cover bottom and sides of each hole). Pour about 1/4 cup of egg mixture into the centre of each muffin hole.


Return pan to oven and cook until potatoes are crisp and golden, and the egg mixture is set, about 15 minutes. Remove from oven and let sit about 5 minutes before serving. Yields 1 frittata per serving.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Daphne and Chloe on May 08, 2006, 12:08:46 PM
I found this thingy in an article about healthy breakfasts for people who don't like to eat in the mornings. It's ideal for the forumite lifestyle, since you make it in the time it takes to load a youtube vid, and you gulp it down without using cumbersome forks, spoons, or other instruments that take motor skills and distract you from reading and writing. It's crammed with nutrients - lots of protein, no added sugar - and will keep you from getting hungry for at least a couple of hours. And of course, it's very tasty! I have at least one of these a day now instead of cookies or ice cream.

Swedish breakfast milkshake

1 tablespoon soy flour
2 teaspoons cocoa powder
1 tablespoon peanut butter
1 smallish, ripe banana
3 decilitres milk (1 1/4 cups)

Put everything in a mixer and blend it.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Edit: found out how many decilitres there are to a cup   :)

This sounds so yummy! I'm sure I can substitute soy milk. I'm going to try this the next time I buy peanut butter. The only problem is, I only buy a jar of peanut butter about twice a year because I'm so crazy about the stuff, I will eat it with a spoon right out of the jar! It's gone in no time.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 08, 2006, 02:16:39 PM
OBSERVATIONS:
What a great thread!  If it wasn't for this forum I would not know there's such
a thing as Breakfast Meatballs!  Love it!

QUESTION:
Do they still sell that brand of beans Jack & Ennis cooked
up on Brokeback?  Better Most?  Anyone know?  (I did a bit of a search
but didn't find anything myself!)  I want me some!

RECIPE:
This is a cocktail recipe made up by Francesco LaFranconi,
the mixologist in the Alex restaurant of the Wynn Las Vegas resort,
prepared on the Martha Stewart Show:

THE BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN

Serves 1
3    sprigs fresh mint
2    ounces fresh sweet ’n sour or fresh lemonade
1 1/2    ounces Bulleit Bourbon
3/4    ounces Disaronno Amaretto Liqueur
2    tablespoons sliced canned peaches

Place the mint in a highball glass and muddle it for few seconds. In a shaker, combine lemonade, peaches, bourbon, and Amaretto. Fill with ice, and shake vigorously for few seconds. Transfer to a highball glass (do not strain).
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on May 08, 2006, 03:00:18 PM
Most of the time I'm cooking just for myself, and I don't like to fuss about much, so I'm always interested in stuff that can be frozen. 

Costco, and probably other similar stores,  has guacamole (which somebody above dared to slander!), basil pesto,  and hummus, all of them pretty good. The only original container I have at hand is for hummus; it lists a bit of chemical preservative, the other ingredients being quite respectable.  Anyhow,  it's easy to freeze all three in small portions.  Nice to have at hand.  Actually, I suspect it would cost more to make the guacamole and the pesto from scratch than to buy these hefty containers.

Bananas: doing that seven-fruits-and-veggies-daily thing can be a bore.  I core and bake the occasional apple or pear in the microwave, for a change.  I think it's bananas that are most improved by zapping, though.  Peel, halve the long way, put in a dish, and cover with a paper towel.  Try for thirty seconds; sometimes that's all it takes.  Mushy and disheveled-looking, but with a pleasant change in aroma and taste.  Put a dollop of non-fat sour cream on top, if you like, or some brown sugar...or whatever.

Some non-fat sour cream isn't half bad.  I mix it in roughly equal quantity with some of the refrigerated creamstyle salad dressings, which tend to be strongly seasoned and still taste fine in spite of the dilution.  Or with mayonnaise.  It doesn't do to cook it, though.



Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: iver on May 08, 2006, 03:16:47 PM
QUESTION:
Do they still sell that brand of beans Jack & Ennis cooked
up on Brokeback?  Better Most?  Anyone know?  (I did a bit of a search
but didn't find anything myself!)  I want me some!

This is exactly what I've been trying to find out too. The brand of beans or a recipe on how to cook them! Still grateful for responses from any Midwesterners who can remember as far back as the sixties.
Iver
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on May 08, 2006, 04:35:55 PM
can we have a powwow of us golden oldies to strangle the poster above... all the way back indeed >:(
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 08, 2006, 06:11:01 PM
mooska and iver, from what i've heard, the bettermost brand beans was made up by the prop department working on brokeback mountain, so good luck in finding the can of beans in a store! ;)

i *think* they were auctioning off cans of beans from the set on eBay, so that might be your best bet in getting a can of the famous beans!

i think the recipe for the brokeback beans is simple: open can, place can carefully near campfire, wait till they're bubbly and hot, then eat while humming. ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 08, 2006, 06:36:21 PM
WHITE BEAN HUMMUS

(http://pbskids.org/buster/images/recipes/illus/hummus.gif)

about four cups of great northern white beans or similar type, canned or fresh-made
olive oil
lemon juice
dash sesame oil
lots of crushed garlic
black pepper & sea salt
a handful of italian parsley
some tumeric and/or paprika

mash the beans with potato masher or other device. (you can use a blender i prefer a chunkier texture.) add 1/4 to 1/2 cup of good green olive oil to soften consistency and make it creamy. finely chop and add the italian parsley and about 3 cloves of crushed garlic. the tumeric is healthy and adds a nice yellow color. add the juice of one entire lemon, but you can subsitute with vinegar -- balsamic or white wine vinegar is nice. i add a lot of crushed black pepper, and a little bit of sea salt.

sesame oil is optional, but since traditional hummus calls for tahini, i figure a dash couldn't hurt!

blend together well and let it sit a while (or store in fridge) for flavors to blend. when ready, you can drizzle a little more good olive oil on top, sprinkle with parsley or some paprika, and serve with pita chips or toasted pita bread cut into little triangles, and carrot sticks. kalamata or those wrinkly oil-cured black olives and hot pickled peppers sit well next to this stuff!

--> you can add chili powder or hot sauce to the mix to kick it up a notch. :D

this has been my favorite munchie food lately, beating out tortilla chips and guacamole... ;)

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 08, 2006, 07:20:43 PM
2 easy snacks .... lo carb also

Pepperoni Chips

Place a couple layers of paper towels on a microwavable plate. 
Then place slices of pepperoni in a single layer on top of paper
towels. Microwave 1-2 minutes until crispy (almost brown) No carbs.
Crunch away.  (Tastes somewhat like bacon.)

Absolutely Awesome Jalapeno Appetizers

8 Jalapenos -- tops removed, cut in 1/2 and seeded
8 Strips lean bacon
Cream cheese
toothpicks


Preheat oven to 350.

Stuff each 1/2 of a jalapeno with cream cheese and wrap with a 1/2 piece of bacon. Secure with toothpick. Bake at 350 until bacon is at desired crispness (I like mine just slightly crisp, about 20-25 min).
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 08, 2006, 07:24:08 PM
Fudge

6 oz. cream cheese   
2 tsp. vanilla 
4 tsp. Heavy Whipping Cream 
1 pkg. diet chocolate pudding mix 
1/4 c. chopped walnuts 
5 tsp. peanut butter 


Mix together all ingredients.
Spread in a buttered dish and place in freezer to chill.
Cut into 15 squares.

33 carbs total           Makes 15 pieces at 2.2 carbs each
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 08, 2006, 07:29:42 PM
  Buttermilk Pancakes or Waffles

1 8oz Pkg cream cheese
3 eggs
3 tsp Splenda
1/4 cup Atkins Bake Mix *see below for making your own
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp vanilla
1/4 cup buttermilk ( I buy the powder type so it lasts forever)

Beat cream cheese with mixer until blended smooth, add the remaining ingredients and let sit for 5 minutes before using.   Preheat non stick pan to med/high heat.   Spray pan with a light coat of butter flavored non stick spray and pour in pan about 3 tbps of mix.   I made them about 5 to 6 inches across.   Be sure to let bubble up all over just like the flour pancakes before turning!

Eat your heart out Aunt Jemima, these are as good as the real thing!

Only 17 carbs in the entire recipe!  Makes 10 large pancakes @ 1.7 carbs per pancake

If you make waffles, this recipe make 18 waffles!  Less than 2 carbs for 2 waffles!

I freeze them and them pop them in the toaster.





Faux Atkins Bake Mix

1 cup soy flour
2 cups soy protein isolate
2 tablespoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons Splenda

Sift together then store and use as you would Dr. A's.
It's much cheaper and things come out about the same.

3 carbs per 1/2 cup serving
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 08, 2006, 07:43:19 PM
CRISPY CHEESE CRACKERS

Deluxe American cheese slices (not cheese food or cheese product)

Cut one square of cheese into 16 tiny squares. Arrange on a sheet of parchment paper in somewhat of a ring around the edges of the paper. Don't place cheese squares too close together or they'll stick to each other. Don't place any in the center of the paper or they will burn before the outer squares are done. Carefully place the sheet of parchment on the tray of a microwave oven. Microwave on HIGH about 65 seconds, or until crackers are well-browned, but not burnt. What closely and add more time if needed. Remove parchment from microwave and let crackers cool slightly before removing them from the paper. Peel them off the paper and store in an airtight container. Repeat process one cheese slice at a time. These will keep quite well in an air-tight container at room temperature for several days.

Each slice of cheese makes 16 crackers
Can be frozen

Per Serving (16 crackers): 106 Calories; 9g Fat; 6g Protein; .5g Carbohydrate; 0g Fiber; .5g Net Carbs



(http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g287/Shrry/cheezits.jpg)

(http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g287/Shrry/cheezits_raw.jpg)


enjoy!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: rick-in on May 08, 2006, 08:23:39 PM
Hey Sherry - What awesome recipes!  I made the GREEN "ENCHILADA" CHICKEN on Saturday. It was so good, I made another batch today!  Tried the nobake lemon cheese cake. Very tasty.

Your new dishes look great, too. Thanks much.

Rick
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 08, 2006, 08:33:06 PM
Rick..

Glad you liked the chicken.. it is one of my favorites.

 :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: iver on May 08, 2006, 10:58:21 PM
can we have a powwow of us golden oldies to strangle the poster above... all the way back indeed >:(
Hi Jack, ;D
I am the same age as Ennis and Jack, and I do remember the sixties!. The irony of my expression was targeted at myself, I have found it useful in dealing with people half my age which is what I do most of the time. I like the expression "golden oldies"!
Iver
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on May 08, 2006, 11:26:49 PM
Hei kjaerre venner!!!

Those beans sound deilig - but I would substitute rosemary and/or mint for the sage as you are roasting lamb.

In Europe, everyone thinks Americans don't know any foreign languages. The more time I spend on the internet, the more I realise that's not true  :)
This recipe probably works with any choice of herbs, especielly rosemary sounds good.

Quote from: Daphne and Cloe
This sounds so yummy! I'm sure I can substitute soy milk. I'm going to try this the next time I buy peanut butter. The only problem is, I only buy a jar of peanut butter about twice a year because I'm so crazy about the stuff, I will eat it with a spoon right out of the jar! It's gone in no time.

I hope you'll like it! I don't know if there will be too much soy taste with soy milk (as there's soy flour too in the recipe, its taste nicely camouflaged by the cocoa), but if you're used to that taste, I don't think it will bother you. Otherwise, there are other kinds of non-dairy milk to try.
The peanut butter is supposed to be the kind that's basically mashed peanuts, maybe with a bit of salt. I'm under the impression that there are several products labelled "peanut butter" that are more like peanut-flavoured sandwich spread, but as it's not a common food in Sweden, I don't really know  :P
My jar of peanut butter used to last forever since I only used it for making Satay sauce, but since I started those milkshakes, it's disappearing at a remarkable rate.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 09, 2006, 12:53:30 AM
FLAT BLACK CHICKEN CHESTS WITH CHEESE
inspired by grace jones

chicken breasts
gorgonzola cheese
olive oil/butter
fresh garlic
flour
salt & pepper
herbs
sesame seeds

butterfly chicken breast, trimming off all fat. cut into two pieces, and flatten each piece with kitchen hammer thingie between wax or parchment paper, pounding thin to about 1/8" thickness.

crumble some cheese and place in center of flattened chicken breast. roll up chicken, tucking in ends, and secure with toothpick. (roll, tuck ends, roll, secure)  do this with all the chicken pieces you've flattened. then dredge the chicken rolls in seasoned flour -- just flour, salt, pepper, maybe some other herbs.

heat up a little olive oil in frying pan, throw in some butter if you wish, some crushed garlic, and sauteé the chicken rolls until golden brown and cooked through, turning to brown all sides.

while chicken is cooking, toss some sesame seeds in a dry fry pan and toast until brown, almost black, and popping. shake the pan constantly, flipping them around. they will brown quickly. doing this releases the oils and aroma of the seeds.

arrange chicken rolls on plate, and sprinkle liberally with the black sesame seeds. you don't need a sauce as the sauce is the melted cheese on the inside!

--> variation: add chopped walnuts and dried cherries to the cheese mixture.

this is yummy with lightly steamed vegetables, like asparagus with butter and lemon juice,,,, and a simple side salad of jicama, cut into matchsticks, tossed with crushed chili peppers and lime juice.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 09, 2006, 02:47:32 AM
dessert time! i posted this simple dish back in auntie's diner before jack started the recipe thread. here's my old reliable (not the video company!) cantaloupe recipe --

BLACK PEPPER PORT WINE MELON BALLS

one or two ripe cantaloupes
some nice ruby port wine
cracked black pepper
a melon baller tool
a hand blender

with the melon baller, scoop out as many "balls" as you can out of a ripe cantaloupe or two. reserve the balls in a big bowl. then scrape out the remaining flesh with a spoon, and combine that using a hand blender (or regular blender) wth some good red PORT (not tawny). the mixture should be thick, don't add TOOOO much port! add a generous amount of freshly cracked black pepper, then toss the melon balls with this mixture. let it sit for a while for flavors to meld. garnish with a sprig of mint or something if you wish.

it's a nice summertime dessert, with a twist. i suppose you could toss these balls around a dish of good vanilla ice cream too, but it's not necessary. forgot where i got this recipe, perhaps martha stewart living? martha did, on her tv show, tell about putting aged balsamic vinegar on high quality ice cream. try to get the expensive, tiny bottle of balsamic vinegar, the thick stuff is best. just drizzle it on the ice cream...

...it's actually really good, lol. ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on May 09, 2006, 07:08:12 AM
this is getting SOOOO good.

lots of adaptable recipes, and the first human i know (sherry) who cooks the same kind of meals i eat.  and let me tell you, as simple as it is seems lost on earth (carb) eaters.  i get all these "what special food do you need" questions.

are you reqady for some company sherry?       

Anytime Jack,

I can always put another plate on the table!


 ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on May 09, 2006, 01:39:38 PM
this is getting SOOOO good.

lots of adaptable recipes, and the first human i know (sherry) who cooks the same kind of meals i eat.  and let me tell you, as simple as it is seems lost on earth (carb) eaters.  i get all these "what special food do you need" questions.

are you reqady for some company sherry?       
Anytime Jack,

I can always put another plate on the table!
plate hah, how about a sleeping bag in the attic  ;D

jack
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 10, 2006, 04:02:59 AM
got this from a box of pasta years ago and it's so quick and easy. let me just say that imported durum semolina (or whatever it is) pasta is great, there's something different about it, better flavor, texture. go italian~! barilla and dececco are my favorite, readily available brands. for this recipe try using a thin, quick cooking pasta, to go with the paper-thin zucchini.

SPICY ZUCCHINI PASTA with MILK

good olive oil
zucchini squash
crushed fresh garlic
red chili pepper flakes
sea salt and black pepper
thin spaghetti or angel hair
a little bit of milk or half and half
some freshly grated hard italian cheese

(start the water for the pasta.) grate cheese. slice one or two squash into very thin coins -- as thinly as possible. crush two or three cloves of garlic. heat a good amount of olive oil in your favorite large pan, toss in garlic, heat to release flavor, don't let it burn. add squash. (add pasta to boiling water.)

stir zucchini squash around a bit till it softens; it will cook quickly as it's cut so thinly. (stir pasta!) add a half cup or so of milk or half and half, turn up heat high and heat quickly, stirring, don't let it boil tho. add some salt, pepper, and a nice shake of pepper flakes. remove from heat. sauce will be thin.

when pasta is al dente, drain lightly, don't rinse. add this to the zucchini sauce. toss in pan over heat for a while if too watery, pasta will soak up sauce nicely.

now transfer the pasta to big, warmed bowl, add the cheese (lots of it if you please), toss lightly. you can add some chopped fresh italian parsley to the mix, it adds a nice freshness.

--> cheese can be parmesan or romano, but fontina, asiago, and the greek kasseri or mizithra cheeses work nicely as well.
--> try drizzling some white or black truffle oil on the pasta when it's on the plate,,,, it imparts a nice, earthy flavor.

THE GIRLS NEED TO BE FED!
WELL YOU TAKE CARE OF IT!
SUPPER IS ON THE STOVE!!!
NOBODY'S EATIN' IT UNLESS YOU SERVE IT!   ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: iver on May 10, 2006, 02:04:19 PM
[
can we have a powwow of us golden oldies to strangle the poster above... all the way back indeed >:(
Hi Jack, ;D
I am the same age as Ennis and Jack, and I do remember the sixties!. The irony of my expression was targeted at myself, I have found it useful in dealing with people half my age which is what I do most of the time. I like the expression "golden oldies"!
Iver
Quote

Hi, Jack!
I think I am close to your age. I still manage to communicate successfully with people much younger. One of the strategies I use is to make light of my age. Do you think that is bad?
I realize there is some ageism around. But I don't t won't to be the target of the fight against that!

Iver
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on May 10, 2006, 08:32:35 PM
iver...

please don't be overly concerned.  i am not famous for my delicacy of word choice myself.  indeed i was more than half joking about it.  perhaps were your own age known, the inherent joke might have been more obvious.  i often refer jokingly to my age, but my visage is well known.  there are more than a few youngsters who might have used this turn of phrase, and i do like to keep them on their toes.  as you said, we do iive in an age-ist culture.  perhaps you might want to trot over to the gay and gray thread, if it is appropriate, and introduce yourself further.

jack   
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 11, 2006, 01:31:40 AM
BLACK PEPPER ICE CREAM

some good, all natural vanilla ice cream
some black (or pink) peppercorns

scoop one serving of ice cream in small sized bowl.
grate a bit of the peppercorns on top of ice cream.

ENJOY!

--> also good with little bits of carmelized ginger. chinatown is a good source for this spicy, yet sweet treat.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: BBM-Intern on May 11, 2006, 07:13:55 AM
Now that I have your attention, I knew you guys would know which scene this recipe comes from.

Early on after seeing the movie, I was keen to get hold of this recipe, so I asked around and someone passed me a workable recipe, which I have since modified and adapted.  Trust me, this is tested and I have tried it out on church members and the choir and they loved it.  Please note that our measurements in Australia are metric, if there's someone experienced in translating this to US measures, that would make it a lot easier for most of the other users on this forum.

Cherry Cake

Ingredients

425g can dark sweet pitted cherries
1 tbsp self-raising flour (for dredging cherries)

180g butter
160g castor sugar
4 egg yolks
1 tsp vanilla essence
1 tbsp kirsch / cherry brandy
4 tbsp cherry juice (see method)

225g self-raising flour
1/2 tsp baking powder

4 egg whites
1 tbsp castor sugar (for egg whites)

Method:

Grease sides and line base of 21cm round cake tin with silicone/baking paper.

Drain can of pitted cherries, reserving juice.  Measure out 4 tbsp of cherry juice, set aside.  Dab cherries with paper towel until fairly dry, then dredge with 1 tbsp self-raising flour.

In large bowl, cream butter, castor sugar, vanilla essence and 2 tbsp cherry juice until light and fluffy.   Add kirsch slowly, beating all the while, followed by egg yolks one at a time, beating well after each addition.

Fold in sifted dry ingredients alternately with remaining 2 tbsp cherry juice.

In separate bowl, whisk egg whites until frothy, add the 1 tbsp castor sugar and continue to whisk until soft peaks form.  Fold whisked egg whites into batter.

Pour batter into prepared tin.  Shake excess flour off the cherries, then drop them into the batter one at a time.

Bake in preheated oven at 180°C for 10 minutes, then reduce heat to 170°C and bake for a further one hour or until skewer inserted in centre of cake comes out clean.

Cool cake in tin until lukewarm, then invert onto cooling rack.  Serve warm or cold.  Makes 8-12 servings.


Notes, hints and tips (apologies to experienced cooks, this is to help first-timers):
* Please note Australian measurements are metric: 1 tsp = 5ml; 1 tbsp = 4 tsp = 20ml; US tablespoons are 15ml so adjust accordingly;
* Butter, sugar etc. should be creamed till light and fluffy, which can take a few minutes even with a mixer.  Mixture is properly "creamed" when a small amount dropped into a cup of cold water floats;
* To prevent the creamed mixture from curdling when the kirsch and egg yolks are added, add in a bit of the flour from the recipe;
* Egg whites must be separated carefully from yolks, no trace of yolk must be mixed in with whites, or they won't whisk properly.  Bowl & whisk for whisking whites must be clean, dry and grease-free too;
* Soft peaks are when egg whites are whisked till stiff enough that when beaters are lifted and the whisked whites stand up but just droop over at the tips;
* Folding of egg whites into cake batter must be done gently; it is best to fold in a small amount (say a heaping tablespoon) of whisked egg whites into the cake batter first, this helps slacken/loosen the mixture, and the rest of the egg whites will fold in more easily without deflating.  Use an "under-over-turn" or "figure-of-eight" movement to fold in -- but gently!  After slacking the mixture, fold in the remainder in 2 or 3 batches;
* If you like your cherries distributed into the cake a little more, try poking 1/3 of them into the batter.  The rest will sink in somewhat, leaving a lumpy surface, which I think is part of the home-made charm.


After you try it, if you have improvements, suggestions, or feedback, let me know!

Now a question for you brokeaholics: Would Mrs John Twist have used a Sunbeam Mixmaster?  Perhaps she had one from earlier days?  From what I understand, it is a bit of an American icon, it was also very popular here in Australia.  A pity I gave my woodtone (!) model away, otherwise I'd have used it to give the cake-making that extra bit of nostalgia!  I imagine nowadays, you would use a Kitchenaid instead.

Have fun!  If you were in Brisbane, I'd invite you round for a cup of coffee and a piece of this cake and we can talk Brokeback till the cows come home!

Lem :-)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on May 11, 2006, 07:45:57 AM
BLACK PEPPER ICE CREAM ...


Sounds well worth a try.  That ginger, btw, is often available at supermarkets,  in a little red cardboard box. At least, I imagine it's the same thing.

And then there's the most basic black pepper recipe of all: stash a bottle of vodka in the freezer until it's syrupy.  Pour out a little glassful; grate pepper on top.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: killersmom on May 11, 2006, 11:58:45 AM
WHITE CHICKEN CHILI

1 lb. raw chicken breast, cubed
I TBS olive oil
1 cup onions chopped
dash of cayenne pepper
1/2 tsp. cumin
1 tsp. oregano
I can chicken broth
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1/2 tsp. salt
1 (4oz) can diced green chilies (not jalepeños)
2 cans (15 oz each) Cannelli beans (White Kidney Beans)
           (Progresso or Goya brand)

In a large frying pan, cook raw chicken with onion, garlic and spices until chicken is no longer pink.
Put rest of ingredients in a large pot, add chicken and onion mixture.
Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes.
Very low in fat and calories and very tasty.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 12, 2006, 01:09:29 PM
lem, the cherry cakes sounds like the real thing, you should post a pic, sliced of course, so we can see the similarities! it looks to me that it's similar to a pound cake with cherries inside. for some reason, i picture jack's mom using an old-fashioned handheld rotary beater, but wouldn't it be funny if tucked away on the counter in that scene there was a shiny chrome amana radar range microwave, heh.

castro, i'm reminded that there's absolut peppar in a bottle, but never thought to simply grate some pepper on top of chilled vodka. i do like the flavored vodkas, and almost bought a bottle of peach vodka last night but thought the better of it, ;D  but am more likely to make/enjoy flavored vinegars and oils than the hi-test stuff ;)

killersmom, that white chili sounds really good, what an interesting twist on the traditional red stuff. i bet this is good with white cornbread, if there is such a thing, white wine, and of course, white pepper ice cream, for dessert. :D

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on May 14, 2006, 01:50:00 PM
Stuffed peppers.  Vastly variable comfort food; freezable.  Basics: sweet peppers, rice, ground meat.  Cut the stem end off  peppers (green, red, or yellow); clean out seeds and white membrane (scissors and a grapefruit spoon helpful).  Boil them in a big pot of water until cooked but not falling apart.    (Or microwave,   for smaller number.)  Cook  rice (white, brown, even a preseasoned box mix).  Fry lean ground beef or ground Italian sausage).  Mix rice and meat (I usually go roughly half-and-half)  plus preferred seasonings; spoon into peppers. It's nice to have extra stuffing mix to go with each serving.

Some possibilities:  cook rice in broth or other seasoned liquid; add chopped cooked onion or mushrooms or other vegs or a bit of garlic; add a handful of wild rice for chewiness (cook separately in microwave to get right texture).  Bulghur wheat another possibility. Could mix a tomato sauce into the rice/meat, or serve with sauce separate.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 17, 2006, 01:04:57 AM
our neighbor's kumquat tree is bursting with fruit. i like to eat these whole, but there are so many! this is a good way to make good use of these tiny, citrus-like fruit.

kumquat chutney

2 teaspoon salt
2 star anise stars
3 cups white sugar
4 minced garlic cloves
2 tablespoon peanut oil
2 thinly sliced small onion
2 tablespoons white vinegar
4 jalapeno peppers thinly sliced
5-6 cups kumquats, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons fresh minced ginger
1 cup of fresh squeezed orange juice
2 teaspoons fresh cracked black pepper

saute the garlic, onions, ginger and chiles in the vegetable oil over medium heat until onion is transparent. then add the other ingredients,, stir well and simmer over low heat about 30 minutes. taste -- add more sugar if kumquats are especially tart, more salt if you wish. when cool, store in a clean, glass jar.

--> you can add golden raisins to the mixture as well.

this stuff is nice with pork chops, packed inside riceballs, as a topping for broiled chicken breasts, with cheese and crackers, etc.. a good snack: on a thin slice of pumpernickel, add sharp cheddar, a sliver of chicken breast and/or avocado, then a dollop of kumquat chutney. these little open-faced sandwiches are great with a good pot of hot tea!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on May 17, 2006, 05:44:40 AM
oh god jimmy...

i am practically salivating here.  i looooooooove chutney, and i looooooooove kumquats, although, like you, they usually get plopped whole right into the mouth, savoring the complexity of tastes of the entire fruit rind and all.  i usually have mango chutney so this is a treat indeed.  if you get to make some, i hope you can save a little till next november or so...

we need a smiley who drools...

jack

modified by jack

i would also be intgerested to know if anyone has experimented with recipes that use this much sugar substituting splenda for the sugar.  can you use it as a major ingredient?    J

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Daphne and Chloe on May 17, 2006, 11:17:59 AM
My friend got this recipe from one of her cooking magazines. The original is a torte where each round layer is cut in half and layed with jam and then almond paste on the top layer. However it could be frosted with anything and is a simple egg free recipe. It is also easy to 1/2 the recipe and just make one layer. It's good plain with coffee.

COCOLATE CAKE

3 Cups all purpose flour
2 Cups sugar
3/4 Cups unsweetened cocoa powder
2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
1 Cup water
1 Cup cooled coffee
2/3 Cup cooking oil
1 tsp. vanilla

Grease and lightly four two round cake pans. In a mixing bowl stir together flour, sugar, cocoa powder, baking soda and salt. Add water, coffee, oil and vanilla. Beat with an electric mixer on low to medium speed just till combined (I hand mix it and it works fine) Pour batter into prepared pans. Bake in a 350 degree oven for 35 minutes or till done. Cool in pans on wire racks for 10 minutes. Remove from pans and cool completely.

Good, easy basic recipe and you can do anything with it.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on May 17, 2006, 08:02:43 PM
BLACK PEPPER ICE CREAM

some good, all natural vanilla ice cream
some black (or pink) peppercorns

scoop one serving of ice cream in small sized bowl.
grate a bit of the peppercorns on top of ice cream.

ENJOY!

--> also good with little bits of carmelized ginger. chinatown is a good source for this spicy, yet sweet treat.

Jimmy, you eat some of the strangest things....but you really do spur on the adventurous side of my food appetite.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on May 18, 2006, 03:38:10 AM
I thought a link to this site might be useful in this thread:

http://www.convert-me.com/en/convert/cooking

Unit conversions especially for kitchen use!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 18, 2006, 07:14:36 AM
Jimmy, you eat some of the strangest things....but you really do spur on the adventurous side of my food appetite.

haha try haagen daaz with balsamic vinegar.. yummy.

at least i don't put mustard on pancakes, with maple syrup. i hear that's a southern thing... ;D

jack, a fellow kumquat lover! i'm also nibbling on loquats from another tree, now that the tangerines have done their thing. i dunno about the splenda, but my friend buys it in huge boxes and uses if for everything. i think she said the uses less splenda than sugar in recipes, as it's sweeter or something like that.

the grapefruit cheesecake sounds reeaaaallyy good!!!  lol, digestive biscuits, :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Lola on May 18, 2006, 07:57:57 AM
Stuffed peppers.  Vastly variable comfort food; freezable.  Basics: sweet peppers, rice, ground meat.  Cut the stem end off  peppers (green, red, or yellow); clean out seeds and white membrane (scissors and a grapefruit spoon helpful).  Boil them in a big pot of water until cooked but not falling apart.    (Or microwave,   for smaller number.)  Cook  rice (white, brown, even a preseasoned box mix).  Fry lean ground beef or ground Italian sausage).  Mix rice and meat (I usually go roughly half-and-half)  plus preferred seasonings; spoon into peppers. It's nice to have extra stuffing mix to go with each serving.

Some possibilities:  cook rice in broth or other seasoned liquid; add chopped cooked onion or mushrooms or other vegs or a bit of garlic; add a handful of wild rice for chewiness (cook separately in microwave to get right texture).  Bulghur wheat another possibility. Could mix a tomato sauce into the rice/meat, or serve with sauce separate.


I make them all the time and I often use ground turkey or chicken instead of ground beef!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Lola on May 18, 2006, 07:59:16 AM

SPICY ZUCCHINI PASTA with MILK


I printed this off to try, thanks!  ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on May 18, 2006, 08:01:18 AM
Jimmy, you eat some of the strangest things....but you really do spur on the adventurous side of my food appetite.

haha try haagen daaz with balsamic vinegar.. yummy.

Yummo...balsamic vinegar on strawberries is yummy too.  And mustard on eggs-over-easy!

Now I'm hungry...(runs off to the diner for some yummy southern cooking...where're them grits?)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on May 18, 2006, 11:15:09 AM
10 oz. digestive biscuit

As a non-cook, I have to ask: what is a digestive biscuit?  ???

And how are "things" going?   :D

Hoffentlich geht's dir gut!

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 18, 2006, 04:41:07 PM
fritz, i'm pretty sure digestive biscuits are like graham crackers or vanilla wafers. at least i hope so!!!

bobbie, i've been told the best balsamic vinegar to use for ice cream is the expensive, syrupy kind that comes in tiny bottles. never heard of putting in on strawberries, i'll have to try the berries on ice cream with the vinegar too. :D

...maybe our "no more beans" jack twist would like this sweet and simple dessert pie:

WHITE BEAN & PECAN PIE

pecan halves
2 eggs (2 eggs lol)
1/3 cup brown sugar (75 ml)
1/2 cup pure maple syrup  (125 ml)
1/3 cup softened salted butter (75 ml)
1 cup well cooked white beans  (250 ml)
1/2 cup raisins and/or chopped pecans  (125 ml)
1 nine inch (23 cm) unbaked pastry pie shell, or 18 tart shells

i use great northern white beans for this recipe, but white kidney beans or cannellini beans or whatever would work too. canned is okay.

with hand blender, blender or food processor, puree the beans with the pure maple syrup until smooth. add sugar, softened butter and eggs until well blended. don't overmix. sprinkle chopped pecans or raisins on the bottom of the pie shell, distributing evenly. pour filling into pie shell, and garnish with pecan halves in star pattern in center of pie (or all over if you like pecans!).

bake pie in preheated 350F (180C) oven for 35 to 45 minutes (bake small tarts for 20 minutes) or until center is set. let cool, it will firm up a bit. serve at room temperature plain with dollop of whipped cream, or warm it up a bit and serve with ice cream.

---> can add 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
---> can add 1/2 cup toasted coconut to filling
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on May 18, 2006, 08:51:11 PM
Gnash, is  that pecan-and-bean pie less sweet than the pecan pie one usually meets up with?  The typical recipe always seems downright cloying to me, so a variation is intriguing. And have you tried the raisin-pie?  I'm also wondering about walnuts.

"Digestive biscuits" turn up frequently in English murder mysteries, so I imagine that's where they flourish. The UK, I mean.   (I'd always surmised they might be ginger snaps, but with no evidence.  You have me wondering; I'll go do a Google.

ETA: You were right.  "Almost the same as graham crackers"  was the first def. I encountered.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on May 18, 2006, 11:56:39 PM
On with the strange food theme!  ;)
I'm in deep wonder that someone has come up with this recipe - there must have been some kind of scientific process involved or something - but these taste just like the meatballs my mum made when I was a kid. Good freshly made with boiled potatoes and sauce, or cooled as finger food or on a picknick. I absolutely love them.

Swedish non-meatballs

1,5 dl (100 g) almonds (1/2 cup)
1,5 dl breadcrumbs (1/2 cup)
1,5 dl grated cheese of some discreet variety - not strongly flavoured! Cheddar probably works (1/2 cup)
1 finely chopped shallot (or 2 tbsp finely chopped onion)
1 tsp salt
1 ml black pepper (1/5 tsp or just a little dash)
3 eggs
1 tbsp water
1 liter weak vegetable stock (2 pints) - use half as much stock concentrate/cubes/powder as recommended
butter for frying

Grind the almonds if you have one of those old-fashioned almond mills (sorry if that's not the English term!  ;D), or use a mixer. Preferably, there shouldn't be any almond pieces left, just a kind of coarse flour. Mix this with breadcrumbs, cheese, shallot, salt, pepper, eggs and water. Make little balls out of the mixture, about a tablespoon of it for each ball; the recipe claims to make 25 - 30 of them, but I've never counted.
Bring stock to the boil and cook the non-meatballs for 8 minutes. They will swell a bit because of the eggs in the mixture. Then take them out and fry them so they get a nice, golden brown appearance.

Much nicer than it sounds and high in protein from almonds, cheese and eggs!


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 19, 2006, 02:08:41 AM
Gnash, is  that pecan-and-bean pie less sweet than the pecan pie one usually meets up with? ...

yes, it's much less sweet than a regular pecan pie, which as that sort of gooey base/filling. this is like a pumpkin pie or sweet potato pie. the pecans are just an extra on the pie, the main part is.. beans! you could certainly make it with walnuts. the raisins do add sweetness, i've never made it without them.

laurentia, the non-meatballs sound very good and healthy, but wonder if your recipe calls for raw, unroasted almonds or the roasted variety. i recently found out that almonds are the most nutritious of all the nuts~!

i need to post my yummy "pasta fagioli" recipe... more beans, haha.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on May 19, 2006, 04:01:05 AM
It's raw almonds in the non-meatballs. I don't know about the overall healthiness of them, because both almonds and cheese are rather fatty foods...but I eat them a lot and I'm not dead  ;D
I didn't know about almonds being super nutritious, but yay! I eat them as candy anyway, so that's good!

I'm very curious of your pasta fagioli as I'm always on the lookout for nice new bean recipes! I really want to try the pecan-and-bean pie as well, but they don't have maple syrup where I shop for food, I think I'll have to go to the special American-themed food shop to get that.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 19, 2006, 07:08:16 AM
laurentia -- oh, good, i love raw almonds anyway! for the bean pie, i'm sure you can use brown sugar instead of maple syrup, or even regular sugar. i wouldn't use honey tho... for some reason i don't think it would taste right, it'd be too sweet.

here's two more BEAN recipes ;)

PASTA FAGIOLI

black pepper
extra virgin olive oil
four garlic cloves, crushed
a pinch of dried rosmary, crushed
freshly grated parmesan cheese, or similar
one cup of short pasta -- penne, bowtie, macaroni
2 cans great northern white beans or cannellini, drained
about 3 or four cups of fresh, washed swiss chard, chopped
and if you're brave, lol, anchovies -- just two or three filets, chopped

cook about one cup of dried pasta in boiling water "al dente" and save some of the pasta water.

cook the swiss chard in about 1/2 cup of lightly salted boiling water, about 3 or 4 minutes or until tender. drain but reserve the cooking liquid.

pour a couple tablespoons of olive oil in pot, add garlic and rosemary and cook over low heat to release the flavors, but don't burn or brown. add the anchovies, add the beans, some freshly grated black pepper, mix it all up. cook for a few minutes to warm the beans.

add the pasta, the reserved liquid from the chard, and a cup or so of the pasta water (or some vegetable or chicken stock). i don't like my pasta fagioli very soup-like, but more like a thick stew. you'll find that the pasta and beans soak up the liquid as it sits, so do add enough at first...

add salt to taste if necessary. serve in bowls and sprinkle with (lots of) freshly grated cheese, and some chopped italian parsley -- it adds a fresh flavor. i sometimes drizzle some extra virgin olive oil on top, or some black or white truffle oil.

--> add crushed red pepper if you like it spicy!
--> try adding chopped ripe tomatoes when you add the anchovy, or just tomatoes if you don't like anchovies.
--> there are many small pastas available, i like the ribbed, curly macaroni, and have even used tortellini.



SUPER SIMPLE TUNA AND BEAN "SALAD"

fresh lemon juice
extra virgin olive oil
some red onion, thinly sliced
1 can cannellini beans, drained
1 can tuna fish, drained and flaked
1/4 cup freshly chopped italian parsley
salt, pepper, some dry italian herb seasoning

put tuna and beans in big bowl. add some red onion to taste, if it's sweet, add a lot. drizzle with olive oil, squeeze the juice of one half lemon (or so) on top.  gently toss with seasonings and parsley.. if you don't have lemon juice, try using white wine vinegar or white balsamic vinegar. you can use regular balsamic but it gets kinda brown and uggy looking.. but it still tastes good!!

this is really simple, and apparently healthy. i like this a lot, but have to be in a tuna mood, which isn't very often these days because of the mercury dangers associated with canned tuna. :(

--> add some tiny grape tomatoes, or some cherry tomato halves.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on May 19, 2006, 07:34:22 AM
Mmm. I'll definitely try that pasta next week! Looks quick and easy to make as well as tasty.

YES more beans!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Dilanon on May 19, 2006, 01:11:25 PM
Hello all:

Here is an effortless chicken wing recipe for the gril.  The quantities vary as needed.

First, rinse off excess blood and feathers from the wings and bend the tip back until it rests under the joint and stays firmly in place.  This won't work if the bone is broken, but you can still use those broken wings.  Binding them this way helps them not to burn on the grill later.

Next, place the wings in a deep bowl.  Sprinkle generous amounts of Knorr Suiza tomato boullion on the wings.  You can get this at any large grocery store with a Mexican foods section.  Then squeeze the juice out of enough limes or lemons to cover the wings.  Marinade a few hours.  It works best if you prepare this the night before, marinade overnight and grill the next day. The lemon juice tenderizes the meat so grilling time is fast, plus the tomato flavoring gives them a kick. 

Dilanon
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nick_F on May 23, 2006, 12:56:03 PM
Digestive Biscuits

I think you americans may call them sweetmeal biscuits.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digestive_biscuit

fantastic with cheese, cold meats, peanut butter, used in cooking to give a crunchy base to cheesecakes etc.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 23, 2006, 10:45:51 PM
hmm, i have never heard of sweetmeal biscuits here in the U.S.. the closest here are probably graham crackers, as those are commonly used for pie crusts when crumbled and mixed with butter. the digestives sound a little less sweet tho -- i can't imagine graham crackers with cold cuts or cheeses, really. they are good with honey, and of course, the old campfire standby (why didn't jack and ennis make these?), S'MORES.

S'MORES

some graham crackers
some large marshmallows
some thin milk chocolate bars
one stick, somewhat green, pointy
a nice bed of coals, or glowing campfire

have all ingredients ready on rock or other suitable surface near where you're sitting. choose a good stick, long but not too long, and whittle the end, removing bark and making a point. i suppose you can choose a forked twig or branch with many pointy ends and roast several marshmallows at once. if the twig is too skinny or thin, the marshmallow may slide down or rotate as you're roasting it, so choose a stick with a bit of girth.

place marshmallow on your new pointy end of the stick, and toast until evenly browned and puffy. do not allow to burn, altho some people love charred marshmallows, or they like for it to catch fire. then they wave it around to put the fire out and it could fling off and hit somebody in the face, so be careful, as the marshmallow will be very hot.

place piece of chocolate on a marshmallow-sized bit of graham cracker, then slide hot marshmallow onto the cracker. then put another cracker on top, squish together a bit, and when it's cooled a bit and the chocolate has melted, you can eat the darn thing. repeat until you run out of chocolate.

--> sprinkle hot marshmallow with cinnamon
--> serve with hot cocoa for total suger overload
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on May 24, 2006, 12:13:19 PM
hmm, i have never heard of sweetmeal biscuits here in the U.S.. the closest here are probably graham crackers, as those are commonly used for pie crusts when crumbled and mixed with butter. the digestives sound a little less sweet tho -- i can't imagine graham crackers with cold cuts or cheeses, really. they are good with honey, and of course, the old campfire standby (why didn't jack and ennis make these?), S'MORES.

S'MORES

some graham crackers
some large marshmallows
some thin milk chocolate bars
one stick, somewhat green, pointy
a nice bed of coals, or glowing campfire

have all ingredients ready on rock or other suitable surface near where you're sitting. choose a good stick, long but not too long, and whittle the end, removing bark and making a point. i suppose you can choose a forked twig or branch with many pointy ends and roast several marshmallows at once. if the twig is too skinny or thin, the marshmallow may slide down or rotate as you're roasting it, so choose a stick with a bit of girth.

place marshmallow on your new pointy end of the stick, and toast until evenly browned and puffy. do not allow to burn, altho some people love charred marshmallows, or they like for it to catch fire. then they wave it around to put the fire out and it could fling off and hit somebody in the face, so be careful, as the marshmallow will be very hot.

place piece of chocolate on a marshmallow-sized bit of graham cracker, then slide hot marshmallow onto the cracker. then put another cracker on top, squish together a bit, and when it's cooled a bit and the chocolate has melted, you can eat the darn thing. repeat until you run out of chocolate.

--> sprinkle hot marshmallow with cinnamon
--> serve with hot cocoa for total suger overload

It seems to me that I've only heard these called S'mores relatively recently. When we went of camping trips with the Cub Scouts and such (mid 50's) we called them Devil On Horseback.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 25, 2006, 04:17:54 AM
we called 'em s'mores in the seventies! for me, "devils on horseback" are appetizers made from pitted dates stuffed with a sharp cheese, wrapped in bacon and secured with a toothpick, then broiled on both sides until crispy. you can also use figs, either fresh or dried. yummy.

floating islands... now that's something else entirely! (floating ennis?) it's a dessert -- meringue "islands" floating on a sea of sweet custard, sprinkled with cinnamon. i've never made them, but the one time i enjoyed the velvetly mounds was memorable. a sweet guy took me on a romantic date, we shared an order at a candlelit dinner table in the somewhat staid community of walnut creek. we lovingly spoon-fed each other the slippery islands, which scooted around furtively on the plate, and giggled (oh, the wine)...

we got a lot of stares that we thought were glares, but as we finished up, the (gay) waiter said that because of our "display", the kitchen was angry -- just about every table wanted to know what we were eating, and as a result, the chef was up to his ears with orders for the floating islands, lol.

that said, i'd still rather have something else! here is my simplified recipe for...

STRAWBERRIES ROMANOV

fresh strawberries
pure, vanilla ice cream
freshly made whipped cream
some cointreau, an orange liqueur
some tall, fluted parfait glasses, chilled

ok, this is easy. wash and dry the strawberries -- make sure they are ripe and sweet. they should be very fragrant. slice them into quarters, or in half if they're small. place in a bowl and sprinkle with cointreau and a bit of sugar. (about one oz. liqueur and 1 tsp sugar to 2 cups sliced strawberries.) you can skip the sugar if the strawberries are sweet enough! you can do this ahead of time and let it sit in the fridge to marinate.

when ready, bring out the ice cream to let it soften a bit.

make whipped cream: whip the whipping cream -- add a bit of sugar, a dash of vanilla, and beat vigorously in a chilled bowl. once you have frothy peaks, divide the whipped cream into three portions.

in an iced bowl, fold two portions of the whipped cream with the softened ice cream in equal portions, or a little more ice cream if you wish, it doesn't matter. you can even skip this part and use only ice cream... but it's better mixed, because it's fluffier, and you can add more cointreau to this mixture, haha. whatever you do, work fast so the ice cream doesn't melt too much!

grab the parfait glasses, spoon some of the marinated strawberries in each glass. add some of the ice cream. more strawberries, then more ice cream, until you have filled the glass. you should end up with two or three layers... top the last layer of strawberries with a dollop of the reserved whipped cream, add a single small strawberry,,, a sprig of mint....

one word: yummydelicious!

--> if you don't have cointreau, you can subsitute grand marnier, curacao, or another orange flavored liqueur.
--> no alcohol? marinate the berries in freshly squeezed blood orange juice, adding a bit of grated orange rind.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on June 03, 2006, 06:10:05 PM
Gnash!  That was a RIVETING description of S'mores.  I'm tingly all over!!  I bought the incredient to make some at the beach over the Memorial Day weekend, but there was too much wind to start a fire with.

bbb - if you have to ask how long salad spinners have been around, you probably weren't born when I used my first one....late 60's early 70s! Still have it too.

B  ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 04, 2006, 07:27:10 AM
bobbie, darn that wind!!! oh well, you can toast marshmallows for s'mores over the gas flame of a stove if you're careful, and enjoy them at home! ;D you might want to line the burner area with foil first, haha.

salad spinners! yes they've been around since at least the seventies, we had one at home. now i just shake and drip dry the greens in a colander, or roll them in a clean tea towel to absorb moisssssture. :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on June 05, 2006, 04:05:18 PM
jimmy...

what the hell is a tea towel, and what planet are you from anyway?  <<<joking, you know i am joking right?

i have cheesecloth dishtowels, on martha's say so, and i must say i use them for everything.  i really must get a spinner someday though.

jack
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 06, 2006, 01:43:04 AM
I've never seen a salad spinner in use, so now that the subject is up: a salad spinner is like a sperical colander and you spin it around so the water is forced out of the salad inside, right?

Well...doesn't that mean you sprinkle the whole kitchen with water? Or is the construction of the salad spinner more ingenious than I imagine?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nick_F on June 06, 2006, 03:53:48 PM


How long have salad spinners been on the market?
I only just got myself one recently, LOL.

 8)

bbb since about 1959 - LOL!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Gonzo on June 06, 2006, 05:27:33 PM
I've never seen a salad spinner in use, so now that the subject is up: a salad spinner is like a sperical colander and you spin it around so the water is forced out of the salad inside, right?

Well...doesn't that mean you sprinkle the whole kitchen with water? Or is the construction of the salad spinner more ingenious than I imagine?

Much more ingenious.  The sperical colander is actually contained with a large unperforated container.  You then put a lid on it and the handle is built into the lid so that all the water is contain within.  There is a space at the bottom of the larger container where the water collects.  After spinning you remove the lid, take out the collander and dump the water is a device called a sink.  Would you like an explanation of what a sink is?   ;) ;) ;) ;) ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Gonzo on June 06, 2006, 05:29:24 PM
I actually have a recipe for a sort of cherry cake if anybody wants it.  Very gourmet.  Not completely cherry but cherries are a significant ingredient.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 07, 2006, 08:20:19 AM
Much more ingenious.  The sperical colander is actually contained with a large unperforated container.  You then put a lid on it and the handle is built into the lid so that all the water is contain within.  There is a space at the bottom of the larger container where the water collects.  After spinning you remove the lid, take out the collander and dump the water is a device called a sink.  Would you like an explanation of what a sink is?   ;) ;) ;) ;) ;) ;) ;)

Ah, I suspected something like that. Thanks for enlightening me!

And thank you also for your gracious offer to enlighten me further, but the sink happens to be an invention I am very familiar with - how I admire the anonymous inventor of this infinitely versatile device! Only last Saturday did I hear about yet another use for it: one can make instant potato mash by plugging the sink, pouring the desired quantity of instant-potato-mash flakes into it, and simply turning on the hot water. Genius, I tell you, genius!

( ;))

I'm very curious about the sort of cherry cake! I've been thinking of making that Australian cake that was posted a few pages back, but there are a few ingredients in it that aren't available in my regular food shop.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 07, 2006, 08:42:58 AM
Cherry Cake

Ingredients

425g can dark sweet pitted cherries
1 tbsp self-raising flour (for dredging cherries)

180g butter
160g castor sugar
4 egg yolks
1 tsp vanilla essence
1 tbsp kirsch / cherry brandy
4 tbsp cherry juice (see method)

225g self-raising flour
1/2 tsp baking powder

4 egg whites
1 tbsp castor sugar (for egg whites)


OK, now that I'm asking questions anyway, does anybody know this?  :)

* Canned cherries: are different varieties very different in taste? I'm going to look for canned cherries in Asian foodstores, since they tend to have many kinds of canned fruit, but I don't expect to be able to choose between several varieties of cherries. Any kind of canned cherries will work, won't it?

* What exactly is self-raising flour? (You see, my folks, they was Swedes. Used potato flour to dredge fruits and berries.) Is anything added to the flour or is it just very finely ground or something?

* Dito for baking powder - is baking powder and baking soda the same thing? The stuff I know as "baking powder" will probably work in this recipe, but 1/2 teaspoon looks very little for a whole cake. Something to do with the self-raising flour, perhaps?

Thanks in advance for any thoughts on this!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Gonzo on June 07, 2006, 08:43:27 AM

Ah, I suspected something like that. Thanks for enlightening me!

And thank you also for your gracious offer to enlighten me further, but the sink happens to be an invention I am very familiar with - how I admire the anonymous inventor of this infinitely versatile device! Only last Saturday did I hear about yet another use for it: one can make instant potato mash by plugging the sink, pouring the desired quantity of instant-potato-mash flakes into it, and simply turning on the hot water. Genius, I tell you, genius!

( ;))

I'm very curious about the sort of cherry cake! I've been thinking of making that Australian cake that was posted a few pages back, but there are a few ingredients in it that aren't available in my regular food shop.
Quote

You should try my recipe for oatmeal-in-a-sink.  Simply divine!!!   ;D ;D

The cake I mentioned is actually a pumpkin cake with black cherry jelly filling and decorated with cherries.  I can post it if you are still interested.  All ingredients are available in at least most Western markets.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Lola on June 07, 2006, 08:48:40 AM
LOL you guys are cracking me up with descriptions of salad spinners! 

Although you can wash lettuce and other greens in any large bowl, drying them is another matter. Paper towels never absorb enough water. Only the centrifugal force of a salad spinner throws off the water quickly and with a minimum of effort. Unless you like soggy greens, a salad spinner is a kitchen must-have.

I can't imgaine life without one, I have had one as long as I can remember!  :-\
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Gonzo on June 07, 2006, 08:51:59 AM
LOL you guys are cracking me up with descriptions of salad spinners! 

Although you can wash lettuce and other greens in any large bowl, drying them is another matter. Paper towels never absorb enough water. Only the centrifugal force of a salad spinner throws off the water quickly and with a minimum of effort. Unless you like soggy greens, a salad spinner is a kitchen must-have.

I can't imgaine life without one, I have had one as long as I can remember!  :-\

But inquiring minds want to know... Do you have a salad shooter?  The perennial XMas gift when you just can't think of anything else.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 07, 2006, 08:52:33 AM
Twistedboy, I'd like to see the recipe (for the cake, I mean)!
It sounds very interesting; I've been curious about cooking with pumpkins ever since I was hooked on Harry Potter in 1999 or so (pumpkin is made out to be a staple food for witches and wizards in the books).
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Lola on June 07, 2006, 08:55:43 AM
Is there a difference between a spinner and a shooter?  lol   And mine has no space at the bottom of the larger container where the water collects, it has holes, so the water just falls down into the sink, it doesn't collect.   :-*
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Gonzo on June 07, 2006, 09:05:10 AM
Is there a difference between a spinner and a shooter?  lol   And mine has no space at the bottom of the larger container where the water collects, it has holes, so the water just falls down into the sink, it doesn't collect.   :-*

A salad shooter is that electric grater device.  It's a bit larger than a regular cheese grater and they show slicing all kinds of ingredients.  Cucumbers, lettuce, cheese, pepperoni, etc.  You never see commercials for it...until the XMas shopping season.  It just strikes me as the type of gift nobody buys until they are in a position of having to buy something and don't know what to get the person.  Sort of like a tie for Father's Day.

You're right about the salad spinner, my bad.  It does have holes in the outside container.   :-* :-*
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Gonzo on June 07, 2006, 09:09:42 AM
Twistedboy, I'd like to see the recipe (for the cake, I mean)!
It sounds very interesting; I've been curious about cooking with pumpkins ever since I was hooked on Harry Potter in 1999 or so (pumpkin is made out to be a staple food for witches and wizards in the books).

Be happy to.  I just need to type it into a word processing program and then I can post it.  I once took it to a party and there was a couple there who owned a coffee shop that is ultra groovy and has all sorts of gourmet treats.  They said the first thought that came to mind was that somebody must've gone into Houston (an hour away) and gone to a specialty baker.  It's very delicious, very easy to make and impresses the hell out of people.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Lola on June 07, 2006, 09:19:15 AM
[
A salad shooter is that electric grater device.  It's a bit larger than a regular cheese grater and they show slicing all kinds of ingredients.  Cucumbers, lettuce, cheese, pepperoni, etc.  You never see commercials for it...until the XMas shopping season.  It just strikes me as the type of gift nobody buys until they are in a position of having to buy something and don't know what to get the person.  Sort of like a tie for Father's Day.


Yes I do have one of those.........it chops, it dices...........it isn't electric though.  It has a storage unit on the botton, it comes in quite handy and it comes apart and just pops in the dishwasher.  We chop alot of veggies around here for cooking and make alot of salads.  Did you want me to get you one for Christmas this year? lol
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: BBM-Intern on June 07, 2006, 09:46:06 AM


OK, now that I'm asking questions anyway, does anybody know this?  :)

* Canned cherries: are different varieties very different in taste? I'm going to look for canned cherries in Asian foodstores, since they tend to have many kinds of canned fruit, but I don't expect to be able to choose between several varieties of cherries. Any kind of canned cherries will work, won't it?

* What exactly is self-raising flour? (You see, my folks, they was Swedes. Used potato flour to dredge fruits and berries.) Is anything added to the flour or is it just very finely ground or something?

* Dito for baking powder - is baking powder and baking soda the same thing? The stuff I know as "baking powder" will probably work in this recipe, but 1/2 teaspoon looks very little for a whole cake. Something to do with the self-raising flour, perhaps?

Thanks in advance for any thoughts on this!

Hi there,

Just my two cents' worth:

* Canned cherries - in Australia, the brands of cherries all seem to come from the US.  Perhaps there's a lot that's produced over there.  I suppose any brand would do, but do try eating one or two out of the can first and mentally note the flavour; I've noted one or two brands that seem very watery and bland, so will avoid them.  I've never tried the recipe with Morello Cherries, which are sharper and more bitter, so beware.

* Self-raising flour already has leavening/raising agent added to the flour.  This is the opposite of "plain flour" (Australian/UK) or "all-purpose flour (US), which has NO raising agent, and therefore is good for any purpose.  The reason self-raising flour is specified is that it's convenient, being a pantry staple for many.  You can convert "plain flour" into self-raising flour by adding two teaspoons baking powder (total of 10ml) to each cup of plain flour (measured to 250ml mark).  Sift flour twice and you should have self-raising flour.  This being said, cookery experts have commented that it is better to use commercial self-raising flour as it has a "better blend of raising agents".  Trivia: if you accidentally mix up your flours and can't tell which is self-raising and which is not, pop a little on your tongue: self-raising will fizz slightly.

* Baking powder is usually a combination of bicarbonate of soda (an alkaline) and another compound such as cream of tartar (an acid).  If you're really in a pinch and cannot find baking powder, try substituting: 1 part rice flour, 1 part cream of tartar and 1/2 part bicarbonate of soda.  Sift six times, then measure out what you need, keeping the rest in an air-tight container.  I've been told that the use of baking powder while common in the US, UK and Australia, is uncommon in places such as France, where this is only found in supermarkets that stock US-style ingredients.

OK, why only 1/2 teaspoon baking powder?  Well, reasons are:

* Cake already uses self-raising flour, which as explained above, contains sufficient raising agents;
* Creaming method of making cake traps air, which raises cake when subjected to heat in the baking process.  Remember your home economics theory?  The most common method of cake-making usually involves the creaming method, which is beating the butter and sugar until it is nearly white; this traps air, which makes cakes light.  Please refer to my detailed guide in original posting on how to tell if mixture is properly creamed;
* Whisking of egg-whites also traps more air; when whisked properly, egg whites can expand up to 8 times their original volume, trapping a lot of air.  Again, please refer to my detailed guide in original posting on how to tell when whites are properly whisked.

Also, I believe that excessive use of raising agents is undesirable, as sometimes too much yields an almost "soapy" or peculiar taste especially when there is insufficient neutralisation in the recipe.  It is also believed that the excessive use also leads to cakes going stale much faster, therefore, I am not fond of those "all-in-one" methods, which do not rely on mechanical action (ie. creaming & whisking) to trap air, instead they tend to advocate extra raising agent to compensate.  It's a matter of personal choice, but I'm yet to find one of those all-in-one cakes with really good texture: they end up either too dry, or "hump" (dome) up too much.

To save your arm (and stop it from giving out), I do recommend using a cake-mixer to help you along.  As mentioned, a Sunbeam Mixmaster perhaps in a woodtone design would be oh-so-sweet and be in keeping with the 1983 timeframe of Ennis meeting Mrs. John Twist.  Maybe an even older model, they made those machines to last!

Sorry for ranting on this post, but I do have a bit of experience in baking and want everyone to have 100% success in their recipes too.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Gonzo on June 07, 2006, 09:57:12 AM
[
A salad shooter is that electric grater device.  It's a bit larger than a regular cheese grater and they show slicing all kinds of ingredients.  Cucumbers, lettuce, cheese, pepperoni, etc.  You never see commercials for it...until the XMas shopping season.  It just strikes me as the type of gift nobody buys until they are in a position of having to buy something and don't know what to get the person.  Sort of like a tie for Father's Day.


Yes I do have one of those.........it chops, it dices...........it isn't electric though.  It has a storage unit on the botton, it comes in quite handy and it comes apart and just pops in the dishwasher.  We chop alot of veggies around here for cooking and make alot of salads.  Did you want me to get you one for Christmas this year? lol

I had to go online to find a better description of the SaladShooter.  You can google salad shooter presto (in the event that you actually care  ;) )and find many positive reviews, so maybe it is not such a bad thing to give someone.  The link below is to a description on Amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/ref=pd_sl_aw_tops-1_kitchen_4156505_1/103-7880157-2375044?search-alias=kitchen&keywords=presto%20salad%20shooter

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Gonzo on June 07, 2006, 09:59:28 AM
Whatever Lola wants,  Lola gets...   :-* :-*
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Lola on June 07, 2006, 10:28:00 AM
OMG yes I have seen that before, I am suprised my oldest son hasn't bought one! LOL
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Gonzo on June 07, 2006, 10:30:15 AM
OMG yes I have seen that before, I am suprised my oldest son hasn't bought one! LOL

Maybe it will be under the tree this year.   ;) ;) 8)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Lola on June 07, 2006, 10:31:57 AM
Yea if he is a good boy, maybe Santa will bring him a salad shooter!  :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: desertrat on June 07, 2006, 02:11:34 PM
here's a recipe i was asked to post (i'm sure it's going to be on the menu at the diner soon, since auntie asked me for it  ;)):

spicy potatoes - a recipe from india

750g potatoes
60g margarine
2 spoons oil
1 teaspoon kurkuma powder (the "raw" substance of curry powder. curry can be used as well, but curry is a mixture of spices and pure kurkuma tastes better)
1 large onion, sliced
2-3 cloves of garlic, squeezed
a piece of ginger root, about the length of a pinkie, finely chopped
1 and a half teaspoons of cumin seed
about a half teaspoon of cayenne pepper
2 teaspoons of lemon juice
1 spoon of chopped mint leaves
salt
mint leaves for decor

peel potatoes and cut them in cubes (1 to 2 fingers thick). cook them for 6-8 minutes in salted water. they should be cooked, but not squashy. let them drip off and put them back in a pot.
put oil and butter in a pan and heat it. add kurkuma and stir, then add onions and potatoes, stir 4-5 minutes until it bronzes (but jarful, it can easily burn).
then add garlic, ginger, cumin seed and cayenne pepper. add salt and stir for one more minute.
but the potatoes in a bowl and add the lemon juice to the juice left over in the pan. mix and pour  over potatoes. serve with mint leaves as decoration.


bon apetit !  :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 07, 2006, 05:35:44 PM
desertrat, the spicy potatoes sound delish! the lemon juice and mint seems like it would give the dish a fresh flavor, a nice contrast to the spicieness of the pepper.

i was wondering about KURKUMA, so i had to google it.. it's TUMERIC!

i get the powder at my local indian spice store for a fraction of the cost of mainstream grocery stores. they come in economical bags and is so fresh and yellow in color. they also sell the fresh tumeric -- rhizomes that look like ginger, but it's yellow inside. they also have fresh white tumeric.

tumeric is a big staple in my kitchen because my BF found out that people that suffer from kidney stones (like he does) benefit from the stuff, according to ayurvdedic practice. as a result, we put tumeric in all kinds of things. our hummus and salad dressings are yellow... potato salad, egg salad, mashed potatoes are yellow, and even scrambled eggs are yellow -- or much more yellow than normal!! i add it to soups and bean dishes, anything that will take the mild flavor. even spaghetti dishes get it -- my spicy zucchini pasta is often yellow as well.

here is more info on tumeric (or kurkuma, curcuma, gurkemeje, gurkemeie, and even gurkmeja),

http://www.uni-graz.at/~katzer/engl/Curc_lon.html

some info i found particularly interesting is this:

The so-called white turmeric is a closely related plant (zedoary), whose fresh rhizome is not so much used as a spice, but eaten as a very tasty vegetable. You can do the same with ordinary yellow turmeric, but it will stain your teeth yellow.

Turmeric's staining capability may seem a nuisance to everybody who must clean cooking utensils – cutting boards are particularly hard to clean with brush and soap alone. The dye is, however, not light-proof and fades away after but one hour in direct sunlight.


it's true -- i now have yellow wooden mixing spoons and even our plastic spatulas are stained yellow. my teeth, however, seem to be holding up ;D

and if you like spices, this website has many:

http://www.penzeys.com

penzey's has opened a store in southern california... i hear they have some amazing spices on their shelves!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Gonzo on June 07, 2006, 06:03:02 PM
Pumpkin Cherry Cake

4 eggs
1 c vegetable oil
2 c pumpkin puree
2 c sugar
2 c cake flour
2 tsp baking soda
2 tsp pumpkin pie spice
¼ tsp ground allspice
¼ tsp salt



Lemon Cream Cheese Frosting

80zs. Cream cheese, softened
¼ c. butter, softened
2 c confectioner’s sugar, sifted
1 tsp lemon extract



Any flavor jelly for filling, I use black cherry Polaner Allfruit.  Hence my claim that this is a cherry cake!!



 
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Sift dry ingredients into a large mixing bowl.  In a separate bowl combine eggs, vegetable oil and pumpkin puree and mix thoroughly.  Combine wet and dry ingredients and mix thoroughly.  Pour into 2 buttered, floured round 9” cake pans and bake 45 minutes or until done.  Remove from pans and place on racks to cool.

When cool, slice the rounded top of one of the cakes off.  This will be your bottom layer.  Spread jelly as thick as you want, don’t go overboard, though.  Stack second uncut layer on top.  Let the cake set while you make the frosting. 

Cream the four ingredients and ice the cake.  If it goes on thin you can put it in the fridge until the icing sets (30 minutes maybe) and then apply another layer.  Decorate the top with whatever you want.  I usually get fresh cherries and split them half and make a pattern of some sort and then sprinkle with lemon zest.

It is a super easy recipe.  I don't even use a mixer.  It's always a big hit.  I adapted this recipe from the NYT Sunday Magazine.  You could try your own.  Add nuts to the cake.  Raisins.  Different jellies.  It is essentially a spice cake so anything you would do with a spice cake would fit.  Be creative.

Almost, forgot, I make it with canned pumpkin.  If you want to get adventurous and roast your own pumpkins you can.  But, you'll have to figure that out on your own.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 07, 2006, 10:18:22 PM
BBM-Intern, how nice to see you back on the thread again! Thanks for the wealth of information, that was just the kind of answers I wished for.

You're very right about too much raising agents. The coffee shops here all too often seem to prefer baking powder to love and care when making their muffins and cakes.  :-\

The Mixmaster will absolutely be on my list to Santa this year... :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 08, 2006, 05:15:34 AM
twistedboy, that cherry cake sounds delicious, and easy to make! spice cakes are wonderful and the addition of the lemon frosting and cherries make it even better. i bet a carrot cake with cherries would be good too.

since summer is here, it's nice to have cold soup for a change. make sure you use fresh, ripe produce, for the flavors really "sing" in this recipe.

EAZY GAZPACHO

one small sweet onion
some tomato juice, like v-8
about six ripe tomatoes, seeded
one big cucumber, peeled and seeded
one green pepper, or two little yellow ones
olive oil, red or white wine vinegar, lemon juice
a handful of freshly chopped italian parsley, or cilantro
some fresh garlic, if you like. also, salt and pepper to taste

chop and seed the tomatoes. (peeling the tomatoes is optional. you can dunk them in boiling water for a few seconds and then take them out, plunge them in ice water to stop cooking, and then peel the skins off.)

finely dice the onion, cucumbers, the sweet green or yellow peppers. put all vegetables in a bowl with minced garlic, almost a cup of olive oil, a few teaspoons of vinegar, the seasonings, and the juice of one lemon. with hand blender, blend everything till it's pureed. you can do this in a blender or food processor as well.

i like this soup somewhat chunky, so i don't blend it all the way. you can puree it really smoothly if you wish. taste and adjust seasoning. i sometimes add some basil, or a pinch of italian seasoning.

add a handful of chopped parsley or cilantro, then add some v-8 to make it as thin as you wish (i like mine thick) and blend some more. cover to refrigerate for a while -- this cools it down for those hot summer days and allows the flavors to blend.

when ready to eat, put the cold soup in bowls and garnish wish slices of ripe avocado, a dollop of sour cream or a drizzle of good olive oil, and serve with warm crusty bread. you can also make fresh garlic croutons (see below) for a garnish.

--> if you puree it really smooth or make it thin by adding lots of tomato juice, it's nice to offer small dishes of chopped onion, cucumber, and green pepper to sprinkle on as a garnish, for this adds texture and crunch.

--> you can also garnish the soup with chopped hard boiled egg, or smoked turkey, ham, etc.

--> give this soup an asian flair by adding some minced ginger, sesame oil, rice vine winegar. top with fresh cilantro, toasted sesame seeds, crispy fried wonton strips, or chow mein noodles.

GARLIC CROUTONS

finely chop lots of garlic and add to a giant pan with a cup or so of olive oil. heat oil, but don't allow the garlic to brown. add cubes of day old bread, like french bread, about 3-4 cups. toss around in pan until the oil is soaked up. try to distribute the oil evenly on the bread cubes.

transfer to a baking dish or cookie sheet, if you wish, sprinkle with salt, pepper, some dried italian herbs. bake in a preheated 350 F oven until golden brown, turning once.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 08, 2006, 10:04:08 AM
Thanks for sharing the cake recipe, Twistedboy! Can I just ask what's in the pumpkin pie spice and the allspice? In Sweden, we mostly use either cardamom or a blend of cinnamon, ginger, and cloves for cakes. Is it the same in the USA?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Gonzo on June 08, 2006, 10:34:18 AM
Thanks for sharing the cake recipe, Twistedboy! Can I just ask what's in the pumpkin pie spice and the allspice? In Sweden, we mostly use either cardamom or a blend of cinnamon, ginger, and cloves for cakes. Is it the same in the USA?

Pumpkin pie spice is a blend of cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger and cloves.  My guess is equal parts, so you could use 1/2 tsp of each.  Allspice is a spice called Allspice.  I know no other name for it.  Good luck although you hardly need it for this recipe.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 09, 2006, 03:47:13 AM
Thanks for sharing the cake recipe, Twistedboy! Can I just ask what's in the pumpkin pie spice and the allspice? In Sweden, we mostly use either cardamom or a blend of cinnamon, ginger, and cloves for cakes. Is it the same in the USA?

laurentia,

"Allspice, botanically-known as Pimenta officinalis, is native to Central and South America, but is most closely associated with the West Indies island of Jamaica. .....  Allspice comes by its name for a very good reason. The berries have a combined flavor of cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves with a hint of juniper and peppercorn. Some enterprising spice companies sell a mixture of spices as allspice, so be sure and check the ingredients on the label to be sure you are getting the real thing."

read more about it here:  http://homecooking.about.com/cs/spices/a/allspice.htm
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on June 09, 2006, 06:27:08 AM


How long have salad spinners been on the market?
I only just got myself one recently, LOL.

 8)

I got one as a wedding gift 20 years ago...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on June 09, 2006, 06:35:44 AM
Is there a difference between a spinner and a shooter?  lol   

Gosh I hope we're still talking salad here...lol~
otherwise this post belongs in one of the "naughty bits" threads!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 09, 2006, 09:11:36 AM

laurentia,

"Allspice, botanically-known as Pimenta officinalis, is native to Central and South America, but is most closely associated with the West Indies island of Jamaica. .....  Allspice comes by its name for a very good reason. The berries have a combined flavor of cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves with a hint of juniper and peppercorn. Some enterprising spice companies sell a mixture of spices as allspice, so be sure and check the ingredients on the label to be sure you are getting the real thing."

read more about it here:  http://homecooking.about.com/cs/spices/a/allspice.htm

Thanks a million, gnash! I thought allspice sounded like some kind of spice blend at first.
Your post made me think, "aww, I'll never be able to hunt any of that weird, exotic Carribbean spice down where I live  :-\", but then I googled "pimento" and found that it's actually kryddpeppar! Allspice is a very common ingredient in extremely old-fashioned Swedish food, the kind of dishes that are only made for Christmas and only eaten by grandparents, so the spice is widely available even here in the apparent outback of the baking world  :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 09, 2006, 03:19:27 PM
oh, so allspice is pimento is kryddpeppar! hmm, foods eaten only by grandparents! odd,,, extremely old fashioned swedish food sounds kinda yummy~! it's funny, because "pimento" here is the red thing, a pepper, found inside of green olives. the kind you stick in martinis! that's a drink, drunk only by old people (over 21 at least!) you wouldn't want that inside of a spice cake, i don't think. the pepper, i mean...

here is my favorite martini recipe.. no olives this time.

MANGO MARTINI

honey
ripe mango
fresh lime juice
some chilled vodka
a good dry triple sec

scrape out the soft flesh of the mango, avoiding the stringy flesh close to the inside seed. then add about a teaspoon of honey and a few drops of lime juice. blend well with handblender to make a thick puree. pour into a small squeeze bottle. keep chilled. (you can scrape the seed and add those juices to the vodka mix below if you wish.)

make the martini:

2 parts vodka
1 part triple sec
splash of lime juice

add that to a cocktail shaker filled with ice. shake well, then very quickly (or have a friend do this while you're making the martini), squeeze a generous bead of the mango puree onto the *dry* upper inside rim of a large martini glass. it should be dry so the puree sticks to the glass. (don't bother to chill this glass beforehand in the freezer.) strain the martini into the glass, just below the rim of the glass.

~ rotate the glass as you drink, so every sip is mixed with the mango puree ~
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Gonzo on June 09, 2006, 03:24:50 PM
oh, so allspice is pimento is kryddpeppar! hmm, foods eaten only by grandparents! odd,,, extremely old fashioned swedish food sounds kinda yummy~! it's funny, because "pimento" here is the red thing, a pepper, found inside of green olives. the kind you stick in martinis! that's a drink, drunk only by old people (over 21 at least!) you wouldn't want that inside of a spice cake, i don't think. the pepper, i mean...

here is my favorite martini recipe.. no olives this time.


The pimiento in an olive is a different thing and has a different spelling.  A second "i" just before the "e".
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 09, 2006, 05:02:01 PM
thanks for that, twistedboy! interesting, pronounced the same, pimiento is the sweet pepper, and pimento is the allspice berry... what i didn't know is that pemientos were a source of paprika. i thought that was from the paprika pepper. ;) oddly enough, many olive manufacturers still refer to the red stuff in their olives as "pimentos" and will spell it that way on the label!

Main Entry: pi·mien·to
Pronunciation: p&-'men-(")tO, p&m-'yen-
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s):  plural -tos
Etymology: Spanish from pimienta
Date: 1845
1 : any of various bluntly conical thick-fleshed sweet peppers of European origin that have a distinctive mild sweet flavor and are used especially as a garnish, as a stuffing for olives, and as a source of paprika
2 : a plant that bears pimientos

Main Entry: pi·men·to
Pronunciation: p&-'men-(")tO
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s):  plural -tos or -to
Etymology: Spanish pimienta allspice, pepper, from Late Latin pigmenta, plural of pigmentum plant juice, from Latin, pigment

then there's this... now i'm confused...

Main Entry: pimento cheese
Function: noun
Date: 1916
: a Neufchâtel, process, cream, or occasionally cheddar cheese to which ground pimientos have been added

how very palimpsest are these pimentos! ;D

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Gonzo on June 09, 2006, 05:08:43 PM
thanks for that, twistedboy!

Actually, most of the credit goes to you, cuz I got that info from the very link you provided earlier.  So, thank you!!   :-* :-*
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 11, 2006, 01:10:56 AM
oh, so allspice is pimento is kryddpeppar! hmm, foods eaten only by grandparents! odd,,, extremely old fashioned swedish food sounds kinda yummy~!

OK, here's an example:  :)

Pickled herring

2 whole herrings (or 4 fillets)
1 - 2 red onions

2 dl water (1 cup, or actually 0.8 cups, but let's not be picky)
1 dl white distilled vinegar (1/2 cup)
1,5 dl sugar (3/4 cup)
10 whole grains of allspice
5 whole grains of white pepper
1 bay leaf

glass jar with room for at least a pint (judging from the measures above)

If the herring is salted, it needs to be soaked in water, 10 - 12 hours for fillets, 24 hours for whole fish. Savour the feeling of living in the 19th century while you're waiting. Then cut the herring in half-inch pieces and slice the onions.
Put water, distilled vinegar, sugar and spices in a pot and bring to the boil, remove from the stove and allow to cool.
Put the herring pieces and the onion slices in the jar, layering them nicely, and pour the liquid on top. Put the lid on and leave in the fridge for at least 3-4 hours (preferably it should mature at least overnight). It will keep for a week.

Eat next Saturday (the 24th, Midsummer's Eve) with small, new potatoes boiled with dill, a dollop of sourcream, and Swedish crispbread with butter and cheese. Strawberries with cream for dessert is a must.

There are usually several kinds of pickled herring to choose from and I, like most younger people, only ever eat those that have a white sauce instead of the clear one in this recipe. The white sauce contains creme fraiche or something and hides the look and taste of the herring better than the one above. Children almost never touch herring at all, they get meatballs and hotdogs instead.

Proof that people are strange: the same age group that is into pickled herring is strongly suspicious about sushi, because there's raw fish in sushi. 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Allspice is also used in dishes like black pudding and sylta, which is an old way of cooking the parts of a slaughtered animal that you can't do anything else with, like the meat you can srape off the head and stuff. Sylta is small pieces of unspecified meat, boiled with spices and glued together with gelatine into a slab that looks a little like a paté, or - like in the days before gelatine - wrapped in bacon rind and pressed together by putting a weight on top of it. I've seen it served at Christmas and sold in the food shop, but I've never seen anyone eat it.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 12, 2006, 09:38:52 PM
ohh, THAT kind of old fashioned food.... allspice is used often in desserts, so i thought you mean antiquated sweet things!

yes, ickled herriing isn't really my cup of tea, but my dad,  used to eat that stuff, and my polish grandma too.

i do like weird raw things tho, sushi and stuff rocks my world but i must limit it due to the parasites.

even with the good stuff, it seems there's always something there to remind you ;D

thanks for the recipe tho, it seems fairly simple, and i bet it's tasty too!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Gonzo on June 13, 2006, 05:34:51 AM
ickled herriing isn't really my cup of tea,
I know this is a typo, but I think it's a much better word than pickled.   ;) ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 13, 2006, 08:34:43 AM
ickled herriing isn't really my cup of tea,
I know this is a typo, but I think it's a much better word than pickled.   ;) ;)

Me too! I thought it was intentional.  :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on June 13, 2006, 09:01:15 AM
Is there such a thing as a "Midsummer's Eve" menu?  I was watching "The Girls Next Door" about Hugh Heffner's "girlfriends" who live at the Playboy Mansion.  (I know, I know, my radical feminism went on a vaction once a week for about an hour  :o) and they through a huge pretty stunning looking "Midsummer's Eve" party.

There costumes were stunning too...well except for Kendra who basically wore nipple tassels, but that's a nother story.

Bobbie
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 13, 2006, 09:26:31 AM
Is there such a thing as a "Midsummer's Eve" menu?  I was watching "The Girls Next Door" about Hugh Heffner's "girlfriends" who live at the Playboy Mansion.  (I know, I know, my radical feminism went on a vaction once a week for about an hour  :o) and they through a huge pretty stunning looking "Midsummer's Eve" party.

There costumes were stunning too...well except for Kendra who basically wore nipple tassels, but that's a nother story.

Bobbie

Yes, I'd say there is. As with most traditions and customs, it's not exactly the same everywhere, but the new potatoes with dill, the pickled herring, the crispbread, and the strawberries with cream are absolute musts. You also get shots of spirits, basically vodka flavoured with various herbs, and most people will drink beer with the food. The traditional menu on Swedish holidays is a smörgåsbord (I think you might know the word  :)), a variety of dishes, so for Midsummer you'll often find meatballs, sausages, maybe some fish (especially gravlax, which is very nice, made from raw salmon), salads, cheeses...
For Christmas, it's pretty much the same, only with more and heavier food.

I'm sorry to say that costumes aren't generally that great here, though  :)  We save them for the celebration of St Lucia in December.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 13, 2006, 12:53:33 PM
oops! oh i guess ICKled works too! now i won't fix it, or the comma after my dad. ;D ::)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Gonzo on June 13, 2006, 01:01:02 PM
oops! oh i guess ICKled works too! now i won't fix it, or the comma after my dad. ;D ::)


"And what would like on your burger, sir?"

"Mayo, lettuce, tomato, onion and ickles, please."
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on June 14, 2006, 06:14:19 PM
is there any hope of returning to some of the classy but quick cuisine we visited a while back.  some of you have a great deal more patience with prep time and culinary methodology than many of us bachelors and busy women.  i don't think the demand is great enough to run two parallel threads, one for gourmet hobbyist cooks, and the other for hurried gourmands, but i could wish for them.

failing that, how about some more quick but delicious  ;D

jack
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 15, 2006, 04:37:50 AM
how quick jack? the gazpacho can be made in a half hour, not including putting it in the fridge to cool it down. you can place a few ice cubes in the blender and crush that along with the vegetables if you're in a hurry tho. ;)

this is one of the quickest dishes ever, made when i'm in a hurry and hungry...

TUNA & BEAN "SALAD"

can of italian white beans, rinsed and drained
can of solid white tuna, drained and flaked
some fresh italian parsley, chopped
some sweet red onion, sliced
some fresh lemon juice
extra virgin olive oil
some wine vinegar
salt and pepper

toss these ingredients in a bowl! enjoy.

of course you can get fancy and add grated lemon zest, capers, or sliced kalamata olives, etc.. i've added marinated artichoke hearts too. this is a very nourishing simple meal, perfect for summertime, and good with those rye-crisp crackers or some toasted italian bread rubbed with raw garlic halves (rub the cut end, the garlic melts on the hot toast) topped with chopped ripe tomatoes that have been tossed with some olive oil, black pepper, and chopped fresh basil.



this is super easy too:

CHINESE BROCCOLI SALAD

raw broccoli florets, washed and dried. about four cups, or a bowlful
nuts or seeds: almonds, sunflower, pine nuts, etc... i like almonds
handful of golden raisins, the plump ones -- or the brown kind
a few stalks of green onion, sliced. sliced red onions work too
some of that good trader joe's sweet chinese salad dressing*

toss ingredients in a bowl. make this ahead, this is better after it's been marinating a few hours. add the slivered almonds or whatever seeds at the last minute so they are crunchy. of course, you can add slices of poached or grilled chicken breast... or some slices of fried tempeh.

*forgot which one exactly, comes in a bottle, i think it's called chinese salad dressing. it's in the condiments aisle ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Gonzo on June 15, 2006, 04:41:41 AM
*forgot which one exactly, comes in a bottle, i think it's called chinese salad dressing. it's in the condiments aisle ;)

Will we ever get over this madness!! ;D ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on June 15, 2006, 07:58:20 AM
Ya know?  I think we should pull together a cook book.  What do folks think?

Bobbie (yummo!)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on June 15, 2006, 09:17:29 AM
bobbie... i am with you, as long as its downloadable.  we have some terrific cooks.  one alteration: i think we need two cookbooks, one full on COOKING with all that entails, and the other good eats, healthy eats, prepared in 30 minutes or less.

some of us can put together a feast fit for a king visually and gustatorially, and others can make healthy food the organizationally challenged can eat and enjoy in under a half hour.  many of us are also interested in stripping the junk carbs out of our diet, but may not want to eat only nuts and seeds.  we have cooks who know their way around this too.

perhaps when some of the other projects die down a bit, we can cull this list for contributors and recipes.  i have a shortlist in my mind of suggestions for contributors.  finding folks with sufficient time and experience to act as volunteer editors, and possibly others to test suggested recipes might be a challenge, but we seem to have a nearly endless pool of talent resources.

an idea worth revisiting...

jack
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on June 15, 2006, 12:25:55 PM
Is there such a thing as a "Midsummer's Eve" menu?  I was watching "The Girls Next Door" about Hugh Heffner's "girlfriends" who live at the Playboy Mansion.  (I know, I know, my radical feminism went on a vaction once a week for about an hour  :o) and they through a huge pretty stunning looking "Midsummer's Eve" party.

There costumes were stunning too...well except for Kendra who basically wore nipple tassels, but that's a nother story.

Bobbie

Yes, I'd say there is. As with most traditions and customs, it's not exactly the same everywhere, but the new potatoes with dill, the pickled herring, the crispbread, and the strawberries with cream are absolute musts. You also get shots of spirits, basically vodka flavoured with various herbs, and most people will drink beer with the food. The traditional menu on Swedish holidays is a smörgåsbord (I think you might know the word  :)), a variety of dishes, so for Midsummer you'll often find meatballs, sausages, maybe some fish (especially gravlax, which is very nice, made from raw salmon), salads, cheeses...
For Christmas, it's pretty much the same, only with more and heavier food.

I'm sorry to say that costumes aren't generally that great here, though  :)  We save them for the celebration of St Lucia in December.

Laurentia, this sound delightful.  I'm already planning my 50th which is a few years away, but I'm thinking of making it a theme party and a "MidSummer's Night Eve" is appealing to me.  I'd like to think that even at 50, one is still in the Summer of their life!  ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on June 15, 2006, 12:29:20 PM
bobbie... i am with you, as long as its downloadable.  we have some terrific cooks.  one alteration: i think we need two cookbooks, one full on COOKING with all that entails, and the other good eats, healthy eats, prepared in 30 minutes or less.

an idea worth revisiting...
Jack, as usual, you have some very insightful thoughts.  Far more insight than I'm often capable of.  ;D  I'm thinking that for the first version, I can download the recipes that have already been identified on this thread.  BUT, I'm only gonna do it if the recipe contributors are ok with it.  I'm thinking it might be nice to have them available for folks at the various get togethers this year.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on June 15, 2006, 02:18:50 PM
why thank you bobbie.   :-[ :-*

i am pretty sure all our contributors so far are more than happy to share vie the site and downloads, and should a print copy be in the offing, permissions could be requested.

jack
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on June 15, 2006, 05:26:53 PM
OK Jack something just for you  ;)

I made this when Nick and Rob came to dinner and they liked it enough to have seconds.  Very Very simple and quick.  If you don't want to have it as a pie you could put it in small airtight containers. have a snack when ever you want or take for lunch. enjoy



(http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g287/Shrry/pie.jpg)
 PIE
Serving Size : 8

2 tablespoons sugar-free vanilla pudding and pie filling
2 cups whipping cream
1/4 Cup Splenda, granular
1 teaspoon vanilla

place pudding mix in a mixing bowl. Gradually whisk in a little of the cream until the pudding mix no longer looks grainy; add 1/4 cup Splenda and vanilla. Whisk in the remaining cream then briskly whisk until filling is thick and fluffy. Be careful not to over whisk or you could end up with butter.

 I used a lo-carb peanut butter cookie crust but you could use anything you like. I also used sugar free cheese cake pudding.  Any Sugar free pudding mix will work.  Next time I will use Butterscotch.
 Chill until ready to serve.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 16, 2006, 01:34:04 AM
PIE. that looks simply delicious, and somehow, it seems like something alma would make! and ennis would eat. :D

here's a recipe for a similar type dessert that always satisfies. a woman brings this to a christmas time pot luck every year. the salty and sweet combination, plus the tang of the rasperries, makes this a very refreshing cool dessert.

RASPBERRY PRETZEL DESSERT

2 cups crushed pretzels
1/2 cup melted butter
2 tablespoons sugar

2 cups boiling water
1 large box of raspberry jello
1 tub of Cool Whip topping, 12oz
1 package cream cheese, softened, 8oz
2 packages of frozen raspberries 10 oz. size

mix the crushed pretzels, sugar and butter. pat into a 9x13 inch pan and bake at 400 degrees for 7 minutes, let cool.

gently fold cream cheese to Cool Whip and spread evenly on top of pretzel layer. mix the jello and water, then stir in the frozen raspberries. pour this over the Cool Whip layer, then refrigerate until set.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 16, 2006, 06:57:18 AM
Laurentia, this sound delightful.  I'm already planning my 50th which is a few years away, but I'm thinking of making it a theme party and a "MidSummer's Night Eve" is appealing to me.  I'd like to think that even at 50, one is still in the Summer of their life!  ;D

I think you're absolutely right there, Bobbie, and the theme idea is great. Feel free to PM me if you'd like to know more about Midsummer celebrations!

About the forum cookbook, I love the idea and would like to be involved in it, but what about copyright? I have many recipes I'd like to share (it's mainly because of laziness I've posted so few here  :-[), but they all come straight out of cookbooks. Sometimes I've added beans or something, but I don't think that's a big enough modification to call the recipe my own invention. 

I like Jack's idea about having two chapters, one for those who like to cook and one for those who don't. More cookbooks should be organised like that! 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 16, 2006, 07:48:26 AM
Here's what I had for dinner yesterday. Quick and easy and very tasty!

Creamy Cashew Pasta

(serves two hungry cowboys or three weedy office workers)

250 g short pasta, brown or white (about 2 cups)
1/2 red onion
4 - 6 mushrooms
2 - 3 tomatoes
1 dl green olives (slightly less than 1/2 cup)
1 - 2 cans of chick peas, drained
at least 1 dl roasted and salted cashew nuts (about 1/2 cup)

2 dl yoghurt (slightly less than 1 cup)
1 tbsp paprika
2 tbsp chili sauce of the kind that's similar to ketchup (e g Heinz)
1 - 2 garlic cloves
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp black pepper

Boil the pasta and drain it, or use leftovers - the pasta doesn't have to be hot. Chop the onion, cut the mushrooms in quarters, fry both ingredients a little in olive oil in a wok or large pan. Add pasta, diced tomatoes, olives, and chick peas. Mix yoghurt, paprika, chili sauce, crushed garlic, salt and pepper and stir in, or just add those ingredients without mixing them first if you're lazy. Heat a little and stir in cashew nuts before serving. This could be served at any temperature, including cold as a salad or picknick food. 

The yoghurt should be thick, like the kind you use for tzatziki. Thin yoghurt can be drained in a coffee filter to make it thicker. You could also substitute creme fraiche if you don't like yoghurt.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 16, 2006, 03:30:09 PM
laurentia, your creamy cashew pasta recipe sounds very interesting! i love cashews,,, but usually just as a snack food. thank you also for including the conversions for the measurments ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on June 17, 2006, 01:59:40 PM
look what auntie googled up...

of course we will apparently have to post this again from time to time, unless you brits want to translate for us americans when you post.


American standard cup Metric equivalent - approx.
1 tsp.   =     1/6 fl. oz.    =   0.5 cl.       =        5 ml.
1 Tbsp =    1/2 fl. oz.    =   1.5 cl.        =      15 ml.
1 cup   =       8 fl. oz.    =   2.4 dl.        =     240 ml
1 pint   =     16 fl  oz.    =   4.7 dl.        =     470ml. 
1 qt.     =   32 fl. oz.      =   9.5 dl.        =     950ml.
 
British standard cup
1 tsp     =       1/5 fl.oz.  =    0.6 cl.    =           6 ml.
1 Tbsp  =    0.55 fl.oz   =    1.7 cl.     =        17 ml.
1 cup    =      10 fl.oz.   =    2.8 dl.     =       280 ml.
1 pint    =      20 fl.oz.   =    5.7 dl.     =       570 ml.
1 quart  =     40 fl.oz.    =      1.1 l       =    1,100 ml.
1 liter               =       1.06 U.S. quarts 

1 U.S. quart    =        0.95  l.

1 l                   =       10 dl.    = 100 cl.   = 1000 ml.   
1 dl                 =        10 cl.   = 100 ml.

Volume
1/4 tsp.                =          1.25 ml
1/2 tsp.               =             2.5 ml
1 tsp.                  =                5 ml
4 tsp.                  =              20 ml
2 fl. oz. 1/4 cup   =              60 ml
4 fl oz. 1/2 cup    =            125 ml
5 fl. oz. 2/3 cup   =            170 ml
6 fl oz. 3/4 cup    =            190 ml 
8 fl. oz. 1 cup      =            250 ml
16 fl. oz. 2 cups   =           500 ml
32 fl. oz. 4 cups   =             1 liter
1 liter                  =              10 dl 
1/2 liter               =                5 dl 
1/4 liter               =          2 1/2 dl 
1/10 liter             =                1 dl 
3/4 liter               =           71/2 dl 

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 17, 2006, 02:12:48 PM
Jack - thanks so much for that information! I didn't know that British measurements were different from American ones, but I suspected it. Why would anything be simpler than necessary?   :P :D
I posted a link, on page four or something, to a site that converted cooking measurements, but only between metric and American units.

laurentia, your creamy cashew pasta recipe sounds very interesting! i love cashews,,, but usually just as a snack food. thank you also for including the conversions for the measurments ;)

Cashews are yummy! I use them a lot in Chinese wok dishes. I generally like food with nuts in it. I used to make my own bread and put hazelnuts in it, and where I lived then there was a bakery that made loaves with walnuts in them. Mmm.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: River girl on June 18, 2006, 09:55:36 AM
I have really enjoyed reading through this thread and plan to try out Laurentia's creamy pasta dish soon. Sounds yummy.

Here's a nice easy summery meal for a Friday or Saturday night - well, that's when I cook it cause there's garlic on the potatoes and furthermore, red meat calls for red wine and I don't usually drink on work nights.

Here it is:
Steak with potato wedges and tomato, mozzarella and basil salad for two.

Potato wedges
500 g. medium to large potatos
olive oil
1 clove of garlic

Clean the potatoes. You can peel them if you like, or give them a good cleaning under running water with a vegetable brush which is what I usually do. Cut them in half lengthwise and then cut each half in two or three wedges lengthwise, depending on how big the potatoes are. Dry them with a paper towel.
Pour 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a medium sized oven proof dish. Mash the garlic through a garlic thingey straight onto the oil. Put the potatoes in the pan and mix it all up and stick it in the oven at 200 degrees celcius, that's a hot oven. Let them bake for about 20 minutes, check, turn them over (use a spatula as they may stick), put salt on them and give them about 10 minutes more til nice and golden brown.

Tomato, mozzarella and basil salad
400 g tomatoes (looks nice if you have different kinds - yellow and red, small and large)
2x 150 g. balls of buffalo mozzarella
2 spring onions
small pot of fresh basil
olive oil
white wine vinegar

Cut the basil leaves off the stalks, rinse and pat dry on paper towels. Chop them roughly. Put them in a mortar along with a good pinch of salt and pound them up a bit. Add some olive oil so it's nice and slick. (If you don't have a mortar just use a bowl and a wooden spoon to mash it up.)

Tear up the mozzarella balls into bitesized chunks and put them in a salad bowl.
Cut / slice the rinsed tomatoes into bitesized pieces and put them in the salad bowl.
Slice the rinsed spring onions finely - you only need the white part - and put into the salad bowl.
Add a good pinch of salt and some pepper.
Pour 1 1/2 tablespoon of olive oil and 1/2 tablespoon of vinegar on the salad and mix it thoroughly. (I like it tart, you can put less vinegar on if you prefer).
Drizzle the basil dressing over the salad and serve. The basil dressing is what makes it special.

Two steaks - prepare them as you like, grilled or whatever. Just remember to use a pepper mill when you season the steaks, it makes a huge difference.

This is very very easy, for summer when you are feeling lazy. Or any other time of year, just look for good tomatoes.

In summer it's nice with a cool beaujolais.

There's more than enough potatoes and salad, but I don't think meals should be skimpy.  :)



Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nax on June 19, 2006, 06:52:44 AM
Chocolate Truffle Torte

This is a very impressive desert that looks and tastes like you’ve spent hours on it.  Got to be my favourite.

This desert is best on a base you can use cake or a biscuit base made with a cup of crushed biscuits bound together with 1 oz / 25grams of melted butter or margarine.

You can make up half the amount in three or four goes using dark chocolate then white chocolate to create layers – allow the mix to set before pouring one layer onto another.

This desert freezes well

9 inch (22 cm) loose bottomed pie dish or spring-form tin at least 1 inch (2.5 cm) deep greased with butter or margarine.
1 pint (UK) 5.7 litres of whipping or double cream
1 pound (UK) 540 grams of good dark chocolate at least 70% cocoa solids
5 table spoons Liquid glucose (Corn syrup I think it’s called in Europe and the States – Brits you can get this at Boots the Chemists)
2 table spoons dark rum (optional – you can choose your own liqueur)
Cocoa for dusting

Break the chocolate into a large bowl add the liquid glucose (corn syrup) and melt (in microwave or over hot water when melted mix in the rum)

Whip the cream until it’s stiff

Add one big spoonful of the cream into the chocolate and mix in gently, now spoon the chocolate into the cream and gently fold in until everything is combined.  Pour into tin and leave overnight (four hours minimum) in a refrigerator.

Slip a knife around the edge of the set desert and remove from tin, dust with cocoa.

Warning this is really rich and a little goes a long way!

Enjoy

Nax.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on June 19, 2006, 11:48:22 AM
It's not that I don't like to cook (within reason), but I'm not especially keen on a collection of full-fledged recipes, because it's so easy to Google up several variations on anything one might fancy, short of cannibal cuisine (well, actually, I never tried that), and there are so many sites specifically dedicated to the sharing of same. 

OTOH, I love the informal, ingredients-don't-demand-precise-measurement, throwtogethers which I understand to be the other sort Jack was suggesting, including stuff on the order of "Ways to Use Up Gift Bottles of Balsamic Vinegar, Other Than on Strawberries."
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nax on June 20, 2006, 04:40:23 AM
It's not that I don't like to cook (within reason), but I'm not especially keen on a collection of full-fledged recipes, because it's so easy to Google up several variations on anything one might fancy, short of cannibal cuisine (well, actually, I never tried that), and there are so many sites specifically dedicated to the sharing of same. 

OTOH, I love the informal, ingredients-don't-demand-precise-measurement, throwtogethers which I understand to be the other sort Jack was suggesting, including stuff on the order of "Ways to Use Up Gift Bottles of Balsamic Vinegar, Other Than on Strawberries."
You can google it - but you can't get personal recommendations! BTW the only thing to do with a half bottle of balsamic vinegar is to add olive oil and herbs and make it into a dressing or boil it with sugar to make a syrup to make another dressing which can be used on a wide range of food.   :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: River girl on June 20, 2006, 04:59:01 AM
You can google it - but you can't get personal recommendations!

That's how I feel - and why I like this thread. So I hope people keep posting. Personal recommendations and impromptu suggestions, all can be inspiring when wondering what to make for dinner.  :P

(The icon is me licking my lips after reading the recipe for Nax's chocolate torte.)

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 20, 2006, 07:09:25 AM
okay this is easy, and vegetarian too. of course, you can add meat -- chicken is nice, slices of breast meat, or even shrimps.

maybe trouts would work, but only if ennis brought some home ;D

you can vary the vegetables in this to your liking -- i'm listing what we had on hand yesterday. also, i used chicken broth, so it's not officially vegetarian at all, but you could use vegetable broth, seaweed broth (made with kombu, a type of seaweed) or just water.

KICK ASS GREEN COCONUT CURRY

1 can coconut milk
1/2 can chicken broth
that thai green curry paste
fish sauce (comes in a bottle)
several leaves of fresh sweet basil
an assortment of vegetables you like
optional: tumeric, sugar, garam masala

sautee some chopped onions in a large pan (i use a wok) in some oil until browned a bit and transparent. add the coconut milk, and simmer on low while you chop the vegetables. i used green beans, red potato, red bell pepper, carrots, grapes... i guess about 4 or 5 cups worth of veggies.

slide those into the coconut milk and onion mixture, add some fresh basil leaves, add the chicken broth, about a teaspoon or so (careful, it's hot!) of the thai green curry paste, which i get in the "ethnic" section of my grocery store. add two or three tablespoons of the fish sauce, and if you want, a tablespoon or so of brown sugar. i also added tumeric for color (and health) and a dash of garam masala, an indian spice mixture. give it a stir.

cover and simmer on low for 20 mins or so, until the carrots and potatoes are done. if you want a thicker curry, simmer with the lid off for a while to reduce the sauce a bit. i like my thai curries quite thin, like a soup almost, but the coconut milk can't help but add some body to the sauce.

oh yeah: i added the grapes last minute -- about seven seedless green grapes cut in half. i didn't have a tomato, so i thought grapes might be interesting, and it was! a different kind of sweetness.

serve this curry with rice. i used basmati, but brown rice is good too. garnish with fresh cilantro if you wish.



Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nax on June 20, 2006, 07:33:41 AM
You can google it - but you can't get personal recommendations!

That's how I feel - and why I like this thread. So I hope people keep posting. Personal recommendations and impromptu suggestions, all can be inspiring when wondering what to make for dinner.  :P

(The icon is me licking my lips after reading the recipe for Nax's chocolate torte.)


Well if you do get around to trying it post up your verdict here  ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 20, 2006, 10:10:28 AM
Green coconut curry - yummy! It's my boyfriend's favourite vegetarian food (he eats meat, I don't), but I use a very different recipe to make it. It sounds really interesting with the spices and grapes!
I once put diced salmon in a coconut curry and let it cook in the sauce, it turned out very tasty (I think I put some lime in it too) and it looked nice as well! Nowadays I use slightly browned dices of tofu.

Thai food in general rules.  :P <-- that's supposed to be drool, not frustration
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: River girl on June 20, 2006, 10:39:03 AM
Laurentia, I made your creamy cashew pasta yesterday, and YUM.  ;D

I didn't use garlic but put in a pulverised dried chili, as I didn't have the chili sauce. And I made just half the portion, but I gotta say, I am one weedy office worker cause there was enough left over for tonight as well, which is fine, since I will be watching Sweden hopefully beat ing England in the World Cup and don't want to cook.

Gnash, I will definitely be trying your curry. I am looking for good vegetarian dishes as I am cutting down a bit on meat.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on June 20, 2006, 10:57:11 AM
Quote
You can google it - but you can't get personal recommendations!
Actually, several of the sites I'm thinking of are made up of people's personal recco's - they include the names of the submitters. But I guess one can just skim the cookbook-style recipes here while looking more for general ideas!

Such as  gnash's use for those green grapes.  I've some bland and not-very-sweet seedless green ones on hand, but it didn't occurr to me to try throwing some into the microwave steamer with some zucchini for adding to salads, rice etc. (Probably a good idea to pierce them first.)  Sure, they're fine raw - but I wonder if, like bananas, they taste different when cooked for a bit?

BTW, even when you're pan-cooking mixed veggies to absorb flavors from fats or a sauce, or plan to throw them into soup, it speeds things along to give the slowest ones -  usually the carrots - a head-start with a brief stint in the microwave.  Speaking as one who regularly gets side-tracked and lets things burn on the stove-top, I like to shorten the time I spend superintending progress there.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 20, 2006, 11:09:50 AM
River girl, I'm glad you liked the pasta! I quit meat almost ten years ago, so if you'd like advice on vegetarian food that works, I'm at your service  :)

(I'm normally mostly bored by football, I started watching the game against Paraguay, but was bored and went to bed. I got to know the result anyway because of the neighbours cheering when Sweden scored  :D
I bought some popcorn for tonight's game anyway - it sounds like it could be entertaining, much pride involved on both sides.)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: River girl on June 21, 2006, 03:33:16 AM
Laurentia, advice would be great. I have always been a meat lover, and I don't plan to shun it completely, but for different reasons I would like to eat more vegetarian food. Some reasons for me are the quality of produce and ethics. I would rather eat a really good piece of meat, organic, from a good butcher, once or twice a week than too much cheap chicken filet from animals that have been treated inhumanely.

I do know a bit about nutrition, and what attracted me to your recipe was that there was protein due to the chickpeas and cashew nuts. So any advice you have along those lines would be much appreciated.  :)



Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 21, 2006, 04:49:17 AM
That's brilliant, River girl, and it seems you know all the nutrition you need to know. In my experience, people who get sickly and skinny from a vegetarian diet and have to back to meat for health reasons, are those who don't eat enough protein. The key combination is beans/peas/lentils with rice/pasta/bread - you might know that protein consists of amino acids, "complete" protein has the right makeup of those, and combining pulses with grains gives that magical blend. If you'll also be eating dairy products and eggs, those are sources of good protein on their own.

Aside from the theory, I find that low-protein meals aren't very satisfactory, I'll still be hungry afterwards. Apparently, not everyone feels like that, because vegetarian cookbooks often contain lots of recipes without a protein source, but I think that's the background for the prejudice that veggie food isn't filling. In most cases, you can add beans, tofu or cheese to recipes, but sometimes it doesn't work. Then you can make a side dish, for example if I was serving pasta with a tomato sauce, I'd make something on the lines of the mozzarella salad you posted to go with it.

And on the whole, I don't find it a good idea to adapt meat or fish recipes to vegetarian, it's better to find recipes that are vegetarian to start with. If you're in Denmark, maybe you can find cookbooks by Kirsten Skaarup? I have one titled Vegetarisk Wok, which is falling apart from being used so much. Very, very tasty food, authentic East Asian stuff, and I think the woman seems to have the right attitude to food in general.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: River girl on June 21, 2006, 05:05:09 AM
Laurentia, thanks for the input. I know I could never survive on a low protein diet, so I like the combinations you mention. I will definitely check out Kirsten Skaarup. I had forgotten all about her! I bet the library has all her books.


Funny us Scandinavians communicating on an American forum.  ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 21, 2006, 05:26:56 AM
The noble art of cooking beans so they won't disagree with your tummy:

Buy some dried beans. Where I live, they're generally sold in bags of 500 g, which corresponds to about eight cans of boiled beans, and I usually cook a whole bag at once. This amount fits easily in my biggest pot (5 liter) and in the regular-sized colander I use when draining them.

Soak the beans in cold water overnight or while you're at work, 8 - 12 hours. Some people think this sounds fussy, but the beans mind their own business while soaking and don't need any kind of supervision. Don't put salt in the water, because this impairs the osmosis, and the point is that the beans should absorb as much water as possible. They will at least double their volume, so use a big bowl or pot for soaking!

Now to the boiling: drain the soaked beans, put them in a big pot with lots of fresh, unsalted water, put them on the stove and bring to the boil. There will be froth forming on the surface, because of the carbohydrates that make the beans hard to digest. When liberal amounts of froth has been formed (after a few minutes or so), pour the boiling water out and refill the pot with new water to avoid that these carbohydrates are absorbed back into the beans. Put a couple of teaspoons of salt in this water and let the beans boil until they are soft.
Beans should never be al dente, so let them take their time. Sometimes it only takes 40 minutes, sometimes almost two hours, depending on what kind of beans you're cooking and how well soaked they are. It's possible to overcook beans, but it's not very likely, so you don't have to check on them very often.

When they're done, especially with red kidney beans or black beans, you might take them off the heat and let them cool for an hour or two before draining them. This way, they'll keep their colour better.

When cooled, put the beans in plastic bags - I make portions of about 2 cans a bag (4 - 5 dl) - and put them in the freezer, or make a big bean chili out of them all.



Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: River girl on June 21, 2006, 05:48:29 AM
Laurentia, you are brilliant!

Check out this photo caption - maybe you should send that General Delivery to Jack and Ennis:

http://davecullen.com/forum/index.php?topic=323.msg308771#msg308771

 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 21, 2006, 06:10:27 AM
Here's my all-time favourite dish to make, appreciated by most non-vegetarians as well, even those who are sceptic about beans. Cheap and easy to make, almost all ingredients can be bought canned, so you don't have to plan it and buy fresh vegetables. Very filling and rich-tasting, everyday grub on its own, party food with nacho chips and beer. Vegan if you serve guacamole instead of crème fraiche with it. Can be used for tacos, burritos etc., totally indifferent to freezing and reheating.

All-purpose Bean Chili

Beans, canned or home-boiled: use chiefly red kidney beans, but for variation add black beans, white beans, or even white beans in tomato sauce if you have a can you want to get rid of.
Shredded tomatoes, the same amount as the beans or a bit less
Onions, about 1/2 onion for each can of beans
Peppers of any colour, about one smallish pepper for each can of beans
Corn, canned or frozen
Maybe some other stuff that might be good and/or is getting old in the fridge, carrots or aubergine, for instance
Some water if it turns out too thick

Garlic
Chili pepper
Ground cumin (for Scandinavian readers: inte kummin, utan spis kummin = spidskommen!)
Paprika
Oregano
Canned jalapeños, chopped
Salt and black pepper
Of course, you could also use you favourite texmex spice mix, and a stock cube or two might add some body to the dish.

Chop onions, garlic and peppers (and other vegetables if you want) and fry them in oil in a big enough pot/pan/wok. Add tomatoes, beans, and corn before the onion gets brown; salt a bit and bring to the boil. Let simmer for 5 - 10 minutes, then start adding more spices to taste. I usually add a dash of the vinegar from the jalapeño jar along with the chopped jalapeños. Don't go too light on the cumin, it gives a nice, meaty/smoky flavour to balance the tomatoes. Remember that beans are supposed to be the main ingredient, it's not a tomato sauce with a little beans in it.
Leaving the chili on the stove makes it thicken and allows the flavours to blend, so don't worry that it will be overdone. Let it simmer on and add spices until you're happy with it.

Serve with a dollop of crème fraiche or sour cream, and if you're not worried about calories, use nacho chips or tortilla chips instead of cutlery. I love to have a light lager with it as well (Carlsberg Hof works, or something like Sol or Corona).

A note on nutrition value: corn counts as a grain, so the chili contains complete protein.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 21, 2006, 06:15:43 AM
Laurentia, you are brilliant!

Check out this photo caption - maybe you should send that General Delivery to Jack and Ennis:

http://davecullen.com/forum/index.php?topic=323.msg308771#msg308771

 

 :D That's a great one, even if I like the "say hello to them there space aliens for me" caption for the same picture even better! Ennis' facial expression...  :)


(I think it feels a bit strange to encounter Scandinavians here, too...I've seen a couple of Swedes on the forum, but I think you're the first Danish person I've met here. Are you going to London in September, perhaps?)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 21, 2006, 08:13:29 AM
Guess what I'm eating right now?

BBM-Intern's cherry cake!
After a trip to the American-themed foodshop and a morning of creaming, sifting, and whisking, it's here on my plate! Its looks are a bit disappointing - the cherries are a sickly violet shade and I poked them too far into the batter so they all ended up at the bottom, plus I could have left the cake in the oven for five minutes more. But the taste?
Absolutely one of my top three cake experiences EVER!!! Seriously, I've never had a piece of cake with this moist, velvety texture, and it has a lovely rich flavour that I assume comes from the cherry juice, even if it's not a cherry flavour. A brilliant recipe, I'll definitely save it and I heartly recommend it to everyone else!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on June 21, 2006, 09:19:30 PM
Hi everybody...sorry I've been away so long, but RL tends to get in my way!  I'll be back to talk more about my cookbook idea.  I'm thinking two editions...first one a really easy one with downloads of the existing recipes and then a second, more organized version.

Gotta run...but I'll be back!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 22, 2006, 12:04:40 AM
Guess what I'm eating right now?

BBM-Intern's cherry cake!

wow that's awesome. i suppose it's all gone and you can't take a picture. you could dress up as mrs. twist ;) ::) it sounds delicious. i rarely bake myself, but the cherry cake sounds like it's a winner!

mmm, your chili recipe sounds good too...  i make chili often almost identical to your recipe, adding corn, zucchini, and mushrooms most of the time in addition the beans. i like it HOT. very spicy, with lots of chili powder. i garnish it liberally with onions, green or white, and often sprinkle on apple cider vinegar -- it cuts the heat somewhat, but also seems to bring out the flavors in a nice way.

as a sometimes vegetarian, i want to mention QUINOA, which is unusual in that it's a complete protein! i cook mine with a rice cooker, and use it as a side dish mostly, making a sort of tabuleh salad with garlic, olive oil, parsley, mint, lemon juice, chopped almonds, etc...

here's some info i found:

Although not a common item in most kitchens today, quinoa is an amino acid-rich (protein) seed that has a fluffy, creamy, slightly crunchy texture and a somewhat nutty flavor when cooked. Quinoa is available in your local health food stores throughout the year. Most commonly considered a grain, quinoa is actually a relative of leafy green vegetables like spinach, beets, and Swiss chard.

A recently rediscovered ancient "grain" native to Central America, quinoa was once called "the gold of the Incas," who recognized its value in increasing the stamina of their warriors. Not only is quinoa high in protein, but the protein it supplies is complete protein, meaning that it includes all nine essential amino acids.

Not only is quinoa's amino acid profile well balanced, making it a good choice for vegans concerned about adequate protein intake, but quinoa is especially well-endowed with the amino acid lysine, which is essential for tissue growth and repair.

In addition to protein, quinoa features a host of other health-building nutrients. Because quinoa is a very good source of manganese as well as a good source of magnesium, iron, copper and phosphorous, this "grain" may be especially valuable for persons with migraine headaches, diabetes and atherosclerosis.

Description

We usually think of quinoa as a grain, but it is actually the seed of a plant that, as its scientific name Chenopodium quinoa reflects, is related to beets, chard and spinach. These amino acid-rich seeds are not only very nutritious, but also very delicious. Cooked quinoa seeds are fluffy and creamy, yet slightly crunchy.

They have a delicate, somewhat nutty flavor. While the most popular type of quinoa is a transparent yellow color, other varieties feature colors such as orange, pink, red, purple or black. Although often difficult to find in the marketplace, the leaves of the quinoa plant are edible, with a taste similar to its green-leafed relatives, spinach, chard and beets.

read more here:  www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=142
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: mary on June 22, 2006, 12:10:00 AM
As a most of the time vegetarian, I love quinoa - it's so good for you but I really like the taste - I find it has a more interesting flavor than  rice or couscous.  I love a quinoa salad with roasted vegetables. THe tabuleh made with quinoa sounds great - I may have to try that too,
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 22, 2006, 12:56:16 AM
Another quinoa lover here  :)  I was thinking of mentioning it in an earlier post, but I thought it was a very obscure food that nobody would know about or be able to find! I use it for tabbouleh too, as I like couscous, but I find it gets a bit dry when you eat a lot of it. Quinoa doesn't have that problem.

I was actually planning to take a picture of the cherry cake and post here, but it didn't look as good as I had hoped, so I ate it instead. It's not all gone though, I put half of it in the freezer. Next time I'll look for cherries of a perkier colour and not poke them that deep into the cake, and then it's floral patterned dress and digital camera, I assure you  ;D

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 22, 2006, 02:16:50 AM
A Middle Eastern recipe for marinated chick peas:

2 cans chick peas, drained
1 tbsp puréed peppers - I use ajvar relish, but I don't know how widely available that thing is
1 tbsp tomato purée
1 tsp dried mint
2 garlic cloves, pressed or very finely chopped
1 tbsp white vinegar
3 tbsp olive oil
freshly ground black pepper

Make a thick dressing out of everything and stir in the chick peas. This will keep for at least a couple of days in the fridge, but the peas will harden because of the acid in the vinegar, so make sure they're very soft to start with.

The marinated chick peas might for example be mixed with quinoa, couscous, or rice into a very filling salad. Make a sauce for it by mixing yoghurt with garlic, chopped cucumber, salt, pepper, and cumin, and you get an excellent lunch for a hot day. Add some fresh vegetables if you feel inspired, and some nice, mediterranean-style bread is never wrong.
I think they'd also make a good side dish e g for grilled meat or chicken, or with roast or grilled vegetables and maybe a slab of good feta cheese.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on June 22, 2006, 12:20:23 PM
I'm not a cook and I have no recipes, but I tried something last night that I'd like to share. I have no idea whether it's obvious or not!

I came home from a hike and was hungry, but not overly since I had had a good lunch. I decided to heat up some soup, like Progresso Minestrone. But I wanted something a little heartier, and then I spied a box of quick oatmeal on the shelf. It entered my mind to try something new, so I put a large handful of oatmeal into the soup, with some extra water, and heated it up. The result was delicious! Not that it had much of a oatmeal taste, which would not have been strong to begin with. The oatmeal absorbed the flavors of the vegetables and broth, and it turned out to be just right for the amount of food I wanted at that time. I would imagine that adding oatmeal would be a way to stretch out a bowl of soup to something a little more. What would y'all think about this?

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on June 22, 2006, 04:43:07 PM
think about how many soups have barley in them, fritz. oatmeal is a relatively natural extension of that.  and i used to, in my carb consuming days, add instant mashed potatoes to thicken soup and thereby make a more rib sticking meal.  it might remain a thicker soup, or go all the way to soup flavored mashed potatoes with a big old pool pf butter.

jack
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 26, 2006, 02:06:42 AM
wow oatmeal sounds interesting... i sometimes add seasoned bread crumbs to my gazpacho soup to give it some texture and add some, umm, carbs. ;D

with the jars of premade pasta sauces (i like barilla best) it's easy to add additional ingredients. i often sautee onions and mushroom or bell peppers or zucchini, anything really that works, even sausages, then pour the sauce in the pan and heat it up.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: River girl on June 26, 2006, 02:44:42 AM
Thanks Laurentia and gnash for all the advice concerning vegetarian eating. I will be checking out quinoa, sounds interesting.

Have any of you tried the mini-watermelons that are now available? Great for smaller households and very refreshing in the summer heat. I have practically lived off Nigella Lawson's Watermelon, Feta and Black Olive salad the past few days.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 26, 2006, 04:18:24 AM
mmm, haven't tried the mini watermelons but the salad sounds good! all this mention of feta cheese makes me want to run down to my local deli to buy a block of their bulgarian sheep's milk feta!!

feta is also good in a sandwich --

feta cheese
good olive oil
a good baguette
red or white vinegar
thinly sliced red onions
a few leaves of fresh basil

warm the baguette a bit in the oven, then slice lengthwise. layer feta, basil and onions on one side of the bread, sprinkle liberally with oil and vinegar (you can also use an "italian" dressing), add some freshly grated black pepper, close the sandwich and smoosh it down a bit with your hands.

i like this very much, the salty creaminess of the feta plays off the pungent basil and the crunchiness of the bread -- try using a seeded baguette.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nax on June 26, 2006, 04:31:54 AM
okay this is easy, and vegetarian too. of course, you can add meat -- chicken is nice, slices of breast meat, or even shrimps.

maybe trouts would work, but only if ennis brought some home ;D

you can vary the vegetables in this to your liking -- i'm listing what we had on hand yesterday. also, i used chicken broth, so it's not officially vegetarian at all, but you could use vegetable broth, seaweed broth (made with kombu, a type of seaweed) or just water.

KICK ASS GREEN COCONUT CURRY


Did a variation on this yesterday it was great!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on June 27, 2006, 07:03:51 AM
Is there such a thing as a "Midsummer's Eve" menu?  I was watching "The Girls Next Door" about Hugh Heffner's "girlfriends" who live at the Playboy Mansion.  (I know, I know, my radical feminism went on a vaction once a week for about an hour  :o) and they through a huge pretty stunning looking "Midsummer's Eve" party.

There costumes were stunning too...well except for Kendra who basically wore nipple tassels, but that's a nother story.

Bobbie

I know we always have a St. Hans fest picnic/dinner here w/ a bunch of Norwegians...We also have special foods for syttende mai (Norway's independence day) and so on...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on June 27, 2006, 07:05:21 AM
Ya know?  I think we should pull together a cook book.  What do folks think?

Bobbie (yummo!)

I've thought that would be a GREAT item...sell it in the Forum Store...proceeds go to one of our projects...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 29, 2006, 04:11:23 AM
this is something i made tonight because we had some leftover greens that needed to be used up. it's a lot like the beans and greens they offered at bucca di beppo, an italian chain restaurant here in california.. sadly, it's off their menus, so i had to recreate it at home as it's always been one of my favorites!

BEANS & GREENS

two tbs olive oil
fresh garlic, chopped
one small onion, chopped
about 2 cups of marinara sauce
about a cup or two of chicken broth
six cups or more washed and cut greens
about two cups of white beans of your choice

--> i used mustard and kale, but you could use collard, swiss chard, spinach, etc.. use a lot, for they wilt to nothin' as they cook.
--> the beans can be freshly cooked or canned. if using canned, be sure to drain the beans of the liquid in the can.

sautee the onions and garlic in olive oil until transparent, add the broth and the marinara sauce. use less chicken broth if you want a thicker sauce. i also added a good grating of black pepper and about a half teaspoon of tumeric. when this mixture is boiling, add the greens and cover tightly. cook for a few minutes, give it a stir, and cover again. cook for about 20 minutes. uncover, stir, add the beans, stir again, cover and cook another 10 minutes or so until the greens are tender. check seasonings, but do not over-salt as you will be adding cheese!

spoon into bowls and serve with grated parmesean or romano cheese. this is good with a side of grilled italian sausages & bell peppers, a simple salad.
 
i imagine it would be good with a nice red wine as well. ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on June 29, 2006, 10:34:12 AM

Their potting soil is too rich for good flowering, but the nasturtiums are earning their seed-packet price for the way their nippy leaves liven up bland salad greens.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 29, 2006, 10:12:54 PM
What to do with parsnips

Some nice pasta; fresh linguini is my favourite, but use whatever kind you fancy, fresh or dried, brown or white
Some parsnips; anything from 1 to 3 per person as they differ a lot in size
Some cheese; mozzarella, halloumi, feta, or goat's cheese
Olive oil, salt, freshly ground black pepper, maybe some balsamic vinegar

Boil and drain the pasta (fresh pasta only takes a couple of minutes), plan this so you won't have to keep the pasta warm after it's done.
Cut the parsnips into little bars, an inch or two long and no thicker than 1/2 inch, and fry them in a pan using a generous enough amount of olive oil so they won't stick or get dry. The parsnips should look nice and golden brown and be soft when they're done. Put salt and pepper on them and stir a little so it gets evenly distributed.
If you're using halloumi cheese, cut it into thin slices (about 1/4 inch) and fry them too in olive oil. Other kinds of cheese you just dice or crumble.

With optimal timing, the pasta will be perfectly done NOW. Drain it, put it on a plate (or several plates, or in a bowl, depending on how many people you're cooking for), put the cheese and parsnips on top. Sprinkle some balsamic vinegar on top if you like (might not be a hit with goat's cheese) and maybe some additional pepper and some of that fancy flake salt.

Variations I can think of right now:
Add fried mushrooms, ruccola lettuce (probably called something else in English, I'll find out and change this!), parsley, tomatoes...
Skip the cheese in the dish and serve some really nice cheese for dessert instead, preferably with a glass of wine, of course.
If you use goat's cheese, you can put it in a blender with parsley, a little salt, and a dash of hot water and make a creamy sauce to stir into the hot pasta instead of little cheese pieces.
If you're cooking for more than two people, it might be easier to roast the parsnip using the oven, like the potato wedges that River Girl posted.

----------------------------------------------------

Parsnips are the most underrated and misunderstood vegetable I know, at least in Sweden where it's mostly used in old-fashioned soups where it gets boiled until all the taste is gone, along with a lot of other ingredients that would kill the delicate parsnip even if it hadn't been boiled to death. The parsnip looks rather sad compared to the carrot, but tastes so much better - I'd say the parsnip is to the carrot as the lime fruit is to the lemon. You know, a more aromatic and interesting flavour.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Melisande on June 29, 2006, 10:20:47 PM
Parsnip fan here!

Another thing to do with parsnips: roast them.

Peel, cut into whatever size pieces you like, drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with coarse salt, spread in single layer not touching, roast at 400 until soft and slightly browned, 30 - 45 minutes, maybe.

Yum!

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on June 29, 2006, 11:08:59 PM
hmmm...

i wonder if parsnips roasted this way might be a reduced carb substitute for home fries.  usually i can take the sense memory of foods, spices, and cooking methods and know how something will taste, but i rarely use parsnips, and i never use my oven. 

i do use olive oil  ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on June 30, 2006, 09:47:29 AM
For what it's worth, a table in an old textbook of mine gives roughly the same amount of carbs for parsnips as for potatoes (per 100 g, 17.8 g carbs for potatoes, 14.7 g for parsnips).

Jack, this is an excellent way to use the oven, trust me! My boyfriend and I make oven roasted potatoes-and-parsnips-and-carrots almost every weekend. Some people throw in things like red onions, rootbeets, and fennel too. You could have them with meat, cheese (e. g. feta), or just a sprinkle of balsamic vinegar. It's very easy, but I'm warning you: the pan you use in the oven gets very greasy and sticky and this might cause fights over who has to wash it. At least it does in our household  :P
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 30, 2006, 06:50:22 PM
(http://www.swintonpark.com/images/hotel/nasturtiums.jpg)

nasturtiums are not only lovely to look at, but the leaf and the flowers are indeed a nice addition to salads. kinda peppery. dandilion leaves are also good. here's a small list of edbile flowers: herb flowers, squash blossoms, dandelion, hollyhock, honeysuckle, impatiens, nasturtium, viola, lilac, pansy, sweet pea, rose, orange blossom, carnation, pumpkin blossoms, and begonia.

whole or chopped, flowers can be a nice surprise in a salad, found floating on top of a bowl of (cold?) soup or dressing up a summer drink a dessert.

how wonderful that people appreciate the parsnip! the parsnip pasta sounds great -- the goat cheese sauce too. even cold roasted vegetables are great with a sprinkling of cheese and balsamic vinegar, etc. as desribed. i love how roasting parsnips and carrots brings out their sugars and they sort of do a self-carmelization in the oven.

if you don't want to heat up the house in summertime by firing up 450 degree oven, try cooking the vegetables instead on an outdoor grill,,, eggplant, corn, summer squash and pepper, beets and portabella mushrooms, yum. any leftovers can be chopped and mixed into a pasta salad.

avoid cooking vegetables in aluminum foil packets -- i found that zucchini cooked in foil can render the vegetable inedible!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on June 30, 2006, 08:39:01 PM
i'm never going to break the brits of quoting european standard measurements  ;D

now i have to figure out what 100 g of parsnips looks like...

look what auntie googled up...

of course we will apparently have to post this again from time to time, unless you brits want to translate for us americans when you post.


American standard cup Metric equivalent - approx.
1 tsp.   =     1/6 fl. oz.    =   0.5 cl.       =        5 ml.
1 Tbsp =    1/2 fl. oz.    =   1.5 cl.        =      15 ml.
1 cup   =       8 fl. oz.    =   2.4 dl.        =     240 ml
1 pint   =     16 fl  oz.    =   4.7 dl.        =     470ml. 
1 qt.     =   32 fl. oz.      =   9.5 dl.        =     950ml.
 
British standard cup
1 tsp     =       1/5 fl.oz.  =    0.6 cl.    =           6 ml.
1 Tbsp  =    0.55 fl.oz   =    1.7 cl.     =        17 ml.
1 cup    =      10 fl.oz.   =    2.8 dl.     =       280 ml.
1 pint    =      20 fl.oz.   =    5.7 dl.     =       570 ml.
1 quart  =     40 fl.oz.    =      1.1 l       =    1,100 ml.
1 liter               =       1.06 U.S. quarts 

1 U.S. quart    =        0.95  l.

1 l                   =       10 dl.    = 100 cl.   = 1000 ml.   
1 dl                 =        10 cl.   = 100 ml.

Volume
1/4 tsp.                =          1.25 ml
1/2 tsp.               =             2.5 ml
1 tsp.                  =                5 ml
4 tsp.                  =              20 ml
2 fl. oz. 1/4 cup   =              60 ml
4 fl oz. 1/2 cup    =            125 ml
5 fl. oz. 2/3 cup   =            170 ml
6 fl oz. 3/4 cup    =            190 ml 
8 fl. oz. 1 cup      =            250 ml
16 fl. oz. 2 cups   =           500 ml
32 fl. oz. 4 cups   =             1 liter
1 liter                  =              10 dl 
1/2 liter               =                5 dl 
1/4 liter               =          2 1/2 dl 
1/10 liter             =                1 dl 
3/4 liter               =           71/2 dl 


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on July 01, 2006, 12:15:43 AM
i'm never going to break the brits of quoting european standard measurements  ;D

now i have to figure out what 100 g of parsnips looks like...


Oh, I'm sorry! I could have converted the grams, but I figured that giving the weight percentage of carbs would do  :-[

(I'm not familiar with the low-carb diet, so I'm totally clueless as to its technialities  :P)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: mary on July 01, 2006, 12:19:36 AM
http://www.swintonpark.com/images/hotel/nasturtiums.jpg

nasturtiums are not only lovely to look at, but the leaf and the flowers are indeed a nice addition to salads. kinda peppery. dandilion leaves are also good. here's a small list of edbile flowers: herb flowers, squash blossoms, dandelion, hollyhock, honeysuckle, impatiens, nasturtium, viola, lilac, pansy, sweet pea, rose, orange blossom, carnation, pumpkin blossoms, and begonia.

whole or chopped, flowers can be a nice surprise in a salad, found floating on top of a bowl of (cold?) soup or dressing up a summer drink a dessert.
Nasturtiums fan here!  They go wild in my garden and we eat them often -we add them to salads and use them as we would lettuce on a sandwich - they have more  flavor than most lettuce.


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on July 01, 2006, 08:29:19 AM

Their potting soil is too rich for good flowering, but the nasturtiums are earning their seed-packet price for the way their nippy leaves liven up bland salad greens.


Great idea!
And the blooms too!  Don't forget edible flowers for bite, spice and color in a salad...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on July 01, 2006, 08:31:07 AM
Parsnip fan here!

Another thing to do with parsnips: roast them.

Peel, cut into whatever size pieces you like, drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with coarse salt, spread in single layer not touching, roast at 400 until soft and slightly browned, 30 - 45 minutes, maybe.

Yum!



DING! DING! DING! 

You've got my attention!  Get a bigger pan and put in quartered baby artichokes, halved baby leeks, halved shallots, morels....continue to baste with butter/oil and broth/wine.....

YUM!

(jack, I think the parsnips have more nutritive value than potatoes - even if their carb count is the same.  More fibre too possibly?)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on July 01, 2006, 10:46:42 AM
thats what i need to know, carb minus fiber.  nutrition is negotiable.  i just like a full belly and a happy tongue.

i still don't know what the count is per cup, or whatever.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on July 01, 2006, 01:02:09 PM
... i just like a full belly and a happy tongue....

Me too.  (Smirks.)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on July 01, 2006, 03:50:52 PM
***reads from the inernet***

a 60g serving of parsnips has approx. 3g of fiber

1/2 cup cooked parsnips has 12.04g of carbs.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on July 01, 2006, 08:09:27 PM
***reads from the inernet***

a 60g serving of parsnips has approx. 3g of fiber

1/2 cup cooked parsnips has 12.04g of carbs.
is that as opposed to the outernet?

okay bearing down on the question of the day's answer, lacking critical translation still though.  so a half cup is 12 grams of carbs, how many grams of dietary fiber in the same quantity, since i don't know the ratio of grams to "cups".  if i get a chance tonight, maybe i can track this down for myself too.  thanks all of you.

jack
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: RobsGalPal on July 01, 2006, 09:21:32 PM
Parsnips 1/2 cup slices, boiled

Total carb count = 15.2 g
Dietary Fiber = 3.8 g
Net Carbs = 11.4

If you are only counting Net carbs then subtract the fiber.

 :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on July 01, 2006, 09:36:40 PM
I know this isn't an ice, but it has handed on to me as "Buttermilk Ice."  Couldn't be simple:  Mix until sugar is dissolved:

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on July 01, 2006, 09:53:12 PM
A hot-weather treasure: tart/sweet buttermilk ice.  (I know, it isn't really an ice, but I honor the name by which it was passed on to me):

Mix until sugar is dissolved: 1 C buttermilk
                                      1 C sugar
                                      1 C orange juice 
Freeze in a shallow pan.  Stir once  to smooth it a little, if you like.  Or freeze in a gel machine with a paddle.

Other citrus juices are fine, though sugar may need adjusting.  When I buy buttermilk this week, I'm going to experiment with a glass of sweetened  buttermilk and raspberry puree; if it tastes okay, will try freezing a batch of that.  Sweeta can be subbed for some or all of the sugar, and I think I've even seen a fat-free buttermilk which ought to be all right, since richness isn't an issue here.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on July 02, 2006, 12:33:15 AM
unless i remember incorrectly, buttermilk is made from skim milk anyway.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on July 02, 2006, 12:40:08 AM
Parsnips 1/2 cup slices, boiled  If you are only counting Net carbs then subtract the fiber.
Total carb count = 15.2 g
Dietary Fiber = 3.8 g
Net Carbs = 11.4
thank you sherry.. i knew i could count on you   ;) ;D 

when i am living a physically active lifestyle,  that works at least as well as sweet potatoes.

jack
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: dante on July 02, 2006, 01:00:35 AM
Hey ya'll.  Just wanted to drop in......I'm still here.  Hope everyone's good.  Just cooked up a great salmon last night and had several guests over.  Whole salmon gutted and scaled, stuffed with corn bread stuffing, lemon slices and butter coat the inside of the fish add salt and pepper to taste..  Wrap the whole thing up in double tin foil, and bake at 375 for about an hour on a cookie sheet.  It's great served with a creamy shrimp sauce over the top....looks great too.  Sauce is just simple white sauce with fish stock and diced shrimp, a little tomato paste for color, should be nice and thick like a gravy.  Yummy  There's not that many carbs either, unless you take a double helping of the stuffing.  This is usually served with an array of vegetables, and now during the summer months some great sliced tomatoes in balsamic vinegar, lemon juice, fresh minced garlic, one package of splenda and salt and pepper, a dash of Worcestershire, and those tomatoes are great.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on July 02, 2006, 05:49:31 AM
unless i remember incorrectly, buttermilk is made from skim milk anyway.

buttermilk is what's left after all the butterfat is churned into butter.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on July 02, 2006, 12:31:23 PM
yeah.. like that  ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on July 02, 2006, 05:18:02 PM
Buttermilk: The house-brand I bought from Safeway this morning (the only brand they had) labels it "Cultured Reduced-Fat Buttermilk," which leaves you to wonder whether it's lower-fat because it's buttermilk or because it's been further tinkered with.  Doesn't much matter, I guess.  In any event, I used it with a mix of orange and lemon juices and their grated rinds to make the recipe above; excellent.

Appliance recco: Recently I had to quit cranking a little manual  Donvier ice-cream maker.  I've replaced it with an electric Cuisinart,  used  three times so far, and love it.  Only four pieces, almost casually easy-to-assemble. Lets you watch progress, lets you stop it for a taste-test.  Of course, there's the  disadvantage of having to plan ahead and freeze its container, and it's a noisy rascal - but heck, if you can make do with about a quart-and-a-half, and don't want the backyard salt-and-ice nostalgia thing, it's great!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: trascendenza on July 03, 2006, 11:19:15 PM
Melli directed me over here, so I thought I'd share a recipe that I made for my fellow Brokeback-ians on June 11th for our pre-BBM dinner.

It's not an exact recipe because I sort of came up with it on the fly one day, but here's what it is roundabouts:

Tahini-crusted tofu

Firm or extra firm tofu (best to press the liquid out of it if you have time)
Tahini + soy sauce
Optional to add in some powdered ginger and toasted sesame seed oil, as well

Cut the tofu into 1 1/2 by 1 1/2 inch pieces, about 1/2 an inch thick (just a guideline, not exact, I've made it all sorts of different sizes before).

The tahini and soy sauce should form a pretty thick paste.  You want to add in enough soy sauce to change the color of the tahini, maybe a ratio of 3 parts tahini to 1 part soy sauce?  Not totally sure of the amount as I usually just eyeball it.

It should taste really salty--a lot of this flavor cooks out, so if it tastes too salty, it's probably right.  Coat the tofu in the paste, marinate for awhile (doesn't have to be long, this step is optional), and then fry at a medium-high to high temperature depending on what kind of crust you want to make. (Higher temperatures will form a crispier crust, lower temps you can brown it more and have less chance of burning, but too low and the crust won't form.)

I actually use Liquid Aminos instead of soy sauce, myself, which isn't as salty as regular soy sauce.

Be sure to have lots of rice with this tofu, it's salty, but good.  At least that's what they said at dinner :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on July 04, 2006, 05:40:28 PM
sheera, your tofu recipe sounds like a good dish to liven up the brown rice. tahini encrusted salmon is good too, and it's prepared just about the same way.

here is something i got in an email, it's about ice cream... since it's the 4th, i suspect many of you might be enjoying a cold dish of the stuff today. just be glad it isn't this particular brand:

Hot ice cream comes with a warning
 
ANGIER, N.C. -- This ice cream comes with an unusual stipulation — customers must sign a waiver before tasting it because it's so hot. Cold Sweat, a flavor sold at ice cream shop Sunni Sky's, is made with three kinds of pepper and two kinds of hot sauce.
 
"It tastes like fire — with a side of fire," said Scott McCallum, a regular customer, who was eating the more sedate butter pecan flavor.
 
"I thought it was a cool idea, but I didn't think he'd make it that hot," McCallum said of proprietor Scott Wilson.
 
Wilson started out experimenting with jalapenos in vanilla ice cream to appeal to Hispanic customers — which was unsuccessful — and worked his way up to Cold Sweat. The waiver for the fiery mixture has dozens of signatures. Pregnant women and people with health problems are not supposed to eat it. Anyone younger than 18 needs the consent of a guardian.
 
Among the first to try Cold Sweat was Justin Smith, 22, an Angier woodworker. He went to the restroom and vomited after a spoonful. He's had about five samples since, and wants to go for the record of 14 ounces in a sitting.
 
"It's got a good flavor," Smith said. "As someone who really likes hot stuff and doesn't mind being scorched, I can taste the difference, and it really does taste good."
 
If he doesn't get the record soon, he might not get a chance. Wilson isn't sure he'll make another batch after the current supply runs out.


i'll stick with black pepper ice cream... or mango popsicles with chili powder. ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on July 04, 2006, 09:51:39 PM
Speaking of mango, here's a question I've been meaning to ask all you well-informed people:

How can you tell whether a mango is ripe? I love mango, but am often disappointed because it turns out to be hard and sour even though it looked nice on the surface. (And that might be the only similarity between mangos and humans  :))
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on July 04, 2006, 10:07:09 PM

...How can you tell whether a mango is ripe? I love mango, but am often disappointed because it turns out to be hard and sour even though it looked nice on the surface..

If you need to use it right away, a gentle but guilty squeeze may be the only reliable test, as they seem to come in different colors regardless of ripeness.  But if you don't need mango that very evening, take it home and let it ripen out on the counter, fondling it to your heart's content. They have just a bit of "give" when they're ripe. 

Proximity to apples seems to speed ripening for some fruits and might work on mangoes, but they come along pretty quickly on their own. anyway.

P.S.:  Do you really like mangoes?  I buy them once in a while for the hell of it, but must confess I don't enjoy the fruit on its own, the way I enjoy, for example, a peach.  For me, they're in the same category as artichokes and Cornish game hens: partly for show and more trouble than they're worth.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on July 04, 2006, 10:35:35 PM
Thanks for the advice, Castro!

I do like mangoes! I don't buy them very often, though, both because they're relatively expensive and because of the difficulties to know if they're ready to eat. Sometimes I buy one thinking I'll put it in a fruit salad or something, but I end up eating it on its own because it feels like I'd waste it if I mixed it with other stuff. Mango has such a complex taste, I love that. To me, it's the ultimate fruit.
Love lime, too, its taste has the same kind of complexity, I think.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on July 04, 2006, 11:13:56 PM
i will vote with laurentia on that.  i am delighted that the mangoes from two different trees will be as different as two wines in the mix of subtle flavors.  beyond mango chutney, most of mine are eaten directly over the sink, gnawing the fibrous residue off the cuttlebone like seed after eating the ready flesh, sticky juices running down my face.

i have often been disappointed when buying mangoes from supermarkets.  many never ripen properly going from unripe to overripe-rotting with no warning, and those that are servicable never compare to those right off the tree.  my favorite way to purchase is from front yard stands set up by most people with a tree or two.  they often sell this way because there are so MANY fruits at once.  vegetable stands run a close second.  it is beyond delightful to have one on your own property from which to pluck one fresh.

and laurentia, you forgot carambola, star fruit, another back yard winner.  i much prefer key limes to persian for complexity and subtlety of taste.

is it any wonder i love living in tropical climes?         
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on July 04, 2006, 11:31:32 PM
lol, cornish game hens. maybe people would like them more if they were boneless, they are quite tedious!

mmmmmmm, mangos and papaya and pineapple and bananas... all the tropical sugary fruit is great. my favorite fruit salads combine all of those with yogurt on top, and a sprinkling of toasted coconut... but here is a simple relish using mango and lime that is a great topper for fish steamed in banana leaves, or baked in parchment paper. this is good with hot or cold grilled chicken breast too.

MANGO RELISH

flesh of one large ripe mango, finely chopped
one small red/orange bell pepper, chopped
one tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
two stalks green onion, chopped
a little bit of chopped cilantro
the juice of one large lime
freshly grated pepper
a pinch of sea salt
one tsp honey

combine everything in a bowl and check seasonings. cover and refrigerate to allow flavors to blend.

--> add grated ginger if you wish, or finely minced jalapeno peppers for a spicier version.

--> subsitute the mango with chopped firm peaches, or add cinnamon. be creative! 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on July 05, 2006, 07:33:40 AM
Jack, you have a mango tree? You're so lucky, it sounds wonderful! I've never even seen one in my life.

Carambola - I seriously didn't know those were supposed to have a taste. I've sampled some over the years, but they were just watery. I suppose those lucky people in the tropics keep the best fruits for themselves and sell us northern barbarians their leftovers.  :-\  ;)

Gnash, the mango relish sounds glorious...I think it's time to go mango-hunting again.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on July 05, 2006, 08:32:32 AM
Jack, you have a mango tree? You're so lucky, it sounds wonderful! I've never even seen one in my life.

Carambola - I seriously didn't know those were supposed to have a taste. I've sampled some over the years, but they were just watery. I suppose those lucky people in the tropics keep the best fruits for themselves and sell us northern barbarians their leftovers.  :-\  ;)

Gnash, the mango relish sounds glorious...I think it's time to go mango-hunting again.
laurentia..
there may be a certain amount of "cherry picking", but i suspect it is the shipping and handling, not to mention the premature harvesting that causes the inferiority of the product.  star fruit is nature's sweet-tart, if you are familiar with those candies.

i don't currently have a mango tree, but i have had on several occasions.  one place i lived in florida had a mango tree and a big honeybell orange tree.  at some point you will have to go through a real fruit shipper, hang the expense, just once to know what you are missing.  maybe when i get situated i can do it from that end for you.  i believe that most shippers are up to international shipping, barring legal complications.
 added: oh i have pics of mangoes about to become ripe on the tree from my recent visit. send me your email and i will show you them.   
       
jack
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on July 07, 2006, 12:24:49 PM
i done started another thread..." HOW MUCH DOES IT COST ? "

check it out, see if it interests you.

http://davecullen.com/forum/index.php?topic=11053.0

jack
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on July 08, 2006, 02:02:32 AM
I was googling "cilantro" to find out what it is (we use "coriander" for both the leaves and the dried spice), as I'm very tempted to try that mango relish. I found a fervent anti-cilantro community: http://www.ihatecilantro.com/! Among other things, they have a discussion forum and a page with anti-cilantro haikus, such as these:

"Happy is the day
Salsa runs free with no green
No more oppression."

"see despair afloat
hear the cry of scared children
caused by cilantro"

 :D  Well, more cilantro left for me, then!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on July 08, 2006, 02:23:57 AM
A very refreshing fruit salad/punch; serve it in glasses.

Some fruit; original recipe says 1 bunch of grapes, 2 kiwi fruits and 1 mango
A handful of lemon balm or mint leaves
1 red chili pepper, remove the seeds
Juice of 1 lime
Some pineapple juice (slighlty less than 1 liter/2 pints)
Lemonade (Sprite, 7up or similar)

Chop fruit, herbs and chili, put in a bowl and pour lime and pineapple juice over it. The fruit should be entirely covered by juice. Keep in the fridge until serving, ladle into glasses and fill them up with chilled lemonade. The combination of fizziness and chili gives this fruit salad an unusual bite which I find nearly addictive.
I think it'd also be great with some kind of alcohol to substitute part of the juice, maybe Sourz Pineapple or just plain vodka, but I haven't tried that yet.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on July 08, 2006, 05:04:23 AM
laurentia,    omg, how funny about the anti-cilantro community! i have two friends how abhor the stuff. i mean, reaaaly hate it, one made a huge scene at a restaurant, holding his hands up in the air like he was being held up, pushing his chair away from the table with a start as if the herb was going to attack him. ::)   i'm with you, more for us!!! many complain of the "soapy" taste, but to me it's just another complex layering of flavor, and many foods wouldn't be the same without cilantro~!

your fruit salad/punch with mango sounds good, and reminds me of the drink they serve at the guatemalen restaurants here in town. they don't use soda, or sprite, etc... it's just fruit (they use apples too) and juices, with some water and sugar, i suspect. it's very refreshing!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nax on July 10, 2006, 08:48:39 AM
I have great dip using coriander (Cilantro)

3 cloves of garlic - crushed
1 teaspoon of salt
6 tablespons of Tahini (Sesame seed paste) if you can't get this smooth peanut butter will do
1 half liter of plain yogurt
bunch of chopped coriander leaves (note all the flavour is in the leaf so discard the stems)

Combine above and leave in the refrigerator overnight - easy and scrummy
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: speedskater on July 10, 2006, 09:58:54 AM
My (warren's) banana bread I bake on Saturday nights usually:
3 ripe bananas (spotted condition-sweet)

1/2 cup non-hydrogenated lard (tenderflake brand is one-not sure about crisco)
1 cup sugar

mash these up with a potato masher

then add:

2 cups all purpose organic flour
3 slightly beaten eggs
pinch of salt
1 teaspoon of baking powder
4 tblesps of milk

you can add chocolate chips or walnuts if ya like

I use two pyrex bread pans and divide the bread batter between 'em

lick the bowl!!!  ::) ::) ::)

Oven at @450 max..takes 30 minutes or so...no peeking...
generally the top splits and when its golden brown...the heat continues to cook the bread while its cooling on the counter...I leave it overnight in the air...and it slices better.

I have not used tin pans...as I don't grease the pyrex

I also like to hear about baked scalloped potatoes: please share.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on July 11, 2006, 01:03:17 PM
I also like to hear about baked scalloped potatoes: please share.

Woohoo, a request! Sadly, I've never had any success with scalloped potatoes myself; it seems that no matter how long I leave them in the oven, the potatoes will still be too hard  :(
I tend to just make potato wedges instead.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: speedskater on July 12, 2006, 02:59:52 PM
LOL ...yumm scalloped potatoes...  :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on July 13, 2006, 10:12:29 AM
... Sadly, I've never had any success with scalloped potatoes myself; it seems that no matter how long I leave them in the oven, the potatoes will still be too hard  :(
I tend to just make potato wedges instead.
I wonder if this is one of those cases in which you might give the potato slices a kick-start in the microwave, and then assemble the dish and finish it in the oven?  (No, I don't "bake" potatoes in the microwave - but when, for example, I'm making soup in the crockpot I generally give the carrots a brief zap so they finish around the same time as the other ingredients.)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on July 14, 2006, 10:16:13 AM
are your taters hard? you could certainly boil them first, allow them to cool, and then slice them and layer them in the pan with the other ingredients (lot and lots of butter and cream and cheese!)...  that would cut down on cooking time as well as insure soft potatoes! still, a proper recipe should create a wonderfully soft dish, the key, i think, is to saturate the potatoes with the good stuff.

ok so i love eating escalloped potatoes for their richness, but prefer to cook something simpler, like thinly sliced red or gold yukon potatoes with goat cheese, slivers of dried apricot, and brushings of olive oil... or goat cheese and oil cured olives and green onions, maybe bits of cooked bacon... all arranged in a few thin layers and baked uncovered in a pie or tart dish at 375F until done. herbs can be parsley, dill, tarragon, thyme, rosemary... anything really, and sea salt and freshly cracked pepper. i've even thrown frozen peas in the mix... this is good hot or cold. damn, now i'm hungry...

ugh, i'm not supposed to enjoy white potatoes! ;D or any nightshade vegetable for that matter. and i LOVE eggplant, shooo.. http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=62
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on July 15, 2006, 08:40:57 AM
got this from a box of pasta years ago and it's so quick and easy. let me just say that imported durum semolina (or whatever it is) pasta is great, there's something different about it, better flavor, texture. go italian~! barilla and dececco are my favorite, readily available brands. for this recipe try using a thin, quick cooking pasta, to go with the paper-thin zucchini.

SPICY ZUCCHINI PASTA with MILK


^ Am eating this right now! I made a budget version using stuff I had at home - regular spaghetti instead of a really thin variety, and cheddar cheese instead of some Italian type - but it's not bad at all even with those alterations. Next time I make it I'll use spaghettini, though, I love thin pasta. So enormously simple and quick, too. Thanks for sharing this back when, gnash!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on July 15, 2006, 12:08:27 PM
Chunky Blueberry Sauce, from Barbara Kafka cookbook.  World's easiest.  Put a pint of blueberries and 3T sugar in a four-cup glass container.  Cover tightly with plastic wrap.  Cook at 100% for 3 minutes.

I tried one batch using Sweeta instead of sugar; don't think it thickened as much; may try a half-and-half mixture next.  Great blueberry flavor.  Freezes well.

BTW: have you spotted those white plastic replacement lids with the Ball canning supplies?  Great for storing opened jars in the refrigerator, and for freezing. 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: speedskater on July 16, 2006, 11:36:27 AM
Great tips on the scalloped potatoes...will try this for sure. Yes the Blueberries are now out for 2006. Stay young ...eat blueberries  :o.
The cherries were nice this year too...well in my neck of the woods I am impatiently waiting for the apricots, strawberries and raspberries. My freezer looks bored. That'll change quick.  ::)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on July 17, 2006, 05:01:29 AM
SPICY ZUCCHINI PASTA with MILK

^ Am eating this right now! I made a budget version using stuff I had at home - regular spaghetti instead of a really thin variety, and cheddar cheese instead of some Italian type - but it's not bad at all even with those alterations. Next time I make it I'll use spaghettini, though, I love thin pasta. So enormously simple and quick, too. Thanks for sharing this back when, gnash!

oh yay i'm happy!! try it also with a hard cheese, or asiago or something tangier than cheddar. you might like mitzithra, a great greek cheese made from goat's milk which is a nice contrast to the mild milk and zucchini flavors.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on July 17, 2006, 05:21:57 AM
oh my gourd... i've always loved this drink, available in mexican restaurants around los angeles. yesterday i decided to make some -- our cantaloupe was getting moldy and a little too soft on one end! poor thing! we forgot it was in that bag. anyway. it's very refreshing and perfect for summer. i love melons and posted an easy recipe for orange melon balls with black pepper and port wine earlier on the thread, but this is even easier. also, the stuff at the restaurants, scooped out of big glass five gallon containers, which are usually sitting on ice, is almost always too sweet for my tastes. if you make it at home you can control the sweetness. the pale orange color is great and looks nice sitting in tall glasses decorated with a lime wedge!

AGUA de MELON

one nicely sized ripe cantaloupe or a tuscan melon
about a half gallon of purified or distilled water
about 1/3 cup white sugar or brown sugar
the juice of one lime, plus some slices

seed the melon, remove rind, and cut into chunks. place melon in a tall container in batches and puree with water and sugar (about 2 cups melon to 2 cups water plus some sugar) with a hand blender until smooth. repeat this process until all the melon is pureed. you can use a blender for this as well.

when it's done, pour the mixture into a big container. glass is nice... then add the rest of the water. stir in the lime juice, adjust sweetness by adding more or less sugar. then cover and refrigerate until cool. serve in a tall glass decorated with a lime wedge if you want! haha!

---> you can strain the melon mixture through a sieve to produce a smoother drink, but i rather like the texture.

---> try this with other fruit, such as pineapple or strawberries. you may want to strain certain fruit, to get rid of seeds.

---> i don't know how long this keeps, but the sugar and fruit combo might not last too long, so be certain to empty the jug!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on July 18, 2006, 06:11:56 AM
ugh, i'm not supposed to enjoy white potatoes! ;D or any nightshade vegetable for that matter. and i LOVE eggplant, shooo.. http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=62

AND to add insult to injury....if you have latex allergies, nightshade veggies can exacerbate the symptoms and even increase sensitivity (and vice versa)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on July 18, 2006, 06:26:20 AM
...then i will never again wrap my potato in latex! ;) ;D  but yeah my hands itch when i wear latex gloves. dang.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on July 18, 2006, 07:00:25 AM
I am not going to even ask why/when you are wearing latex gloves...
 ::) ::) ::) :o :o!!

jimmy, you might want to get tested for latex allergies...they can escalate rapidly and without warning - one minute you're itching, the next your throat is closing up!  (Do you have a neoprene mouse pad?  It can cause a rash/blisters on your hand too.....)

 :-*
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on July 18, 2006, 07:32:53 AM
IJSE -- the gloves are for PAINTING!~ ;)  the pad? my guess it's neoprene, no adverse reactions from it!  knock on... rubber!

this is a good drink:

ROSE or ORANGE BLOSSOM WATER

one gallon of purified or distilled water
rose or orange blossom essence for cooking (available in some grocery stores or a middle eastern market; it comes in little bottles)
a nice big glass or ceramic pitcher or something

mix in one or two teaspoons, or a splash, of the rosewater essence into the water. place in non-reactive container and keep chilled. if you want, throw some rose petals into the pitcher as well. hell, why not.

i like this much better than plain water. i served this to some very thirsty construction workers one hot summer day and they raised an eyebrow and said something in spanish that i did not understand, then they all laughed. but i left a 3 gallon insulated cooler of the stuff out there, and by the time they got off, it was drained.

the next morning one of them came up asking about the "special water."  ;D

---> you can also place this in a squirter bottle and mist yourself with it on a hot summer day to help keep cool. use distilled water if you do this so your nozzle won't clog. apparently the rose essence is good for your skin. use only food grade rose essence, not the essential oils, if you're going to drink the stuff too.


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on July 18, 2006, 12:24:15 PM
IJSE -- the gloves are for PAINTING!~ ;)  the pad? my guess it's neoprene, no adverse reactions from it!  knock on... rubber!

this is a good drink:

ROSE or ORANGE BLOSSOM WATER

one gallon of purified or distilled water
rose or orange blossom essence for cooking (available in some grocery stores or a middle eastern market; it comes in little bottles)
a nice big glass or ceramic pitcher or something

mix in one or two teaspoons, or a splash, of the rosewater essence into the water. place in non-reactive container and keep chilled. if you want, throw some rose petals into the pitcher as well. hell, why not.

i like this much better than plain water. i served this to some very thirsty construction workers one hot summer day and they raised an eyebrow and said something in spanish that i did not understand, then they all laughed. but i left a 3 gallon insulated cooler of the stuff out there, and by the time they got off, it was drained.

the next morning one of them came up asking about the "special water."  ;D

---> you can also place this in a squirter bottle and mist yourself with it on a hot summer day to help keep cool. use distilled water if you do this so your nozzle won't clog. apparently the rose essence is good for your skin. use only food grade rose essence, not the essential oils, if you're going to drink the stuff too.
how cool.  never would have thought of that, and i abhor plain water.  i love that you can mist with it as well, and i have markets nearby that sell both.

jack
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on July 18, 2006, 11:25:29 PM
jack

you can also make those rose scented cloudy/clear gelatin cubes, which are good with fresh fruit cocktail and a little sweetened condensed milk, toasted coconut.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on July 19, 2006, 08:51:34 PM
*Martha's Way* vs *Muriel's Way*


Stuff a miniature marshmallow in the bottom of a sugar cone to prevent ice cream drips.

   Just suck the ice cream out of the bottom of the cone, for Pete's sake! You are probably lying on the couch with your feet up eating it, anyway!

To keep potatoes from budding, place an apple in the bag with the potatoes.

   Buy Hungry Jack mashed potato mix , keep it in the pantry for up to a year.

When a cake recipe calls for flouring the baking pan, use a bit of the dry cake mix instead and there won't be any white mess on the outside of the cake.

   Go to the bakery! They'll even decorate it for you.

If you accidentally over salt a dish while it's still cooking, drop in a peeled potato and it will absorb the excess salt for an instant "fix-me-up."

   If you over salt a dish while you are cooking, that's too bad. Please recite with me the real woman's motto: "I made it and you will eat it and I don't care how bad it tastes!"

Wrap celery in aluminium foil when putting in the refrigerator and it will keep for weeks.

   Celery? Never heard of it!

Brush some beaten egg white over pie crust before baking to yield a beautiful glossy finish.

   The Mrs. Smith frozen pie directions do not include brushing egg whites over the crust so I don't.

Cure for headaches: take a lime, cut it in half and rub it on your forehead. The throbbing will go away.

   Take a lime, mix it with tequila, chill and drink!

If you have a problem opening jars, try using latex dishwashing gloves. They give a non-slip grip that makes opening jars easy.

   Go ask that very cute neighbour if he can open it for you.

Don't throw out all that leftover wine. Freeze into ice cubes for future use in casseroles and sauces.

   Leftover wine?? ?? ??  HELLO !!!!!!!

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on July 22, 2006, 12:50:45 AM
Hey ya'll!!   Fritz totally busted me for putting up recipes on the Lovesick Diet thread and not sharing them here!  LOL!  Trying to put up one a day to help keep us focused.  Hope you enjoy!!!
gnash-- Martha vs. Muriel-- LMAO!!


Here's my recipe for Broccoli Salad.  I took it to a party on July 4th and got lots of compliments.  Then I made another batch for home and polished it off too!!!

Prep time 20 minutes


Salad Ingredients

2  cups broccoli florets (raw)
1/4 cup thinly sliced red onion ( I use Vidalia- not as strong as red)
1  tablespoon sunflower seed kernels
2  slices bacon, cooked crisp and crumbled ( microwave does this great, very little fat left)


Dressing Ingredients

1/4 cup light mayo
1  teaspoon olive oil
2  tablespoons cider vinegar
2 tablespoons splenda

Mix salad ingredients together in a large bowl.  Whisk dressing ingredients together in small bowl, pour over salad and mix thoroughly.  Cover and refrigerate at least 2 hours, overnight is even better!!!  Makes 2 servings. I multiplied by 10 to make a huge batch!!

per serving--Calories: 212, Fat: 17g (ouch, that's a little high :-\), Protein: 3g, Carbs: 12g, Fiber: 3g, cholesterol: 18mg, Sodium: 483mg.


Parmesan Vegetable Stir-Fry
Prep Time 15 minutes


1 Tablespoon Olive Oil
1/2 onion, thinly sliced (vidalia for me)
1 clove garlic, chopped (oh come on 1?  more like 4!)
1/2 cup fresh sliced mushrooms (I always use more)
1 cup fresh spinach ( I use more spinach too)
1 Tablespoon Lemon Juice
2 Tablespoons Parmesan Cheese (I use the good stuff, in block then shaved)

Saute' onion and garlic in olive oil until soft.  Add mushrooms and cook until done.  Add spinach, toss well and saute' very, very briefly.  Sprinkle on lemon juice adn Parmesan Cheese.  Serve hot.

Makes one serving.  Add shrimp or chicken for a one dish meal.

Calories: 275, Carbs: 22g, Protein: 8g, Fat 17 gm (reduce cheese to lower fat), Sat Fat: 0g (good), Fiber 6gm (excellent), cholesterol: 10 mg, sodium: 1189 mg (the cheese?)

Here's my recipe for today.  The serving size says 3 but it serves 5/6.  But it's great leftover after the flavors mesh over night.

EASY FRITTATA

Prep Time: 15 minutes

1/2 lb 93% lean ground beef
1 tablespoon butter (I leave this out)
2 cups sliced mushrooms (or more)
1/2 onion, chopped (about 1 cup, vidalia, what else?)
2 teaspoon Worchestershire sauce
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder (I use fresh, crushed)
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon dried parsley flakes
2 cups chopped fresh spinach (or more)
4 large eggs (or eggbeaters)
1/4 cup skim milk
1/2 cup shredded Parmesan cheese


Spray skillet with non-stick cooking spray.  Add ground beef, mushrooms, and onion; cook over medium heat (6-8 minutes) or until onion is tender, breaking up beef.  Add Worchestershire sauce and seasonings.  Cook until meat is no longer pink.

Stir spinach into meat mixture.  Push mixture to one side of pan.  Beat eggs with skim milk and pour into other side of pan, cook, without stirring, 1 to 2 minutes or until set on the bottom.  Lift eggs to allow uncooked portion to flow underneath. Repeat until softly set.  Gently stir into meat mixture and heat through.  Stir in cheese.

Makes 3 servings (more like 6)
Calories: 384, Carbs: 16gm, Protein 33gm, Fat 21gm (less w/no butter), Sat Fat 10gm (less w/no butter), fiber 4g, cholesterol:  356mg, Sodium: 1176mg.


This recipe is delicious!!  I know it's summer and boiling hot outside....


French Onion Soup
Cook time: 1 hour
Prep time: 1 hour

4 tablespoons butter  (I use only 2)
4 cups onions, thinly sliced (vidalia 2-3 of 'em)
2 cups sliced mushrooms (or more)
1 1/2 tablespoons flour
6 cups beef broth (I use the stuff from the grocery Swansons?)
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1/2 cup brandy (or cooking sherry)
1/2 teaspoon kitchen bouquet seasoning (never have put this in)


On the stovetop, in a soup pot, melt the butter and add the onions, stirring constantly (I don't think so!). Cook for 15 -20 minutes, or until soft.

When the onions are soft, add mushrooms, cook 2 minutes and sprinkle them with flour.  Stir and add 2 cups of beef broth.  Continue to stir until the mixture is thickened.  Add the remaining broth, and stir in salt and pepper and brandy (or sherry).  Bring to a boil.  Cover and simmer 45 minutes.  Taste for seasonings and correct if necessary. 

Makes 6 (1 1/3 cup) servings

Calories: 199, Carbs: 15gm, protein 4gm, fat: 8.gm (less if you use half the amount of butter), Sat Fat: 6g (ditto), Fiber 3gm, Cholesterol: 21mg, Sodium: 1735mg (less if you use low sodium broth).

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on July 23, 2006, 09:05:41 AM
Littledarlin, I had the primary ingredients on hand, so I've just mixed a batch of your broccoli salad posted above. My only change was the substitution of rice vinegar, simply because I wanted to finish the bottle.  Oh, and regular mayo.  Like you, I used sweet onion.  Yep, it's gonna be tasty!

BTW, with the omission of the bacon and the addition of raisins, this would be similar to a deli salad I've bought once or twice.  Since I regard broccoli as an obligation, not a pleasure, it's always nice to find recipes that include but subdue it.

I want to second your comment about using the microwave for bacon. It's far and away the best method for cooking this fatty meat.  I have a grooved platter for the job, so the fat drains into the hollows, but any sort of rack (like the ones that come with microwave steamers) should do. 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on July 24, 2006, 07:57:11 AM
at pomodoro they have a great side dish of brussels sprouts in browned garlic sage butter... it's easy to make at home! i make it as a side dish to accompany a simple pasta dish, like spaghetti in browned garlic butter and mizithra cheese. homer's favorite, LOL.

BRUSSELS SPROUTS in sage/garlic buttah!

fresh brussels sprouts with ends cut off and loose leaves removed, about 20
garlic, fresh sage leaves, sea salt, freshly grated pepper, butter/olive oil
a pan big enough so all the sprouts will fit inside in a single layer

place sprouts in lightly salted boiling water, cook for about 5 minutes, drain well, then place in pan with about 2 tbs of butter and 2 finely chopped cloves of garlic. sprinkle with salt and freshly grated black pepper, and allow to cook for about 10 minutes on low-ish heat. i like to cook them a while so they are tender... roll them around every so often. the butter should not burn or the garlic get too browned. then, add the sage, turn up the heat a bit, and toss around until it's all browned a bit... serve.

i've made this with olive oil and it's almost as good. it's even good without the sage. ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on July 25, 2006, 07:03:03 AM
BRUSSELS SPROUTS in sage/garlic buttah!
i've made this with olive oil and it's almost as good. it's even good without the sage. ;)

Jimmy, that's because brussels sprouts rock.  Thanks for this great recipe!

(my kids are going to hate me now!  hahahaha!  another way to cook these little beasties....)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Lola on July 25, 2006, 07:09:27 AM
I love them, I just printed this off!  :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on July 25, 2006, 08:39:18 AM
yay, haha.. i'm glad i'm not getting pelted with "EWWWWWW BRUSSELS SPROUTS -- bleeechh!!!"  ;D :D ::)

my bf is not so fond of the little cabbagey things, but he'll eat them. last night he insisted on leaving ONE on his plate. in protest. ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on July 26, 2006, 10:21:04 AM
Littledarlin, I think your broccoli salad recipe (#257 above) is a keeper.  As I mentioned, I substituted rice vinegar, but the basic idea was the same.  Oh, and I didn't have sunflower seeds either, so for one serving I threw in some walnuts at the last minute (they'll get soggy otherwise), and for another, a few raisins to see if that's basically like the deli recipe (it is).  While I doubt that  even a sweet dressing like this would take the blight off Brussels sprouts (beauty is as beauty does), it would probably work with some other vegetables. 

And the basic recipe would look nice with sliced or slivered carrots added, wouldn't it?

So: thank you!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on July 26, 2006, 09:07:22 PM
i posted a broccoli salad a while back, but it uses a store bought asian dressing, which is sweet and probably has rice vinegar as an ingredient.  it uses almonds instead of sunflower seeds, and no bacon, but it does have raisins in it! ;)

http://davecullen.com/forum/index.php?topic=8751.msg300522#msg300522
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nax on July 27, 2006, 02:28:55 AM
yay, haha.. i'm glad i'm not getting pelted with "EWWWWWW BRUSSELS SPROUTS -- bleeechh!!!"  ;D :D ::)

my bf is not so fond of the little cabbagey things, but he'll eat them. last night he insisted on leaving ONE on his plate. in protest. ;D
Oh we love sprouts over here mine are on boiling for Christmas dinner already!!! (the joke is the Brits overcook sprouts until they are a mush - yuk)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on July 27, 2006, 06:48:52 PM
I'm copying these and I forgot to mention that I put raisins in my broccoli salad even though this recipe didn't call for it.  The walnuts sound delicious!!  And all I had was honey roasted sunflower seeds but no one noticed!!



Here's a couple of recipes.  I personally hate blue cheese but everyone who has made this dip raves about it!!

Blue Cheese Dip

Prep time: 5 minutes
Chilling Time:  at least 1 hour


4 ounces crumbled blue cheese
8 ounces light (Neufchatel) cream cheese,  softened
2 tablespoons light mayo
1/4 cup light sour cream
1 clove garlic, mashed
1 tblspoon fresh chives, snipped
1 tblspoon fresh parsley, snipped
2 tsp lemon pepper seasoning
1/8 tsp hot pepper sauce
3 tblspoon fat free half and half


Beat all ingredients together completely, and chill at least one hour. Serve with a selection of raw vegetables.

Makes about 2 cups of dip, or 16 (2 tablespoon) servings

Calories: 73, Fat: 6g, Saturated Fat: 3.5g, protein: 3g, carbs: 2g, fiber 0g, cholesterol: 18mg, sodium: 240 mg.


Spicy Chili Pork Chops

Prep time: 25 minutes


4 boneless pork chops, (4 ounces each)

Rub:

1/2 tbls salt
1/2 tbls cumin
1/2 tbls black pepper
1/2 tbls chili powder
1 tbls  paprika
1/2 tbls garlic powder
1/2 tbls ground ginger

Trim fat from pork chops.  Mix all spices together.  Rub the spice mixture into all sides of the meat.  Broil or grill 10-15 minutes on each side or until done.

Serves 4

calories: 219, Carbs: 4gm, protein: 14gm, Fat: 14gm, sat fat:  2.5 gm, fiber: 0gm, cholesterol: 2 mg, sodium: 1652mg.


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on July 28, 2006, 11:22:11 PM
Here's a recipe for a lighter taco salad.  Enjoy

California Taco Salad

1 small head iceberg (yuck!) or romaine lettuce (yum, much better choice) chopped, about 6 cups
1 15oz can black or red beans (I like black), drained
1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese
1 Avocado, diced
1 mango or 2 tomatoes, diced
1/3 cup  sliced black olives, drained
1/2 lb cooked chicken or lean ground beef, seasoned with salt and chili powder
1 Tbs lime juice
1/2 cup vinaigrette dressing
1 cup broken tortilla chips or corn kernels
Light Sour Cream (optional)
Mild Salsa (optional)


In a large bowl, mix together lettuce, beans, cheese, avocado, mango or tomatoes, olives, and chicken.  Sprinkle with lime juice and vinaigrette and toss thoroughly.  Top salad if desired with sour cream and salsa.

Serves 6-8.  Calories:  280, protein: 25g , carbs: 24g, fat: 10g, Sat Fat: 3g, cholesterol: 55mg, fiber: 7g, sodium: 210mg



And for dessert.......


Angel Food Trifle

Makes 6 servings

1 cup skim milk ricotta cheese
2 cups no-sugar vanilla flavored yogurt
1/2 angel food cake, cut into 1" cubes
2 cups thawed frozen unsweetened berries (or fresh, if in season)
1/4 cup + 2 Tbsp whipped dessert topping

Mix together ricotta cheese and yogurt in a blender/food processor until smooth.  Arrange half of the cake cubes in the bottom of a medium sized glass bowl.  Top with one cup of the berries.  Top with 1 1/2 cups of the cheese/yogurt mixture.  Top with layers of remaining cake cubes, 3/4 cup berries, and the remaining cheese/yogurt mixture.  Decorate with the remaining 1/4 cup berries.  Top each with 1 tbsp whipped topping.

Sorry no calorie amounts, this is a Weight Watchers recipe, counts for 5 points.  Makes 6 servings.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: jack on July 29, 2006, 02:03:56 AM
god i love my own cooking... which accounts for part of my weight battle.

tonight my staples supply is low again, time to shop, so i set out a block of tofu, which i have finally learned to take the time to press the excess liquid out of.  it just takes something flat to rest on it and a weight.  i use a can of spam or two.

now you can take the time to assemble your own assortment of fresh tasty vegetables, but being a bachelor cook, i just popped a pacakge of oriental style frozen veggies in the micro long enough to thaw and precook, and sauted 1"x1"x.25" squares in sesame oil.  i love that rich nutty taste.  as they stiffened and browned i splashed some tamari liberally over them and flipped them all cooking until sort of french toast golden.  i then poured the tofu squares, sesame oil tamari in the pan over the veggies, drizzled a bit more sesame oil and tamari over the lot and gave it another minute in the micro.

under 20 minutes to table and yummy.  some chinese 5 spice is nice if you have some in the house, or some hot oil or cayenne if you crave heat, or ginger if you like bite.  feeds two handsomely, or me lavishly.   
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on July 29, 2006, 02:31:31 AM
^^^Very nice! I occasionally cook exactly the same thing, Jack! Those frozen oriental veggies are great and we get lots of varieties where I live. There's one frozen veggie mix with lotus roots and pumpkin seeds that's just delicious. I usually add ginger, if I have any and can be bothered to grate it, and always garlic. As we don't mind carbs, we have rice or noodles with it.

For some extra protein, you can add eggs: whisk together a couple of eggs and start frying them, but stir it a bit so you end up with something in between scrambled eggs and an omelette gone wrong. Put this on a plate, wipe the pan, add new oil to it and use it for the tofu etc., so you won't have to clean two pans. Add the eggs along with the veggies.

As my hubby is very easily impressed when it comes to cooking, I get lots of praise for this incredibly small effort ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on July 29, 2006, 09:27:32 AM
Hummus:  does anyone in this creative bunch have ways they use hummus as an ingredient - I mean, aside from spreading it on things or dipping things into it?   

I know there are various ways to make hummus (including formulas that omit the oil altogether).  That's not what I'm looking for.  But it seems like something that could be mixed with other ingredients and, for example, baked...   If, that is, you're not a culinary or vegetarian purist!

I like it fine as is (including the way it comes from Costco).  But seems like it could have broader uses that one I've encountered so far.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Wayne SF on July 29, 2006, 09:46:53 AM
We have a new little cafe in Memphis.  And on our drink menu, we have the Ennis and Jack.  Ice cream blended with E&J brandy, cointreau, whisky (preferrably Old Rose) and garnished with a twist.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Gonzo on July 29, 2006, 05:12:23 PM
Hummus:  does anyone in this creative bunch have ways they use hummus as an ingredient - I mean, aside from spreading it on things or dipping things into it?   

I know there are various ways to make hummus (including formulas that omit the oil altogether).  That's not what I'm looking for.  But it seems like something that could be mixed with other ingredients and, for example, baked...   If, that is, you're not a culinary or vegetarian purist!

I like it fine as is (including the way it comes from Costco).  But seems like it could have broader uses that one I've encountered so far.

I'm not a great cook but what about using it as an ingredient in salads, like pasta salad.  Thin it out a bit.  Potentially you could spread it out on dough and roll the dough like a savory cinnamon roll kind of thing.  More bread than dessert.  You might be able to mix in other things and use it as stuffing for something that needs to be stuffed.  Mix it with chopped black olives and bake it into some sort of "turnover".  Or use that same mix and make ravioli stuffed with it.  Substitute it for mayo in an actual sandwich rather than as a dip or spread.  Get premade croissant dough, spread a very thin layer of hummus, top it with another layer of dough.  Cut into strips and twist the strips and bake for some kind of chewy breadsticks.  Use your imagination and experiment.  Toss it into soup to thicken and add some flavor.  All of these suggestions might prove disastrous, but they might turn out something truly unique.

Now the real challenge would be to make a cocktail using hummus.   ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on August 03, 2006, 07:02:41 AM
Hummus:  does anyone in this creative bunch have ways they use hummus as an ingredient - I mean, aside from spreading it on things or dipping things into it?   

I know there are various ways to make hummus (including formulas that omit the oil altogether).  That's not what I'm looking for.  But it seems like something that could be mixed with other ingredients and, for example, baked...   If, that is, you're not a culinary or vegetarian purist!

I like it fine as is (including the way it comes from Costco).  But seems like it could have broader uses that one I've encountered so far.

Use it to thicken a clear-brothed soup (like chicken or veggie) add some Mediterranean and/or Indian spices to kick your soup up a notch...

It makes a great ingredient to rub on chicken or porkchops before putting in oven - again add some spices to it first. 

And i know you were looking for uses other than spreading it on stuff...but I use hummus instead of mayo a lot of hte time.  It's great on deli turkey and/or chicken - keeps the bread moist without going soggy.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on August 05, 2006, 12:56:49 PM
Twistedboy and I'mJackShe'sEnnis,  thanks for your ideas about hummus.  I've some skinned chicken breasts to cook this evening; if it's not too hot for baking, I may just try using tarted-up hummus to keep them moist.  And one of you mentioned using in soup: maybe one of these desperate times when there's not much around but a packet of ramen noodles and some zucchini...?   

Lttledarlin, I just shook up a second jarful of your sweet dressing for broccoli salad.  It's definitely a keeper, especially for people who don't like broccoli.  (I tenderize mine slightly in a microwave steamer.)  Made more the second time, thinking I might also give it a try on coleslaw, maybe thinning a bit with buttermilk, since there's some of that on hand too.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on August 06, 2006, 06:43:34 PM

Lttledarlin, I just shook up a second jarful of your sweet dressing for broccoli salad.  It's definitely a keeper, especially for people who don't like broccoli.  (I tenderize mine slightly in a microwave steamer.)  Made more the second time, thinking I might also give it a try on coleslaw, maybe thinning a bit with buttermilk, since there's some of that on hand too.

Glad you like it.  I just took a huge batch to a cookout today and they ate it up!!! 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on August 07, 2006, 06:18:00 AM
Twistedboy and I'mJackShe'sEnnis,  thanks for your ideas about hummus.  I've some skinned chicken breasts to cook this evening; if it's not too hot for baking, I may just try using tarted-up hummus to keep them moist.  And one of you mentioned using in soup: maybe one of these desperate times when there's not much around but a packet of ramen noodles and some zucchini...?   

oh absolutely!  Ramen and zucchini with some hummus....a few drops of toasted sesame oil on the top and YUM! instant chic for packaged soup!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on August 08, 2006, 11:11:52 AM
Here's a simple recipe using shrimp and broccoli, two of my favorites!!

SHRIMP AND BROCCOLI STIR FRY


1 1/2 tablespoons canola oil
1-inch fresh ginger, peeled and minced
2 cloves garlic, chopped (only 2?, more like 4 or 5, gotta keep the vampires away!!)
2 scallions, thinly sliced, greens and whites separated
1 1/2 pounds frozen broccoli, defrosted
1 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined
1/3 cup soy sauce ( I use lite, or low sodium)
2 teaspoons corn starch

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add ginger, garlic, and scallion whites; cook until fragrant, about 1 minute.  Add broccoli and shrimp; cook until heated through. 

Meanwhile, combine soy sauce and corn starch in a small bowl; stir to combine.  Add soy sauce mixture to skillet; bring to a simmer, and sauce will thicken.  Serve warm. 

Sorry, no nutritional info on this one, but it can't be too horrible ;D.  Enjoy!!!

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on August 08, 2006, 09:59:39 PM
Here's another recipe that's a favorite of mine. 


PROTEIN POWER DIET SOUP RECIPE

3 Tbs. Olive Oil
3 Cloves garlic (you know me , more is better!!)
1 1/2 medium to large onions, chopped (Vidalia)
3 cups each Zucchini and Yellow Squash, chopped into bite size chunks
3 cups diced cooked chicken ( I use breasts, cook extra on the grill for salads or soup)
2 cans (14 1/2 oz each) diced tomatoes ( I usually omit these, not a big fan of tomato in hot food)
3 cans (14 1/2 oz each) seasoned chicken broth (low sodium is fine)
6 cups fresh baby spinach

In a large saucepan over medium heat, add oil, garlic and onions; cook until onions are transparent and beginning to become golden.  Raise heat to medium high, add remaining vegetables except spinach and cook until just tender.

Add chicken, tomatoes, and broth; bring to a boil.  Reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Add spinach and cook until just wilted. 

Makes 6 servings.  Calories: 269, Protein 25g, Fat: 14g, Saturated Fat: 3g, Cholesterol: 62mg, carbs: 11g, sodium: 1496 mg (ouch, better use low sodium broth!), fiber: 5g, sugar: 2g.

The name is cheesy but the soup is fantastic!!!!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on August 10, 2006, 09:10:53 PM
And a couple more...

This was my first experience with chickpeas, other than hummus.  I rank it as one of my favorites!!

AUNTIE BONNIE'S CHICKPEA SALAD (Don't know who Auntie Bonnie is :D)


Makes 2 large or 4 small servings

19-ounce can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
1/4 small onion, minced (vidalia or red, whatever you like)
2 garlic cloves, minced (more, more, more)
1 large tomato, diced
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and toss to coat.  Refrigerate one hour before serving. 

--recipe from Sarah Kramer's "La Dolce Vegan!"


Sorry no nutrional info..

Another favorite, I make a double batch and freeze it in smaller portions then buy fresh mushrooms and eat a few as a meal. 

ITALIAN STUFFED MUSHROOMS

1/4 lb bulk Italian sausage (chicken or turkey sausage is fine too)
1/2 cup onion, minced (Vidalia)
2 cloves garlic, minced (more, of course)
1/2 cup zucchini, shredded (it's got to be shredded!!)
1/2 teaspoon oregano
1/4 teaspoon thyme
1 teaspoon dried parsley flakes
1/2 teaspoon salt (I omit this)
3 Rye Krisp crackers (appx 1/4 cup) smashed into fine crumbs (Wasa bread works too)
2 tablespoons shredded Parmesan cheese (Use the good stuff)
2 tablespoons red wine (or more, this really adds to the flavor)
2 tablespoons water
18 large button mushrooms, washed


Spray skillet with cooking spray.  Brown sausage, breaking up into small crumbles as it cooks. Add onion and cook until tender.   Add garlic, zucchini and spices and cook well.  Turn off heat under skillet.  Add crumbs, cheese, wine and water, and mix well.  Remove stems from mushrooms and discard (are they kidding??  chop them up finely and add to the stuffing mixture!!)  Stuff mushroom caps with filling, piling high.  Place in glass dish and cover tightly with microwave safe plastic wrap.l  Microwave on high power 6 to 8 minutes.  Let stand 5 to  7 minutes before serving. 

Makes 3 servings (6 mushrooms each)

Calories: 192, Carbs: 16gm, Protein: 9gm, Fat: 9gm, Sat Fat: 3gm, Fiber: 4gm, Cholesterol: 24gm, Sodium: 734mg

That one is so delicious even typing it makes me hungry. 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on August 13, 2006, 10:22:12 PM
Here's a new recipe.  I adore mushrooms, but only recently. 

FRESH MUSHROOM SALAD

Serves 6

1 pound fresh mushrooms ( I go by looks, whatever looks freshest and cleanest)
5 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons wine vinegar
1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
1 teaspoon dried tarragon
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper

Rinse mushroom caps thoroughly in cold water ( I always just brush mine off, never wash them).  Remove stems (I don't).  Slice the mushrooms crosswise about 1/4 inch thick.  In a medium mixing bowl, mix mushrooms, oil, vinegar, and seasonings.  Toss well.  Cover and chill for about an hour before serving.

Calories: 121.2, Fat: 11.7g, Protein: 1.6g, Carb: 4.0g, Fiber: 1g


I'm looking for a good grilled Portabella Mushroom recipe.  Maybe a marinade for them??  all help is appreciated!!!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on August 14, 2006, 07:30:09 AM
I had some friends 20 years ago make this for a BBQ, and it was amazingly easy and delicious.  Since then I've developed an allergy to the mussels, but I can share this for those of you to enjoy:

Steamed Mussels - the easy way

a bag o' mussels, scrubbed and picked over
heavy duty aluminum foil
bottled Wish Bone italian salad dressing
extra chopped/sliced garlic (optional)
red pepper flakes (optional)

sliced baguettes, for serving

Fire up the grill and get it good and hot beforehand.  Once this starts to cook, no one will want to have to wait!

Tear two sheets of the foil and place on top of each other, bringing up the sides slightly to create a bowl.  Pour in the clean mussels (make more pouches if necessary) and then pour the italian dressing liberally over the shellfish.  If you are adding the red pepper flakes and/or garlic, add it now too.  Seal the foil pouches and place on hot grill.  Close cover and cook for about 7-8 minutes.  Test doneness by opening one packet - if the mussels are open and no longer opaque, tehy are done.  Depending on the grill you may need more/less cooking time.

My friends served these right from the foil pouches, but I prefer to dump them into a large pot or tureen.  Ladle generously into bowls and serve with the baguette - to sop up all the delicious juices.  Plenty of cold beer/iced tea to go around and this is a great casual summer supper.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on August 14, 2006, 08:04:40 AM
Late Sunday afternoon + hangover + hungry + rain outside = leftover cooking.  :P
Here's what I made for supper yesterday, it turned out so well that I'll make it again soon!

Pasta with halloumi and almonds

Pasta, spaghetti or some short kind
Halloumi cheese, about 1/8 to 1/4 lb per person
Mushrooms, 2 - 4 per person
Garlic, a couple of cloves
Almonds, a smallish handful per person
Grated cheese, preferably Grana Padano or similar
Green pepper, a couple of teaspoons (I used pickled, but dried should work as well)
Olive oil, salt and black pepper

Boil the pasta. Dice and fry the halloumi in a large pan until golden, put it on a plate. Add some more oil to the pan and fry the mushrooms, add garlic towards the end so it won't get burned. Put the halloumi back in the pan, chop the almonds and add them along with salt, green pepper (you might want to crush it first, but whole grains are fine) and black pepper.
If you're using short pasta you might add it to the pan and stir it all together, but if you're serving the pasta and the topping separately, stir some oil or pesto into the pasta so it won't get dry and sticky. Sprinkle with nice cheese and eat at once.

Variations: this is probably just as nice with meat, maybe leftovers from a BBQ or something, instead of halloumi. Almonds can be substituted with hazelnuts or any other kind of nuts except peanuts. Next time I'm going to try it with quinoa instead of pasta and I believe that rice or potatoes might work too.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on August 14, 2006, 10:01:09 PM
Today's recipe I haven't tried but it sounds delicious, kind of like the broccoli salad, I think


GREEN BEAN SALAD

Serves 6

1 pound green beans, fresh
4 slices bacon, cooked crisp and crumbled
1/2 cup red onion (no thanks, I'll take a vidalia)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon splenda (2 packs maybe?)
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1/8 teaspoon thyme
3 tablespoons cider vinegar


cut beans crosswise into 1" pieces.  Cook in 1" of boiling water until tender-crisp about 7 minutes. (Do not Salt) Drain and cool.  Mix beans, bacon and onion.  In separate bowl, combine remaining ingredients.  Toss with beans.  Cover and refrigerate one hour.

Calories: 93.2, Carbs: 6.9g, Fiber: 2.6g, Fat: 6.7g, Protein: 2.7g
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on August 16, 2006, 01:52:18 PM
Laurentia-
What is halloumi, Grana Pando (cheese?), and quinoa?  I've never heard of any of that but it still sounds good!!

Lola rewards me with Jakey pics for recipes on the lovesick diet thread.  That's why I post so many recipes LOL!!

Steam-Sauted Green Beans with Lemon Zest and Parsley
Prep Time: 5 to 10 minutes
Number of Servings: 4 servings
Special Notes: Hazelnuts are equally good in this simple preparation. Or you can leave the nuts out altogether and flavor the beans with only lemon zest and parsley.

This recipe courtesy of the North American Olive Oil Association.
© Copyright North American Olive Oil Association
 

Ingredients

1/4 cup slivered almonds
1 pound green beans, stem-end trimmed, and halved
4 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon peel
2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley

Directions

Heat a small Dutch oven or medium skillet over medium-low heat. When pan is hot, add the almonds and toast, stirring frequently, until they are golden brown and fragrant, about 2 minutes. Remove and set aside. Add green beans, 1/3 cup water, oil and salt. Increase heat to medium-high, cover and cook until steam escapes around pan lid. Set timer for 5 minutes and continue to steam until green beans are brightly colored and just tender. Remove lid and continue to cook until water evaporates and green beans start to sauté, 1 to 2 minutes longer. Turn off heat, stir in toasted almonds, lemon peel and parsley. Serve immediately.



Nutrition Info

Calories: 110; Fat: 8.0g; Saturated Fat: 1.0g; Protein: 3g; Carbohydrates: 9g; Fiber: 4g; Sodium: 290Mg


Here's another:

Tuscan Vegetable Soup with Sage

Prep Time: Approx 30 minutes
Number of Servings: 4 servings
Special Notes: Top each serving with ricotta, if desired.

 

Ingredients

3 Tbsp. olive oil
4 Tbsp. chopped fresh sage leaves
4 cloves garlic, finely minced
1 cup fresh or frozen peas
1 cup 1/2" pieces green beans
1 cup diced zucchini
1 cup diced carrots
1/2 cup diced celery
1 sweet potato, peeled and diced
1 16-oz. can white beans, rinsed and drained
6 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth (vegetable broth can be substituted)
1/2 Tsp. crushed red-pepper flakes
Salt and black pepper, to taste
1/4 cup low-fat ricotta cheese (optional)
Directions

In a large saucepan, heat oil on medium heat. Add sage and garlic and sauté 5 minutes. Add peas, green beans, zucchini, carrots, celery, potato, and white beans. Stir over medium heat 3 to 5 minutes.
2. Add broth and red-pepper flakes. Simmer until vegetables are tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.



Nutrition Info

Calories: 360; Fat: 11.0g; Saturated Fat: 2.0g; Protein: 20g; Carbohydrates: 48g; Fiber: 11g; Sodium: 197Mg

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on August 16, 2006, 02:05:54 PM
OMG!!!  Look at what I just found!!!!



Tacos del Mar

Prep Time:
Number of Servings: 8
Special Notes: Serve the tacos with instant brown rice

 

Ingredients

1 Tbs. olive oil
1 medium red bell pepper, diced
1 small onion, diced
1 tsp. minced garlic (about 2 cloves)
1 15-oz. can diced tomatoes
1/2 tsp. ground cumin
1 lb. cod fillets or other white fish fillets
Juice of 1 lime (3–4 Tbs.)
1/8 tsp. salt
1/8 tsp. black pepper
8 corn taco shells or whole-grain flour tortillas
Garnishes, such as Cheddar cheese, light sour cream, chopped lettuce, or guacamole
Directions

1. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Sauté pepper, onion, and garlic until tender and just starting to brown, 5 to 8 minutes.
2. Stir in tomatoes (with juice) and cumin and bring to a low boil. Place fish on top of the mixture, sprinkle with the lime juice and season with salt and pepper.
3. Cover the pan, reduce the heat just enough to keep the sauce simmering, and cook for 15 minutes, until the fish is opaque and flakes very easily. Pull the fish apart and serve, using a slotted spoon, so the tacos don’t get too drippy.



Nutrition Info

Calories: 150; Fat: 5.0g; Saturated Fat: 0.5g; Protein: 12g; Carbohydrates: 14g; Fiber: 2g; Cholesterol: 25Mg; Sodium: 200Mg

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on August 16, 2006, 10:12:53 PM
Keep those recipes coming, littledarlin! We appreciate them!

What is halloumi, Grana Pando (cheese?), and quinoa?  I've never heard of any of that but it still sounds good!!

Quinoa was discussed a couple of pages back, I know it's a bit of an obscure ingredient. :)  It's little grains that you boil, same principle as rice, but they're enormously nutritious and contain complete protein. They taste good too!

Halloumi is a kind of cheese that's salty and rubbery uncooked, but very nice when you fry or grill it, it doesn't melt when heated like most other cheeses do.

Grana Padano is an Italian hard cheese, I don't know anything about it except it tastes good! If you're familiar with Gruyère cheese, it's the same sort of taste.


 :D Del Mar Tacos  :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on August 17, 2006, 06:02:19 PM
If you're familiar with Gruyère cheese, it's the same sort of taste.


Yes, that one I know and like very much. 


Here's another recipe.  It suggests serving with Holland Rusk Toast but I think I'd use it to stuff mushrooms or zucchini instead or maybe with fresh veggies.





Crab and Mushroom Appetizers


Prep Time: 25 minutes
Number of Servings: 10 appetizers

 

Ingredients

2 Tbsp. olive oil
1/2 pound mushrooms, diced
3 green onions, sliced thinly
6 ounces light cream cheese. softened
3 Tbsp. fresh parsley, chopped
1 Tbsp. lemon juice
1 (6 oz.) can fancy crabmeat
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
10 pieces Holland Rusk Toast paprika
Directions

Heat olive oil in skillet. Sauté mushrooms until tender. Add green onions and sauté briefly. Remove from heat. In a bowl, beat together cream cheese, parsley and lemon juice. Stir in crabmeat, contents of skillet, and salt and pepper. Spread 3 Tbsp. of mixture on a toast round and place on a baking sheet. Continue until all mixture is used. Sprinkle with paprika and bake at 400 degrees for 8-10 minutes, or until lightly browned. Serve immediately.



Nutrition Info

Calories: 111; Fat: 7.0g; Saturated Fat: 3.0g; Protein: 4g; Carbohydrates: 8g; Fiber: 1g; Cholesterol: 25Mg; Sodium: 197Mg

           
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on August 20, 2006, 04:53:10 PM

Quinoa was discussed a couple of pages back, I know it's a bit of an obscure ingredient. :)  It's little grains that you boil, same principle as rice, but they're enormously nutritious and contain complete protein. They taste good too!

[qoute]



Where do you buy this?  Specialty market?  Super market?  Thanks!!







Shrimp and Mushroom Scampi
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Number of Servings: 3 servings

 

Ingredients

1 pound large raw shrimp, peeled and deveined
1 pound mushrooms
1/4 cup olive oil
4 cloves garlic, minced
6 green onions, thinly sliced
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
3 Tbsp. white wine
juice of 1 lemon (about 1/4 cup)
2 Tbsp. chopped fresh parsley
Directions

Rinse shrimp and pat dry. Remove and discard stems from mushrooms, and cut caps in half. Heat olive oil in large skillet. Add shrimp, mushrooms, garlic, and green onions, salt, and pepper, and cook, stirring occasionally, until shrimp are pink and firm on both sides. Add wine, lemon juice, and parsley and cook another 2 minutes.



Nutrition Info

Calories: 330; Fat: 19.0g; Saturated Fat: 2.5g; Protein: 24g; Carbohydrates: 15g; Fiber: 2g; Cholesterol: 220Mg; Sodium: 710Mg



Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on August 20, 2006, 10:06:07 PM
My super market is supposed to stock quinoa, but they tend to be out of it - apparently whoever is in charge of that shelf (the same as bulgur, coucous, and fancier varieties of rice) doesn't realise how popular it is. I also like to go shopping in an organic-foods-and-general-hippie-stuff place that has every kind of strange but healthy foods and they stock quinoa too. You could check your regular supermarket first, and if they don't have it, aim for some more specialized shop.
Maybe someone living in the USA could give a better answer...  :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on August 21, 2006, 01:26:50 PM

I also like to go shopping in an organic-foods-and-general-hippie-stuff place that has every kind of strange but healthy foods and they stock quinoa too.

I like those kind of stores too, thanks, I'll check it out.  I'm sure my grocery has never heard of it, but I'll ask.

Another recipe for ya'll

Beef and Asparagus Stir-fry

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Number of Servings: 4 servings 

Ingredients

1 piece ginger, 1/2" long, minced
3 garlic cloves, minced
4 Tbsp. light soy sauce
4 Tbsp. cornstarch
1 lb. London broil or flank steak, cut in thin strips
1/2 cup fat-free chicken broth
1 Tbsp. hoisin sauce
1 Tbsp. black bean sauce
1 Tsp. sugar
2 Tbsp. canola oil
1 lb. asparagus, trimmed and cut in 1" pieces
1/4 cup chopped scallions
Directions

In a medium bowl, combine ginger, garlic, soy sauce, and 3 Tbsp. cornstarch until blended. Add beef and mix well. Set aside. In another bowl, combine broth, hoisin sauce, black bean sauce, sugar, and remaining 1 Tbsp. cornstarch. Heat a wok or heavy skillet on medium. Add 1 Tbsp. oil and swirl to make sure the pan is coated. Add asparagus and stir-fry until crisp but cooked, about 3 to 4 minutes. Add scallions during the last minute of cooking. Transfer to a bowl. Add remaining 1 Tbsp. oil to pan. Cook beef, separating pieces until done, about 4 to 6 minutes. Return asparagus and scallions to pan, add sauce, and bring to a boil. Stir while cooking until heated through. The sauce will thicken when it boils. Transfer to a bowl. Serve with 2 cups cooked instant brown rice.



Nutrition Info

Calories: 524; Fat: 18.0g; Saturated Fat: 5.0g; Protein: 34g; Carbohydrates: 56g; Fiber: 4g; Cholesterol: 62Mg; Sodium: 776Mg


 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on August 23, 2006, 06:00:18 AM
Haven't tried this one but I love artichokes!!

Artichoke Salad      
 
Wake up your tastebuds with this break from the traditional greens salad.
 
 
Calories: 44  Carbs: 8  Sodium: 243
Fat: 1 Fiber: 4 
Protein: 2 Cholesterol: 0 
 
     
 
Ingredients:
 
1/4 cup mayonnaise

2 tablespoon fat-free creamy Italian dressing

.12 teaspoon black pepper

1 package (10 ounce) frozen artichoke hearts 

1/2 cup red peppers

1/2 cup celery

1/4 cup basil

8 - pimiento-stuffed olives 

6 - lettuce leaves

 
 
 
Instructions:1
 
To Make Dressing: Whisk together mayonnaise, Italian dressing, and black pepper.

To Assemble Salad: Combine artichokes, red peppers, celery, basil, and olives. Stir in dressing. Cover and refrigerate unitil ready to serve. Spoon onto lettuce leaves. 
 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on August 26, 2006, 06:12:08 AM
OMG!!!  Look at what I just found!!!!

Tacos del Mar

hahah! that's sweet!!! and sounds delicious. after the aero screening of BBM and the Q & A with heath, jake, michelle, diana, rodrigo and gus, a bunch of us headed to a mexican restaurant in venice,,,,,,,,, and guess what was on the menu??? 

enchiladas del mar!               

...i had the combo tho.. ;)  the enchildadas, if i recall, contained crabmeat.

quinoa.

as laurentia said, it was discussed earlier in the thread, with a link to a page that described this wonderful little seed, with info on its nutritional value and history. it can be found at trader joe's, whole foods, and other health food stores. they come in many colors apparently, but i've only seen the sort of golden brown variety,,, it's great. i cook it in a rice cooker and make a quinoa tabuleh with the stuff -- parsley, lemon juice, olive oil, mint etc... i like how the seeds crunch in your teeth. it reminds me of tobiko.

anyway, i love your posts, they make me hungry!!

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on August 26, 2006, 06:17:19 PM

anyway, i love your posts, they make me hungry!!



Thanks, I loved the pic of you cooking at the bbq!!  And the Aero screening and Q & A must have been to die for!!!!  The bbq too I imagine!

Tobiko?  What's that?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on August 27, 2006, 01:51:56 AM
^ What she said!  :)  I've been ogling the bbq photos since they started to appear on the forum, it looks like the best party ever. I'm going to the get-together in London, but I don't think it'll be quite the same...

But what I really came here to post is yesterday's glorious supper:

The Lazy Cook's Creamy Thai Stir-fry

a little Sambal Oelek
4-5 cloves of garlic, sliced
1 lime
2-3 tbsp soy or tamari
4-5 tbsp chopped ginger, fresh or pickled
2/3 tbsp sugar
1 can coconut milk (about 1 1/2 cup)
6-7 tbsp peanut butter

Put this in a blender and mix until smooth. I cut away the peel and the hard, stringy thing in the middle of the lime and put the whole thing in, but you could also squeeze it and just use the juice. If you don't have a blender or similar, use finely grated ginger, lemon juice and crushed garlic and stir everything together, but then you'll have to wash the garlic press and the grating iron and possibly even the citrus press, and I've been trying to minimize the amount of washing-up needed here, being a lazy cook myself. If you're really lazy, you might check for grated ginger, crushed garlic, bottled lime juice and fried tofu in your foodstore, and use frozen vegetables.

Firm tofu; the slabs I buy weigh a bit less than 3/4 lb (300 g) and I find one of those to be enough, but throw in as much as you want.
About 2 lb vegetables (800 g to 1 kg), e. g. cabbage, mushrooms, aubergine and some kind of onion, preferably spring onion

Dice the tofu and fry in oil until golden, put aside until later. My wok is cast iron and tofu mercilessly sticks to it, so I use a teflon frying pan for this and the wok for the rest of the dish.
If you're using mushrooms, fry them first and when they start to look nice, add the rest of the vegetables. Fry everything for a minute, then add the sauce and the tofu and put on the lid. Let simmer until ready - takes five minutes or so - and serve with rice or noodles.

Serves four with normal appetite and rice or noodles on the side, if you go low-carb and eat it on its own it should be enough for two very hungry people. Made in this way it's vegan, but you could substitute chicken for the tofu if you prefer meat.


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on August 27, 2006, 03:06:52 AM
A tiny nutrition tip for those who don't spend much time in the kitchen: soy flour. It's made from ground soy beans and doesn't taste very nice, but you can mix it into everything that you want to kick up the protein content of and the taste is quite easily camouflaged. One tablespoon of soy flour has as much protein as an egg, and it's good protein.

For instance, oatmeal. Oatmeal is great, quick to make and fills your tummy nicely, but I find that I'm hungry again after an hour or so. A spoon of soy flour in the oatmeal and I'm not hungry for two or three hours! (Mix it into the oats before adding water to avoid it forming lumps, and add a bit of cinnamon to cover the taste if needed.)
Yoghurt and muesli is one of my emergency meals as well and works the same, doesn't quite satisfy me. A spoon of soy flour does the trick. You could also mix it into pancakes, home-made bread and other foods with flour in them.

If you eat a lot of ramen noodles, which contain about as much nutritives as a white roll, try adding chick peas to them. I keep boiled chick peas in the freezer and let a handful or two of them thaw in the pot with the noodles. Red lentils are good as well but take a little more time; put 3 tablespoons of dried red lentils in 2 cups of water (1/2 liter), bring to the boil and simmer until they are done (about 15 minutes), then add the uncooked noodles and the stock/seasoning powder. You'll get a thick soup that needs a bit more seasoning than the little sachet that comes with the noodles. Good soy sauce is an easy option.
I've also tried - after someone in here had the idea - putting a good dollop of hummus and a couple of grated carrots in my noodle soup, and that wasn't bad at all. If you eat a lot of ramen and can't be bothered to cut up vegetables, go to the freezer in your supermarket and get small-sized things like corn, peas, and diced carrots to add to the noodles. It's not expensive and your body is going to thank you.

/ Little Miss Sensible  ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on August 27, 2006, 04:02:22 AM
^ What she said!  :)  I've been ogling the bbq photos since they started to appear on the forum, it looks like the best party ever. I'm going to the get-together in London, but I don't think it'll be quite the same...

oh i'm sure it will be delightful! if you're going it will be wonderful times!! wish i could be there with ya'll... i'm guessing nick, redbrit, sal and zed will be there, great fun. be prepared for the love. omg --- i'm getting teary eyed just thinking about it...  :) ::) :D

your soy flour tips sound great. i've never used it before, but you sold me on the oatmeal trick -- i find plain oatmeal doing the same thing. nice to know you can get some good protein for breakfast w/o relying on eggs or cheese. thank you, little miss sensible! ;)


littledarlin --- omg, that pic of me cooking... that was fun, a big meal for 11 people i think, and enough for lunch the next day. barbecued chicken breasts in lemon juice, olive oil, white wine, herbs and lots of garlic... grilled zucchini, red bell peppers and red onion... a simple red cabbage slaw with grated carrots and... parsley!  gee, i sense a theme -- red... ::) something else, i forgot.. it was pretty good.

um, tobiko are the little fish eggs, flying fish roe? at least i think it's called tobiko -- the tiny orange eggs that crunch when you chew them, used in sushi rolls and such.. only the quinoa isn't salty.. lol.
 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on August 27, 2006, 12:27:01 PM
um, tobiko are the little fish eggs, flying fish roe? at least i think it's called tobiko -- the tiny orange eggs that crunch when you chew them, used in sushi rolls and such.. only the quinoa isn't salty.. lol.
 

"masago" is, I believe, the same thing or very similar.

One of my favorites!!! 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on August 27, 2006, 06:26:49 PM
(http://www.origamirestaurant.com/sushi/images/sushi_seasoned_tobiko.jpg)

masago, tobiko... smelt roe, flying fish roe...   now i'm craving sushi.. damn... ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on August 27, 2006, 07:00:07 PM
now i'm craving sushi.. damn... ;)


That's what I had for dinner tonight!!  ;D    YUM!! I didn't know that it was called anything but masago!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on August 28, 2006, 02:24:58 PM
soy flour. It's made from ground soy beans and doesn't taste very nice, but you can mix it into everything that you want to kick up the protein content of and the taste is quite easily camouflaged.


Excellent suggestion Laurentia!!  I'm going to add a bit to my daily breakfast protein shake.  I started fitness boot camp today and I need to add some protein without adding calories!!  Your timing couldn't have been better!!


So I was ckecking out recipes looking for inspiration with some broccoli and score! I found this @ prevention.com and here's the link, it sounds delicious and it has mushrooms, yum!!  the serving size is 4 jumbo shells, I'd eat maybe 2 and a big salad. 


http://www.prevention.com/recipeview/0,5755,s1-3-82-0-0-0---334,00.html


Broccoli-Stuffed Shells   
 
 Makes 4 servings
 
Calories: 484  Carbs: 52  Sodium: 869
Fat: 19 Fiber: 8 
Protein: 26 Cholesterol: 41 
 
     
 
Ingredients:
 
16 - jumbo pasta shells

2 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

1 pound mushrooms  (any kind you like)

1 - red onion  (I use vidalia's most all the time)

3 clove garlic cloves  (more is better!!)

1/2 cup red wine or chicken broth

1 large head broccoli 

2 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning

1 1/2 cup (12 ounces) reduced-fat ricotta cheese

1/2 cup (2 ounces) Romano cheese

1 1/2 cup tomato sauce

 
 
 
Instructions:1
 
Cook shells according to package directions. Drain.

Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C).

Warm oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add mushrooms, onion, and garlic. Cook 5 minutes, or until mushrooms are tender but not limp. Add wine or broth, broccoli, and Italian seasoning. Simmer 15 minutes, or until broccoli is tender and liquid is absorbed. Remove from heat and stir in ricotta and Romano.

Stuff shells with broccoli mixture. Spread a thin layer of sauce over bottom of a 13" x 9" (32.5 x 23-cm) baking dish. Arrange shells in dish and top with remaining sauce. Bake 15 minutes, or until heated through. 
 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on August 29, 2006, 10:29:02 PM
gnash and littledarlin, I hope the soy flour will work for you too! After posting, I had one of those "why did I think anybody would be interested in that???" moments, so I'm really pleasantly surprised that you found that a useful idea  :D

Good luck in fitness boot camp, littledarlin. It seems you've got one of the basic parts of weight loss right: good food! That latest recipe sounds enormously yummy.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: daphne on August 30, 2006, 02:38:43 AM
Laurentia, don't worry, your tip was very useful! I never post here because I'm a terrible cook, but I'm a lurker - I love reading recipes. Since I'm trying to eat less meat, I'm very interested in veggie proteins - your tip was precious, Little Miss Sensible  ;) :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on September 02, 2006, 09:23:36 AM
(http://www.origamirestaurant.com/sushi/images/sushi_seasoned_tobiko.jpg)

masago, tobiko... smelt roe, flying fish roe...   now i'm craving sushi.. damn... ;)


Carol and I went out for sushi that night.  Couldn't stand it any longer.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 06, 2006, 04:48:27 AM
heidi -- ohh, lucky you! i love tobiko with a quail egg on top.

we had southern indian food the other day... an amazing sweet pumpkin-mango curry. i asked a lovely indian woman who works at this vegetarian only restaurant about the recipe. in her colorful dress, she waved her arms excitedly, telling me how easy it was to make.

"just fry some onion in oil, then add the pumpkin, some water and coconut milk. some curry. add the mango. DONE!"

i asked her which type of curry to use.

she thought for a second, then smiled, "anything works! easy!"

so, the ingredients are there... adjust to taste i guess. what they served was a very thick stew-like mixture of the orange flesh of both mango and pumpkin. i could not see or taste onion so it must be cooked down, or perhaps grated to begin with.

i decided to buy a KABOCHA pumpkin, which is already sorta sweet and nutty. the 2 large mangos are ripening. i'll use a prepared curry mix -- i have several kinds from the indian market. actually, the dish i enjoyed wasn't very curry-ish, so i don't think much of the spice is needed.

it was soooo good, it's almost like a dessert. i could see it flecked with golden raisins too, or maybe a handful of dried cranberry for a shot of sweet and tart and color.

it was served with basmati rice, but it's also good wrapped in a DOSA, a crepe-like thing. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dosa

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 06, 2006, 05:17:26 AM

Broccoli-Stuffed Shells   
 
 

I made an alternate version of this, putting the lovely mushroom/broccoli mixture in a dish along with some cooked pasta (brown fusilli), topping it with a jar of nice tomato sauce and a lot of grated cheese. Super nice! Thanks for the recipe, littledarlin!


daphne - thanks, I'm glad to hear that! Aren't there a lot of traditional dishes with beans in Italy, by the way? There's a company marketing pasta, olive oil, etc. in Sweden that bases its advertising on this "genuine" old Italian man talking about his mother's cooking and how the company in question has finally brought that sort of food to the cold North, and in some ads he claims to be a hell of a mangiafagioli... ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: daphne on September 06, 2006, 06:30:33 AM
daphne - thanks, I'm glad to hear that! Aren't there a lot of traditional dishes with beans in Italy, by the way? There's a company marketing pasta, olive oil, etc. in Sweden that bases its advertising on this "genuine" old Italian man talking about his mother's cooking and how the company in question has finally brought that sort of food to the cold North, and in some ads he claims to be a hell of a mangiafagioli... ;D

Yes, there are a lot of Italian recipes with beans and other legumes (i.e. peas, chick-peas and lentils). Mostly, you will find stewed legumes and various kinds of soups, and some salads. The "pasta e fagioli" (= beans soup) is the most famous Italian dish with beans (and one of the very few things I can cook  ;D - one day my husband will say "no more beans"  ;D). Instead, soy is almost unknown here, it still sounds "exotic" - I sometimes buy soy burgers, but that's it.

Mangiafagioli = beans eater - LOL  ;D  It's funny because it's a little insulting: it means more or less "churlish", "uneducated", "person with bad taste"  ;D  :D.
There's also a famous painting named Mangiafagioli - maybe that company should use it for some advertising  ;D

(http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j71/daphne_IT/mangiafagioli.jpg)

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on September 06, 2006, 07:28:41 AM

we had southern indian food the other day... an amazing sweet pumpkin-mango curry.


**THUNK!!**

okay, next to sushi, my favorite favorite food is Indian curry.

This sounds awesome!  I have managed to make a fake Tandoori chicken too - obviously I do not have a Tandoori oven in my home.  I'll find the little slip of paper I jotted down the ingreds, and post it here...It actually tastes just like the real thing!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 06, 2006, 12:33:21 PM

**THUNK!!**

okay, next to sushi, my favorite favorite food is Indian curry.

This sounds awesome!  I have managed to make a fake Tandoori chicken too - obviously I do not have a Tandoori oven in my home.  I'll find the little slip of paper I jotted down the ingreds, and post it here...It actually tastes just like the real thing!

you don't have an authentic tandoori??? girlfriend, get with it!! LOL. ;) mmmm, if we did, just think of the garlic naan we could make.

what i wanna know is what makes tandoori chicken red? i hope it's not cochineal!  :P ;D but i think marinating the chicken would be the key step, and then you could probably bake it at home in a very hot oven or something. isn't there yogurt involved?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on September 07, 2006, 07:25:20 AM

you don't have an authentic tandoori??? girlfriend, get with it!! LOL. ;) mmmm, if we did, just think of the garlic naan we could make.

what i wanna know is what makes tandoori chicken red? i hope it's not cochineal!  :P ;D but i think marinating the chicken would be the key step, and then you could probably bake it at home in a very hot oven or something. isn't there yogurt involved?

Yeah, it's basically yogurt and spices rubbed on the chicken and then baked - it tastes like the real thing.  (Good on the grill - a bit messy with the yogurt though...)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 07, 2006, 08:49:23 AM
gnash, I tried to find out about the red colour, and it seems that whatever it is, it's not cochineal (most of the recipes I found used artificial colour  :P). Possibly it's chili. Here's a recipe that's linked to from Wikipedia's Tandoori Chicken entry, I thought it sounded so nice with its few and simple ingredients that I had to share it:

http://www.numkitchen.com/dc1_tandoori%20chicken.htm

Quote
TANDOORI CHICKEN

Chicken 1 lb
Red chili  powder 1 tsp
Yogurt 1 cup 
Ginger paste 2 tbsp
Garlic paste 2 tbsp
Lemon juice 2 tbsp
Chili powder 3 tsp
Sesame oil  3 tbsp
Salt 

Wash and clean the chicken. Make incisions with a sharp knife on breast and leg pieces and keep it aside.

Take a bowl, add oil, ginger paste, garlic paste, yogurt, chili powder, lemon juice, salt and mix well. Apply this marinade onto the chicken pieces and refrigerate for three to four hours.

Pre heat the oven at 350 F and cook the chicken for 30 min.

For garnishing Onion rings and lemon wedges.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on September 07, 2006, 02:41:49 PM
Here's a really simple Spinach Salad recipe, the dressing is delicious and it takes no time at all to fix.

From Mycurves.com @    http://www.mycurves.com/recipes/display.php?RecipeId=47


Spinach Salad With orange Vinaigrette


Prep Time: 15 minutes
Number of Servings: 2 servings

 

Ingredients

Vinaigrette:
2 1/2 Tbsp. orange juice
1 Tbsp. wine vinegar
1 1/2 Tbsp. extra-virgin or virgin olive oil
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1/2 teaspoon salt (or to taste)
Salad:
2 cups (lightly packed) fresh spinach or baby spinach
1/2cup sliced fresh mushrooms
1/2 cup thinly sliced red onion
Directions

For vinaigrette: Combine orange juice and vinegar in shaker. Add oil, salt and pepper. Shake well. For salad: Place ingredients in a serving bowl. Toss with vinaigrette to coat vegetables. Serve immediately.



Nutrition Info

Calories: 138; Fat: 10.0g; Protein: 2g; Carbohydrates: 11g; Fiber: 2g; Sodium: 577Mg

Enjoy!!

Have a great day everyone!!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 08, 2006, 02:15:58 AM
oh, it's so nice to come here and read the stuff posted by other foodies!

mmm, that tandoori mix is very simple. i wonder if the ginger paste is a special thing or just mashed ginger. my kitchen right now has every ingredient needed make it,,, except the chicken! also, it doesn't say on that recipe but i think they usually skin the chicken before applying the marinade.

one thing to do is heat an iron platter (it could be a cast iron pan) very hot, oil it lightly and toss on the fresh slices of onion. then place the cooked chicken on the bed of onions and spritz with lemon. that way the onion cooks a bit and is a nice accompaniment to the chicken.

that's how they serve it at anarkali, anyway. ;D

mmmmm pakoras. ^_^
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 08, 2006, 02:57:01 AM
okay, this is for you mangiafagiolis... made this tonight out of necessity, hungry and wanting a meal in one dish with three last carrots begging to be used.

HEARTY "BEAN" SALAD

1 can of white beans, rinsed and drained well
about 1 cup or more of freshly grated carrot
romaine lettuce, about 6 cups chopped
freshly crushed garlic, 2 or 3 cloves
1 tsp fresh toasted sesame seeds
some extra virgin olive oil
white/red wine vinegar
rice wine vinegar
sesame oil
a half cup of chopped parsley
fresh cracked pepper, sea salt
a pinch italian herb seasoning
some tumeric powder for color and health, and to stain your wooden salad tongs!!!

combine everything but the sesame seeds in a big bowl and toss well, adjusting the oil and vinegars to taste. i happen to like a bit of tangy rice vinegar, and the sesame adds a nutty flavor. remember to add enough garlic as that's what seems to give the bland beans a flavor they need. toast the sesame seeds in a dry skillet until they brown and begin to pop, and sprinkle them on the salad, they should sizzle.

...i think a little grated ginger might be nice as well.

...with garlic toast, and a large portion of salad, this dish became a meal!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Desecra on September 09, 2006, 01:29:05 AM
Just popped in to answer the cochineal question which was brought up on the daily sheet.  It's a dye/food colouring derived from beetles.  I used to use it years ago, but it doesn't seem to be so popular now.  Why would someone avoid it?  I've known people who avoid because they're vegetarian and it's an animal product.  But other people might avoid it because of the risk of an allergic reaction.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner - Tandoori-style Chicken
Post by: BBM-Intern on September 09, 2006, 02:13:34 AM
Quote
what i wanna know is what makes tandoori chicken red? i hope it's not cochineal!    but i think marinating the chicken would be the key step, and then you could probably bake it at home in a very hot oven or something. isn't there yogurt involved?

Hi all you lovely brokebackers,

Thought I'd jump in with my experience in cooking Indian food.  No, the food colouring is usually not chochineal.  Cochineal is listed as E120 - Carminic Acid, a pink-red colour.  My booklet on food allergies states that it is derived from crushed cactus eating insects (!), possibly toxic to embryo, hypersensitivity especially in children.

However you are correct about it being food colouring: Madhur Jaffrey (UK TV cook) in her groundbreaking series in 1982 stated that she wished that the colour of Tandoori Chicken was from some exotic Asian spice, but it is food colouring.  For 2 1/2 lbs of chicken, her recipe advocated using a pastry-brush to "paint" the chicken with as much as 3 tbsp yellow liquid food colouring and 1/2 - 1 1/2 tbsp red liquid food colouring (!!).

The recipe from Wikipedia that was posted earlier looks fine, the only thing is I would advocate using a very red chilli powder or mild paprika to achieve the red colour, if no food colouring is to be used.  In India, there is a type of chilli called "kashmiri chilli", which produces a brilliant red colour, but is quite mild, so it can be used in greater quantities without the consequent heat blowing one's socks off!  This is sold in shops specialising in Indian groceries, but please bear in mind that it isn't probably exactly "kashmiri" - I've been told that the true Kashmiri chilli is produced in quite small quantities and seldom exported.  However, here in Australia, I purchased some labelled "kashmiri" and it seems to work fine for me.  Mild paprika isn't exactly authentic either, but if one has food allergies, it is an acceptable alternative.

Also note, chilli powder in Indian recipes is just plain ground chillies, as distinct from chili powder in Tex-Mex cookery.

I've re-written the recipe in greater detail for all of you to try, but please note that this is at best "Tandoori-style chicken", as I don't think many of us have a tandoor at home.  The tandoor is a hand-shaped clay oven, usually heated by live coals, thus it has that special smoky flavour.  The heat in a tandoor is very fierce, and marinaded meat is skewered on long (1m+) metal skewers and the tips of the skewers rest on the hot coals.  It is the intense heat surrounding it and the heat from the skewers that results in meat taking mere minutes to cook to perfection.  The fat from the meat usually drips on the coals, creating smoke and that unique flavour.

TANDOORI-STYLE CHICKEN

Ingredients:

2 lb chicken - preferably drumsticks and thighs
2 tsp salt
juice of 1/2 lemon

4 tsp mild red chilli powder (preferably kashmiri)
2 tsp garam masala
1 cup plain yoghurt
2 tbsp garlic paste
2 tbsp ginger paste

ghee or oil for basting
wedges of lemon and onion rings for serving

Method:

Skin the chicken pieces, then using a sharp knife, score the chicken deeply to the bone - for each drumstick, slash twice on each side, for thighs, three times each side.  Place chicken pieces into glass / porcelain dish, then sprinkle salt and lemon juice over each side.  Using your fingers, rub this salt and lemon juice marinade deep into the chicken, making sure it gets into each slash made.  Turn chicken over and repeat on the other side.  Set aside for 20 minutes.

In the meantime, mix together the chilli powder, garam masala, yoghurt, ginger and garlic paste.  When the chicken has marinaded in the salt and lemon juice for 20 minutes, pour over the yoghurt-based marinade.  Again, rub this marinade into the chicken thoroughly on both sides, making sure the marinade gets into each slash.  Cover and refrigerate for three to four hours,

Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C), remove chicken pieces from the marinade and place chicken on grill pan and cook for 30 minutes.  Baste once or twice during cooking with melted ghee or oil.  Serve immediately with lemon wedges and onion rings.

Hints (sorry about this, experienced cooks, just want everyone to have 100% success):
* This works really well for joints of chicken with drumstick and thigh; for some reason this is called "chicken maryland" in Australia - no doubt you good folk will have something to say about the naming!
* Chicken skin can be a little tricky to strip especially if it is wet or slippery - try holding the skin with dry paper towels for better grip.  Unless you're watching every morsel of fat, don't worry too much about the fat, as quite a bit of that usually renders away during the cooking.
* Please use a glass or porcelain dish for marinading - a lot of acid is used (lemon juice and yoghurt) and this can have a nasty reaction with metallic dishes.
* If your (kashmiri) chilli powder is mild, feel free to increase the amount to get a redder colour.  If you have an Indian grocery store nearby, try getting some of their "Tandoori Masala", and use 1 - 2 tbsp in place of the chilli powder and garam masala.
* The garlic and ginger paste is fresh garlic and ginger that is peeled and then grated/pureed.  Easiest method is to grate it using a microplane grater, otherwise pop garlic and ginger into a blender with the yoghurt and blend till it is smooth.  Be sure to cut the ginger into thin slices across the fibre when using the blender method, as most blenders will reduce ginger to fine puree, but will leave "threads" of fibres.
* If your oven has a "fan grill" setting, this is excellent for Tandoori chicken - preheat your oven to 190°C, place your chicken pieces on the grill and then pop the grill tray under the grill about 10cm (4") from the element.  Chicken will be ready in 20-25 minutes with bits of it tinged with brown, which is what it should be - kissed a little too fiercely by the heat in places.  The fan grill setting is where the top element of the oven is heated, with heat circulation assisted by the oven's fan, but the element for the fan is not heated.  This gives a kind of "rotisserie" or "barbeque" effect with the least fuss.
* Madhur Jaffrey on the other hand advocates heating the oven to its maximum temperature, then cooking the chicken for 20 minutes.  I must confess I have never used the low temperature method as mentioned in the wikipedia recipe, the fan-grill method works everytime for me.
* In places such as Punjab in India, after the chicken is cooked in the tandoor (clay oven, fired by live coals), the chicken is chopped up into smaller pieces, then tossed with chaat masala, which is a mixture of spices and sour green mango powder (amchoor).
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 09, 2006, 02:29:48 AM
thank you BBM-intern for such an informative post. you answered so many of my questions about tandoori chicken and the coloring used. i would be inclined to skip the artificial coloring altogether, as long as the dish tastes good. i do like to use tumeric tho, and would settle for yellow tandoori chicken. ;)

fortunately we have a glorious number of good indian restaurants in los angeles and because i very rarely cook meats at home, i will leave the cooking to the chefs. ;)

i would love a good convection oven!!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on September 09, 2006, 04:56:34 PM
There's lot of room for modification in this one.  Use Rondele spread instead of cream cheese, ham instead of turkey, romaine instead of butter lettuce, you get the idea.  Use whatever you have in the fridge!!  Recipe from mycurves.com, my lifeline of recipes at


http://www.mycurves.com/recipes/display.php?RecipeId=44


Turkey-Lettuce Wraps


Prep Time: 10 minutes
Number of Servings: 8 wraps

 

Ingredients

8 butter lettuce leaves
1/2 cup vegetable cream cheese, softened
1/2 cucumber, peeled and diced
1/4 cup roasted and salted sunflower seeds
8 (1/2-ounce) slices deli turkey breast
Directions

Spread each lettuce leaf with 1 Tbsp. cream cheese. Evenly divide cucumber and sunflower seeds between lettuce leaves and sprinkle over the cream cheese. Top each lettuce leaf with 1 slice of turkey. Press down gently and roll up.



Nutrition Info

Calories: 80; Fat: 6.0g; Saturated Fat: 3.0g; Protein: 4g; Carbohydrates: 3g; Cholesterol: 16Mg; Sodium: 179Mg


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 10, 2006, 01:53:24 AM
BBM-intern, you're brilliant! Thanks for your enlightening posts!

Desecra, thanks for jumping in! I'm guessing some people might want to avoid cochineal because crushed beetles sound icky even to non-vegetarians  ;D 

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 10, 2006, 05:51:17 AM
... I'm guessing some people might want to avoid cochineal because crushed beetles sound icky even to non-vegetarians  ;D 

hehehe... i think, somebody told me once, that the coloring is just from the wings of the beetles... that's a little better since it doesn't include the squishy stuff..

one of my fave toothpastes, that aryurvedic or however you spell it brand, was so nummy tasting! but i found out later it was bright pink from cochineal. sigh....

but now, what makes ketchup red? LOL...  i read that as far as food goes, ketchup has the highest percentage of "insect parts" allowable by the FDA. put that on your fry (or chip) and eat it. maybe the european method of dipping fries in mayonnaise isn't so bad afterall! ;) ;D

but that seems a bit like dipping potatoes dripping with hot grease into cold grease, to me... :P

try squeezing lemons on good homemade frenchfries. my favorite way to eat fries is to toss them with crushed garlic, some lemon juice, scant salt, and chili powder. there was a restaurant in the rocky mountains we'd stop at after a day of skiing that served them that way. deeelish. 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 10, 2006, 10:05:04 PM
^ Mmmmm! I've taken up the British habit of sprinkling salt and vinegar on my chips  ;), but will definitely try the above next time!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Ellen (tellyouwhat) on September 10, 2006, 10:25:07 PM

but now, what makes ketchup red? LOL...  i read that as far as food goes, ketchup has the highest percentage of "insect parts" allowable by the FDA. put that on your fry (or chip) and eat it. maybe the european method of dipping fries in mayonnaise isn't so bad afterall! ;) ;D

but that seems a bit like dipping potatoes dripping with hot grease into cold grease, to me... :P

try squeezing lemons on good homemade frenchfries. my favorite way to eat fries is to toss them with crushed garlic, some lemon juice, scant salt, and chili powder. there was a restaurant in the rocky mountains we'd stop at after a day of skiing that served them that way. deeelish. 

JIMMY did you have to question KETCHUP???? What about good old Tomatoes!!! They are RED.  So is spaghetti sauce.  Why did you have to put this doubt in my mind? :-[
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 11, 2006, 10:42:54 AM
ellen ---- oh i'm sorry! it's just........... well i always think of that every time i open a ketchup packet. then i think about the time we tried chocolate covered ants in elementary school... it was not so bad! and i know that people eat bugs in south east asian countries all the time... hell i'll eat anything. once. besides.. shrimp -- they are just like water bugs to me, visually. and those are quite nummy. :)

laurentia ---- i put malt vinegar on french fries sometimes!! the armenians here in glendale do that too, it's a good thing!

btw -- balsamic vinegar on ice cream... good balsamic, the syrupy kind, on good pure ice cream. DEELISH.

...and the southern way of eating pancakes?  ...with yellow mustard and maple syrup... not so good sounding.. ;) ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Desecra on September 11, 2006, 01:03:25 PM
MUSTARD and maple syrup?  What kind of mustard?  [French, English, etc.]  I'm quite intrigued by this.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on September 11, 2006, 06:56:06 PM
I told my kid about the "bugs" in ketchup tonight!!  LOL!  She was revolted, after loading her fries (I know, I don't eat that crap, shouldn't let them eat it either!) with it, I had to tell her I was kidding!  Now, I'm gonna do a little research on it...

Gnash, where did you read that?  (that's probably the extent of my research!)  And mayo on fries, yummy.  Takes me back to all of those bad habits I used to have! 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 11, 2006, 07:54:22 PM
I told my kid about the "bugs" in ketchup tonight!!  LOL!  She was revolted, after loading her fries (I know, I don't eat that crap, shouldn't let them eat it either!) with it, I had to tell her I was kidding!  Now, I'm gonna do a little research on it...
...

LOL that is so funny... but you're not kidding. i don't know where i heard about it. apparently, there are limits to the amount of bugs in food. of course, when you take massive truckloads of tomatoes to turn them into ketchup, you can't remove all the bugs. i see them carted around town, big open semi haulers filled to the brim with tomatoes. they drip red juice, and if they hit a big bump on the freeway, some topple out. i've been splatted with them on the road!...   anyway, dunno where but i read somewhere that the FDA allowed the highest level of insect "parts" in ketchup... out of all the foods they bug-monitor. they also monitor things like "mammalian excreta" and whatnot. thank goodness for that.

there is even an allowable limit of pesticide residue in ketchup (and other foods). apparently it is decided how much pesticide is "okay" for us to ingest. i'd imagine all these things are probably not closely monitored and fluctuate wildly.

the good thing is that ketchup is boiled and so the insect parts are rendered harmless. but boiling does nothing for chemical pesticides.

cottonseed oil, i hear, should be avoided because the FDA does not consider cotton a food product, and the amounts of pesticides used to control the cotton weevils is astounding. but then after harvesting the textile product, the seeds are used to make cottonseed oil for food use. in and out burger, who used to proudly proclaim that their potatoes were fried in 100% cottonseed oil on their packaging, has changed their advertising to say "vegetable oil." perhaps it's still cottonseed, which is probably cheaper than vegetable oil.

they say "you are what you eat..."  ...now ya know why the mosquitos won't bite! :D ;D ::)

my motto is to eat organic when you can, to avoid pesticides... or grow your own. avoid chemicals, artificial sweeteners, colorings and flavoring in foods. avoid the word hydrogenated. avoid flouridated baby water. children especially will benefit, because of the long term build up of things in the body.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on September 11, 2006, 09:49:22 PM
MUSTARD and maple syrup?  What kind of mustard?  [French, English, etc.]  I'm quite intrigued by this.

Yellow american mustard.  Try topping that mess with a couple of over easy eggs, cut the whole thing up and dive in.

 ;D ;D ;D

Yum.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 11, 2006, 10:18:45 PM
my motto is to eat organic when you can, to avoid pesticides... or grow your own. avoid chemicals, artificial sweeteners, colorings and flavoring in foods. avoid the word hydrogenated. avoid flouridated baby water. children especially will benefit, because of the long term build up of things in the body.

Little Miss Sensible APPROVES!

And on the topic of weird combinations, I had a friend whose mother was half Sami and she told me how they used to take their coffee with salt and a piece of cheese that melted in the cup. She often had this when she was a kid.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 12, 2006, 03:02:23 AM
...
And on the topic of weird combinations, I had a friend whose mother was half Sami and she told me how they used to take their coffee with salt and a piece of cheese that melted in the cup. She often had this when she was a kid.

that is hands down the weirest thing i've heard of... cheese and coffee.. and salt. what is Sami?

when i was growing up my grandmother would make black tea and sweeten it with Tang instant orange drink mix. sugar and artificial flavors, basically... the stuff the astronauts brought up in space.

it was good, but a mild mix compared to CHEESE and COFFEE!!  ;D

heidi --  thanks for answering descara's question, i forgot... i had no idea you undulged in such a manner! you naughty pancake eater! ;D

okay how about this very bizarre combo: marmite on toast...

(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/marmite.jpg)

i tried it in texas for the first time!  with honey, it's not so bad ;) :D

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: desertrat on September 12, 2006, 03:46:16 AM
(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/marmite.jpg)

i tried it in texas for the first time!  with honey, it's not so bad ;) :D


barf!

 ;D ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 12, 2006, 05:19:04 AM
that is hands down the weirest thing i've heard of... cheese and coffee.. and salt. what is Sami?

Sorry - the Sami are a minority people who live in northern Scandinavia and parts of Russia. Traditionally, they were nomads and herded reindeer, have suffered oppression for centuries, and currently strive to repair all the damage done to their culture and identity. I live in southern Sweden and have actually never seen a Sami person in real life, so if anybody's interested, Wikipedia is far more informed than me: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sami_people

I think maybe coffee and cheese is better than it sounds. My standard breakfast is cheese sandwiches and coffee and that combination is very nice, it seems that the cheese (I tend to eat a very mild variety in the mornings) brings out the chocolatey flavours in the coffee. I still wouldn't put a piece in my cup, though! The salt feels far weirder, but here's a theory: in northern Sweden people (older people, at least) like something called "boiled" coffee. I don't know exactly how that is prepared, and only know this from hearsay, but I imagine they end up with a coffee similar to, say, Turkish, with a bit of dregs in the cup. If they actually boil it, it's probably more acidic than the coffee I'm used to and it's possible that some salt would balance that sourness. Maybe.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 12, 2006, 07:47:45 AM
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/87/Saami_Family_1900.jpg/350px-Saami_Family_1900.jpg)

ohh, look at that! a sami family in front of their dwelling around 1900.. that so warms the heart, it reminds me of the native americans that roamed our great country before the others arrived.

i can imagine them putting into coffee (how did they get it?) their chunk of (reindeer maybe?) cheese... holding the hot cup to their hands and drinking it to energize them and nourish them to face the cold days...

thank you for the info on the sami, laurentia!

i also like cheese for breakfast, at least with eggs, in an omelette, or plain. a typical breakfast for me might consist of hot tea, soft-boiled eggs dotted with butter and salt and pepper, some fruit, cheese or yogurt, and toasted bread with butter and jams. i dated a fellow from germany during college and we would sit mornings in his sunny berkeley apartment and enjoy this type of breakfast.

he also introduced me to a type of cheese -- gehvost, i think it's called -- which is great with fruit, like pears or apples. it's a very dense brown, almost caramel flavored goat cheese. i love it but it's quite expensive to buy here in the states. but sometimes i'll get some, for a little goes a long way. now this cheese i could see in coffee.

for some reason i can't find a thing about it on google. i'm probably spelling it incorrectly! oh wait --- i found something:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geitost

that's it...  gjetost, geitost...  however it's spelled, this stuff is delicious, and i totally recommend it for cheese fans! the texture is what i find so appealing, like it's laced with sugars --- slightly grainy, but with that sweet creaminess of cheese...

lol, the brand i get here in the states is by SKI QUEEN:  http://www.norwegiancheeses.co.uk/ski_queen.htm
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 12, 2006, 11:41:21 AM
ohh, look at that! a sami family in front of their dwelling around 1900.. that so warms the heart, it reminds me of the native americans that roamed our great country before the others arrived.
Spinning totally off topic; it's really remarkable how you find similar cultures over much of the northern hemisphere: from the Sami to the Native Americans via the various peoples of Siberia. I get the feeling that once they were the rulers of the earth, like the Western culture is today (like it or not). Like us Westerners today, a person could travel across a whole continent or even to a different one and meet people who spoke an unintelligible language and hunted strange animals, but whose way of life was still largely similar to the one at home.
(Any anthropologists on the forum are welcome to correct me if I'm romanticizing here  :P)

Coffee was probably not too hard to come by for that family...I don't think the Sami have ever been isolated from southern Scandinavia (they might have been better off otherwise  :-\), I suppose they just went to the next village and checked if anybody wanted to sell some! On the other hand, the nearest village was probably not exactly within five minutes' walking distance. Northern Sweden is very sparsely populated, I've met people who live there who think it's quite normal to travel 60 miles to go clubbing on a Saturday night.

I'm so glad you were curious enough to check the link!

Quote
gjetost, geitost...  however it's spelled, this stuff is delicious, and i totally recommend it for cheese fans! the texture is what i find so appealing, like it's laced with sugars --- slightly grainy, but with that sweet creaminess of cheese...

How funny! You were introduced to Norwegian cheese by a German guy in the USA...I knew from the description what you were talking about - mesost to me - and you know what? I've been trying to like it because it's so rich in iron, and others minerals too, I think, but I just can't!  :D  That caramel flavour just doesn't agree with me somehow. I'm very fond of French goat's cheese, though, chèvre. Mmmmm.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on September 14, 2006, 09:30:54 PM
Ok first you all were totally grossing me out!!

Heidi- Yuck!!  And I thought bugs,  I mean ketchup, and eggs were gross but you have blown that out of the water!!

Laurentia- Cheese and salt in your coffee?  Why would you ruin a good piece of cheese??  LOL!  I don't drink coffee, but I love cheese. 

Gnash- pesticide laced food.  A lovely thought.  I see how quickly my daughters have matured and I am convinced it is because of the food.  I'm not really a grow your own kinda person, FL is hard to garden in unless it's suited for the climate and sandy soil.  Not to mention my general laziness.  And organic is good but really expensive when you're feeding a family.  Marmite??  Yeast extract?  Sounds horrifying.

Then you switch topics to the cheese, cherve, yum, and the gjetost, sounds delicious!!  Now you have me hungry.  When I visited France I was astounded at the selection of cheese and wine at the grocery store.  For breakfast we had baquette with Nutella.  Which is basically a chocolate hazelnut sandwich.  Heavenly.  Thank goodness I was only there for 2 weeks!!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 15, 2006, 05:36:44 AM
Nutella!!! It's one of the loveliest substances in the world!!! When I was little, we didn't get that in Sweden, but our parents allowed us to buy a jar each and bring home when we were on holiday in Italy. We never put it on sandwiches, but ate it with spoons out of the jar. Nowadays I've seen it in the supermarket, but I try to ignore it, because if I got some, it would take over my life  :o  :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on September 15, 2006, 05:45:59 AM

heidi --  thanks for answering descara's question, i forgot... i had no idea you undulged in such a manner! you naughty pancake eater! ;D

okay how about this very bizarre combo: marmite on toast...

(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/marmite.jpg)

i tried it in texas for the first time!  with honey, it's not so bad ;) :D


Marmite rocks.  I'm glad you liked it. ;D

as for the bizarre combos...that could be a whole new thread!  My ex used to eat carrots and ketchup. (whut?  condiments.)
and Fritos and peanut butter.

My closet indulgences tend to be a)raw potato slices (when I'm making mashed taters), b) tomato and mayonaise sandwiches, c) radish and butter sandwiches

anyone else got a weird one in the pantry?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on September 15, 2006, 05:48:56 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geitost

that's it...  gjetost, geitost...  however it's spelled, this stuff is delicious, and i totally recommend it for cheese fans! the texture is what i find so appealing, like it's laced with sugars --- slightly grainy, but with that sweet creaminess of cheese...

lol, the brand i get here in the states is by SKI QUEEN:  http://www.norwegiancheeses.co.uk/ski_queen.htm

Ja vi elsker detet landet....

( Gjetost is best on a really nutty, dense brown bread lightly toasted with just a tiny smear of butter... IMHO)

jimmy, you should be able to get gjetost in the US.  If I can find it in the local grocery store here in Indiana, you should have no trouble.  Try "Trader Joe's"
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 15, 2006, 06:01:21 AM
My closet indulgences tend to be a)raw potato slices (when I'm making mashed taters), b) tomato and mayonaise sandwiches, c) radish and butter sandwiches

anyone else got a weird one in the pantry?

We have a berry called lingon, which is similar to cranberries and is made into a widely popular, no too sweet jam. It's served with a lot of Swedish food, like meatballs. My dad used to have lingon jam with everything. I remember that one day a discussion arose over this habit because mum was heavily opposed to putting lingon jam on nasi goreng, so that'll have to be my favourite eyewitnessed weird combination.

When I was 20 or so, I ate a lot of strange things, mainly because I hadn't begun to take an interest in food and nutrition yet. How about macaroni with béarnaise sauce? Sandwiches with leftover potato crisps from yesterday's party (it's actually quite nice, the combination of soft bread, butter and crunchy crisps)? How did I survive?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 15, 2006, 07:36:22 AM
laurentia -----

yes, the german guy taught me about the cheese, and a few other things...! i'd never had soft boiled eggs before i met him, and he taught me the easiest way to boil eggs: put eggs in a pan of cold water. bring the pan to a roiling boil. then take off the heat. let sit for 3 minutes for soft. 10 for hard. i dunno about putting vinegar in the water to make them easier to peel, but he did say that older eggs are easier to peel than fresh. plus, he had all sorts of colorful egg cups which held the white orbs on the kitchen table, and we'd set out a tablecloth and use his oddball collection of colorful wares. it was a beautiful display... such great memories of thomás...

oh, lingonberries! we get that, of all place, at a furniture store called IKEA. lol. a nice accompaniment to swedish meatballs for sure! but i have to ask --- what is nasi goreng?

heidi ----- gjetost cheese!

i can get it here, sometimes in a chain market if it's somewhat upscale, but also at the better cheese shops. there's a gourmet shop near my house.. the problem is the cost. they're so expensive.  i visit trader joe's next door for a 2.99 log of of sonoma chevre goat cheese. here's a recipe using that stuff:

goat cheese appetizers:

slice a seeded baguette into 1/4" thick rounds on the diagonal... smear on some dijon mustard or some sweet chutney, some chopped basil, then a good dollop of goat cheese. crack some grated pepper on top of that, and drizzle or spray on some olive oil. dot each slice with a sliver of black oil cured olives (my fave) then bake in a hot oven until slightly toasted and warmed. YUM. the freshness of basil, saltiness of olive, and the texture of the cheese combine with the chewiness of the baguette excellently.


as far as weird foods go -- when i was a child living in greece, there was a neighbor boy whose mother's idea of a treat was to stick a popsicle stick into a cold 1/4 lb block of butter. the first time i saw that i wondered what he was eating and he offered me some. i was expecting banana or pineapple flavors because of the color,,, EWWW... the initial shock of that was repulsing, and as a result, i'm not big on butter.

heidi, raw potatoes, another eww.. the starchiness is weird to me. a good subsitute is JICAMA... it's nice cut into matchsticks and tossed with lime juice and chili powder!!

little darlin -----

mmmm nutella.. hazelnuts are one of my fave foods, along with porcini mushrooms. of course we rarely eat either of them so it's always a treat...

it's probably the hormone additives in today's meat that might be accelerating your daughter's growth... i've heard that in japan the kids are much taller than ever now, due to their diet. in the US, some girls are menstruating at age 9. wow. it might not be hormones, but when you think of what's pumped into chickens to get them to produce faster, you gotta wonder. also, all the preservatives in food seem to affect the human body. i try to avoid that stuff...................  typed while chewing a stick of artificial watermelon colored and flavored aspartame sweetened gum.
 ::) :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: daphne on September 15, 2006, 10:04:26 AM
Nutella!!! It's one of the loveliest substances in the world!!! When I was little, we didn't get that in Sweden, but our parents allowed us to buy a jar each and bring home when we were on holiday in Italy. We never put it on sandwiches, but ate it with spoons out of the jar. Nowadays I've seen it in the supermarket, but I try to ignore it, because if I got some, it would take over my life  :o  :D

 :D :D LOL, Laurentia! Everybody loves Nutella  ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on September 15, 2006, 10:49:50 AM
:D :D LOL, Laurentia! Everybody loves Nutella  ;D

Available at your friendly neighborhood super Walmart for $2 for a small jar.  I took a jar on vacation (Treasure Island) and ate it with a spoon.  Yum.  Something about vacation that makes it ok to indulge a little.  I never buy it regularly, I wouldn't be able to resist!!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 15, 2006, 11:33:31 AM
oh, lingonberries! we get that, of all place, at a furniture store called IKEA. lol. a nice accompaniment to swedish meatballs for sure! but i have to ask --- what is nasi goreng?

Ah, yes, I've heard that IKEA stands for the greatest part of Sweden's food export! Not that we have much food to export  :D  I didn't know that IKEA's tentacles had reached America, though, I thought they were still only to be found in Europe.
Nasi goreng is a kind of Indonesian fried rice. That time when my mum made it, I remember there was chicken in it and the seasoning was very gentle and not very exotic at all, maybe a little chili. Here's the recipe I use when making it, it's cheap and simple and can be made from leftovers:

Vegetarian Nasi Goreng

2 eggs (or more)
1 tbsp wheat flour
4 tbsp water
salt, pepper

Make an omelette out of the above and put it aside.

4 shallots, sliced

Fry these in oil until nice and soft, put aside for now.

4 cloves of garlic
8 shallots, chopped
2 red chillies, chopped

Put these three in a mortar and pound them together. If you don't have a mortar, or can't be bothered to clean it because your mortar is made from granite and cleaning it is equivalent to a full gym pass (which leads you to avoid using it even though it's the same kind that Jamie Oliver uses and you squeed over it in the shop and was hugging it all day after having been given it for your birthday last year), just chop everything finely.

4 cups (1 l) boiled rice, preferably cold, leftovers are ideal
ketjap manis - an indonesian soy sauce that is thick, black and sweet (and gave the Western world the word "ketchup")

Fry the mixture from the mortar briefly in oil in a wok or large pan, add the rice, ketjap manis and a little salt and fry until heated through.
Cut the omelette in strips, cut up a small cucumber and a couple of tomatoes and serve the dish with omelette, the fried shallot slices, cucumber and tomatoes on top. I also like to add some fried tofu, and non-vegetarians might hide any leftovers of meat - from a BBQ or something - in their nasi goreng.
And don't forget to put peanut sauce and the bottle of ketjap manis on the table as well.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 15, 2006, 12:12:03 PM
Available at your friendly neighborhood super Walmart for $2 for a small jar.  I took a jar on vacation (Treasure Island) and ate it with a spoon.  Yum.  Something about vacation that makes it ok to indulge a little.  I never buy it regularly, I wouldn't be able to resist!!

http://www.caramelsin.com/

omg. this stuff is spoon candy too. the ginger is fabuloussssssssssinfully deeeelish. it's very thick stuff. ;D

i haven't tried the cranberry fool.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: littledarlin on September 15, 2006, 12:21:14 PM
http://www.caramelsin.com/


Great site Gnash.  The cinnamon raisin fool sounds delish too!!  And ginger? Yummy!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 15, 2006, 12:22:06 PM
... (which leads you to avoid using it even though it's the same kind that Jamie Oliver uses and you squeed over it in the shop and was hugging it all day after having been given it for your birthday last year)...

hahah! oh that jamie oliver... what a dish.

the nasi goreng fried rice sounds incredibly tasty, laurentia!! i'm very interested in both peanut sauce and ketjap manis now.. will go to an indonesian marketplace sometime!

yummy. my mother, being japanese, would often make fried rice, and it's sort of a comfort food for me. studded with snowpeas, green onion, leftover meat or scrambled egg and whatnot, it was often a meal in itself. when other kids ate peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, i would often open a fat thermos of steaming fried rice she'd cooked up that morning, and enjoy that for my school lunch. with chopsticks. i got teased for it sometimes, the sushi rolls too. i begged my mother to pack something "normal"... lol.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 16, 2006, 01:43:28 AM
:D :D LOL, Laurentia! Everybody loves Nutella  ;D

You bet!  :D

Quote from: gnash
http://www.caramelsin.com/

OMG. That looks impossibly glorious. Made from real cream and butter, I hope?
My greatest toffee experience to date is Thornton's toffees, they're available here but expensive. I'm going to stock up when I'm in London for the get-together.

gnash, how great to have a mum from somewhere with a good food culture! Have you tried making fried rice with toasted coconut flakes (I toast them in a dry frying pan)? It's great with peanut sauce, too.

The easiest way to make your own peanut sauce is to put 1/2 cup of peanut butter with a cup of water, some chopped chili, and a couple of tablespoons of sugar in a pan and heat slowly until it's smooth, then add soy sauce or tamari and/or salt to taste and let cool. That's easiest, but not best; I prefer to use this recipe:

Peanut Sauce

1 small onion
2 cloves of garlic

Chop and fry lightly in oil, it's just supposed to soften, not brown.

1 cup peanuts, toasted and salted, chopped
2 tbsp soy sauce or tamari
2 tsp brown sugar or honey
1 cup coconut milk
a little sambal oelek or chopped chili

Put everything, including the onion and garlic, in a blender and mix until as smooth as you like it. Peanut butter could be used instead of peanuts, of course, and then you could make this without a blender.



Yet another variety is used in this recipe that I posted a while back, but it's yummy enough to repost:

Quote from: last month or so
The Lazy Cook's Creamy Thai Stir-fry

a little Sambal Oelek
4-5 cloves of garlic, sliced
1 lime
2-3 tbsp soy or tamari
4-5 tbsp chopped ginger, fresh or pickled
2/3 tbsp sugar
1 can coconut milk (about 1 1/2 cup)
6-7 tbsp peanut butter

Put this in a blender and mix until smooth. I cut away the peel and the hard, stringy thing in the middle of the lime and put the whole thing in, but you could also squeeze it and just use the juice. If you don't have a blender or similar, use finely grated ginger, lemon juice and crushed garlic and stir everything together, but then you'll have to wash the garlic press and the grating iron and possibly even the citrus press, and I've been trying to minimize the amount of washing-up needed here, being a lazy cook myself. If you're really lazy, you might check for grated ginger, crushed garlic, bottled lime juice and fried tofu in your foodstore, and use frozen vegetables.

Firm tofu; the slabs I buy weigh a bit less than 3/4 lb (300 g) and I find one of those to be enough, but throw in as much as you want.
About 2 lb vegetables (800 g to 1 kg), e. g. cabbage, mushrooms, aubergine and some kind of onion, preferably spring onion

Dice the tofu and fry in oil until golden, put aside until later. My wok is cast iron and tofu mercilessly sticks to it, so I use a teflon frying pan for this and the wok for the rest of the dish.
If you're using mushrooms, fry them first and when they start to look nice, add the rest of the vegetables. Fry everything for a minute, then add the sauce and the tofu and put on the lid. Let simmer until ready - takes five minutes or so - and serve with rice or noodles.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on September 16, 2006, 04:11:11 AM
Nutella!!! It's one of the loveliest substances in the world!!! When I was little, we didn't get that in Sweden, but our parents allowed us to buy a jar each and bring home when we were on holiday in Italy. We never put it on sandwiches, but ate it with spoons out of the jar. Nowadays I've seen it in the supermarket, but I try to ignore it, because if I got some, it would take over my life  :o  :D
Ooohh, Nutellaaah. I'm glad it wasn't in America when I was a kid or I would have had a serious addiction and thoroughly rotted my teeth. When I was in my 20s one of my flatmates in Boston had lived in Germany for a few years of his childhood and whenever his father went back there on business he would bring him back a jar of Nutella. I just couldn't keep my fingers out of it.  :D Now that I have kids and live in Nutellaland I have to ration it, it disappears so fast.

Nigella Lawson has a great recipe for Nutella cake in her Domestic Goddess cookbook. My daughter makes it often.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 16, 2006, 05:49:23 AM
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

the peanut sauce sounds very good, and the recipe is great. i have all the ingredients on hand except for the sambal oelek.

it sounds similar to the peanut sauce they put on the thai dish called "pra lam long song"... tofu or chicken or pork or whatever on a bed of spinach with a creamy, flavorful peanut sauce. your recipe doesn't call for fish sauce, so that a plus (for me).

i love stir frying since it's usually an all-in-one-pan meal -- less cleanup. i have a big wok styled stainless steel pan (high sides, rounded) with a heavy copper bottom clad in stainless steel... and i'm in love with it. my other pans are jealous. LOL. i've recently switched to stainless steel, since i was tired of replacing the scratched or worn out teflon, and i LOVE it. i do love our one cast iron skillet tho, i've had that since college!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on September 17, 2006, 03:36:36 AM
As long as we have an Asian theme going, here is a recipe for what I call an Indian-style guacamole. The original recipe was for an avocado salad and the only thing I changed was to mash the avocado instead of chopping it. Then use papadams instead of tortilla chips for dipping. It's really delicious and the flavour is surprising to people when they're expecting regular guacamole.

Avocados
fresh coriander (cilantro)
lemon or lime juice
salt

cooking oil
black mustard seeds (1 tsp per avocado
garlic, minced (one clove per avocado)
onion, finely chopped (1/2 small one per)
green chilies, minced (1 per or less)
curry powder (1/2 tsp per)


Mash some avocados and mix in lemon juice and salt to taste and finely chopped coriander leaves (about 1 Tbsp per avocado)

In a small pan, heat 1 Tbsp of oil per avocado and add the mustard seeds. When they stop splattering (hold a lid over the pan) add the garlic and let sizzle a few seconds, then add the onion and cook until it wilts, then add chilies and curry powder and cook 1 minute more. Stir into avocado mash.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 17, 2006, 09:20:44 AM
^^^ that sounds realllly good!! i like the idea of using papadams instead of tortilla chips, but i bet chips would be good too. i made an indian curry last night and wish that indian guacamole was the appetizer...


EGGPLANT & OKRA CURRY

6 or 8 small chinese or japanese eggplants cut into 1" rounds
about 3 or 4 cups of chopped okra (i just cut the ends off and cut them in half)
one 15oz can tomato sauce
one 15oz can stewed tomatoes (or fresh tomatoes)
two small potatoes, chopped into 1" cubes.
almost 1/4 cup finely chopped fresh garlic (lots of garlic!)
about 1 1/2 cups frozen peas
one small white onion, chopped fine
olive oil for frying the vegetables
garam masala seasoning
curry spices seasonings (i used a prepared "korma curry" mix)
about 2 cups of plain yogurt

in a large pan, (like a high sided wok type pan) sauteé the onion and garlic in olive oil for a bit, then add the eggplant and okra. add more oil as the eggplant really soaks it up. i used about 1/4 cup total. when the eggplant begins to soften and before the garlic browns too much, add the potatoes, tomatoes and tomato sauce. add 2 cans of water. stir and bring to a boil. then add the frozen peas. sprinkle in the seasonings, i used about 1/2 tsp each. stir well. let this cook, uncovered, stirring often, until the vegetables are cooked and mixture has thickened, about a half hour. when almost done, stir in the yogurt and stir well. let simmer a bit longer, then it's done! serve over rice, and sprinkle with fresh, chopped cilantro/coriander.

the korma curry is very fragrant and has all sorts of spices. i don't know what it is, but it's good. there are these seed pod things in it that you can't eat, but they release a very wonderful flavor... it's hot and spicy so watch out and go easy.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on September 17, 2006, 01:34:10 PM
Pity, I love okra but it's just about impossible to find in France. When we moved here from London we craved curries so much that, 5 months into our life here we actually booked ourselves into a B&B run by English people for a weekend because the guide said they offered Indian meals. After that I decided to master Indian cuisine (hadn't been necessary in London) but I have to grow some essential ingredients myself, like chili peppers and coriander.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 18, 2006, 04:23:22 AM
aahh, you're one of the few people that seem to love okra. most everybody i know hates the stuff!!

i also like them dipped in egg, then cornmeal, and fried in oil till crispy.

that's great you took courses in indian cuisine, you probably know what those little seed things are, i think maybe cardamom? very fragrant stuff!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 18, 2006, 04:48:14 AM
Mmm! Indian food! I've failed epically every time I've tried making it, but I'll give these latest two recipes a shot, it can't go wrong forever and they sound so good! I suppose I haven't found a really good curry spice yet - will keep on searching.
Those little pods are probably cardamom, yes! Mmmm.

Chapeugris - we don't get okra in Sweden either, I've never seen them in real life. What do they taste like, is there a good substitute? Green beans perhaps?

I also wanted to tell you all that I've held my promise from a couple of months ago - I made another cherry cake on Friday and there's now a photo in the picture thread! http://davecullen.com/forum/index.php?topic=8792.1217
The result wasn't as great this time around, I didn't have enough patience with the creaming, I think. The cake turned out quite compact and the cherries still sank to the bottom even though I tried to poke them in evenly. Anyway, it tasted nice.

(I don't own a floral patterned dress or even a knitted jacket á la Mrs Twist, but I did find a rose patterned shirt!)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on September 18, 2006, 05:01:28 AM
aahh, you're one of the few people that seem to love okra. most everybody i know hates the stuff!!

i also like them dipped in egg, then cornmeal, and fried in oil till crispy.

that's great you took courses in indian cuisine, you probably know what those little seed things are, i think maybe cardamom? very fragrant stuff!
I didn't take courses, I just bought several books and kept at it.

Little seeds? I have about 10 jars of different types of little seeds... maybe be more specific?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on September 18, 2006, 05:04:53 AM


Chapeugris - we don't get okra in Sweden either, I've never seen them in real life. What do they taste like, is there a good substitute? Green beans perhaps?
Okra is slimey inside when you cook it so really, there is no substitute. It's the key ingredient in Creole dishes called gumbo -- the okra is what makes it gummy. I agree with gnash, it's an acquired taste. If you Google okra in Images, you'll see what it looks like.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on September 18, 2006, 05:37:07 AM
Mmm! Indian food! I've failed epically every time I've tried making it, but I'll give these latest two recipes a shot, it can't go wrong forever and they sound so good! I suppose I haven't found a really good curry spice yet - will keep on searching.
You'll find plenty when you're in London! I plan to visit my favourite Indian grocery on Brick Lane to stock up.

Quote
I also wanted to tell you all that I've held my promise from a couple of months ago - I made another cherry cake on Friday and there's now a photo in the picture thread! http://davecullen.com/forum/index.php?topic=8792.1217
The result wasn't as great this time around, I didn't have enough patience with the creaming, I think. The cake turned out quite compact and the cherries still sank to the bottom even though I tried to poke them in evenly. Anyway, it tasted nice.

(I don't own a floral patterned dress or even a knitted jacket á la Mrs Twist, but I did find a rose patterned shirt!)
You look like Pipi Longstocking in that photo.  :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 18, 2006, 06:00:50 AM
You look like Pipi Longstocking in that photo.  :D

Thanks! She used to be my heroine when I was four - it was a mystery to me why mum wouldn't let me wear my Pippi costume when we were going into town, because in my opinion, those were my nicest clothes. Sometimes she agreed to braid my hair and put steel wires in the braids to make them stand straight out from my head, but I wasn't even allowed out in our garden like that.  :D

Quite a lot of British cookbooks get translated and sold in Swedish bookshops, so I've seen okra in pictures, just not in reality. Slimy? Hmmm...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on September 18, 2006, 06:17:12 AM
Pippi Longstocking is called Fifi Brindacier in France. Fifi because Pippi sounds like the French word for "pee pee". Brindacier ("brin d'acier" ) translates as "Steel Twig"
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on September 19, 2006, 06:30:26 AM
We have a berry called lingon, which is similar to cranberries and is made into a widely popular, no too sweet jam. It's served with a lot of Swedish food, like meatballs. My dad used to have lingon jam with everything. I remember that one day a discussion arose over this habit because mum was heavily opposed to putting lingon jam on nasi goreng, so that'll have to be my favourite eyewitnessed weird combination.

When I was 20 or so, I ate a lot of strange things, mainly because I hadn't begun to take an interest in food and nutrition yet. How about macaroni with béarnaise sauce? Sandwiches with leftover potato crisps from yesterday's party (it's actually quite nice, the combination of soft bread, butter and crunchy crisps)? How did I survive?

Lingon berries rock my world.  *familien min komer fra Norge!*

Macaroni with bearnaise is like Mac'N'Cheese w/o the cheese! 

And I have put potato chips (crisps) on my sandwiches since I was a child - white bread, bologna, american cheese and potato chips. lol.

Maybe these aren't so strange afterall... ;D ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: daphne on September 19, 2006, 07:30:23 AM
Pippi Longstocking is called Fifi Brindacier in France. Fifi because Pippi sounds like the French word for "pee pee". Brindacier ("brin d'acier" ) translates as "Steel Twig"

First Nutella, and now Pippi - how come every time I come to lurk here you are talking about my childhood's sweetes memories?  :D ;D I had a thing for Tommy.
Laurentia, thank you for posting that lovely pic - your cake looks very yummy, and you are so young! You sound so expert that I thought you were older  :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 19, 2006, 07:39:20 AM
First Nutella, and now Pippi - how come every time I come to lurk here you are talking about my childhood's sweetes memories? 

That's because this is the BEST thread! Isn't it cool that we have the same sweet memories, by the way?
Quote
Laurentia, thank you for posting that lovely pic - your cake looks very yummy, and you are so young! You sound so expert that I thought you were older  :D
No, I'm just bossy for my age!  :D  Thanks for the compliments, Dahne!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: daphne on September 19, 2006, 08:06:39 AM
That's because this is the BEST thread! Isn't it cool that we have the same sweet memories, by the way?

Yes! Nutella is for Italian people what tea is for the British (LOL). It's as Italian as spaghetti and pizza, and I didn't know it was famous abroad, I found it so funny!
Btw, your "Pippi and Nutella stories" should have made me realize how old you are (more or less). They are the symbols of our generation  :D
Title: And now for something completely different!
Post by: BBM-Intern on September 19, 2006, 08:32:36 AM
Hi all you lovely people,

Here's a recipe to "throw" most of you, a Vietnamese one.  It isn't the easiest to make, but I assure you, it's special.  One from a collection of recipes I'm putting together, perhaps I'll publish a book one day!  I first tried these in a Vietnamese restaurant in Brisbane many years ago, but wasn’t too keen on it for some reason or other. But when I tasted it on a trip to Saigon (or HCMC as it is properly called these days), it was a superb meal at “Banh Xeo 46A” (check it out in LonelyPlanet) that really hit the spot. The crepes were filled with tender slices of pork and prawns and crunchy beansprouts, accompanied with an array of aromatic herbs. I have tried to re-capture that magic and this is a simplified recipe suitable for home cooking.

Oh, any of you experienced Vietnamese cooks, please give me some feedback!

Bánh Xèo (Vietnamese crepes)
(Makes approximately three 25-30cm crepes, serves two persons as light meal/entrée)

Ingredients:
Batter:
¾ cup of rice flour
1 tbsp plain wheat flour
¼ tsp turmeric powder
¼ tsp curry powder
1 cup water
1 small shallot (green onion), sliced finely

Filling:
45ml cooking oil
100g lean pork shoulder or loin, cut into thin slices
150g medium uncooked prawns, peeled and deveined
½ small onion, thinly sliced
salt and pepper
1½ cup mung bean sprouts

Dipping sauce:
1 small clove garlic, crushed
1 tbsp light brown sugar
1 tbsp hot water
1 tbsp lime/lemon juice
2-3 tbsp fish sauce
few strands carrot, very finely julienned

To serve:
½ bunch each mint and basil, or mixed Vietnamese herbs
2 bunches soft lettuce, leaves separated

Method:
Make batter first: in a medium bowl, whisk the rice flour, wheat flour, turmeric powder and curry powder, adding 1 cup water slowly. Whisk to a smooth batter, add sliced shallot then set aside.

To prepare dipping sauce: in a small bowl, put in crushed garlic and brown sugar, then add hot water to dissolve sugar. Add lime/lemon juice and fish sauce, then dilute to taste with cold water, adding more sugar, lime/lemon juice or fish sauce to balance as desired. Add julienned carrot strips to garnish, set aside.

To make the crepes, heat a large nonstick frying pan over medium heat. Add 15ml cooking oil and then add 1/3 of the sliced pork, prawns and sliced onions. Fry for 1-2 minutes until pork and prawns are nearly cooked, then season with salt and pepper. Pour 1/3 cup of batter into frying pan, swirling it up the sides of the pan and evenly over the surface of the pan, then lower the heat to medium-low and cook for 5-6 minutes until the sides curl up and the underside is a deep golden yellow-brown colour. Scatter ½ cup bean sprouts over one half of the crepe and cook for 1 minute longer. Fold the crepe in half and slide it onto a serving plate. Repeat with remaining filling and batter.

Serve crepes hot with herbs, lettuce and dipping sauce. Diners help themselves by cutting a small piece of the crepe, wrapping it in lettuce with herbs and adding the
dipping sauce as liked.

And this is what they look like, or at least my own version from the kitchen (my own amateur photography)
(http://members.optushome.com.au/taybardon/BanhXeo-Small.jpg)

Additional notes & hints (apologies in advance to experienced cooks, this is to help everyone achieve perfect results):

All measurements are Australian metric measures: 5ml teaspoon, 20ml tablespoon and 250ml cup.

The batter can be made well in advance and kept in the fridge. If liked, a dash of coconut milk can be also added, replacing part of the 1 cup of water.

For ease of cooking, set the crepe fillings (pork, prawns and onions) in three little mounds so the correct amount can be added for each crepe.

Dipping sauce should be made to taste, with a lightly sweet and sour note, but emphasizing the salty. The salt should dominate more, as it is needed to season the blander crepe and salad-type ingredients.  A few slices of cut (bird’s eye) chilli can also be added if liked.

Beansprouts can be tailed for neatness, but this is not essential.

To make fine julienne of carrot, peel a 5cm section of a small carrot, then using the vegetable peeler, take strips of carrot. Stack a few strips together and cut them finely with a sharp knife for fine julienne.

Use a good-quality non-stick pan, approximately 30-35cm in diameter. If your pan is significantly larger or smaller, adjust the number of crepes and apportion the batter and filling ingredients accordingly.

Stir the batter well before making each crepe to make sure the flour hasn’t settled to the bottom.

Don’t overcrowd the pan with the filling ingredients. One of the possible points of failure is having not having sufficient pan surface left or too low a heat when the batter hits the oil, resulting in soggy crepes. If necessary, reduce the quantity of filling ingredients used. The finished crepes should be very crisp to contrast with the softer herbs and lettuce, which is essential to the character of the dish. Adjust the heat so that the crepe cooks in 5-6 minutes and has fully cooked through; there should be a trace of sizzling oil on the surface towards the end, indicating the heat has evaporated the excess moisture.

The ideal type of lettuce is the soft “local” lettuce available in local markets. Otherwise try using soft “butter” or “bib” lettuce. All the salad-type ingredients should be well-washed and then dried thoroughly in a salad spinner. Other herbs to try include pennywort, shiso leaves or laksa mint (polygonum hydropiper).
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on September 19, 2006, 08:13:08 PM
This sounds really good. Can you recommend any other good filling ingredients to substitute for pork and shrimp? (Doesn't have to be vegetarian.)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on September 20, 2006, 07:31:28 AM
oh, lingonberries! we get that, of all place, at a furniture store called IKEA. lol. a nice accompaniment to swedish meatballs for sure! but i have to ask --- what is nasi goreng?

Ah, yes, I've heard that IKEA stands for the greatest part of Sweden's food export! Not that we have much food to export  :D  I didn't know that IKEA's tentacles had reached America, though, I thought they were still only to be found in Europe.
Nasi goreng is a kind of Indonesian fried rice. That time when my mum made it, I remember there was chicken in it and the seasoning was very gentle and not very exotic at all, maybe a little chili. Here's the recipe I use when making it, it's cheap and simple and can be made from leftovers:

Vegetarian Nasi Goreng

2 eggs (or more)
1 tbsp wheat flour
4 tbsp water
salt, pepper

Make an omelette out of the above and put it aside.

4 shallots, sliced

Fry these in oil until nice and soft, put aside for now.

4 cloves of garlic
8 shallots, chopped
2 red chillies, chopped

Put these three in a mortar and pound them together. If you don't have a mortar, or can't be bothered to clean it because your mortar is made from granite and cleaning it is equivalent to a full gym pass (which leads you to avoid using it even though it's the same kind that Jamie Oliver uses and you squeed over it in the shop and was hugging it all day after having been given it for your birthday last year), just chop everything finely.

4 cups (1 l) boiled rice, preferably cold, leftovers are ideal
ketjap manis - an indonesian soy sauce that is thick, black and sweet (and gave the Western world the word "ketchup")

Fry the mixture from the mortar briefly in oil in a wok or large pan, add the rice, ketjap manis and a little salt and fry until heated through.
Cut the omelette in strips, cut up a small cucumber and a couple of tomatoes and serve the dish with omelette, the fried shallot slices, cucumber and tomatoes on top. I also like to add some fried tofu, and non-vegetarians might hide any leftovers of meat - from a BBQ or something - in their nasi goreng.
And don't forget to put peanut sauce and the bottle of ketjap manis on the table as well.

Oh Laurentia, thanks for this recipe.  My Uncles grew up in Holland and had nasi goreng almost every Friday.  Many Dutch in the village they were in served it then.  I grew up hearing about it, but alas, neither Uncle new how to make it.  Both Uncles are gone and I've often thought about trying to make it...and now I have a recipe. 

and NUTELLA...one of my all time favorite comfort foods.  I love to warm it up and then eat it with strawberries and pineapple, like a fondue, or just slather it on toast.  There's a bar/restaurant in DC that has lots of overstuffed sofas and chairs arranged like ones living room.  We go there and always order the Nutella and fruit/cheese platter.  I just love it.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 20, 2006, 11:07:58 PM
Oh Laurentia, thanks for this recipe.  My Uncles grew up in Holland and had nasi goreng almost every Friday.  Many Dutch in the village they were in served it then.  I grew up hearing about it, but alas, neither Uncle new how to make it.  Both Uncles are gone and I've often thought about trying to make it...and now I have a recipe. 

and NUTELLA...one of my all time favorite comfort foods.  I love to warm it up and then eat it with strawberries and pineapple, like a fondue, or just slather it on toast.  There's a bar/restaurant in DC that has lots of overstuffed sofas and chairs arranged like ones living room.  We go there and always order the Nutella and fruit/cheese platter.  I just love it.

Bobbie, I'm glad you appreciate it! Dutch, yes, parts of south-east Asia used to be Dutch colonies, didn't they?

That restaurant sounds like my ideal coffee shop! There used to be several living-room style cafés where I lived in the 90's, but then they all got converted into the kind of minimalistic espresso bars that's still the norm. I hope the stuffed, mismatching furniture will be back in vogue some day, I miss those places.

It's funny how so many people have a relation to Nutella  :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 21, 2006, 12:30:55 PM
laurentia --  that's a lovely photo of you and the cherry cakes looks delicious!! but you're not redhaired or freckly enough to be a pippi in my book ;) ;D

bbm-intern --  that's sooo cool you posted the recipe for banh xio. YUMMYYYYYY yummy stuff... we almost always get that when we go to the unnamed vietnamese cafe near us. there really is no sign, it's just a storefront with good food inside and it's open till midnight so that is a plus. they do a great crepe as well as a wonderful bowl of PHO and those noodle dishes... and now i'm craving it madly!!!

chapeaugris -- i've seen it filled with mushrooms and tofu instead of pork and shrimp. the one i get is usually stuffed with beef and shrimp, and is very tasty. it's wonderful because the hot oil makes a crispy crust on the crepe, so you have the crunchiness of that along with the ingredients inside. a marvelous experience to eat this dish.

one thing that i like to dot on the crepe is that garlicky red hot sauce.. and lots of it. at at the place we dine, they serve the crepe also with those sort of gooey rice flour "tortillas" that they use to make spring rolls. so the lettuce and herbs go in there along with the crepe and it's all rolled up and eaten that way.

PS: breakfast today was a big bowl of hot oatmeal with strawberries and rice milk. maple syrup was added for sweetness. no recipe needed really, but it's a nice, hearty meal. i must say that cooking oatmeal in a pot, where it boils and softens and develops that creamy texture, as opposed to the "instant" packets or the microwave, has renewed my interest in oatmeal as a breakfast staple!

i'm curious to know if there's a recipe for another type of hot breakfast cereal, perhaps even one that is not sweet, but savory. i thought of maybe something with polenta, which could be studded with mushrooms and cheese...but that's not very breakfasty.

:)

PPS: our microwave DIED the other day. i do not think we will get another one....
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on September 21, 2006, 02:16:10 PM
I usually make oatmeal with half milk, half water. But another good version is to use water only with chopped, unpeeled apple a cinnamon stick, which you bring to a boil all together before adding the oats.

I loved cream of wheat when I was a kid but you can't get that in France. But it's just semoulina, which is available. If we have leftover rice, I warm it up with milk, chopped banana and and cinnamon. The ground cinnamon you get in the US is different from the European product -- it's from the bark of a different type of tree, similar to real cinnamon. Apparently Americans prefer its stronger flavour. I use whole sticks in these breakfast things because it imparts a subtler flavour.

Gnash, do you know Indian Pudding -- as in native American? (cornmeal slowly baked with milk, eggs and molasses). It takes too long to cook to serve for breakfast (3 hours) but it's good for breakfast the next day.

It's blackberry and apple season here in the Pyrenees and we make a lot of crumbles, the leftovers of which we eat for breakfast with yogurt.

The French don't make much of an effort for breakfast -- bread, butter and jam or croissants plus café au lait or hot chocolate.  Once I heard a nutritionist being interviewed on the radio and she actually defended that type of breakfast as perfectly balanced: cereal in the bread, fruit in the jam, dairy in the butter and milk. Even when the French are going to be doing something strenuous in the morning like skiing, they eat the same meager breakfast. According to a TV news story, more skiing accidents happen between 11 and noon here because French skiers are low on energy by that time.

I'ver never had a microwave. It seems like it must be doing something sinister to the food.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 22, 2006, 10:45:43 AM
I am SO going to try those Vietnamese crêpes this weekend!

Quote from: gnash
laurentia --  that's a lovely photo of you and the cherry cakes looks delicious!! but you're not redhaired or freckly enough to be a pippi in my book
 
Not rich or strong enough either, sadly... :)

Quote from: chapeaugris
The French don't make much of an effort for breakfast -- bread, butter and jam or croissants plus café au lait or hot chocolate.  Once I heard a nutritionist being interviewed on the radio and she actually defended that type of breakfast as perfectly balanced: cereal in the bread, fruit in the jam, dairy in the butter and milk. Even when the French are going to be doing something strenuous in the morning like skiing, they eat the same meager breakfast. According to a TV news story, more skiing accidents happen between 11 and noon here because French skiers are low on energy by that time.

 :D  How funny! Cereal in the bread, fruit in the jam, dairy in the butter and milk - and TONS of sugar in all of them!! Plus real butter consists to 80% of fat, so there's not that much room left for the dairy nutritives...but leftover blackberry crumble with yoghurt, oh my god, how I want that right now. It sounds absolutely gorgeous...

I was visiting a friend last summer, whose mother was American. My friend was over thirty but still living with his parents (who were very nice) and still being treated as a 12-year-old. Anyway, I awoke to a glorious smell that turned out to be cinnamon toast, which I hadn't even heard of before. It tasted just as nice as it smelled, but...that was the whole breakfast. A slice of white toast with sugar and cinnamon and some tea (my friend's father had a can of Coca Cola instead of tea or coffee  :o ). By lunch time, I could hardly walk on a straight line for lack of blood sugar  :D 

I'm a big fan of breakfast, it's my favourite meal of the day. Sweden is one of the countries where breakfast is quite a serious affair and people generally eat healthy stuff, so I have lots of recipes for hot cereals/porridges, but the ones I've tried I didn't like that much, so I don't think they're worth posting. I generally stick to sandwiches, I love, love, love nice bread. Really hearty sourdough bread with butter and thin slices of nice cheese...in my pantry right now is a heavy loaf made from organic rye and wheat and sourdough, it has the lovely chewiness that mediterranean style bread has and is compact, but not too dense. Aaaahh...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on September 22, 2006, 02:41:06 PM
When I visited Sweden once, I bought a litre carton of what I thought was fruit juice. But when I tried to pour it out, it was like very thick fruit slush. What was that stuff?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 22, 2006, 09:49:53 PM
hmmm, haven't heard of INDIAN PUDDING but i have had acorn mush, cooked in a basket on coals! by hupa indians of the klamath region of northern california. it was starchy and a little strange, but nourishing.

the indian pudding you describe sounds like polenta, and i love that stuff so i will look for recipes.

there was something online about the effects of microwaved water used to water plants (seedlings) and the results were astounding. perhaps the scientist wanted them to do poorly, but the plants watered with the "dead" water really looked sad. of course, they didn't have three test groups: water, microwaved water, AND boiled water.. but it was still shocking to see the twisted stunted growth of the microwave watered plants vs. plain tap water. and i hear that what microwaves do to meat proteins in particular is not good. then again, they say grilled foods is bad... so...  moderation, i suppose. however, the food that's sold to be heated in microwaves are awful to begin with, for the most part. the salt content in most frozen "entrees" is astronomical.

i agree that breakfast is an important meal, but it seems so many people are in a rush to get out of the house that a decent, big breakfast is overlooked. on weekends, the breakfast houses around here have lines out the door, so it is something that they are craving... a decently portioned breakfast is a nice idea, but not if it's dripping with sugar. one look at the cereal aisle and you will see row after row of sugar coated cereals, and the sad thing is they're all aimed towards the kids, but even the "healthy" adult granolas are laden with sweetness. i usually eat the non sweet grape nuts for breakfast,,,, but am a fan of raisin bran too. ;D

and don't get me wrong, i put a heck of a lot of maple syrup in my oatmeal yesterday. LOL. ;)  we also love to eat honey.

well. today i bought a couple of interesting items at the store, all on sale, probably because they're so bizarre: pumpkin butter, sweet potato mustard, and fig jam. all of them really delicious.... the pumpkin butter would be good on toast. it's like nutella that way. mildly sweet, and a good break from apple butter... the fig jam is really just an all fig puree sweetened with grape juice. very interesting flavor, a lot like orange marmalade. extremely sweet. it's spoon candy if you're not careful!

the sweet potato mustard is great, we ate it with apples and cheese and salami and crackers as a snack just now. it's a little thin, but there's potato in there to give it some texture. it can also be used as a glaze for meat... i think this, on pork chops, might be a nice twist...

but fish. fish. fish.... i'm craving fish, so will list a recipe. it's so simple, anybody could do it, and probably already does:

PAN FRIED FISH WITH LEMON CAPER SAUCE

three or four red snapper fillets (usually the cheapest at the fish market so i tend to buy them, but could certainly use most anything)
one beaten egg, flour, seasonings.
olive oil
for the sauce: butter and capers, lemon juice, a bit of cream

pat dry the fish of excessive moisture. dredge the fish in beaten egg, then in the flour (seasoned with cracked pepper and dry herbs of your choice) and fry in a pan in hot oil until golden brown, on both sides. do not burn, of course, lol. remove fish from pan and drain on toweling and keep it warm while you make the sauce.

melt about a tablespoon of butter in the same pan, scraping the little browned bits left from frying the fish, then add about two tablespoons of cream or half & half, and cook over high heat stirring constantly. season with salt and pepper, squeeze in some lemon, toss in some capers, and stir some more until thickened somewhat... then drizzle this over the fish, add some finely chopped fresh parsley on top, and serve immediately.

very simple, and the tartness of the capers is nice with the fish. 

PS: you can made this w/o the egg. just coat the fish in flour. you can do it without the flour too, and just fry the fish "naked" in oil..  or you can fry it with just the egg batter, like my mom used to do, and sprinkle on chopped green onions then drizzle with soy sauce. that, with rice and miso soup and assorted japanese pickles, was a common breakfast for us when i was a child.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 22, 2006, 09:53:34 PM
When I visited Sweden once, I bought a litre carton of what I thought was fruit juice. But when I tried to pour it out, it was like very thick fruit slush. What was that stuff?

how odd... i have no idea but it sounds like it would make a great smoothie!!  there is a brand of somewhat pulpy fruit juices in glass bottles over here called LOOZA that we use for smoothies, but it's not slushy, and pours easily.

maybe what you had was a concentrate that could be added to water to create a juice drink... ?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Jer009 on September 23, 2006, 12:33:20 AM
Laurentia--
I made the Fancy Tomato Beans that you posted on May 7, 2006. Absolutely delish! Is there any way to reduce the amount of oil?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: CANSTANDIT on September 23, 2006, 09:14:32 PM
I have a recipe for Taco lasagna that goes over big with my occasional holiday company....I'll dig it up and post it; it is somewhat addictive, I'll warn ya.....
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 24, 2006, 01:07:46 AM
Laurentia--
I made the Fancy Tomato Beans that you posted on May 7, 2006. Absolutely delish! Is there any way to reduce the amount of oil?

Yay for feeback! I'm glad you liked them!  :)
I tend to not measure the oil anymore, I use enough to cover the bottom of the pan quite lavishly (so the herbs won't burn) and that's that. The olive oil smoothens the taste and makes it feel more luxurious, but I think it's just as good with less oil.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 24, 2006, 01:18:11 AM
When I visited Sweden once, I bought a litre carton of what I thought was fruit juice. But when I tried to pour it out, it was like very thick fruit slush. What was that stuff?

Hmmmmm! This had me absolutely mystified. Just to check my English, "slush" means something that's grainy, right, like snow that's begun to thaw? All I can think of that's thick, sold in litre cartons and could be confused with juice because of the pics on the package is kräm, which is basically a fruit beverage thickened with potato starch (if it's homemade, it's more like a thin jam). It's a bit old-fashioned and used to be eaten as a dessert or snack with milk or cream in the days when people still had dessert every day. I wouldn't call it slushy, though, it's more like thick yoghurt in texture.
There's juice concentrate that's meant to be diluted, like gnash said, but it's generally sold in 2 dl cartons and not really slushy - the way the word makes me think - either. I'm curious now! Can you remember anything else about it? What did the carton look like, what kind of fruit was in it, etc?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 24, 2006, 02:31:00 AM
well. today i bought a couple of interesting items at the store, all on sale, probably because they're so bizarre: pumpkin butter, sweet potato mustard, and fig jam. all of them really delicious.... the pumpkin butter would be good on toast. it's like nutella that way. mildly sweet, and a good break from apple butter... the fig jam is really just an all fig puree sweetened with grape juice. very interesting flavor, a lot like orange marmalade. extremely sweet. it's spoon candy if you're not careful!

Fig jam is supposed to go very well with French goat's cheese (chèvre)! We have a fantastic cheese shop where they recommend fig or rosehip jam to go with their truncated little pyramids of ash-covered chèvre.

I was so happy when I went shopping yesterday, because our supermarket had put up a couple of new shelves with strange food! It's mainly to cater for the large population of immigrants in the area, so there's a lot of Turkish and Middle Eastern foods. The weirdest thing was one of the instant soups, it looked like a nice hearty chowder on the package, so I took a look and it was komage soup. I thought maybe komage means something in Turkish, or is the name of an idyllic village in Cappadocia, and it's only coincidence that it means cow's stomach in Swedish, but then I gradually realised that all the other soups had the names printed in Swedish and a look at the ingredients box confirmed it: it was cow's stomach soup. I don't think I'll try that anytime soon.

They had canned okras, too, do they work as substitute for fresh ones?

The fish recipe sounds so good! That's what I call a hearty breakfast!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on September 24, 2006, 01:50:00 PM
Yes, Laurentia, it was kräm! I remember thinking what a strange word it was. It was so bizarre to open the carton, which felt the right weight for juice, tilt it and have nothing come out. Slush is not the right word  to describe it because It was denser than that. Anyway, that's the risk you take when buying food in a country whose language you don't speak at all: sometimes the picture on the label is misleading!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 24, 2006, 07:40:10 PM
ahhh! the bizarre swedish juice slush mystery has been solved! ;D :D  it sounds kinda interesting, actually...!

mmm, i will certainly try the fig jam with chèvre, and the pumpkin butter might be nice too.. a thin "schmear" on a cracker with some cheese..  and perhaps a nice sparkly white wine, too. ;)

ohhh komage is cow tummy huh? lol... well, the mexicans here in LA eat MENUDO like crazy, it's supposedly really fabulous stuff but i have never ordered it. not brave enough to "stomach" that stuff... they call it "tripas" or tripe, and i see it in the stores all the time, a sort of fluffy lacy like whitish material. eww. i'm not fond of "lengua" either, which is beef tongue, but the tacos made with that is very popular.

i would eat raw sea urchin roe tho, not to mention raw clams and oysters. YUM. oh, and the entire roasted head a shrimp -- there's a japanese sushi called ama ebi, it's the raw tail of the shrimp on rice, which is sweet and delicately chewy....  and they roast or fry the body of the shrimp, antennae, eyes and all, and that's crunchydelicious. :D

oh - canned okra... hmm, i dont know. frozen okra might be okay... but for the curry recipe, heck, it's all cooked down anyway, so perhaps canned is fine.  i think you could just as easily subsitute cauliflower. or zuchinni, or anything. heck, it's eggplant and okra curry only because that's what i had on hand!!! ^_^

okay here's today's recipe:

PASTALICIOUS TUNA SURPRISE (lol, sounds scary?)

about two cups of cooked orzo pasta, or another type of small pasta
one can of tuna, preferably italian, packed in oil, drained and flaked
about seven black oil cured olives, chopped into slivers
about 4 cloves of garlic, finely minced or crushed
extra virgin olive oil
red wine or balsamic vinegar
lemon juice
about a half cup of finely shredded red cabbage.
if you have it, some artichoke bottoms, one or two, sliced
some fresh italian parsley, chopped
a couple of green onions, chopped
some bell pepper or celery, chopped.. i like red or orange bell pepper with this.

toss all this together with the olive oil and vinegar, squeeze in some lemon juice. season with sea salt and freshly cracked black pepper. the cabbage, celery and bell pepper are optional and interchangeable, it's just there for crunch and color. the leafy celery tops is nice too, if you dont have parsley.

you could add feta cheese to this as well, i suppose.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 25, 2006, 11:55:55 AM
chapeaugris, I'm glad we solved it  ;D  Yes, buying food in other countries...I'll never forget my first unsuspecting mouthful of sugared popcorn (that was in Germany, I think I was ten). More recently, my boyfriend's sister moved to Turkey to work and found it surprisingly difficult to buy milk, as all the cartons with cows on them proved to contain yoghurt. Actually, if I was her, I'd have brought a tourist dictionary so I could at least point to the printed word or something, but she relied on the trusty old method of approaching a shop assistans and go (in English) "Do you have milk? Like, MOOOO???".

gnash, I've had ama ebi and I love the texture too! Yes, I call myself a vegetarian, but I a) don't believe in dogmas and rigid principles, b) think it's what you eat every day that counts in this field, not what you indulge in a couple of times a year or what you'll eat if there's no alternative, c) LOVE SUSHI. Oh, and I have a question about technique here: when I eat nigiri with shrimp, I dip the shrimp in the soy, put it back onto the rice, then - here's the problem - ponder if there's a better way of removing the piece of shell left on the tip of the shrimp's tail before using both hands to tear it off. I have the feeling that there must be a way that's more elegant and looks more like good table manners. Or are you supposed to eat that too? It looks awfully tough.

Isn't there a Japanese snack that's tiny fish, whole and dried with heads and fins and all? I'm generally squeamish about food that looks back at you...when I was little my grandmother would make a huge smorgasbord for Christmas and there was always a jar of whole, inch-long, pickled fish. I don't know what kind of fish it was, but my mean older cousin always considered it a splendid joke to put one of them on my sister's or my plate while we were looking away. We were hysterical every time and it would take a minute for us to calm down while Mum removed the fish and scolded the cousin.
I'm okay with unpeeled shrimp, we sometimes eat them boiled, peel them as we go and have toast on the side, but I find it a bit offputting when the bottom of the shrimp bowl is reached and there are stray eyes and legs floating around  :P
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on September 25, 2006, 12:14:14 PM

Oh, and I have a question about technique here: when I eat nigiri with shrimp, I dip the shrimp in the soy, put it back onto the rice, then - here's the problem - ponder if there's a better way of removing the piece of shell left on the tip of the shrimp's tail before using both hands to tear it off. I have the feeling that there must be a way that's more elegant and looks more like good table manners.
Hee hee, this reminds me of the time my boyfriend-now-husband and I dined at a very nice restaurant in France, before we moved to this country. I ordered crab, and was surprised when they served me a completely intact creature. I grew up in Washington, DC and in that general region steamed crabs are a speciality. (We also used to catch them and steam them ourselves while on vacation near the Chesapeake Bay.) Eating whole crabs is a messy operation ideally conducted at a big table covered with newspaper, so I was really not sure how I was supposed to go about it in this fancy restaurant. Finally, keeping my eyes lowered  and not looking around, I pulled off the legs, peeled back the flap on the belly and ripped off the back with my hands. There was no special implement for hooking out the meat, as in crab houses back home, so I just used my fingers. My husband told me the people at other tables were watching and that I had "provoked comment."   :D I never did learn whether there is an elegant way to eat a whole crab.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 26, 2006, 01:54:07 AM
when i eat ama ebi, i just put the entire nigiri in my mouth except for the tail and then pull it off and set it on my sushi plate very delicately. ;)

with the head, i nibble off the long antennae, then the legs, then when it's neatly trimmed so it won't poke my cheeks, i stuff the whole bit in my mouth and try not to think about the brains in there. ;D

i guess saying "MOOOOO" in turkey is better than pointing at your nipples and then holding up four fingers. ::) :D

as a kid, we called that fishy japanese snack DRIED MINNOWS. haha. sometimes there was a sweet edge to them, and probably loaded with MSG. the dried cuttlefish, which is shredded and similar to beef jerky or something, was good too, but the msg in that was probably what made it so addicting. i do like the wasabi peas that you can find in stores now, and the japanese rice crackers with the little black seaweed wrapped around them, but those are also laden with MSG which unfortunately give me a headache.

one of my favorite japanese dishes, and good for summer and hot weather, is buckwheat noodles dipped in a cold sauce.. this is both healthy and delicious, and as far as i know, it's vegan!


(http://www.worldramen.net/Varietion/soba/DSC000061.jpg)


ZARU SOBA

buckwheat noodles, cooked, cooled and drained
some toasted dried seaweed, julienned, and/or toasted sesame seeds, for garnish.

dipping sauce:

two cups water
a piece of kombu (thick dried seaweed)
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/2 cup mirin (a sort of japanese rice cooking wine)
a little sugar (optional)

chopped green onion
grated fresh daikon (a mild, white radish), or prepared wasabi paste (that hot green stuff)

to make the dipping sauce, rinse the excess salt off the kombu, then boil it in a saucepan with the water for about 10 minutes, then remove the kombu, add the other liquid ingredients and some sugar, and let cool.

boil the noodles till done and then rinse in cold water. use immediately or else they might stick together. i sometimes toss them in a little sesame oil to prevent this from happening and it adds a nice flavor.

arrange the noodles on a plate or bowl, or, better yet, in a bento box with bamboo tray -- this keeps the noodles from sliding all over the place, and sprinkle on the seaweed and/or sesame seeds. toast the sesame seeds dry in a hot pan until they brown and start to pop, this released the flavor, and you can toast the seaweed by waving a sheet of it over an open flame or hot burner until it get just slightly toasted, or dried out. an easy way to julienne the seaweed it to cut it up with scissors, like paper.

serve the dipping sauce in a smaller fairly deep bowl, with sides of the daikon or wasabi and green onion for flavor. chili powder, or hot chili oil, is another option if you want a fiery kick with your coolness.

if it's really hot out, nestle some ice cubes in with the noodles to chill them even more.  to eat, just grab some noodles with your chopsticks, then dip into the sauce, and then slurp them into your mouth.

yummy...  if you serve this a side of tempura (shrimp, tails and all, and vegetables) on the side, this is called TENZARU SOBA. you can also serve this with strips of scrambled egg, cooked shrimp, slices of fried tofu, etc.

this is also good with fresh spinach that's been cooked a bit in boiling water and then squeezed dry and cut into little blocks. sprinkle this with sesame seeds too... and i like to have on hand a small dish of pickled japanese radish, i forgot what it's called, but it's yellow,,, or any of the other little japanese pickled vegetables. luckily, there is a great japanese market nearby, where all of these weird things can be found. ^_^


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on September 26, 2006, 06:06:41 AM
Here is a recipe for Indian Pudding.  I just adore this desert and always order it when I see it on a menu.  My favorite version is offered at the Inn in Sturbridge Village just outside of Boston.  I've used both skim mild and whole milk and I feel you get the better consistency with whole milk, but using either worked for me.

INDIAN PUDDING

4 1/2 cups milk
2/3 cup cornmeal
1/4 cup butter
1/2 cup dark molasses
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup white sugar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

DIRECTIONS:
1.  Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Grease a 1 1/2 quart baking dish.
2.  Scald 3 1/2 cups of milk in top of double boiler over direct heat. Remove milk from heat.
3.  Mix cornmeal with remaining 1 cup of milk, and stir this mixture into the scalding milk, stirring constantly. Place the milk mixture into the top of the double boiler and cook for 20 minutes, stirring frequently.
4.  Stir butter, molasses, salt, sugar and cinnamon into the mixture. Pour into the prepared baking dish.
5.  Bake in the preheated 325 degrees F (165 degrees C) oven for 1 1/2 hours.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 26, 2006, 09:30:46 AM
Thanks for the ama ebi tip, gnash! The soba sound delicious, I'd love to use more sea vegetables in my cooking but it's hard to find recipes.

On the icky side, I think shrimps keep most of their internal organs in their heads (or what looks like their heads). Sometimes when you peel shrimps you accidentaly squeeze out a greyish goo from the head and apparently that's not brains, but stomach content.  :P  I think shrimps should be more considerate towards their consumers and fast for at least twelve hours before being caught and boiled.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 26, 2006, 02:31:29 PM
^^^  aahh, well i eat the entire head so i guess i get it all in one bite. ;) including eyeballs. the strange thing about shrimp is that they remind me of insects, and wonder, if we lived beneath the sea, would spiders and bugs be considered a delicacy? :)

thanks bobbie for the recipe for indian pudding. it seems very simple to make, like polenta, frequent stirring and whatnot. the molasses sounds like imparts a rich flavor too..

hmm, i'm craving those vietnamese crepes today... perhaps, perhaps, perhaps... :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Jer009 on September 26, 2006, 10:24:01 PM
Laurentia--
Thanks for the reply! I'll try making it (the Fancy Tomato Beans) with a little less oil. I'm not a vegetarian, and I was surprised how good these beans were. If I could tell Jack and Ennis, I would tell them: try THESE beans for a wonderful change of pace! (But I'll bet they would have a devil of a time finding tomato paste in a tube!)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 27, 2006, 01:42:14 AM
i just realized, unless i'm mistaken, there's no TROUTS recipes on this thread....!!

the way we did them in the boyscouts was good -- scale, clean, cut and gut the fresh fish, cut the head off if you wish (but definitely leave on the fins because them is good eatin), then roll in white wheat flour seasoned with salt and pepper (about as simple as it gets), and fry in a lotta bit of hot oil in a cast iron skillet until golden brown on boths side (flippin once)...

we did this at the campsite and would sometimes eat three or four fish each, or however many we were lucky to have caught that day. sometimes we had to settle for hot dogs... ;D

if they were bitin, we brought a whole mess of em home, which were frozen head down, vertically in water, inside of half gallon cardboard milk cartons we cleaned, dried, and set aside for the purpose. we caught  mostly browns and rainbows. the rainbows of course were my personal favorite... :D

(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/trouts.jpg)

here i am with my blond fishin buddy, jeff t., and my dad's fishin buddy, dan r.... oh, that just sounds bad. LOL..

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on September 27, 2006, 11:08:58 PM
Laurentia--
Thanks for the reply! I'll try making it (the Fancy Tomato Beans) with a little less oil. I'm not a vegetarian, and I was surprised how good these beans were. If I could tell Jack and Ennis, I would tell them: try THESE beans for a wonderful change of pace! (But I'll bet they would have a devil of a time finding tomato paste in a tube!)

I'd love to see Ennis collect some wild herbs, peel some garlic, splash some white wine into the worn pot on the fire, and take a hearty swig out of the bottle before carefully hiding it, along with the olive oil, until the next day. Then he stirs the pot a little, hums some, and when the beans are ready, looks around before filling two empty Bettermost cans and hurrying down to the stream to wash out the pot. Here, I'd like to post a picture of Jack eating beans, captioned "They sure don't taste like this when I open the cans...I gotta marry this guy", but I don't think we ever see Jack eating beans in the movie, so.

gnash, what a great pic! I regret never having been a scout, I'd love to know the practicalities of camping out, but at the time I detested all activities that didn't involve a good book and a comfy place to read it. Will force my own kids to join when they're old enough so they'll at least learn how to make fire, that's a cool thing to be able to do.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Jer009 on September 28, 2006, 12:41:41 AM
[
I'd love to see Ennis collect some wild herbs, peel some garlic, splash some white wine into the worn pot on the fire, and take a hearty swig out of the bottle before carefully hiding it, along with the olive oil, until the next day. Then he stirs the pot a little, hums some, and when the beans are ready, looks around before filling two empty Bettermost cans and hurrying down to the stream to wash out the pot. Here, I'd like to post a picture of Jack eating beans, captioned "They sure don't taste like this when I open the cans...I gotta marry this guy", but I don't think we ever see Jack eating beans in the movie, so



Me too!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 28, 2006, 05:08:08 AM
laurentia, aww, that is a sweet image of ennis making a better pot of beans with the wild herbs and wine and putting them in the bean cans! ...i'd like to see him collecting wild mushrooms too... in the nude. hey, why not,,,, jack did laundry in the buff! ;)

you might not have to force your kids to join, they might really enjoy it! i loved winter camping the best i think, ice fishing and cross country skiing and snowshoeing,,, building igloos.. it was great fun.  btw, we used lighters and paraffin soaked pinecones to make our fires... scouts are also resourceful... :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 29, 2006, 05:29:27 PM
(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/jollibee.jpg)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)<<<odd new flavors...

umm, so we had filipino spaghetti from jollibee the other day.
(jollibee is a fast food chicken chain from the philipines i guess.)
basically, a sweet tomato based meat sauce, ketchupy in a way,
with sliced hot dogs. not exactly gourmet but it was interesting.
to be honest, i was surprised to find hot dogs in the spaghetti!!

but it came with two pieces of really yummy spicy fried chicken.


thank goodness. ;D


here is a recipe for a cheesy appetizer dish that's easy to make.

SAGANAKI (FLAMING CHEESE lol)

1/2" thick hunk of kasseri or kofalotiri, or haroumi (?) cheese. (i use one whole wedge of "stella" brand cheese)
butter (or olive oil)
lemon wedges
a little bit of brandy
a lighter

melt a tiny dab of butter in a tiny skillet (or whatever) and put the cheese inside. on high heat, melt the cheese a bit, butter the top then turn it over, so it's sorta browned on both sides. i like it a little crunchy at the edges.... then take the skillet off the heat (turn cheese onto a plate if you wish), pour a tablespoon or so of brandy on top, light it and cry out "OPA!" :D     

---> don't light the brandy in the skillet if it's telfon coated!

squeeze on some lemon juice, grate a little black pepper if you wish, maybe some chopped parsley (why not) and serve with warmed pita bread or a sliced baquette... on the table have some oil cured olives, or some dolmas (grape leaf roll ups), etc...  a nice salad with this makes an easy light lunch.

i like to nibble on saganaki with a glass of RETSINA, which is a white wine made with pine sap or something.... very strange, but it takes me back to greece.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on September 29, 2006, 05:47:45 PM
Jimmy, I remember the first time I had retsina, in Greece in 1966. I really expected to hate it, but found the taste intriguing, bought a bottle of it and had some (just a little at a time) over the course of a couple of months until I finished off the bottle. I've had some since, but not that often. I still find the taste intriguing.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 29, 2006, 08:00:42 PM
wow fritz!! we were in greece at the same time (i lived near the AFB in glyfada). of course i couldn't buy wine, but could climb a tree to reach the figs. ;) aaahh, souvlaki.... retsina does have a unusual flavor. i like the italian apertif, "campari" and that's also an aquired taste.



(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)for those curious about the wine, here's what i found on wikipedia:


Retsina is a Greek resinated white (or rosé) wine that has been made for at least 2700 years.

Its unique flavor is said to have originated from the practice of sealing wine vessels, particularly amphora, with Aleppo Pine resin in ancient times. Before the invention of impermeable glass bottles, oxygen caused many wines to spoil within the year. Pine resin helped keep air out, while at the same time infusing the wine with resin aroma. In time the practice of adding resin to the fermenting must have flavored the wine even more strongly, and apparently kept it better preserved.

The Romans began to use barrels in the 3rd century AD, removing any enological necessity for resin, but the flavor itself was so popular that the style is still widespread today. It is perhaps the most commonly-drunk wine in Greece (though not equally popular in all its regions), and, given its strong flavor, is best served with the strongly herbed dishes characteristic of Greek cuisine and Mediterranean cuisine in general.

(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://www.amb-grece.fr/grece/faience.jpg)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on September 29, 2006, 08:21:31 PM
Neat, Jimmy!

And love your avatar!

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on September 30, 2006, 09:06:10 AM

i'm curious to know if there's a recipe for another type of hot breakfast cereal, perhaps even one that is not sweet, but savory. i thought of maybe something with polenta, which could be studded with mushrooms and cheese...but that's not very breakfasty.

PPS: our microwave DIED the other day. i do not think we will get another one....

Have you ever had Malt-o-meal? Cream o Wheat? Cornmeal mush? Coco wheats?  Midwestern staples all of them.  Coco Wheats over vanilla ice cream is a sinful way to start a lazy cold Indiana day...

I have grown fond of Kashi pilaf prepared with half water half apple juice.  Served warm with vanilla yogurt, fresh (sweet) berries, sultanas (golden raisins) and honey.  Very filling and the kashi is a complete protein and high-fiber.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Desecra on October 01, 2006, 01:52:23 AM
Breakfast cereal that isn't sweet?  I haven't seen porridge mentioned.  You can use oatmeal or porridge oats, depending on taste.  Make it with water and salt, and add cold milk while eating. 

If it's a cereal type thing, I don't see any reason why you couldn't have something like couscous or bulgar wheat for breakfast - maybe I'll try that sometime.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 01, 2006, 02:28:13 AM
heidi, i haven't even heard of coco wheats!! puffs yes...  but it sounds chocklitty. ;) no, what i want is something savory, like the indian corn pudding, but i guess most breakfast cereals are enhanced with sweet stuff.  now, i haven't tried porridge, but that's funny because at dinner my friend said he felt all porridgy inside,,, i guess somebody on project runway used that term recently...  i'll google porridge, since i'd never had that either.

PS: i'm craving greek marinated octopus for some reason! :D ;D  or the octopus marinated in the miso sludge that the japanese eat, or grilled baby octopus sprinkled with lemon juice. i'll even settle for kalamari,,, i want tentacles! :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Desecra on October 01, 2006, 02:32:30 AM
I did a google and this recipe is the closest to porridge as I know it:

http://www.retrofoodrecipes.com/traditional_porridge.html

Sadly we don't get top of the milk these days now we're all drinking lower fat milk from cartons :(. 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on October 01, 2006, 12:47:27 PM
heidi, i haven't even heard of coco wheats!! puffs yes...  but it sounds chocklitty. ;) no, what i want is something savory, like the indian corn pudding, but i guess most breakfast cereals are enhanced with sweet stuff.  now, i haven't tried porridge, but that's funny because at dinner my friend said he felt all porridgy inside,,, i guess somebody on project runway used that term recently...  i'll google porridge, since i'd never had that either.

PS: i'm craving greek marinated octopus for some reason! :D ;D  or the octopus marinated in the miso sludge that the japanese eat, or grilled baby octopus sprinkled with lemon juice. i'll even settle for kalamari,,, i want tentacles! :D

poop!  I just read that as testicles and snorked soda all over the keys!

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on October 01, 2006, 01:11:45 PM
That too.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on October 01, 2006, 05:58:05 PM
heidi, i haven't even heard of coco wheats!! puffs yes...  but it sounds chocklitty. ;) no, what i want is something savory, like the indian corn pudding, but i guess most breakfast cereals are enhanced with sweet stuff.  now, i haven't tried porridge, but that's funny because at dinner my friend said he felt all porridgy inside,,, i guess somebody on project runway used that term recently...  i'll google porridge, since i'd never had that either.

PS: i'm craving greek marinated octopus for some reason! :D ;D  or the octopus marinated in the miso sludge that the japanese eat, or grilled baby octopus sprinkled with lemon juice. i'll even settle for kalamari,,, i want tentacles! :D

Try making the Kashi Pilaf with vegetable broth instead of water...I add dehydrated mushrooms (I buy the big jar of them at Costco) and maybe some onion and/or garlic....it's very savoury with the veggie broth and if you cook it until it's very soft it gets a creamy texture...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on October 02, 2006, 06:48:02 AM
Heidi, the pilaf sound yummy.  Must try.

Well I made the Pumpkin Curry and basmati rice Gnash mentioned earlier in this thread.  It was delicious, but I think I changed it a bit.  I added quite a bit of curry and apples along with the mango.  My mangoes (hehehe) weren't quite ripe and I needed to add some sweetness to the dish so I added apples.  It was very rich, which I was surprised about. 

I've started preparing the 'weekly' recipes from one of Martha Stewart's many endeavors "Everday Food."  I love the little magazine (fits nicely in my purse) and they provide the shopping list for the weekly recipes which is very convenient.  I'm the Queen of convenience and ease.  If it ain't easy, I probably won't even try.  Tonight it's Cod fish with roasted potatoes, olives and grape tomatoes.  I'll see how that works out.

R
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on October 03, 2006, 06:28:04 AM
Some food related pics from the London get-together!

(http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g47/metannica/fullenglish-1.jpg)
A Full English Breakfast - the sausage is nicer than it looks, according to my hubby. Behind it is the Vegetarian Full English Breakfast, with hash browns and vegetarian sausages that taste like the meatballs they used to serve at school when I was a kid. That is not a good thing, sadly. On the right is a glimpse of the American Breakfast, consisting of bacon, eggs, and pancakes with maple syrup in the little bowl. That sounded icky until I remembered one of my old favourite dishes, bacon pancake, which is just what it sounds like: you put slices of bacon in a dish, let it fry in the oven until it's done, then pour pancake batter over it and bake the whole thing. You end up with a big, rather thick pancake that you eat with lingonberry jam, and it's such a nice mixture of salty bacon, sweet (but not too sweet!) jam and soft, bland pancake. Loaded with protein and fat, it's bound to taste good!

On Sunday, I went to Brick Lane with Chapeaugris - a great place, I've never been there before. These pics are from a Bangladeshi supermarket that stocked everything, and in abundance - just look at the shelves in the background! After doing our shopping, we had an excellent dinner in a restaurant nearby and talked into the evening...I've never known hours pass so quickly as they did this weekend.

(http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g47/metannica/okras.jpg)
Okras! For real! A small amount is currently biding their time in my fridge...

(http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g47/metannica/spices2.jpg) (http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g47/metannica/spices1.jpg)
That's Chapeaugris with short hair, me in the cap, and so many lovely spices!

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 03, 2006, 05:15:10 PM
laurentia --- that is such a great set of pics! that breakfast looks great, tho i've never heard of BEANS with eggs in the morning. what a way to fuel your day! heheh... i'll have to try it, it seems the brokeback thing to do.. ;)  oh wait -- i have beans with eggs whenever ordering huevos rancheros...

the greasy pancake sounds interesting too, one dish cooking is appealing because there's less wash up! of course i'd have to drain the bacon before adding the batter, lol.

OKRA at last, well aren't you clever!! and it looks so fresh. it's found at our local indian market as well.  don't let it keep too long, it'll brown before you know it, on the inside too. so wash, cut (and wash the slime off your fingers hahah) and cook it soon! the green melony vegetable below the okra looks interesting, i've seen it at the market but dont' know what it is -- a type of squash, a melon? i'll have to ask them sometime.

and you're right -- the shelves are stocked to the gills! looks fantastic. lol, you're wearing a HEATH cap, i see.... that's hot. :D


bobbie ---  wow that's great you tried the pumpkin curry, and adding apples sounds like a good idea! i guess when it's cooked down it's all mushy and sweet anyway.. ;) :D  mmmm that fish dish sounds yummy. martha stewart rocks, she's such a domestic goddess!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on October 03, 2006, 08:12:10 PM
Ooooh!  THose pics of English Breakfast bring back memories of Irish Breakfast!  (which is virtually the same thing but served a few hundred kilometres to the west...)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on October 03, 2006, 11:54:44 PM
Yep, Full English Breakfast, it's protein with protein on the side...not really my thing, I must say, I like bread-based brekfasts more, but at least I've given it a try now!

Hmm, what did J&E have for breakfast up there on Brokeback? The book mentions coffee and biscuits, but that sounds rather scrawny for someone who works outdoors all day, doesn't it?

Part of the idea with the bacon pancake was that the batter was supposed to fry in the grease from the bacon, so if you drain it it might stick...then again, the last time I had bacon pancake was before the first time I saw a teflon dish  :)
The Brits have a dish called Toad In the Hole, which has fascinated me for years because it sounds so weird. I mean, Toad In the Hole? In London, I took the opportunity to ask one of the British forumites what it was and it seems to be similar to the bacon pancake, but made with sausages. You put them in an oven dish, pour pancake batter over them and bake. Variations on the same theme.

Thanks for the advice on the okras, gnash! They had lots of funny vegetables in that shop! Chapeaugris and I found something that looked like pieces of the stem from a giant flower, or the trunk of a small tree, maybe two inches in diameter, green on the outside and very porous inside, like it was made from a bunch of white drinking straws. The pieces were about two feet long, we should have taken a photo, because they looked really alien.

(Is that a Heath cap? I have to start wearing it more often!!  ;D)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on October 04, 2006, 07:51:18 AM
ACK!  I thought Toad in the Hole was an egg fried in a hole in teh middle of a piece of toast!

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on October 04, 2006, 08:06:23 AM
Hmmm. Why would somebody be interested in frying an egg in that peculiar manner?   ???

The conversation actually turned to strange food at the get-together without me having anything to do with it, which is how Toad in the Hole came up! I told a couple of Brits that I was intrigued by the "British" ready-made meals shelf at Sainsbury's, and they both leaned in with surprised looks on their faces, going "British food? What's that??".  :D
Except TitH, the dishes I could remember seeing there was Liver & Mash and Shepherd's Pie, and Steak and Kidney Pie seems quite common, too. Shepherd's pie sounds nice, I think, both the name and the actual dish (unless there's something I don't know about it...).
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Desecra on October 04, 2006, 01:29:58 PM
ACK!  I thought Toad in the Hole was an egg fried in a hole in teh middle of a piece of toast!

Those are Egyptian Eggs, and very nice they are too!  [No doubt they have other names too].   Toad in the Hole is just sausages cooked in yorkshire pudding type batter.   Funnily enough, I just ate some today.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on October 04, 2006, 02:06:45 PM
We've tried making Toad in the Hole at home and it has always been a disappointment. We just can't seem to get the Yorkshire pudding to come out right no matter who's recipe we follow. Also, I don't think the French sausages are the ideal shape for it (comes in a long coil instead of links). But when my daughters were in primary school they liked to tell their friends, with deadpan faces, that the previous night they had eaten "un crapaud dans le trou" for dinner.

So Laurentia, have you eaten the okra yet? I made a fish curry tonight and we had the Brick Lane okra as a side dish. I forgot about gnash's okra recipe and just ended up sautéing them with onions, cumin seeds and green chilies.

That grocery has almost everything I could want for Indian cooking, but there are two things I have been searching for without success: screwpine essence and a live, potted curry plant. Some recipes call for curry leaves, which are from a plant with very pungent, almost bitter leaves. That grocery we went to usually has branches of fresh leaves but they were out of it when we were there. A friend of a friend in the States has a curry plant growing in a pot and since hearing about that I've been desperate to get hold of one. You can get dried curry leaves but it's like using dried basil instead of fresh.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on October 04, 2006, 11:05:08 PM
The okras still bide their time in my fridge, but I'll have to use them today, they're starting to look less perky than when I put them there. I was going to make that curry yesterday, but I got home from school very late, had to go shopping, the sink was full of dirty dishes, Christoffer was ill (the flu or a really nasty kebab, we still don't know which it is), and it had been the first cold day of autumn, so I just made some hot, minimal effort soup instead:

Lentil Soup

2 small onions
2 - 3 cloves of garlic (or more, especially if you have a cold coming on)
1 tsp nice curry powder, add more later if you wish
1 cup red lentils, dried - you don't need to soak them or prepare them in any way
4 cups vegetable stock
a couple of bay leaves, if you have them
1/2 lime or lemon

Chop the onions and garlic and fry them lightly along with the curry. When the onions are soft, but before they brown, add lentils, stock (or, of course, water and stock cubes), and bay leaves. Boil until the lentils are done, along the lines of 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, add lime or lemon juice to taste (I squeezed half a lime over the pot and found it to be perfect), maybe some more curry, and serve with some nice bread.
This fills you up very gently and warms you, especially if the curry powder is on the spicy side. It's also extremely easy to make, costs next to nothing and is the kind of dish you don't need to plan or go shopping for in advance, since all the ingredients - except maybe the lime/lemon - keep almost forever and are widely found lurking in people's pantrys.

And if you know your Old Testament, you'll know that when Esau sold his rights as the first-born son to his younger brother Jacob, the price was a bowl of Jacob's lentil soup.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on October 05, 2006, 06:46:47 AM
Hi folks, just wanted to let you all know that a DC area (DC, MD, VA) get-together is being planned for October 13 (Friday  ) and all are welcome.  Head over to the get-togethers thread for more detail...http://davecullen.com/forum/index.php?topic=9035.msg506042#msg506042

Bobbie  :-*
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Ellen (tellyouwhat) on October 05, 2006, 10:56:36 AM
^^^  aahh, well i eat the entire head so i guess i get it all in one bite. ;) including eyeballs. the strange thing about shrimp is that they remind me of insects, and wonder, if we lived beneath the sea, would spiders and bugs be considered a delicacy? :)

thanks bobbie for the recipe for indian pudding. it seems very simple to make, like polenta, frequent stirring and whatnot. the molasses sounds like imparts a rich flavor too..

hmm, i'm craving those vietnamese crepes today... perhaps, perhaps, perhaps... :D

gnash, you're not serious!  I have never heard of this.  Are you kidding?  sorry to be a wimp.  My husband eats parts of lobster I won't go near, but I never heard of this type of shrimp eating, unless you actually ARE an ocean fish, in which case it is de riguer.

Depending on your answer to this, I wonder at your objection to cochineal (sp?)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 06, 2006, 08:04:02 AM
^^^ ellen, it's called ama ebi (sweet shrimp) and most sushi houses serve it with the heads if you ask them. or sometimes they just surprise you and there it is, crunchydelicous, hot and sprinkled with lemon. i think i don't mind it because i can see what i'm eating. with the cochineal, i just think BUG WING and freak out. then again, it's probably a healthier red dye than LAKE #14 or whatever it's called... here is a picture of ama ebi, usually the raw shrimp is not pink, but a pale translucent white:


(http://www.origamirestaurant.com/sushi/images/sushi_amaebi.jpg)


laurentia --- your lentil soup sounds sooo good. i will definitely make some, as i have all the ingredients on hand, including the lemon! ;)

okay now -- toad in the hole -- i see this for sale at the renaissance faire, it's a sausage wrapped in dough and baked i guess, i've never tried one but it sounds like a hotdog, sorta.  the traditional dish baked wish sausages actually sounds kinda good, and i see online that there are special toad-in-the-hole batters marketed just for that dish.


(http://www.kraftfoods.com/images/recipe_images/Toad_in_the_Hole_Bake.jpg)


heidi --- we used to make that egg in a toast hole dish (above) when we were kids -- we used a glass to punch out the round hole in the bread, and it would fry up very nicely.... the one pictured above looks gourmet, with bits of ham and cheese.  we also made fried bologna sandwiches, i remember being at the desoto's house and tony and i would laugh at how the baloney would puff and raise up in the skillet. we'd push it down, steam would escape with a hiss, and then it would puff up again. then we'd take the spatula and make little cuts around the edge of the round slices to flatten it out. we'd end up with pinwheel shaped processed meat, hahah.

gosh, i haven't had a fried baloney sandwich since around age 14...  if i shut my eyes, i can almost hear them sizzling, and smell them.  tony's parent's had one of those bizarre lamps with the statue of venus in the middle, it was illuminated and droplets of mineral oil slid down in regular patterns along a series of nylon strings encasing the statuette, i remember sitting on the sofa in their spanish revival living room after school with the brady bunch on TV, staring at the lamp and eating those warm sandwiches... :D

here's a recipe from www.kraftfoods.com. i'd probably skip the marshmallows and go for extra raisins or dried cranberries instead. hey, if raisins are dried grapes, what are dried cranberries called?  ;) ;D  anyway, this sounds like a good snack to take camping or on a hike:


(http://www.kraftfoods.com/images/recipe_images/Easy_Trail_Mix_Cereal_Bars.jpg)


EASY TRAIL MIX CEREAL BARS

2 Tbsp. butter
1/2 cup peanut butter
4 cups Miniature Marshmallows
6 cups POST Fruit & Bran Cereal, crushed

PLACE butter and peanut butter in large microwavable bowl. Microwave on MEDIUM (50%) 1 min.; stir.  ADD marshmallows; toss to coat. Microwave an additional 1-1/2 min. or until marshmallows are puffed; stir until well blended. Add cereal; mix well.  PRESS cereal mixture firmly into 9-in. square pan. Let stand 1 hour or until firm. Cut into 20 bars to serve.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on October 06, 2006, 09:41:54 AM
Laurentia, I just finished off the tomato beans I made for my daugher last night. They looked exactly like the horrible canned  baked beans the English are so fond of, but were 100 times better. Next time I think I'll try preparing them with white beans I've cooked myself because the canned variety  turn to mush so quickly.

I've been meaning to post this fish curry recipe every since the discussion turned to eastern food. It also works well with chicken and tofu. It's the most delicious, fragrant curry I know and doesn't lose anything by reducing the chili, which I tend to do when serving it to French people.


Purée in food processor with a little water:
4-5 green chilis (if you don't want any heat, use half a green pepper just to get the green colour and a little flavour)
1 onion, chopped
1 tablespoon poppy seeds (the white kind but can use black if not available)
3 garlic cloves
1 oz cashew nuts (pref. raw unsalted)
3 cardamoms
1/2 blade of mace or 1/4 tsp mace powder
1/4 tsp fennel seeds

Purée in food processor:
1 1/2 cups coriander leaves (cilantro) and a few mint leaves

Mix with a little water to make a paste:
1 tsp coriander powder

Have ready:
1 tsp cumin seeds
3/4 cup coconut milk and 3/4 cup water
1 lime
turmeric

About 500 g  any kind of white fish

Before you start, mix juice of half a lime and pinch of turmeric and pinch of salt with a little water and spread over the fish.

Heat 1/3 cup of oil with the cumin seeds in a wide pan. When the seeds begin to fry, add the coriander powder paste. After 10 seconds add the spice paste and sauté for 5-10 minutes, stirring continuously. Add a little water if it starts to stick.

Add the pureed coriander leaves and salt to taste and stir. Add a tsp of sugar and juice of the other lime half. Add the coconut milk and water  and bring to boil. Put in the fish and cook until done.

If you eat this with rice, throw some turmeric into the water when you cook the rice to colour it yellow for a better presentation.

When I manage to get my hands on a lot of fresh coriander I made a big batch of the sauce and freeze what I won't need for that one meal.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on October 06, 2006, 10:38:11 AM
--- we used to make that egg in a toast hole dish (above) when we were kids -- we used a glass to punch out the round hole in the bread, and it would fry up very nicely....

gosh, i haven't had a fried baloney sandwich since around age 14...  if i shut my eyes, i can almost hear them sizzling, and smell them. 

OH Jimmy, you've really brought back some memories for me too.  My (late) Mom made fried balony sandwiches for me on the weekends when she wasn't at work.  When she fried the balony,  it would look like a hat to me, so I called them "Mexican Hat" sandwiches.  Toast, balony, a  little mustard, glass of milk, and snuggling with Mommy....sigh, what a lovely memory!

I've never had the egg in a toast hole or even seen them made, but I do remember a scene in "Moonstruck" when Olympia Dukakis was making them for breakfast talking to Cher about her life...an excellent scene that always stood out for me.

B xo
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 06, 2006, 07:49:20 PM
(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/sebastian9.jpg)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)FRUITY UPDATE:

the snowfruit from my friend's cactus plants are still bearing their rosy nibbles. inside there's a translucent pale flesh that even looks like snow. the sometimes slimy (when it's really ripe) flesh tastes perfumed -- and it's crunchy because of the black seeds. it's like eating crunchy snow only it's not cold, and tastes sorta like those "violet" candies that come in the purple foil wrapper. i don't know any recipes for this fruit, so we just slice them open and eat them. it's called pitaya or dragonfruit, but ours don't have those curly things on the outside. you can read more about them and see the different varieties on wikipedia. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pitaya)

below is the last of the kumquats! they're almost all gone from the tree, sadly, and it marks the end of summer. i posted a recipe for kumquat chutney earlier on the thread, but now there's so little of them it's just good to have a bowl handy for snacks, skin and all. notice the interesting four sectioned membrane inside. i guess because of their tiny size, that's all that's needed.

they're the ultimate sour blast taste sensation! ;D
(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)
(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/kumquatz.jpg)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/kactusfruit.jpg)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 06, 2006, 08:00:18 PM
OH Jimmy, you've really brought back some memories for me too.  My (late) Mom made fried balony sandwiches for me on the weekends when she wasn't at work.  When she fried the balony,  it would look like a hat to me, so I called them "Mexican Hat" sandwiches.  Toast, balony, a  little mustard, glass of milk, and snuggling with Mommy....sigh, what a lovely memory!

I've never had the egg in a toast hole or even seen them made, but I do remember a scene in "Moonstruck" when Olympia Dukakis was making them for breakfast talking to Cher about her life...an excellent scene that always stood out for me.

B xo

haha that's funny about the mexican hats.  we had them on white bread with mustard, mayo, and a little relish i think. maybe a slice of that processed cheese. i'll have to look for that scene in moonstruck, i missed that the first time around. ;)

chapeaugris, your fish curry sounds reaaaally good. spicy, please!  ;D

tonight i'm making chicken in a pot. i'm feeling very lazy. i just put a chopped up chicken in a big pot, brown it really well in some oil, with garlic and onions, then thrown in carrots, potatoes, whatever else, mushrooms are nice, parsnips, etc, two cans of chopped tomatoes, spices, and some water and garam masala, some white wine (why not? haha), and let it simmer for a couple hours.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on October 07, 2006, 01:57:58 AM
Ah, how I love it when this thread has been busy overnight! There's so much to talk about!

gnash, I hope you'll like the soup - I found the recipe in an 80's vegetarian cookbook that's quite funny, because it's so extreme. In the 80's we hardly got any "exotic" ingredients or spices in Sweden, plus the vegetarian movement was obsessed with health and at the same time a little hippie-influenced. So no sugar, no salt EVER, forget the coconut milk and coriander and even the fresh basil; herbal tea instead of coffee, and instructions on how to make your own sauerkraut and tofu. And then the food photography of the time, with black china and greyish colours on the food. Anyway, I've made lentil soups according to other recipes, with tomatoes and potatoes and rice and things, but that evening I just felt like going basic, and it was easily the best lentil soup I've ever had.
As always, the spices are important. I used an unknown but nice-smelling Pakistani spice that my boyfriend's sister gave me - she's enormously cool, works for the UN and spent a couple of weeks inspecting refugee camps in Pakistan this summer. When she came back, she had bought several wonderful shawls for her mother and spices for me! She didn't have a clue what was in the spice mixtures, though, had chosen them for their nice colours. That's a little sad, because I'd love to be able to recreate the red one when I run out of it, it's so good.

The cereal bars look yummy! I made something similar a couple of weeks ago, but made the mistake of trying to hide my remaining Hemp Nibbles in them and their hard little shells ruined the whole thing. I'll probably try your version, it's very handy to be able to make them in the microwave!

chapeaugris, that curry sounds so incredibly good!!! I'll be trying it out very soon!

Speaking of which, I made the eggplant and okra curry the other day; the okras were still fine, luckily. I hadn't bought that many, though, since I didn't know whether I was going to like them. There was about a cup when I cut them up, I replaced the rest with green beans.
I loved handling them, they look so beautiful when cut through! I had expected them to be very much more slimy, like it would ooze out of them when cut  :D  When ready, I found them interesting and definitely not unpleasant. I'll keep watching for okras - someday they're bound to make their way here!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 09, 2006, 02:12:38 AM
laurentia ---- aah, you like okra! that's so cool. ;)  and green beans are always good in a curry!~! mm mmm... one of my favorite and probably the least heathy way to eat okra is to bread them lightly in cornmeal after a dip in milk or water, and then frying them until crispy in hot oil. you can do this sliced, or whole, and either way it's fine. when we were growing up we'd have this along with fried smelt, those tiny fish 2-3" long, and eat those with a spritz of lemon juice, or ketchup. i have no idea where my dad got that recipe but sometimes he'd crave it and so we'd get the house all fishy smelling frying those things up.

the pakistani spice mixtures sound very interesting. sometimes i have no idea what i'm buying at the indian market, it says "curry" and if i ask the guy if it's for meat or vegetables he just waves his hand and says "good with everything!" and that is that.

i've never made saurkraut, but my mom used to make her own japanese style "korean saurkraut" all the time -- kimchee. i loved the effervescent quality of the lightly fermented cabbage. and since it was so fresh and lightly spiced, it wasn't as powerful as traditional kimchee. i remember she liked to use napa cabbage most of the time, which also gave it a fresher texture as well.

omg. tofu skin is like my new favorite thing. we found a tofu shop here that does a great tofu skin PHO (soup). it's amazing. apparently the tofu skin (there's a name for it) is what if formed as you boil the soymilk. they skim it off in sheets, and at this place they season it somehow, then roll it into little bundles and then throw that in the soup. it's your vietnamese grandmother's chicken soup! ;) ;D very very good and utterly healthy. it's especially good spicy, and i can't wait for the cold(er) LA weather and some rain, to get maximum enjoyment from a bowl of the stuff!

hmm.. there's no posts of beet soup borscht recipes are there? hot or cold, i love the flavor and the color of borscht, the earthy flavor of beets. i will roast them in a very hot oven along with parnips, carrots, and red potatoes, then dress them up with oil and vinegar, salt and pepper and fresh garlic.. yum. 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on October 09, 2006, 03:39:03 AM
Gnash, where's "here" for you?

I love borsht too, but don't have a favourite recipe. I looked at a bunch and just took elements from them. Besides beets, mine includes carrots, potatoes, red onions, garlic, a fistful of red lentils which give it a nice creamy texture when they've broken down, and to finish off a few drops of tobasco sauce, a twist of lemon and glug of apple brandy.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 09, 2006, 06:10:01 AM
here? here in los angeles! and there are plenty of russians here so the borscht is flowing. i get it (oddly enough) at an armenian bakery/deli/hot counter, they have it hot or cold any time of the year. i do make it, but i like slipping over there for borscht and then of course a wonderful pastry from the bakery. ;)

my borscht is like yours -- a handful there and this or that here, but never with lentils,, and never with apple brandy!!!!! i'll have to try that sometime.

i DO put apple cider vinegar on very hot chili tho, it seems to enhance the flavor and also cools the heat a bit. it's something learned at chili john's, a local chili establishment that's been in business for years,, i think fifty or more... and they have a super HOT chili, which is poured over a bowl of plump pinto beans, and that with sour cream and onion and a splash of vinegar...... perfection, and sometimes heartburn.  ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on October 09, 2006, 12:47:56 PM
my borscht is like yours -- a handful there and this or that here, but never with lentils,, and never with apple brandy!!!!! i'll have to try that sometime.
Well, I'm not sure what I use is exactly apple brandy. It's called eau de vie ("water of life") here (my "here" being in the French Pyrenees), and ours is made from apples from our neighbors' trees. Twice a year, in spring and autumn,  a guy comes round with a still and the locals bring the plums or apples they've been storing since the previous season. The plums are nice and rotted and swimming, along with dead wasps, in their fermented juices. Once of the borsht recipes I saw called for a hit of vodka, and since I didn't have that I used the apple eau de vie.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 09, 2006, 11:05:50 PM
vodka borscht.. now that's definitely russian. ;)

oh mmm mmm mmm,,, eau de vie, i've had that made with pears and it's reallllly good.  lol, dead wasps.  :P :D

it sounds like you live in an idyllic setting!! i thought you were in a city...  that's cool.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on October 10, 2006, 06:28:03 PM
My Husband's parents were from Ukraine and we socialize with Ukrainian Americans often.  I've had tons of different types of borscht and my favorite has white beans in it.  At first I thought beans in borscht was a strane combo, but I've learned to love it.  Some folks put a little cream in theirs, but I prefer a broth-based soup, though it's tasty with cream too.  Hmmm, will have to try the borscht with a bit of Vodka!  ::)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 16, 2006, 05:31:50 AM
it's been six days with no recipe posts? ya'll must be starved! :D ;) i made "linguini con vongole" last night. or is that vognole. i don't know. it's spaghetti with clams to me. actually, spaghetti RIGATI, which means it got little ribs along it, all the better to catch the sauce. i made it a little differently from my usual "recipe" with the addition of mushrooms.

SPAGHETTI with WHITE CLAM SAUCE

half a box or a little more of spaghetti or linguini (a good italian dried pasta please!)
1 can of baby clams. SAVE the LIQUID.
some mushrooms (i used four large white ones)
1 small onion, or half a medium onion
fresh parsley, about 1/4 cup chopped
fresh garlic, about 3-5 cloves
extra virgin olive oil
some dry white wine
a pat of butter
salt, pepper, chili flakes, tiny pinch dried oregano or basil


put a large pot of water to boil for the pasta. don't salt or add oil. rinse the parsley, shake to dry, remove the stems, and coarsely chop so you have 1/4 cup or more, set aside.

chop onion fine, slice mushrooms thin, crush garlic. sautee these in a large pan with olive oil. just enough to coat the pan i guess. don't let the garlic burn. no no no. sautee until onion is transparent. season with pepper, the dried herbs, and some chili flakes if you like it spicy, but just a tiny bit.

you can time all this so the pasta is almost done (extra al dente) when the sauce is almost done. okay, now that the water's boiling, add the pasta, stir.

then go back to the pan: add the liquid from the can of clams to the limp onions. add half the parsley. add the wine, about a half cup. simmer on low for about 10 minutes.

just as the pasta is reaching almost done, add the clams, a pat of butter (this is totally optional but i wanted to finish off the stick), stir well, check seasonings. add salt only if needed, as the clams are already somewhat salty. you probably don't need it.

drain the pasta lightly, never rinse, and add this to the pan with the sauce, over low heat. add more parsley, and toss well. the noodles will continue to cook and absorb the liquid. if it's a bit dry, add some pasta water (not wine! haha). after a couple of minutes, check to see if the pasta is done. remove from heat, sprinkle a little more fresh parsley on top, drizzle with an extra good virgin olive oil, if you want.

this serves two very well... if you like clams. :D  one day i'll try this with fresh, but until then, long live the can~!

you can add a tiny bit of cheese, but i read that in italy you're not supposed to add cheese to seafood pastas. oh well -- i sprinkle on finely grated romano or mizithra or parmesan. served with a simple salad, and perhaps a good hot crusty bread, this is a super less-than-30-minute meal.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on October 16, 2006, 06:09:16 AM
You really have a knack of posting great recipes featuring an ingredient I can't get here in the Pyrenees. Never even seen canned clams over here. I sure do miss clam chowder.  :-[  (New England, not Manhattan) We used to rake them out ourselves when I was a kid.

One consolation is being able to get fresh basil in the market well into October. Last night I we had linguini and pesto.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on October 16, 2006, 06:14:07 AM
Quote
hey, if raisins are dried grapes, what are dried cranberries called?  ;) ;D 

jimmy, we've been calling them "craisins" I guess for cranberry-raisins.  I've never heard them called anything else.  Unlike raisins or sultanas or whatever...

;)

Never ate fried bologna.  And I think I'm the only middle-class white kid who didn't!  lol.  Evidently I've missed out on a culinary treat...just regular Oscar Mayer or deli style?  Hmmm.....
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on October 16, 2006, 06:19:36 AM
Made some roasted cauliflower from a recipe I found in a tapas food article yesterday and it was really good:

1 medium head cauliflower, rinsed and cut into florets
1/2t. red pepper flakes
1/2t garlic powder
1 t. kosher salt
1/3 c. Olive Oil

Combine the oil, salt and spices and whisk together smoothly.  With cauliflower in a bowl, pour the oil mixture over and toss to coat lightly.  Pour into a roasting pan and roast at F400 for about 30-40 minutes. 

This was very good, but Carol and I thought it would be equally delicious without the HOT peppers and just italian seasoning instead.  We didn't turn it or anything while roasting and just took it out of the oven when it was browned - crunchy coating but really tender.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on October 16, 2006, 06:56:07 AM
Mmmm...definite thumbs up for both the clam pasta and the cauliflower!

It's pumpkin season and as usual, I get an irresistible urge to buy some because they're so cheap, look so interesting, and they're a staple food in the Harry Potter universe  :D 
But what to do with them? Sweden has no pumpkin tradition at all - I saw my first pumpkin something like five years ago, and most people who buy them use them to carve for Halloween (which is also a new thing here and still considered very American). So now I wonder, does anyone have a favourite recipe with pumpkin? I'd mostly like to use them for savoury dishes, but I'm curious about sweet ones to!

What I normally make is a kind of curry that I came up with myself but that I can never get to taste as good as I'd like to. The version I'm eating right now has onions, an apple, lots of pumpkin, chick peas and a couple of fistfuls of raisins. Plus garam masala, curry powder, cinnamon, turmeric, vinegar, salt, sugar and lime juice. It sounds good, but there's something missing and I don't know what, I think I'd like a fruitier taste somehow. The raisins help a lot.
Oh, and last week I made "Pumpkin in Panaeng Curry" from a Thai recipe. It was yummy, but then again, it's hard to go wrong with coconut milk and Thai curry paste...  :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: desertrat on October 16, 2006, 07:01:24 AM
for me, the best is pumpkin soup ! you just make a soup with pumpkin, some soup spices and nutmeg. at the end, you mash the whole thing with a blender and serve it with a bit of whipped cream on top. on the cream you can either put a bit of olive oil or pumpkin seeds. a streak of olive oil over the spoup looks good and makes a great taste.

another pumpkin recipie i like is pumpkin with gnocchi. i don't know it by heart now but there's onions in it and italian spices and pumpkin cubes. if you're interested let me know then i'm going to search for it.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on October 16, 2006, 07:09:48 AM
Pumpkin Pie.

An American invention (Pennsylvania Dutch had a lot of spare time and a lot of wheat flour - they "invented" a majority of America's desserts and treats).

Pastry crust (sometimes baked first and) filled with a pumpkin-based custard and baked again until the custard sets. 

Pumpkin Flan
Pumpkin Bread
Pumpkin Pudding

You could also use pumpkin in savoury dishes like pastas and stir-fry's and curry's - it is a squash vegetable like zucchini. 

It takes really well to garlicky and peppery flavours - not just the sweet, nutmeggy ones.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on October 16, 2006, 07:26:57 AM
At our monthly breakfast at the K of C hall yesterday, they served pumpkin pancakes. No idea about the recipe, but they were delicious!

Most of the items were usual American breakfast stuff. Jari said it made his arteries clog just to hear the menu!  :D

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: daphne on October 16, 2006, 08:06:36 AM
My favorite recipe with pumpkin is pumpkin tortelli. It's a kind of filled pasta and it's a typical recipe of some parts of Northern Italy. My mom used to make them for me, and they are my no. 1 soul food. There are two variants, as far as I know:

1) The filling is made with pumpkin, parmigiano, nutmeg and macaroons; the sauce is made with melted butter, grated parmigiano, and sage.

2) Same filling, but without macaroons. Sauce: meat gravy and tomato sauce. This is my favorite version. Sweet pumpkin + salty sauce = delicious.

I have to call mom and tell her to invite me to dinner as soon as possible  ;D  ;)

Btw Laurentia, if you want the tortelli recipe let me know, I'll try to translate it into comprehensible English  ;D


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on October 16, 2006, 08:53:36 AM
I'm a big fan of Curry Pumpkin Soup which is a dish I serve every American Thanksgiving with whole wheat biscuits and/or cornbread.  It's really easy. 

Bascially I cook pumpkin and butternut squash and mix it with chicken broth, sauted onions and garlic, cooked carrots and, of course, curry, salt and pepper.  Once it's all mixed together, I either mash it together with a potato masher or run it in a blender/food processor.  If I'm going to make it country-style I serve it more chunky.  If I want to serve it more 'elegantly' I push the puree thru cheese cloth and serve it that way.  If either style is too thick, you can thin it down with broth.   I occasionally add a little milk or cream to either style to give it some richness but I don't use the milk/cream to thin it down.  It will just become to milky and you'll lose flavor. 

I've sprinkled paprika on top to give it color.  This TG I'll put a little dollop of sour cream on each serving and sprinkle crushed pecans/walnuts on top to give it a little texture and crunch.  And, I might also add sherry to give it a little punch! ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 17, 2006, 03:06:56 AM
ooh yummy, all the pumpkin recipes sound so good... i love pumpkin ravioli but have never made it myself. there's always the pumpkin/mango curry too, which i've now made twice with kabocha pumpkins.

bobbie and desertrat, the pumpkin soups sound great... i often make carrot soup, very similar to pumpkin soup, simple as ever. lots of boiled soft organic carrots (somehow they're sweeter?) and then blended in batches with chicken or vegetable stock, a little heavy cream or half and half, and salt, pepper, and grated FRESH nutmeg. this and a salad with hot crusty french bread. YUM. and so easy.

heidi, the roasted cauliflower sounds delish. i roast veggies all the time in winter, but have never once tried cauliflower! it just never crossed my mind. i would think a dusting of curry instead of the chili flakes would also work, or maybe a tamari based dressing and sprinkled with toasted sesame seeds and fresh cilantro/coriander for an asian flair.

tonight i made something that could be served up on brokeback: pork chops, baked beans, corn on the cob, and string beans. i rarely cook meat at home but there was a great sale on pork chops at ralph's and sometimes i crave that "other white meat." lol.

the corn on the cob was dressed with butter, lemon juice, and salt and pepper. why i used lemon i'll never know, but it was different. ;D

the pork chops were oven "fried" -- coated with progresso bread crumbs and baked in a hot oven for 40 minutes. came out great.

the string beans were the skinny french kind, steamed, then tossed in olive oil and balsamic vinegar, garlic and lemon juice.

the baked beans were whatever was in that can of bettermost from the barbecue -- not bad for mystery beans. :D

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on October 17, 2006, 06:28:16 AM
heidi, the roasted cauliflower sounds delish. i roast veggies all the time in winter, but have never once tried cauliflower! it just never crossed my mind. i would think a dusting of curry instead of the chili flakes would also work, or maybe a tamari based dressing and sprinkled with toasted sesame seeds and fresh cilantro/coriander for an asian flair.

the baked beans were whatever was in that can of bettermost from the barbecue -- not bad for mystery beans. :D

OOOh!  Yes, Jimmy your modifications sound good too!

and omg.  You ate your BBM BBQ beans!?!?!?  LMAO!  We've practically bronzed ours!  The two cans are sitting side by side on the top shelf of the bookcase, flanked by one of Pat Sinnott's pictures and the plaque that Chucky gave me.   **sniff sniff*  It's like a mini-altar! lol.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 17, 2006, 07:10:35 AM
and omg.  You ate your BBM BBQ beans!?!?!?  LMAO!  We've practically bronzed ours!  The two cans are sitting side by side on the top shelf of the bookcase, flanked by one of Pat Sinnott's pictures and the plaque that Chucky gave me.   **sniff sniff*  It's like a mini-altar! lol.

LOL, yes -- but i saved the can. hey, we wuz hungry. ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on October 17, 2006, 12:54:28 PM
The recipe I follow for roasting cauliflower (you can mix with broccoli as well) is to first toss the flowerettes with olive oil, crushed garlic , salt and pounded coriander seeds (not ground). Those little explosions of coriander when you chew make all the difference.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on October 17, 2006, 06:25:06 PM
OOOh!  Sounds manifique!

LOVE coriander seed heads...tend to eat them right out of the garden when no one is watching....
 ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 21, 2006, 01:44:06 AM
this is a 360 degree composite with my friend (in orange) at the korean 24 hour TOFU house.... (http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/bcd_tofu_house.jpg)  btw, this should be viewed from right to left, with the menu first and the meal last.

i had the bowl of BIBIM BAP shown on the left --  a big bowl of veggies and whatnot -- dandelion leaves, odd greens and root vegetables, fresh bean sprouts, grated cucumber and carrot, tofu, shiitake, egg strips, pickled onion and other yummy things. hot rice is plopped on top, you mix it all up with spicy korean ketchup in vigorous strokes with steel knitting needle type chopsticks. just delicious.

my friend had the CORVINA/soon tofu combination: a big broiled fish alongside a spicy tofu stew bubbling in a stone cauldron...

okay and here is the kicker -- the neighboring tablemates after our food arrived were a trio of young boisterous koreans teenagers out having fun. when their fish arrived (a small fish is given as an appetizer along with all the other stuff -- kimchee, spicy raw oysters and jalapeño in a miso paste, seaweed salads, pickles, etc.) the girl, an asian britney spears lookalike, grabbed her metal sticks and deftly snatched the eyes out of their sockets. "i want the eyes!" she cried out, popping them in her hello kitty mouth. she insisted that they are good for health, and her friend (a boy in saggerz who kept playing with his cigarette lighter) said that some koreans believe eating fish eyes will help human eyesight....  so i had to try it at least once.

(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/fisheyes.jpg)
corvina eye, plucked out to be eaten

it was like a bite of concentrated ocean parts, a bit metallic, sorta greasy, like concentrated fish oil. kinda like i imagine squid ink tastes. odd... there was a hard ocular membrane inside that was spit out, but the girl said that should be eaten too. ummm, i didn't bother with the other one!  :-X :P ;D

i'd rather have a carrot, lol.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on October 21, 2006, 04:28:06 PM
Where do you buy food? Here are some photos from the Saturday market near us.
These are some of the vendors I patronise:


(http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g54/Chapeaugris/vegbio.jpg)

Organic veg grower


(http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g54/Chapeaugris/onions.jpg)

This man grows onions and garlic and drives 2 hours to get to this market.

(http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g54/Chapeaugris/mushrooms.jpg)

In summer he picks wild blueberries in the mountains and sells them. (More like combs for them, as he uses a  thing with metal teeth to rake through the bushes.) In autumn he gathers mushrooms. I buy his blueberries but not mushrooms as we have plenty growing around us. Those are cèpes, called porcini mushrooms in Italy. Not sure what they are called in English. Boletus, I think.


(http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g54/Chapeaugris/miel.jpg)

Philippe has some of his bee hives not far from our house.

(http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g54/Chapeaugris/pain.jpg)

This bread has apricot and orange bits in it.

(http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g54/Chapeaugris/ventreche.jpg)

In the foreground is "ventreche" (ventre = belly). We buy this thinly sliced for bacon.

(http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g54/Chapeaugris/pighearts.jpg)

Pig hearts. (I don't care for offal, though.)

(http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g54/Chapeaugris/roti.jpg)

The piece of meat in background is pork roast wrapped around prunes and pineapple.

(http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g54/Chapeaugris/viedecochon.jpg)

The have a poster showing the farm where the pigs they butcher are raised.

(http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g54/Chapeaugris/greens.jpg)

This guy mainly sells organic cheese and yogurt but this time of year also has herbs and greens.

(http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g54/Chapeaugris/fromager.jpg)

The cheese van.

(http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g54/Chapeaugris/brebis.jpg)

Several types of sheep cheese.

(http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g54/Chapeaugris/horsemeat.jpg)

The horse meat van. (I've never tried it.)







Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on October 22, 2006, 01:35:45 AM
First off - thanks so much for all the pumpkin input! I've been so busy since I asked, I haven't been able to catch up in here, but thanks, everyone!

About the Korean restaurant adventure  :) - there seems to be a number of eye-eating little rituals around. In parts of Scandinavia where they have much sheep (I've heard of this practice from Iceland, Norway, and the Swedish island Gotland) there's a dish called various things, but it's the cooked head of a sheep or lamb, sometimes halved so you have the sheep's profile staring up at you from the plate. Now, of course it's MANLY to ostentatiously eat the eye, so either you pick it out of the socket and eat it, or you get it served in a little glass of vodka and it's supposed to be swallowed whole with the vodka shot. The latter sounds a little less icky, I think.

Oh, Chapeaugris, what lovely pictures! I wish I had a market like that nearby! Look at those mushrooms...and the bread! They call those petit pains? Then how big are the normal-sized loaves?  :D  And 1.50 euros for a bread like that is a bargain in my opinion. It's very nice to have pictures of where the meat comes from, and that cheese van...aahh. Not so sure about the horse meat van, though...but there's quite a queue, do people prefer horse meat for some reason?

I read somewhere that the general distaste in Europe for horse meat comes from the effort of the Church to erase Pagan ways a thousand years ago. Apparently, horses were often sacrificed and the meat eaten in some kind of religious context, so the Church made it out to be disgusting and sinful. I don't know if it's true, but it's interesting, and in Scandinavia, the horse butcher used to be one of the lowest-ranking people in society even in the 19th century. There's even a common derogative that was originally the term for that job.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on October 22, 2006, 04:17:12 AM
Not many people eat horsemeat -- that's all one family in front of the stand. The tradition is kind of dying out, though it revived a bit during the mad cow scare.

I think the petit pain is the one behind the big one in the foreground.

I checked out that cooking conversion site link you put in your signature. Incredibly useful! I have American, British and French cookbooks and have to juggle scales and measurements all the time.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 22, 2006, 07:24:44 AM
laurentia -- sheep eye vodka shots!! that's hardcore!  ;D  sorta like eating the worm with the tequila i guess ;)

chapeaugris, thanks for the photo field trip to the farmer's market! WOWOWOW, so that's what porcini looks like? we only find it dried here, in little shavings! i will look harder for fresh,,, i absolutely love porcini.

the bread and herbs look wonderful too....  and those big bunches of radishes... mmm. we have farmer's markets here too, or that's what we call them, where they will close off a street and vendors set out their organic foodstuffs. mostly fruit and vegetables tho, honey, hand milled soaps, candles, etc.. but i've never seen horsemeat.

luckily, california is a great place to grow green things so we do have an abundance of great markets. also, the abundance of varying cultures -- mexican, chinese, korean, japanese (i looove our japanese market, they have the best KYOHO grapes, like a glass of wine in every grape!), armenian, indian, etc. -- make for some interesting food shopping.

oh. when i was visiting japan, we were served an elaborate dinner at a grand hotel and one of the tiny dishes contained a new type of sushi.  chewy and red and raw and sort of grainy,  almost gritty, and tasted metalllic. you were to swish it in a miso/soy sauce mixture, i think, before popping the tiny morsel in your mouth. anyway, i didn't like it and only afterwards did we learn that it was raw horse meat... a delicacy!

all i could think of was spaghetti and soda-pop -- not the food, the two horses my sister and i rode back home in colorado. haven't had it since, but i do eat other meats, so i can't altogether say horse is different from cow or rabbit or.. froglegs.  lol.  but you know what, ever since i got a pet rabbit, i haven't been able to bring myself to eat rabbit stew, even tho it was one of my favorite dishes in my younger days... :-\ :-\

PS: i made the pumpkin/mango curry AGAIN... LOL. again with kabocha squash, and it's soo good. one squash two mangos. they don't even have to be fully ripe! once can of stock and one can of coconut milk, a good fragrant curry, a fried onion in some oil..... and this time i added corn that i'd shaved off from leftover cobs boiled the night before. it was good -- everything is sweet, the corn, the kabocha, the mango, and add to that the spiciness of the curry.. yummy. it's great over rice, a wonderful fall dish. i might add raisins, toasted coconuts, if i have some handy.  i think even peas might be good in this. sweet peas, of course, or maybe snow. ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on October 22, 2006, 07:37:23 AM
PS: i made the pumpkin/mango curry AGAIN... LOL. again with kabocha squash, and it's soo good. one squash two mangos. they don't even have to be fully ripe! once can of stock and one can of coconut milk, a good fragrant curry, a fried onion in some oil..... and this time i added corn that i'd shaved off from leftover cobs boiled the night before. it was good -- everything is sweet, the corn, the kabocha, the mango, and add to that the spiciness of the curry.. yummy. it's great over rice, a wonderful fall dish. i might add raisins, toasted coconuts, if i have some handy.  i think even peas might be good in this. sweet peas, of course, or maybe snow. ;)
Oh, you're killing me! Our market is great, but there are so many things you can't get.

I love rabbit. Once I read a French article about the Tour de France and the writer described the cyclists as being "thin as rabbits". That puzzled me, because rabbits don't look that thin. Then I realised he meant skinned rabbits, like you see at the butcher's.

Last fall while on a walk, my husband found a hare that had just expired after having been shot by a hunter, who hadn't managed to find it. It was still warm, so he brought it home. Our neighbor skinned it for us, then we hung it in the shower stall for a couple of days. Then marinated it in wine and other things for 24 hours and stewed it. It was delicious but our kids wouldn't touch it. Later, I saw an email my daughter sent to a friend in the States: "My parents are so disgusting! They found a dead rabbit on the ground and ate it."
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 22, 2006, 03:33:04 PM
^^  LOL.....  as opposed to finding one refrigerated in a grocery store....  ;)

yes, a fat plump rabbit *is* good eating, for some. :) ;D  i was also fond of the lime marinated rabbit dish they served at restaurant up in oakland, CA.

hmm, now i'm picturing jake as lance armstrong, in a cute furry rabbit costume...  that fuzzy little tail, hahah.  :D

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on October 23, 2006, 12:18:36 AM
I bought a cookbook by a chef of a restaurant in Boston just for the recipe for braised rabbit with a sauce that contained not only spices used for game but also chocolate and chilies. It's similar to a Mexican "mole". It's incredibly good and unusual, and I serve it, along with with walnut noodles, when I want to impress French people. It's so unlike anything they've had here. Americans have such a bad culinary reputation here (the French think all we eat are hamburgers) that when I have people over for dinner I feel I really have to make a supreme effort yet not serve them anything typically French.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on October 23, 2006, 12:43:01 AM
"My parents are so disgusting! They found a dead rabbit on the ground and ate it."

 :D   :D   :D   :D   :D   :D   :D   :D ...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 23, 2006, 07:06:14 AM
I bought a cookbook by a chef of a restaurant in Boston just for the recipe for braised rabbit with a sauce that contained not only spices used for game but also chocolate and chilies. It's similar to a Mexican "mole". It's incredibly good and unusual, and I serve it, along with with walnut noodles, when I want to impress French people. It's so unlike anything they've had here. Americans have such a bad culinary reputation here (the French think all we eat are hamburgers) that when I have people over for dinner I feel I really have to make a supreme effort yet not serve them anything typically French.

hamburgers! ...well, those can be good too! ;)

but oh my goodness, the walnut noodles sound amazing. who is the chef, is his recipe online do you think? i'd love to try it, with or without the rabbit.  i love the chocolate mole sauces in mexican food, a favorite type of enchilada for me, the sauce is rich and has a great texture.

:::googling walnut noodles:::


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on October 23, 2006, 07:54:26 AM
For any French people who think that Americans have a bad culinary reputation, I've got two words for them:

NOUVELLE-ORLÉANS!!!

 :D

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on October 23, 2006, 02:24:50 PM
Sweet-and-Sour Braised Rabbit with Chocolate

1 rabbit, cut up

1/4 tsp hot red pepper flakes
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground allspice
1/8 tsp mace
Flour for dredging

1/2  cup oil
1/4 lb (250 g) thickly sliced pancetta, diced small
1 small onion, chopped
12 shallots, peeled
3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 tsp tomato paste
2 1/2 cups chicken stock
2 Tbsp sugar
1 cup Marsala
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
1/4 Tbsp crushed fennel seeds
1/4 Tbsp crushed juniper berries
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
1 bay leaf
1 1/2 oz semisweet chocolate, finely chopped



Combine the first 4 spices with flour. Sprinkle rabbit pieces with salt and pepper then toss them in the seasoned flour. Heat 3 tbsp vegetable oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat and brown the rabbit pieces on all sides. Place the rabbit pieces in a heavy pot.

Add the pancetta to the sauté pan and cook over medium heat until the fat starts to render, 1-2 mins. Add the onion, shallots, and garlic and stir them about until they start to brown. Add the tomato paste and cook for 1 more minute. Transfer the vegetables to the pot with the rabbit.

Deglaze the sauté pan with the chicken stock. bring the stock to a boil, scraping the bottom of the pan with a spoon to dissolve any crispy bits in the hot liquid. Pour over the rabbit.

Melt the sugar in a small saucepan over medium heat. Remove it from the heat as soon as it caramelizes. Stir in the Marsala and 2 tablespoons of the red wine vinegar in a slow stream. As soon as the liquid is blended with the caramelized sugar, pour the mixture into the pot with the rabbit.

Add the fennel seeds, juniper berries, cayenne pepper, and bay leaf to the pot and bring to a boil, then lower the heat to a simmer. Cover and cook until the rabbit is tender but not falling off the bone, about 30  minutes.

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 200° F / 95° C

Transfer the rabbit to a heatproof platter and place in the oven. Reduce the braising liquid over high heat until it's thick enough to coat  the back of a spoon.. Lower the heat, add the chocolate and the remaining 2 tablespoons of vinegar and stir until the chocolate melts completely. Taste--the flavor should be a balance of sweet and sour. Add more vinegar if necessary. Discard the bay leaf and season with salt and pepper. Pour the sauce over the rabbit and serve.



This recipe is from In the Hands of a Chef, by Jody Adams who has a restaurant called Rialto in Boston (or did, when I bought the book a few years ago).
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on October 23, 2006, 04:42:45 PM
The Rabbit in Chocolate sounds amazing...

Seems the Aztecs and the Mayans combined the hot fire of chilis/spicy cinnamon with the richness of chocolate in their templar drink...similar to our modern day hot chocolate:

Basic:
Boil a litre of milk (or water, like in the ancient Mexican style)
When the milk is warm (not hot) add a chocolate tablet; broken into pieces
Stir with a blender (but be careful! the blender's electric cord should NOT touch the pot or any other hot thing around it)
When the chocolate has dissolved add ½ - ¾ cups of sugar (depending how sweet you like your chocolate) and blend in fast; make sure the sugar is completely dissolved in the chocolate otherwise it will be bitter no matter how much sugar you may add afterwards
Add a teaspoon of cinnamon or natural vanilla flavour (artificial vanilla flavour with chocolate results in an awful medicine like flavour) if you like, and blend again
Let the mixture boil, when it starts to get bubbly quickly remove the pan from the stove top, and rest the bottom against a soaked cloth
Put again on stove top, it should get bubbly almost immediately, remove once again and repeat one last time. This aerates the chocolate which enhances the flavour.
In a mug, put about 1/2-3/4 of the chocolate mixture, and add cold milk, until the temperature and/or the concentration of the flavour is right for your tastes
Accompany with French/Danish pastries and enjoy!


Mayan "xocoatl" :
Add the crude powder or the chocolate tablets (broken down in a pestle and mortar) and add to cold water
Bring to a boil over a medium heat while stirring
The Mayans were said to have added local herbs also; but what they might have been as far as I know as been lost in antiquity and no doubt no longer exist!?


Aztec "Cacahuatl" :
Add the cocoa powder to a non-reactive pan and add to cold water (the Aztecs are said to have refined the Mayan "xocoatl", by grinding the powder finer than the Mayans)
Add some chilli water (chop chillies and soak in boiling water to make a 'tea'), vanilla beans/pods and honey
Let the mixture boil while stirring constantly, when it starts to get bubbly quickly remove the pan from the stove top and allow to cool slightly
Place back on the flame and continue to stir to the boil again
Repeat the cooling and re-boiling
Repeat again: this aerates the chocolate which enhances the flavour

Chef notes
You should now have a drink similar to the Aztec drink, which should be: finely ground, soft, foamy, reddish, bitter and spicy No amounts are given, as it is very much a case of producing them to suit your individual taste...Bon appetite and enjoy!

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 24, 2006, 02:05:57 AM
oohh great chocolate recipes, just in time for autumn (somehow it seems right!). i could go for a hot cocoa now. sometimes, and in winter, the mexican restaurants here serve a chocolate drink that's thickened with i think CORN or something. it's very filling and i would imagine it's a good breakfast drink on cold winter days. i forgot what it's called tho, but "tacos llamas" in the valley has it on their menu sometimes.

thanks for the rabbit recipe chapeaugris, but could you post the walnut noodles? i tried to find it online to no avail! lots of pasta dishes featuring walnuts in the sauce but nothing in the noodles. i do like the nutty flavor of buckwheat noodles (japanese buckwheat soba) and i think walnut noodles would be divine. with a nice porcini mushroom cream sauce.. mmm...

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on October 24, 2006, 02:14:01 AM
Sorry gnash, the walnut noodles are store-bought. They are flat pasta called "taillerins" and are a speciality of the Savoy region. They also come in wild mushroom flavor (porcini in fact). You might be able to duplicate the flavor slightly by drizzling walnut oil on fettucini.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on October 24, 2006, 07:05:02 AM
Or making the noodles at home with ground walnuts replacing part of the flour....
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 25, 2006, 05:59:57 AM
hmmm, well i'll look for the dried walnut noodles in imported food stores,,, they sound so good and so do the porcini noodles! lately we've been drizzling "truffle oil" on my simple pasta dishes.. it adds a nice nutty flavor!

i may also try the replacing the flour with ground walnuts trick.. however, my pasta machine's been ruined because my bf and i use it to squish out sheets of polymer clay... i should show you some of the food i've "cooked" for our dollhouses....

(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/p_carrotpepper.jpg)

1/12" scale fimo carrots, tomatoes, chili peppers, hot cross buns, some cheese, and a burger (with lettuce).

here's pics of bread, (http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/p_breadstuffs.jpg) some decorated cakes & pies (http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/p_cakes4.jpg) (top floral cake i didn't make),
a bowl of actual peel-able oranges,  (http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/p_oranges.jpg) and of course, couple of inch scale pizzas!  (http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/p_pizza.jpg)

it's kinda funny i make the cakes and breads -- baking and pastries is one thing i NEVER attempt at home in full scale. :D

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on October 25, 2006, 06:22:37 AM
What's this about dollhouses? Please explain!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 25, 2006, 07:45:44 AM
What's this about dollhouses? Please explain!

well, when responding about the walnut noodles, i realized our pasta press/cutter machine was now unsuitable for food because we use it for polymer clay, and thought i could get away with posting pictures of food that i've made in miniature -- dollhouse scale. so not only do i enjoy cooking food, i enjoy making food in miniature :D



i found this link a while back and don't think i've posted it yet -- it's got some interesting "camp" recipes that maybe jack and ennis could have cooked on brokeback mountain:

                     http://www.chuckwagondiner.com/categories.php?id=11

the titles are interesting: billy's beer butt chicken, angels on horseback, brown bears and banana boats, chops and drops, walking tacos,  s'mores with a TWIST and empty bird's nests, and of course, camp beans... ;D

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on October 25, 2006, 08:07:03 AM
Not to mention Rodeo Burgers.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on October 29, 2006, 12:23:03 PM
Bobbie, that pumpkin soup recipe suggests a new way to deal with the acorn squash sitting on the counter.  Except that before putting the full complement on the stove to simmer I'll use the microwave to steam the carrots and cook the squash,and probably puree them with some broth.  Thanks!

Actually, most of the formulas on this thread are so healthy, very healthy, exotic and/or stylish I feel impelled to contribute this anti-recipe from today's NYT magazine.  I haven't made it, but I plan to fall from grace in a major way and do so:
Quote
Dick Taeuber's Cordial Pie

1 1/2 cups crumbs (graham crackers, chocolate wafers or gingersnaps)
1/4 cup melted butter (1/3 cup with graham cracker crumbs)
1 envelope unflavored gelatin
2/3 cup sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt
3 eggs, separated
1/2 cup of liqueurs or liquor, as directed on chart
1 cup heavy cream
Food coloring (optional).

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine crumbs with butter. Form in a 9-inch pan and bake for 10 minutes. Cool.

2. Pour 1/ 2 cup cold water in a saucepan and sprinkle gelatin over it. Add 1/3 cup sugar, salt and egg yolks. Stir to blend. Place over low heat and stir until the gelatin dissolves and mixture thickens. Do not boil! Remove from heat.

3. Stir the liqueurs or liquor into the mixture. Then chill until the mixture starts to mound slightly when nudged with a spoon.

4. Beat the egg whites until stiff, then add remaining 1/ 3 cup sugar and beat until peaks are firm. Fold the meringue into the thickened mixture.

5. Whip the cream, then fold into the mixture. Add food coloring if desired. Turn the mixture into the crust. Add garnish, if desired. Chill several hours or overnight. Serves 6.

And before you start thinking of variations, the original author supplied 20:
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/10/29/magazine/29food.html?adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1162148650-OIfTPu583kU2yEeuuGiY/Q&pagewanted=all

 (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/10/29/magazine/29food.html?adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1162148650-OIfTPu583kU2yEeuuGiY/Q&pagewanted=all)
(Gnash, neat minis. Do you have a web site.  Anyone curious about the hobby of tiny things, just google "dollhouse miniatures" and you may become infected.)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on October 29, 2006, 12:35:12 PM
Oh wow oh wow!!! I can finally use up the walnut liqueur I bought in Italy. With chocolate cookie crust. I MUST try this recipe!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nax on October 30, 2006, 07:50:10 AM
We've tried making Toad in the Hole at home and it has always been a disappointment. We just can't seem to get the Yorkshire pudding to come out right no matter who's recipe we follow.

It is very important to use plain flour, not sefl-raising or anything that has a raising agent in it.  The batter should rest for 10 minutes in the fridge before use, the pan in which you cook this should be pre-heated in the oven with some oil in it.  While this is cooking on no account open the oven door as the pudding will fall so follow the time on the recipie.

This is normally the same batter mixture used for waffles or just about.  I love my yorkshire puddings, Sundays wouldn't be the same without them, even though I'm a vegetarian I still have to have my Yorkies  ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on October 30, 2006, 08:03:58 AM
We've tried making Toad in the Hole at home and it has always been a disappointment. We just can't seem to get the Yorkshire pudding to come out right no matter who's recipe we follow.

It is very important to use plain flour, not sefl-raising or anything that has a raising agent in it.  The batter should rest for 10 minutes in the fridge before use, the pan in which you cook this should be pre-heated in the oven with some oil in it.  While this is cooking on no account open the oven door as the pudding will fall so follow the time on the recipie.
Thanks, Nax. That's the one thing we haven't tried, so we'll give it another shot.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nax on October 31, 2006, 03:37:52 AM
We've tried making Toad in the Hole at home and it has always been a disappointment. We just can't seem to get the Yorkshire pudding to come out right no matter who's recipe we follow.

It is very important to use plain flour, not sefl-raising or anything that has a raising agent in it.  The batter should rest for 10 minutes in the fridge before use, the pan in which you cook this should be pre-heated in the oven with some oil in it.  While this is cooking on no account open the oven door as the pudding will fall so follow the time on the recipie.
Thanks, Nax. That's the one thing we haven't tried, so we'll give it another shot.
Make sure the pan is right up to temperature with the hot oil in it when you add the batter - this is where it usually goes wrong.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on October 31, 2006, 06:07:44 AM
my pasta machine's been ruined because my bf and i use it to squish out sheets of polymer clay... i should show you some of the food i've "cooked" for our dollhouses....

Jimmy!  Do not even use that pasta machine for cooking REAL food after squishing out the polymer clay!

Carol Duvall will come after you and beat you with a stick!

Go buy another one....
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on November 02, 2006, 01:32:21 AM
^^^ yes i know, it's ruined for FOOD but works great for clay, i'll have to find another way, i do not want that duvall woman chasing me around...! maybe i can just roll it out and slice the noodles...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on November 02, 2006, 06:05:22 AM
^^^ yes i know, it's ruined for FOOD but works great for clay, i'll have to find another way, i do not want that duvall woman chasing me around...! maybe i can just roll it out and slice the noodles...

Roll out the pasta as thin as you can with a rolling pin, lightly dust with flour and roll the dough up loosely, jelly-roll style and then slice like you would icebox cookies or pinwheel cookies...you can either dry them in the little coils or unroll them and dry them flat or over the handle of a wooden spoon between two drinking glasses...

I've done this - but I'm always in such a hurry that I don't roll the dough out thin enough so my linguine is a bit doughy.  Oh and remember that fresh pasta - even air dried for a day - cooks up in about oh 2 seconds!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: PatSinnott on November 03, 2006, 09:09:27 PM
Does anyone have a recipe for Hot Buttered Rum, or a good spiced mull wine or cider punch, something adult to serve on a chilly night?

Thanks, and by way of contributing here is a great dessert recipe I've made several times:

1 package of Archway Coconut Macaroons
1/2 cup light rum (tried Captain Morgans spiced rum once, not as good)
6 Hershey bars
1 carton heavy whipping cream (I think it's a pint)
1/2 cup toasted almond slivers (I buy them raw and put them in the toaster oven until golden brown)

Soak macaroons in rum until rum is absorbed (about 20 minutes), flipping them over occasionally.  Press macaroons down into bottom of springform pan to form crust.  Chill while making filling.

Break Hershey bars into pieces, put in microwave safe dish and heat on high for 30 seconds.  Stir, heat another 30 seconds until melted, repeat until melted making sure not to let sides scorch or crystallize.  Can use double boiler to melt chocolate too.

Whip cream till stiff.  Temper chocolate with about 1 cup whipped cream, and then fold chocolate into whipped cream, mixing well.
Spread over macaroon crust and top with toasted almonds.  Chill for 1 hour.

To serve, remove springform from bottom of pan and slice.   
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on November 04, 2006, 06:52:40 PM
God Bless You, Pat!

Carol and I will be trying that one VERY soon....

I'll see if I can dig up a Hot Buttered Rum recipe in exchange.

I do make a wassail recipe in the Crock Pot that you could just as easily use some wine or cranberry vodka:

1 medium orange studded lightly with cloves and sliced thinly
1 large lemon studded lightly with cloves and sliced thinly
1 or 2 limes sliced thinly
1 cup fresh cranberries

4 cups orange juice
4 cups cranberry juice cocktail or cranberry juice blend (cranapple or crancherry are best, crangrape is okay IMHO)

3 or 4 large cinnamon sticks, slightly broken
2 or 3 large star anise (yuck!  I don't like these and don't use them!)  :P
3 or 4 cardamon pods, slightly crushed

(optional) wine to taste
    -  or  -
(optional) cranberry or orange or lemon vodka to taste

Now for the hard part:  Dump all that stuff into the crock pot and cook on "high" setting for about an hour, then turn it on "low" setting.  When the stuff smells so good that it starts to draw people's attention, it's ready.  This is also VERY good when you have a scratchy throat or head cold.

chef's note:  All these measurements are approximate.  I just throw the ingreds together until it looks right and smells right and tastes right.  This recipe can also be adjusted if you have a smaller/larger crock pot, or if you want to cook it on the stovetop in a large stock pot.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: PatSinnott on November 05, 2006, 04:11:21 PM
Thanks Heidi,
I'm gonna give this one a try! 

I did find a spiced apple cider recipe in my Betty Crocker cookbook, and as a variation it told how to make it into a hot buttered rum spiced cider, so I'm going to serve them both. Basically to make it into a hot buttered rum version, you put a tablespoon of butter, a tablespoon of packed brown sugar and two tablespoons of rum into the bottom of the mug, and fill with hot cider.

Oh, and enjoy the chocolate mousse/macaroon thing.  It's totally rich, so be prepared!!



Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on November 08, 2006, 03:58:27 PM
Simple Dessert for Solitaries and Lovers:  Here's the single-serving recipe. Modify as needed to share with a friend.

One mug very hot black coffee
One Hershey Skor bar, unwrapped, broken in half, preferably served on a small, pretty plate.
Paper napkin.

Dip one piece of candy bar into the coffee.  In a leisurely manner, lick or suck the melted chocolate from the toffee. Reverse grip and, holding the naked end of the piece, dip the other end in coffee and remove the rest of the chocolate.

(Alternative: continue to dip and nibble the unclothed toffee until consumed; then dunk the other end.)

Repeat process with other half of candy bar.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on November 09, 2006, 12:37:22 AM
^ Simple desserts are the best!
Reminds me of the kind of biscuits an Australian friend told me about, a sort of porous wafer coated in chocolate, that can be used as a straw for coffee. The chocolate will, of course, melt and blend with the coffee on its way through the wafer. Sounds delicious...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on November 13, 2006, 02:56:19 AM
pat, the recipe you posted sounds realllly yummy and decadent. i'm inclined to put sliced bananas into the mix.. damn, i didn't have dessert all weekend, and that would certainly fit the bill!  oh wait, duhhhh,,,, i made brownies last night!   ::)   :::runs to kitchen:::

the hot cider and wassail recipes sound delicious. my american grandma in wisconsin used to serve us tea with tang (flavored drink mix) in it.. down-home, simple and sugary, and around holidays, i remember her peppery pfeffernusse cookies -- homemade, with nuts inside. they where dry and crumbly and delicious. covered in powdered sugar, they reminded me of snowballs and omg i must have eaten hundreds of em over the years..!

with the holidays around the corner, i guess we'll be seeing more good recipes here for holiday meals. i hope to see some unusual things from different cultures... okay, not haggis or anything like that,,, but you know what i mean. ;)

lately i've been enjoying shredded raw vegetable salads -- little separate mounds of shredded carrots, zucchini, beets, jicama, cabbage, green papaya, bell peppers and whatnot, all finely shredded (with a grater) and topped with toasted sesame seeds, then drizzled on a lemon-olive oil-vinegar dressing, with herbs, garlic, etc...

however tonight we went out for chinese at the ultra non-descript noodle house in arcadia and OMG it was deliciousnesss.. the best buns i've ever had, just amazing:

(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/noodlehouse_buns.jpg)

they were so soft, yet had that crunchy crispiness on the bottom, and inside was a perfect meat filling...  next time i want to try this, it's very spicy (or so they say):

(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/noodlehouse_fun.jpg)

with a name like that, how can you resist... :D ;D  ...i think it's those clear rice noodles with tofu and vegetables.  tonight we also ordered a beef noodle soup. the noodles are handmade, and chewy -- hands down the best chinese noodles i've eaten. worth the drive... ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: PatSinnott on November 13, 2006, 08:21:48 AM
Hi Jimmy,
I loves me some Chinese food!  I tend to order the hot/spicy dishes.  Jim doesn't eat it because it raises his sugars.  He is a long time diabetic.  So I usually eat it for lunch. 
The recipe I posted won a contest many years ago in the Dallas Morning News for recipes using only 6 ingredients or less.  That's how I found it. I'm sure they would have added bananas or something else if the rules for the contest didn't say 6 or less ingredients.  It's a great base recipe to try additions with. 




For Thanksgiving this year I'm going to make another dessert that I love, and have made dozens of times.  Here's the recipe:


Butch’s White Chocolate Cheesecake  (December 1987)

Crust:

18 Oreo cookies
1/2 cup pecans
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
6 tablespoons melted butter (salted butter)
      
Put all ingredients into food processor and mix thoroughly.
Press into bottom and sides of spring form pan.
Save 2 tablespoons for topping.
Refrigerate while making filling.

Filling:
   2 lbs cream cheese at room temperature
   4 eggs plus one egg yolk
   8 tablespoons of unsalted butter at room temperature
   2 tablespoons of vanilla extract
   3 tablespoons of favorite liqueur (Grand Marnier, Amaretto, Kahlua, etc.)
   Pinch of ground nutmeg
   1 lb of white chocolate, melted

Place cream cheese in food processor or beat with mixer and cream until light and fluffy.  Add four eggs, one at a time, plus one egg yolk.  Add room temp butter, vanilla, liqueur and nutmeg, until thoroughly blended.  Stop and wipe sides of processor bowl with rubber spatula.  Process on low and blend in white chocolate. 
Pour carefully into crumb crust.  Bake in preheated 350 degree oven for 1&1/4 to 1&1/2 hours.  Sprinkle saved cookie crumbs over the top and continue to bake for 15 more minutes. 
Cool completely, then refrigerate, covered, overnight.




Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on November 15, 2006, 07:48:12 AM
omg, sugar rushes! it's no wonder people worry about weight during the holidays -- all the delicious desserts! i love cheesecake, but to be honest, i prefer a plain one with just a fruit topping. which is the kind that is not sweet and creamy but rather dry and crumbly? ny or philadelphia? i remembered once my friend ordered one fed-exed to california from the east coast, and we at the entire thing in one sitting. LOL. can you say oink oink...?

umm, an old friend, who is italian, made the best biscotti and crumbly italian berry dessert bars. i need to find those recipes. she would bake for hour during the holidays, her house was always sweet smelling and warm. i am not big on desserts really, but my BF loves sweets (he has the metabolism of a hummingbird) so tonight to replace the brownies we scarfed he made oatmeal-coconut cookies. i never had them with coconut before, but they were good,,,, you could smell the coconut during the baking, and the texture of the oatmeal hid the sometimes annoying chewiness of the shredded coconut.

for a simple dessert, i will sometimes poach pears sitting in a red wine/water/sugar solution halfway up their sides, when i bake a chicken or other oven meal. i baste them with the liquid while baking..  by the time dinner is over they're cooled a bit and ready to eat. i usually slice them keeping the upper part near the stem intact and fan them on a plate (peel and core the firm-ripe pears, retaining the stem; pack brown sugar inside if you want)... they are good sprinkled with cinnamon and served with a scoop of vanilla ice cream, or probably just whipped cream as well.


latest favorite sandwich:  grilled BTCs... bacon, tomato and cheddar, on sourdough. i use that precooked bacon.... it's so easy and very good with a bowl of soup.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on November 15, 2006, 07:53:13 AM
I love it when jimmy posts in here!  lol!

I was just getting ready to log off when I saw his post and HAD to come in here...I'm now going to be HORRIBLY late for work, but it was worth it....

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on November 16, 2006, 12:18:26 AM
Oooh! Poached pears are an old-school Swedish dessert, the kind of stuff that people had after Sunday roast in the 50's and something my grandmother might make!

Here's another old-school dessert with pears, it's also really good with apples. Traditionally tinned fruit is used, because fresh fruit used to be expensive and hard to come by here in the Northern wastelands  :)

Toscapäron

4 - 6 sweet, ripe pears
some butter for the pan

"Tosca" batter:
1/3 - 1/2 cup almonds, chopped or thinly sliced (hazelnuts are OK, too) (1 dl)
2 ozs butter (50 g)
3 tbsp sugar (1/2 dl)
1 tbsp wheat flour
1 tbsp milk

oven temperature: 225 Celsius, which corresponds to 437 Fahrenheit - I don't know the "standard" temperatures of Fahrenheit ovens, but I'm sure a couple of degrees up or down doesn't ruin it!

Grease a pan; peel, core, and halve the pears if using fresh ones. Put them flat side down in the pan.
Melt butter in a small saucepan, add almonds, sugar, flour, and milk and simmer for a couple of minutes. Put a dollop on each of the pears, then bake in the oven until the tosca is nicely brown and the fruit is soft. Let cool slightly before serving with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on November 17, 2006, 05:07:18 AM
I'm now going to be HORRIBLY late for work, but it was worth it....

tell you what, heidi. you really should learn to read more quickly... ::) ;D  now, don't blame me about work! lol. ;) :D

laurentia, the toscapäron sounds yummy and simple...  sort of like a apple crumble. hazelnuts sound good, one of my fave nutmeats. :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on November 17, 2006, 05:26:02 AM
Funny, my older daughter asked me the other day when I was going to make poached pears again. So I bought some nice ripe ones on my way to their collège (jr high school) for a parent-teacher meeting. I handed the bag to younger daughter just before she got on the bus and told her to give it to her dad when he picked them up. She was so embarrassed because 1) I spoke English to her in front of her classmates and 2) she thinks it s not cool to be  seen doing anything helpful for one s parents. So once on the bus crammed the sack of pears into her book bag. We had to have pear smoothies instead.

But in my poached pear recipe I use a mixture of water, sugar, lemon peels and vanilla pod for poaching on top of stove and then refrigerate them afterwards. Maybe I ll try the wine this time.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on November 17, 2006, 05:43:12 AM
aww, your daughter doesn't fully appreciate the delicate flesh of a ripe pear! ;) :D

poaching pears is great, you can add all sorts of things -- ginger, lemon, orange peel, cinnamon, etc. i sometimes toss a clove in there too. but always, always, some sugar. :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on November 17, 2006, 11:04:18 AM
Chapeaugris, your daughter was embarrassed that her mum spoke English? Over here, that would have made her coolest in her class!  :D Especially American English equals coolness here. I hope the pear smoothies were good  :)

Toscapäron does resemble an apple crumble a bit, they're like a cross between apple crumble and toffee apples (only with pears) - mmmmm. Tosca can also be spread on an almost ready sponge cake, which is put back into the oven for 10 - 15 minutes more so the tosca goes brown and crisp and chewy at the same time. I made a couple of those cakes for my workmates when I quit my latest job, and they (mostly men in their fifties) were like slightly embarrassed, but starved, vultures  :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on November 19, 2006, 01:53:15 AM
mushroom and cheese strudel

1/2 oz shallots, minced
1/4 oz garlic, minced
6 oz mushrooms – cremini, shiitake, & portobello, sliced
1 1/2 oz goat cheese
1 oz madeira wine
1/2 Tbsp fresh chives, chopped
4 sheets phyllo dough
1 oz butter
1 bunch watercress
4 each mushroom caps, sautéed

1. To work with phyllo dough, allow it to thaw under refrigeration.
2. Sauté shallots and garlic in a little bit of butter
3. Add mushrooms and sweat.
4. Add wine, and cook until almost dry.
5. Remove from heat, put mixture into a bowl and cool. Chill in refrigerator for 30-45 minutes.
6. Add goat cheese and chives to mushroom mixture.
7. Layer four sheets of phyllo, brushing melted butter between each sheet.
8. Add half of the mushroom mixture to the phyllo, roll up and brush once more with butter. Repeat with remaining phyllo and filling.
9. Bake strudels on sheet pan at 400 degrees until golden brown.
10. Slice and serve with sautéed mushroom caps and watercress.

sounds yummy!!!  i can see this made with blue cheese too, or a gorgonzola. also, i think some lightly sauteed enoki mushrooms (those little white japanese kind) would be good instead of mushroom caps. and maybe a sprinkling of sesame seeds, lol.

a few years ago i made something similar to this, sliced into little rounds, as appetizers at a friend's housewarming party. they had a beautiful brand new granite counter, and i asked them for something to roll out the sheets of phyllo and brush them with butter. they said "just use the counter!" and so i did. later that night we noticed a big, dark grease stain the exact shape of the phyllo sheets. omg! they were really bummed about their counter top. luckily, as time went by the stain disappeared, and in 6 months it was totally gone. ;D

the appetizers turned out great, btw. ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on November 19, 2006, 02:12:31 AM
^ Wow - weee!!! That sounds incredibly good!

Chris and I are having a couple of (vegetarian) friends over for dinner next weekend, and we were thinking of feeding them maki rolls for a starter and some kind of wok...but this recipe just made me rethink it all...
These guests are close friends who would be happy to eat ramen noodles with us, but we like to overdo things when they come over, sort of as a joke, which is why we're going to have two courses (and a crisp white tablecloth and a candelaber  ;D). Maybe this strudel to start with, and filled mushroom caps to make it look even more fancy, and then something really simple, like pasta with a feta-and-spinach sauce. Hmm...


Herb-filled Portabella Caps

3 - 4 shallots, or 1 onion
1 - 2 cloves garlic
4 portabella mushrooms
about 4 tbsp chopped herbs; basil, thyme, etc
1/2 cup grated cheese
salt, pepper, and olive oil

Take the stems (right word?) off the mushrooms. Chop them and the shallots and garlic, then mix the chopped stuff with herbs, cheese, and pepper. Put the mushroom caps, underside upwards, in an oven dish, sprinkle salt on them and put the filling on top. They get quite a pile on them, but as the cheese melts, they'll flatten. Sprinkle olive oil over them and bake in the oven, 225 C = 437 F, for about 15 minutes until nice and browned.

Pasta With Feta and Spinach Sauce

Spaghetti or other kind of pasta for 4
about 3/4 lb frozen spinach (375 g)
1/2 cup crème fraiche (1 dl)
at least 1/4 lb feta cheese (100 g) - the more, the merrier!
2 - 3 cloves of garlic
salt and pepper
15 - 20 nice black olives

Boil the pasta. Thaw the spinach in a covered saucepan on the stove. When thawed, stir in crème fraiche and feta cheese (grated or cubed). Add garlic, salt and pepper to taste. Stir into the pasta and put the olives on top.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on November 19, 2006, 05:27:07 AM
^^^ mmm, those dishes sound great!! i do a similar pasta with spinach and gorgonzola.  and yes, it's mushroom "stems"...   sounds like you two have lots of fun with the elaborate dinners! yes, the fine linens and candelabra DO make a difference, lol.... little individual salt cellars with tiny spoons, personalized placecards, sauces drizzled in lavish patterns on fancy china... maybe one day you can do a twist and serve ramen noodles in crystal chalices! :D 

now i'm thinking of the most lavish dishes (that are easy to make) to impress somebody.. first thing that comes to mind is "strawberries romanov"  but you simply must have super fresh, sweet, in-season strawberries for that...  how about various herb infused ices between courses to cleanse the palate?

-------------

here's a recipe i liked because it's so darn healthy:

Easy Apple Crumble

6  Medium apples, cored and thinly sliced
1/2 cup  Unsweetened applesauce
3/4 cup  Rolled oats
3 t  Toasted wheat germ
3 t  Packed brown sugar
1 tsp  Ground cinnamon
1 t  Canola oil
1 t  Unsalted butter, cut into small pieces

combine the apples and applesauce in a 13 x 9 beaking dish coated with cooking spray. In a bowl, combine the oats, wheat germ, brown sugar and cinnamon, then add the oil and butter. Crumble the mixture over the apples. Bake at 350 for 30 minutes. Serves 6.

Although you can make this recipe with peeled apples, leaving the peels on ensures that you get more fiber as well as the beneficial antioxidant quercetin!


^^^ i might add fresh or frozen blueberries to that, perhaps almonds or hazelnuts... and bake for a longer time.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on November 19, 2006, 11:45:12 PM
Thanks for the ideas, gnash! I love the individual salt cellars, and we absolutely need to make placecards this time! I never thought of that!  :D

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on November 20, 2006, 12:50:17 AM
Thanks for the ideas, gnash! I love the individual salt cellars, and we absolutely need to make placecards this time! I never thought of that!  :D



oh really??? WELL!!!!  ;) :D   what about edible placecards -- white chocolate "paper" (edged in colored sugars?) with dark chocolate writing, inserted in a meringue cloud, or leaning on a truffle. you need a superfine tip, and can use a syringe to apply the dark chocolate. alternately, you can use a thin biscuit or wafer for the "paper."

           (http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/chocolate_placecards.jpg)

if you do a chinese dinner, you can print up clever sayings to slip into fortune cookies then hand those out for dessert. ;)   anyway have fun, i can't wait to hear how the dinner goes!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on November 20, 2006, 03:59:33 AM
Those are great ideas, gnash, I especially like those written on chocolate-covered strawberries!

We seem to be back on the Asian theme for this dinner, since one of our guests appear to be as good as vegan, at least she's avoiding milk and dairy products. We'll be shamelessly mixing different Asian cooking traditions, though: maki rolls and miso soup for a starter, followed by a sweet-and-sour thai wok with tofu and vegetables. Mostly because I don't have any good Japanese recipes, but plenty of Thai ones  :P

I've seen a recipe for fortune cookies and thought I'd saved it, but it seems I didn't! A couple of years ago, I was active in the social student life at my college and was going to make geeky fortune cookies with things like the Schrödinger equation and Maxwell's equations in them, but it never came to pass  :(
Does anybody on here know how to make fortune cookies? I expect it's just flour, sugar, and water, but I don't dare doing guesswork on the proportions...

I'd also love to hear about ideas for vegetarian maki! I'm thinking carrot and avocado, and cucumber and tofu, but there must be many more good combinations!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on November 20, 2006, 04:26:55 AM
Does anybody on here know how to make fortune cookies? I expect it's just flour, sugar, and water, but I don't dare doing guesswork on the proportions...

oh gosh, i would just buy them, use very pointy tweezers to pull the old fortunes out and gently slide the new ones in! brokeback fortunes would be fun ;)

Quote
I'd also love to hear about ideas for vegetarian maki! I'm thinking carrot and avocado, and cucumber and tofu, but there must be many more good combinations!

if you use carrot sticks, i'd blanch them a bit so they're softened -- still firm but not hard-crunchy -- or grate the carrot. salted plum is good, it's a salty concoction that you can smear sparingly on the rice before rolling it up. a curry mayo would make a flavorful "smear" too.  i like cucumber (kappa maki), cooked spinach with sesame seed, soft slivers of shiitake (mushrooms), blanched thin asparagus, and avocado too. if you have time, you can make tempura vegetables (onion, green beans, sweet potato, etc) and roll that up. spinach in a slurry of red or yellow miso paste is nice too, and watercress, for its peppery flavor.

try making a reverse roll -- ingredients rolled in nori (seaweed), the rice on the outside -- then rolled in toasted or black sesame seeds before slicing. hand rolls are good too, they're shaped like ice cream cones.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: desertrat on November 20, 2006, 04:39:56 AM
i have a new challenge for the cooking crowd  :D
i'm looking for new, nice and unusual winter drinks. something hot, sweet, alcoholic - just something nice if you come in from the cold.
i have quite a number of recipies already, but i could always use more....so, if you have ideas, i would be delighted. in exchange, i'm going to post some of mine !
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on November 20, 2006, 01:05:52 PM
desertrat,

My grandmother used to make “Ponche” for the family during cold weather.  It’s a sweet, milk rum punch that she learned to make when she was a teenager living with a British family stationed in Panama during the early part of the 20th Century.  It's interesting that some of my Grandmother's favorite drinks were hot one, i.e hot chocolate, ponche.  She said hot drinks were a novelty in a tropical country and she loved drinking them even when it was 110 degrees.  ::) 

Here is the recipe for one serving.  I love this drink on really cold days especially after being out in the snow--It’s so comforting and has a kick to it.  When I was a little kid, Nanny left the rum out and just increased the vanilla. (Though once she forgot and put rum in it.  I took a very long nap that day!  ;D)

Ponche

¾ cup milk (whole, half and half, skim, whatever you like.)
1 egg
Droplet of pure vanilla extract
1 teaspoon of regular sugar (vanilla sugar works nicely)
Nutmeg (or Cinnamon)
Rum

Beat the egg till it’s frothy.  Heat the milk till it’s warm but not hot.  Poor a little warm milk in to the egg to temper it.  If you put really hot milk in to the egg or add the egg to the milk you’ll have scrambled eggs.  Add the tempered egg in to the milk and start to beat it rapidly.  Simmer the milk/egg mixture and continue beating.  Don’t let the milk boil, just keep it at a low simmer (bubbles around the edge of the liquid).  Add the vanilla, sugar, cinnamon and rum.  Take it off the heat and enjoy. 

If you do get solid egg pieces (this happens to best of us), poor it through a cheese cloth and beat the milk mixture some more.  Also, the constant beating (whipping) of the milk mixture creates a froth on top and I'd always get a "frothy mustache" when I'd drink it down.

Salute!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on November 20, 2006, 10:11:08 PM
(Though once she forgot and put rum in it.  I took a very long nap that day!  ;D)

bobbie,,, perhaps maybe you were especially rambunctious that day and she did it on purpose! ;) :D ;D

the PONCHE sounds good tho.. i'm not a big milk drinker, but still....   i do like bailey's irish cream!

PS: good thing you didn't think this was the "recipes and cock's corner" thread.. :D ::) ;)

ok, here is a recipe for an "original irish cream."  (http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Original-Irish-Cream/Detail.aspx)
read down to see how others "lightened" the mixture by using less cream.
it's not a hot drink, but added to freshly brewed coffee... yummy!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on November 25, 2006, 06:05:27 PM
Thanks for the ideas, gnash! I love the individual salt cellars, and we absolutely need to make placecards this time! I never thought of that!  :D



oh really??? WELL!!!!  ;) :D   what about edible placecards -- white chocolate "paper" (edged in colored sugars?) with dark chocolate writing, inserted in a meringue cloud, or leaning on a truffle. you need a superfine tip, and can use a syringe to apply the dark chocolate. alternately, you can use a thin biscuit or wafer for the "paper."

           (http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/chocolate_placecards.jpg)

if you do a chinese dinner, you can print up clever sayings to slip into fortune cookies then hand those out for dessert. ;)   anyway have fun, i can't wait to hear how the dinner goes!

Edible rice paper and paste food colors work well too!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on November 25, 2006, 06:05:53 PM
Dave has an important announcement about the forum, which he asks all members to read:

http://davecullen.com/forum/index.php?topic=18085.msg602098#msg602098

We have set up a thread to discuss the situation. That discussion thread is linked from the post directly below the message from Dave. Follow the above link and you'll get to both.

Thanks
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nax on November 26, 2006, 06:44:03 AM
Heidi / Jimmy

I tried the roast cauliflower recipe with both coriander seeds and chili flakes - it was absolutely delicious and I can see it becoming a firm favorite. 

Thanks

N.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on November 26, 2006, 09:47:41 AM
Heidi / Jimmy

I tried the roast cauliflower recipe with both coriander seeds and chili flakes - it was absolutely delicious and I can see it becoming a firm favorite. 

Thanks

N.

oh yay!

I've got a couple recipes for roasted/broasted veggies...they are fast faves in my house.  I'll dig up recipes and post them...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: eocs on November 29, 2006, 07:30:16 PM
  Anyone one know how to make a dessert we always had at Christmas called Heavenly Hash?  It is made with cocoanut, cherries, pineapple, nuts and whipped cream and maybe a few other things.  My mother used to make it and I wish I had the recipe.  Oh, it was so good
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: PatSinnott on November 29, 2006, 10:07:47 PM
i have a new challenge for the cooking crowd  :D
i'm looking for new, nice and unusual winter drinks. something hot, sweet, alcoholic - just something nice if you come in from the cold.
i have quite a number of recipies already, but i could always use more....so, if you have ideas, i would be delighted. in exchange, i'm going to post some of mine !
Heidi posted this recipe, and I made it at a party a couple of weeks ago.  I put in Mandarin Absolut as the alcohol, one cup.  It was fantastic.
http://davecullen.com/forum/index.php?topic=8751.msg569257#msg569257
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on November 30, 2006, 06:10:58 AM
  Anyone one know how to make a dessert we always had at Christmas called Heavenly Hash?  It is made with cocoanut, cherries, pineapple, nuts and whipped cream and maybe a few other things.  My mother used to make it and I wish I had the recipe.  Oh, it was so good
This sounds like "Ambrosia" salad - made with mini marshmallows and I think pineapple juice - the acidity breaks down the marshmallows into this glorious surgary sauce...

Try searching food.com
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on November 30, 2006, 06:29:09 AM
I found "Mama's Heavenly Hash" at http://www.netcooks.com/recipes/Salads/Momma's.Heavenly.Hash.html.  Sounds yummy.  I've made something similiar and added sour cream to give it a bit of richness, but for 'us' calorie counters (yes, even during the holidays), I use fat free cool whip.  It tastes good too!

B xo
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on November 30, 2006, 06:35:07 AM
That sounds like the stuff, Bobbie!

we just always called it "Ambrosia" because it was like heaven...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: All4one on November 30, 2006, 07:39:30 AM
eocs, I have a small collection of those privately printed paperback cookbooks. Last night I went through several of them .
I found one called Heavenly Hash ( 1990, recipes from a woman in Montgomery Alabama who printed all of her favorites as a holiday gift to friends and family )  and another called 'Five Cup Fruit Salad) ( 1979 Chicago area Methodist church woman fund-raiser ). They are identical to each other, so I will combine their names . :)

Heavenly  Fruit Salad

I cup sour cream
1 cup coconut
1 cup fruit coctail
1 cup pineapple tidbits
1 cup mandarin oranges
1 cup miniature marshmallows
Optional: chopped pecans, maraschino cherries

Drain the fruit well. Combine ingredients.
Refrigerate at 3 hours ( overnight is okay )  before serving.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on November 30, 2006, 08:31:25 AM
It's not the same thing, but back in Louisiana we have an Easter candy called Heavenly Hash, made by Elmer's, a local company. The recipe for it is something like this:

http://www.realcajunrecipes.com/recipes/cajun/heavenly-hash/971.rcr

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on December 01, 2006, 08:57:35 AM
Here's another hot winter drink. I haven't tried it myself yet, but doesn't it sound splendid?

1 l (2 pints) apple juice
3 tbsp honey
5 whole cloves
1 vanilla pod
2 sticks cinnamon
3 - 4 dl (somewhere between 1 and 2 cups) vanilla flavoured vodka

Put honey and spices in the apple juice, bring to the boil. Take it off the heat and leave for ten minutes. Add vodka, if you want an adult drink, and some more honey if needed. To be served hot!

I also have a recipe for Glühwein, which sounds good, but I haven't tried this either yet...

1 orange
10 cloves
1 bottle red wine
2 dl (almost 1 cup) water
1 vanilla pod
sugar

Wash the orange and stick the cloves into the peel. Put the whole orange along with wine, water, and vanilla pod in a saucepan. Heat it up, add sugar to taste, serve.

The Swedish version of Glühwein, glögg, is one of my favourite drinks, but I don't have a good recipe. I usually buy a litte sachet of glögg spices to make my own, but I can't remember exactly what's in it or in what proportions. I think there's at least cinnamon, cloves, and ginger in the mix.
A friend of mine had the most fabulous recipe for glögg, it was an authentic 19th century one and there was both wine, brandy and rum in it, along with all the spices. It made a gallon or so, since it was meant to be enough for all the people in a 19th century household, and it was very strong. I wonder if she still has it...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on December 01, 2006, 09:08:08 AM
Ah Laurentia,

I've had Gluhwein and it was tasty, but we just called it 'spiced wine."  Silly Americans!  If the temperatures here in VA get back to normal, I may have to make this and try it.  Right now it's too warm for me to enjoy a hot drink! Sounds yummy though!

B
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on December 01, 2006, 10:07:16 AM
We all have colds  here -- runny nose, scratchy throats, general lassitude -- so I need some hot drinks (preferably alcoholic) that do not contain milk. Thanks in advance! *sniffle*
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on December 01, 2006, 11:25:27 AM
 :-\ Aww! Sorry to hear about the colds! Maybe you could try this. It sounds icky, but isn't bad at all (assuming that your cold has robbed you of some of your sense of taste):

Blackcurrant remedy for colds

4 dl (1 1/2 cup) water + 2 dl (3/4 cup) blackcurrants OR 5 dl (2 cups) blackcurrant juice
a couple of garlic cloves, 2 or 3 depending on size
a tablespoon or so of honey

Very simple. Mix berries with chopped or pressed garlic in a blender, then mix with hot water. Strain the drink and add honey. Alternatively, heat blackcurrant juice with garlic and add honey.

This drink is supposed to be taken in small portions, about 1/2 cup at a time, with maybe an hour between them. In practice, have some whenever you feel like it. It can be kept in a thermos, but be warned: that thermos will taste of garlic afterwards. I usually keep it in the fridge instead and microwave my portions. Pure blackcurrant juice might be tricky to find, but try and get a blackcurrant drink that's sweetened as little as possible.

I also like basic old honey water, it feels really soothing for the throat (I've heard that it's bad for a sore throat in the long run, though). My organic food shop has herbal tea blends for different conditions, and their Throat Comfort Tea is excellent, but I don't know what's in it except licqourice root.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on December 01, 2006, 12:43:04 PM
Garlic and black currants. Hmmm. That's one combo I would not have thought of. The French are not so enamored of black currants -- no Ribena here. I'll see what other ideas get posted.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on December 02, 2006, 10:13:58 AM
...
Heavenly  Fruit Salad

I cup sour cream
1 cup coconut
1 cup fruit coctail
1 cup pineapple tidbits
3.  1 cup mandarin oranges
1 cup miniature marshmallows
Optional: chopped pecans, maraschino cherries

Drain the fruit well. Combine ingredients.
Refrigerate at 3 hours ( overnight is okay )  before serving.

For this recipe to succeed, though, you have to assemble it wearing:

1. a shirtwaist dress, tightly cinched at the waist and very full-skirted
2.  black patent pumps
3.  a wee ruffled white apron (no bib)
4.  a well-lacquered flip hairdo.

(You can tell I've been around a decade or so.)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: All4one on December 02, 2006, 04:38:11 PM
 :D
And you know, Castro, that when nobody was looking, June Cleaver pulled out Peg Bracken's I Hate To Cook Book ( 1960 ) which contained instructions like this ( from Skid Road Stroganoff )

Start cooking those noodles, first dropping a bouillon cube into the noodle water.
Brown the garlic, onion, and beef in the oil.
Add the flour salt, paprika, and mushrooms, stir, and let it cook 5 minutes
 while you light a cigarette and stare sullenly at the sink.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Castro on December 02, 2006, 06:56:37 PM
Hah!  Yup: Peg Bracken, the under-appreciated forerunner to The Feminine Mystique.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: All4one on December 03, 2006, 09:11:12 PM
Here's a glimpse of the lady herself.

http://www.roadode.com/eat_1.shtml

She's on the right, next to last. I can see the 'nudge nudge, wink wink' one of the cookbooks critic mentioned.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on December 04, 2006, 06:17:11 AM
A bit of Auyervedic medicinal remedy for your colds and scratchy throats:

place several very thin slices of peeled raw ginger in a mug and pour boiling water over it.  Allow to steep for a minute or two and then drink the ginger-water while still very warm.

This will help stave off the creepy germies of season, help your immune system fight off the germies you've already got and it's a great digestive aid. 

I suppose for those of you who are not so righteous, you could float a tablespoon of whisky in this  ;) and add lemon juice and honey.  I'm a bit of a purist and drink the hot ginger at work and drink the hot whisky at night.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on December 04, 2006, 06:55:47 AM
I'd also recommend incorporating 'spirulina' and elderberry syrup into your daily supplemental regimen...erm...that's if you have one...a regimen that is.  ;D

I take one 'spirulin' capsule everyday and once a week add 2 tablespoons of elderberry syrup in to at least one liter of bottled water.  The syrup can be very sweet so the more you dilute it the better.  It will just require you to drink lots of water which isn't such a bad thing.

THEN at night, throw back a couple of hot toddy's and you'll be feelin healthy in no time.  :o
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: desertrat on December 04, 2006, 04:17:54 PM
this recipie is dedicated to linda, who loves coconut !  ;)

aljatores de maizena (argentinian corn flower cookies):

150g margarine
150g sugar
2 egg yolks
1 whole egg
200g maizena (corn starch)
250g flower (self raising or normal with 1 teaspoon of backing powder)
flakes of lemon peel

filling:
1 tin of condensed milk
coconut flakes


mix flower and maizena, add butter and sugar and mix till the dough is creamy. then add the yolks, the egg and the lemon peel. it should be a soft, creamy dough (but not sticky). roll the dough out and cut out round forms (i used a round cookie cutter with a diameter of about 3cm/1.18 inch). bake for 10-20min at 160°C/320F.
let the cookies cool down. meanwhile take the condensed milk (it should be in a metal tube or tin) and cook it (the whole tin /tube) in hot water for about 2 hours. the sugar in the milk will become caramel and the whole condensed milk will be a light brown, sticky cream. fill the cookies with it and smear it on the sides. then turn the cookie in coconut flakes, they will stick on the sides of the cookie.

finished ! it's quite a lot of work, but they taste delicious ! :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on December 04, 2006, 11:54:49 PM
^ Thanks for posting this, Martina! I love making cookies, but most recipes are variations on the same theme. These are decidedly different and sound incredibly good! (And hooray for the metric units  ;D)

I'm looking forward to making gingerbread soon, fill the house with that wonderful Christmas smell...maybe this weekend, maybe next. Why does December have to be so busy? I want to bum around with some mulled wine and a handful of ginger snaps and shop for presents, not spend my days in the computer room at school or worry about passing the tests.  >:(
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: desertrat on December 05, 2006, 12:44:57 AM
oh yes ! for years i'm trying to make december a calm, peaceful month, but it never really works... >:(
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: killersmom on December 05, 2006, 01:43:48 PM
Cherry Chocolate Chunk Cookies

1/4 cup butter, softened
6 TBLS sugar
2 TBLS beaten egg
4 tsp milk
1/4 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 cup all purpose flour
3 TBLS baking cocoa
1/8 tsp baking soda
1.8 tsp salt
1/2 cup semisweet chocolate chunks
1/4 cup dried cherries

In a small mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar. Beat in egg, milk and vanilla.
Combine the flour, coca, baking soda and salt; add to creamed mixture and mix well.
Stir in chocolate and cherries.

Drop by rounded TBLS  2 inches  apart onto baking sheets lightly coated with nonstick cooking spray.
Bake at 350o for 12-14 minutes or until firm. Cool for 1 minute before removing to a wire rack.
Yield 10 cookies.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on December 05, 2006, 01:58:03 PM
Martina, I assume by corn flower you mean corn flour, which in the US is referred to as corn starch. When I spent a summer in London I wanted to make corn bread and bought Maizena thinking it was corn meal. Didn't realise I should have looked for maize meal.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: desertrat on December 05, 2006, 02:34:31 PM
Martina, I assume by corn flower you mean corn flour, which in the US is referred to as corn starch. When I spent a summer in London I wanted to make corn bread and bought Maizena thinking it was corn meal. Didn't realise I should have looked for maize meal.

oops, typo  :D

what i actually mean is maizena, corn starch. i edited the original post. thank you for pointing that out, kim ! whew, imagine people what people might have baked there... :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: estefue on December 05, 2006, 10:48:03 PM
Those sound yummy Martina!  And of course the filling is better known as Dulce de Leche!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: desertrat on December 06, 2006, 05:45:03 AM
Those sound yummy Martina!  And of course the filling is better known as Dulce de Leche!

hahaha...i knew people with latino ancestory would know it ! the aljatores de maizena are very common throughout south and central america....i also have a coconot sweets recipie from costa rica that i love for christmas.

¡ que aproveche !  :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on December 06, 2006, 07:09:32 AM
^ Thanks for posting this, Martina! I love making cookies, but most recipes are variations on the same theme. These are decidedly different and sound incredibly good! (And hooray for the metric units  ;D)

I'm looking forward to making gingerbread soon, fill the house with that wonderful Christmas smell...maybe this weekend, maybe next. Why does December have to be so busy? I want to bum around with some mulled wine and a handful of ginger snaps and shop for presents, not spend my days in the computer room at school or worry about passing the tests.  >:(

Okay, it is WAY past the time for gingerbread!!  And I've not made my gingerbread house for a few years now.

I found a cheat recipe to make cookie forests (using storebought tube sugar cookie dough and an extra half cup of flour and storbought royal icing!) and will probably be baking and "cheating" all weekend now...

This year, instead of making cookie bags for my friends and neighbors, Carol and I have talked about making mini muffins in about 8 varieties and giving those instead!  Christmas morning breakfast all done up with a bow.  I'll post recipes this weekend - but we're looking at blueberry lemon, blueberry, lemon poppyseed, cranberry orange, banana nut, chocolate chip and spice flavors...
;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on December 12, 2006, 04:39:42 AM
Cherry Chocolate Chunk Cookies
...

Yield 10 cookies.

mmmmmmmmmm.... i think this recipe could be made better by quadrupling!!! :D ;D

the argentinian cookies sound good too.. dang. there's a place near me that has wonderful peruvian cookies, light and flaky just perfect and sandwiching that caramel stuff, dusted with powdered sugar. it makes oreos taste like..... oreos. lol.

i am not a baker per se but gosh, there are some wonderful italian biscotti of various flavors and i really like everything about them... not too sweet, but crunchy, nutty at times, with dried fruit or whatever... just perfect for my cup of tea.

(http://www.abc.net.au/queensland/stories/Gingerbrea_m992625.jpg)

mmm.. gingerbread.. and gingersnaps! anybody making a gingerbread house for the holidays? how about a gingerbread tent? frosted white of course, with flap openings... ;)  i'm freaking out because the chimney on the pic i linked looks like the face of a man with a mustache, weird... i love those boxy things by the front door, they look like triple decker sandwiches.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on December 12, 2006, 11:24:48 PM
I wish I had a photo of the only gingerbread house I've ever built...it was ten years ago, in high school, and I built it with my flamboyant gay friend Andreas, who was famed for wearing a cloak to school. We made a big castle with the Addams family in marzipan, mixing red and green food colouring on a plate to paint their clothes black, which worked very well. They also got a pond with a long green marzipan tentacle reaching out of it. Why on earth didn't we take a picture?

If there's something I really miss about being a teenager, it's the creativity.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on December 12, 2006, 11:42:12 PM
If there's something I really miss about being a teenager, it's the creativity.
And having the time to make things like that!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on December 13, 2006, 06:28:41 AM
I wish I had a photo of the only gingerbread house I've ever built...it was ten years ago, in high school, and I built it with my flamboyant gay friend Andreas, who was famed for wearing a cloak to school. We made a big castle with the Addams family in marzipan, mixing red and green food colouring on a plate to paint their clothes black, which worked very well. They also got a pond with a long green marzipan tentacle reaching out of it. Why on earth didn't we take a picture?

If there's something I really miss about being a teenager, it's the creativity.

LOL!  omg, my straight HS friend larry wore a cloak! too funny... and carried in one pocket a giant wind-up alarm clock with two bells.

wow, marzipan???  yes, WHY ON EARTH??  for the big green tentacle alone! :D  :::snaps fingers twice:::

speaking of marzipan, here are sugary babies that are just too adorable, how could anybody eat such a thing?

(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/marzipanbabies.jpg)

(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/marzipanbabies2.jpg)



chapeaugris, i saw martha stewart make a gingerbread house in a half hour! ::) ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on December 13, 2006, 11:21:30 PM
Wow, those babies are incredible!  :o  Cuter than the real thing... ;D

A gingerbread house in half an hour? Those things are not to be rushed! They're supposed to be made with love!

Cloak and giant old-fashioned alarm clock? I'd have loved that guy back then! He wasn't too happy with his name, though, was he? "Larry" comes across as slightly mundane  :D  I always thought Andreas' name fitted him well, romantic and timeless.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ChrisW on December 14, 2006, 12:24:49 AM
Cherry Chocolate Chunk Cookies
...

Yield 10 cookies.

mmmmmmmmmm.... i think this recipe could be made better by quadrupling!!! :D ;D

the argentinian cookies sound good too.. dang. there's a place near me that has wonderful peruvian cookies, light and flaky just perfect and sandwiching that caramel stuff, dusted with powdered sugar. it makes oreos taste like..... oreos. lol.

i am not a baker per se but gosh, there are some wonderful italian biscotti of various flavors and i really like everything about them... not too sweet, but crunchy, nutty at times, with dried fruit or whatever... just perfect for my cup of tea.

(http://www.abc.net.au/queensland/stories/Gingerbrea_m992625.jpg)

mmm.. gingerbread.. and gingersnaps! anybody making a gingerbread house for the holidays? how about a gingerbread tent? frosted white of course, with flap openings... ;)  i'm freaking out because the chimney on the pic i linked looks like the face of a man with a mustache, weird... i love those boxy things by the front door, they look like triple decker sandwiches.
wonderful. i nearly bought a gingerbread house in Prague last week. But i thought it might break on the way back, so I bought lots of iced gingerbread biscuits, all different, by now I have given most of them away and i didn't take a photo  >:(
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ChrisW on December 14, 2006, 12:29:20 AM
Wow, those babies are incredible!  :o  Cuter than the real thing... ;D

A gingerbread house in half an hour? Those things are not to be rushed! They're supposed to be made with love!
i couldn't eat those babies either, absolutely lovely. But not better than real babies ;).
After seeing this I am thinking I'll make a gingerbread house as therapy, need that right now, did someone post a recipe? Did I miss this? My Croatian friend in Ireland uses to make these, it took her a while, and they were indeed made with both love and care. And that's what I need right now.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on December 14, 2006, 05:29:24 AM
haha, laurentia, larry's nickname was alarm clock, as in strawberry alarm clock. :D   aren't those babies adorable? i think they're spanish made, not sure. they seem one of a kind, but they must use a mold for the body parts...? just amazing.

yeah, i'm sure the gingerbread house martha stewart made was not without lots of studio help, and editing! but it looked good and inspired me to make my first.

it helps to make a template, put this on your rolled out dough and cut around. cut windows. bake and hope to heck it doesn't curl too much! i think you can spread beans (dried of course!!) on top to prevent curled edges, altho a slightly warped house lends some charm. then the royal icing to hold it together. that's the glue, and with a fine tip, it creates details. martha's house was white and brown and silver, very elegant, but ours was every color of the rainbow. necco wafers were installed on the roof, candy canes and jelly beans and all sorts of things were attached to the side of the house with royal icing, and stuck into the frosting "snow" all around.

windows were made by pouring hot melted sugar onto lightly greased foil -- this hardened to create amber tinted windows, and lit from within with a low watt bulb, the house just glowed. it was devoured by friends at a christmas party -- the host couldn't resist, broke off a roof tile, and it was downhill from there... :D  they're meant to be eaten, right? and if you wait too long it becomes stale.

i have seen "gingerbread" houses made from premade cookies,, or graham crackers, actually. so you don't even have to bake, you can use those large crackers as building materials, just be careful, reinforce, reinforce reinforce (interior walls) and decorate as usual. also, my bf made little xmas elves to inhabit the house out of various colors of fuzzy pipcleaners, with hats and eyes glued on, very cute.

montezumae, hopefully you'll find time to make one, i'm sure it will be beautiful and delicious. the love and care you put into it should come back to you!  ..if the walls don't curl up too much.. ;)   :-*
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on December 14, 2006, 06:48:17 AM
I hope you'll make one too, montezumae! If you can get ready-made gingerbread dough where you live, that's a good way of cheating lightly. My grandmother uses melted sugar for glueing the pieces together, it's sticky as hell but doesn't taste very good as it's apparently very hard not to burn the sugar when melting it.  :-X  We only used to loot the gingerbread house for the candy decorations anyway, the birds got the gingerbread.

If you get gelatine in the form of thin transparent sheets where you live, they make excellent window panes!

gnash, I love the mental image I get of pipecleaners with hats and eyes!  :D  There's a woman in Sweden who makes "chili elves", which is chili peppers with eyes glued on near the stem so the rest of the pepper forms the hat...I think there's a string attached to the things too, so you can hang them in the tree. She apparently sells a lot of those!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: PatSinnott on December 19, 2006, 03:58:50 PM
Here are some recipes sent to me by a friend.  I haven't made any of them, but I thought they all had a real Texas flavor and might be interesting if anyone was putting on a themed party.



A friend asked me to submit some of my favorite recipes to her for possible inclusion in their church's cookbook.  I thought while I was at it, I might as well pass them along to all of you as well, so here goes:

 
Appetizer:
 
CORN DIP
2 Cans (11 oz. each) Shoepeg Corn
1 cup sour cream
1 cup mayonnaise
1 bunch green onions finely chopped
8 oz. colby/monterrey jack cheese shredded
3 Tbs. thick salsa
Combine all and serve with corn chips or your favorite cracker.
 
Soup:
 
COWBOY SOUP
1 Large onion chopped
2 lbs. ground beef
Saute above until browned
Add:  (do not drain cans...add liquid and contents)
2 cans corn
1 can blackeye peas
1 can kidney beans
1 can pinto beans
1 can navy beans
3 cans stewed tomatoes
1 can green chili peppers
1 1/2 tsp chili powder
1 package taco seasoning
1 package ranch dressing
1 can chicken broth
salt and pepper to taste
Simmer all for 1 hr or more.
 
Bread:
 
Creme Brulee French Toast
 
1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter
1 cup packed brown sugar
2 Tablespoons corn syrup
an 8- to 9- inch round loaf country-style bread
5 large eggs
1 1/2 cups half-and-half
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 teaspoon Grand Marnier
1/4 teaspoon salt
In a small heavy saucepan melt butter with brown sugar and corn syrup over moderate heat, stirring, until smooth and pour into a 13-by 9-by 2-inch baking dish.  Cut six 1-inch thick slices from center portion of bread, reserving ends for another use. and trim crusts.  Arrange bread slices in one layer in baking dish, squeezing them slightly to fit.
In a bowl whisk together eggs, half-and-half, vanilla, Grand Marnier, and salt until combined well and pour evenly over bread.  Chill bread mixture, covered, at least 8 hours and up to 1 day.
Preheat oven to 350 and bring bread to room temperature.  Bake bread mixture, uncovered, in middle of oven until puffed and edges are pale golden...35/40 minutes.  Serve hot toast immediately.
 
Salad:
 
NAPPA CABBAGE SALAD
1 Cup walnut or pecans coarsely chopped
1/3 cup olive oil
1/4 cup white wine or balsamic vinegar
3 Tbs. grainy mustard
   Salt and freshly ground pepper
1/4 cup dried currants or raisons
1 red delicious apple
1 1/2 lbs. Napa cabbage (quartered lengthwise, cored, and coarsely chopped
3/4 lbs smoked ham cut into 1" x 1/4" strips (or turkey or chicken or a combination thereof)
1 medium red onion halved lengthwise and thinly sliced crosswise
2 teaspoons caraway seeds
1 1/2 cups Caesar or Parmesan croutons
 
1.  Spread the nuts in a small pan and bake for 4 - 5 minutes until fragrant and lightly toasted.
2.  In a small bowl, whisk the oil, vinegar, mustard and salt and pepper to taste.  Stir in the currants/raisons.
3.  Quarter and core the apple and then slice thinly.  (peel if you like and tossing in a little white vinegar or lemon juice will keep from turning color)
4.  In a large bowl, toss together the cabbage, ham, onion, apple, caraway seeds, and croutons.  Whisk the dressing, then pour it over the salad and toss thoroughly.
5.  Serve at once on large plates to make a single course meal if you like or smaller salad plates as a separate course.  Top with additional cracked pepper and parmesan cheese if you like.
 
Vegetable:
 
Tomato Pudding
5 cups (1-inch) cubes country style bread (discard crust)
1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter, melted
1 (14 1/2 oz) can whole tomatoes in juice
2/3 cup water
1/2 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1 tablespoon tomato paste
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sauce such as Tabasco
Put oven rack in middle of oven and preheat to 400.
Toss bread cubes with butter in a 13 x 9" baking dish.
Puree tomatoes with juice in a blender 5 seconds, then transfer to a small saucepan along with water, brown sugar, tomato paste, salt, and hot sauce.  Bring mixture just to a simmer, then pour over  bread, stirring to combine.  Bake, uncovered, until edges are beginning to caramelize...35 - 40 minutes.  Cut into squares and serve as side vegetable.
 
Main Course:
 
CHICKEN ANDALUSIA
1/4 cup dry sherry
2 tablespoons golden raisins
2 tablespoons orange juice
1 1/2 teaspoons chopped fresh parsley
1 clove garlic, crushed
6 chicken breast halves, skinned and boned
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1/2 cup olive oil
1/4 cup butter or margarine
2 tablespoons sliced almonds
1 (3-oz) jar pimiento-stuffed olives, drained
Orange slices
Parsley sprigs
Combine sherry and raisins, set aside.  Combine orange juice, parsley, and garlic; brush mixture on chicken.
Combine flour, salt, and pepper; dredge chicken in flour mixture.  Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet; add chicken, and saute 5 minutes on each side or until browned. Remove chicken; discard oil.
Melt butter in skillet over medium heat; add sherry, raisins, almonds, and olives.  Return chicken to skillet; cover and cook 10 minutes or until done.  Transfer chicken to a serving platter, and pour glaze mixture over chicken.  Garnish with orange slices and parsley.
 
Dessert
 
MARGARITA FLAN CAKE
1 (14 oz) can sweetened condensed milk
1 (12 oz) can evaporated milk
3 eggs
3 tablespoons Grand Marnier
1 teaspoon very finely grated orange zest
Vegetable-oil cooking spray
1/2 cup (or more) cajeta (Mexican caramel sauce) or caramel ice cream topping 
1 (18.25 oz) box butter recipe cake mix, plus ingredients called for on box
1/2 cup tequila
1 teaspoon very finely grated lime zest
1 cup sweetened flaked coconut
Preheat oven 5o 325.  In a large bowl, whisk the sweetened condensed milk, evaporated milk, eggs, Grand Marnier, and orange zest together.  Set aside.
Generously spray a 12 cup Bundt pan with vegetable oil spray.  Spread the cajeta or caramel sauce in the bottom of the pan.  Set aside.
Prepare the cake mix according to the package directions, substituting the 1/2 cup tequila for 1/2 cup of the required water and adding lime zest.  Fold coconut into the cake batter.  Pour the batter on top of the cajeta in the pan.  Gradually pour the milk mixture over the batter (the milk mixture will sink and the batter will rise.).
Bake for 45 - 50 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.  Let cool in the pan for 15 minutes.  Unmold onto a serving plate.  Let cool completely.  Serve or refrigerate and serve later.
 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on December 19, 2006, 06:57:14 PM
:D  they're meant to be eaten, right? and if you wait too long it becomes stale.

then you dunk them into your tea to soften them...but the kids won't go near it b'c it is too crunchy.


mwuaaahaaahaaa!
Title: Announcement from Team Cullen - Please Read!
Post by: BrokenOkie on December 20, 2006, 06:03:10 PM
The administration has been working extremely hard to solve the slow down issue that has been plaguing the forum for some months now. It has been determined that to solve this we will have to change the host company of the forum. The new host server has now been contracted with by Dave as of today.

We are proceeding rapidly now and hope to have the conversion complete within a few weeks at the latest and hopefully much sooner. We will keep you (members) apprised. Please look for announcements in the Newsbox. Some changes will likely come up suddenly--that is the nature of computer conversions, so it is impossible to know before we test whether something will go flawlessly and take two hours, or uncover thorny issues that will take days. The testing process is being started. This will not affect the forum at this point.

So taking this into consideration, we don't want to give you timeframes that are unrealistic. As soon as we finish a stage, we'll proceed immediately to the next, and the exact changeover will likely come on very short notice to you (members). We will post this changeover time in the Newsbox as well as in the individual threads, and will give you as much lead time as we can manage. This will enable us to end the slowdown ASAP.

Thank you for your patience.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on December 22, 2006, 03:26:04 PM
I have a question.  I'm making gingerbread trifle with lemon pudding and whipped cream.  What type of liquor should I sprinkle over the gingerbread?  I need something fairly sweet.  Anyone?  Anyone?  ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on December 24, 2006, 05:51:32 PM
Bobbie - try sprinkling brandy on the gingerbread.  or a good bourbon.

*hic*   ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on December 26, 2006, 12:14:43 PM
Bobbie - try sprinkling brandy on the gingerbread.  or a good bourbon.

*hic*   ;)
I experimented with both and like both, but in the end I didn't use either.  Some of the folks, including children, can't have licquour so it worked out.  But the next batch is all for me and Hubby, and I'll be sure to add spirits. ;D

Thanks Heidi!  :-*
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fernly on January 04, 2007, 10:34:49 AM
What with the cold, rainy weather (and the need to, ahem, recover from the treats of holiday season) anybody have some favorite soup recipes?

(If I missed ones already here in the thread, could you point me to which pages?)

Thanks!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: sugarcheryl on January 04, 2007, 12:23:43 PM
Im not much of a cook by any means....matter of fact I quite Hate it! However I have THE BEST and EASIEST Wonton recipe, and I kid you not you will have people raving about them. I do, everytime....im always being asked to make them. They are delicious!

Ingredients:

Wonton skins (1 pack per 1lb of ground beef)
1lb Ground Beef
1 packet onion soup mix
1 lg egg
1 good sized handful of bread crumbs (seasoned ones are good too)
1-2 tblspn garlic
1-2 tblspn pepper
NO Salt....already enough salt in the on. sp. mix

Small saucer of Milk (reserved)

Cooking Oil


Mix all of the above ingredients (except the milk) in a bowl. Mix well as you want each wonton to taste the same (Yummy)
Teaspoon sized balls into the palm of your hand and roll into a ball. Place each ball onto each wonton skin at one cornor, not in the middle, this is so you will have room to fold. Taking a pastry brush lightly brush milk onto two of the sides on the skin and along the back of the meatball (on the skin, not the meatball itself). Do Not over saturate as it will cause splatter when you go to fry them. You just want enough to close them.  Close each wonton into a triangle making sure to press all the air out around the meatball, or else it will puff up and when you take a bite the meatball will probably fall out. LOL! The milk that was spread in the back will help secure that the meat will not move. I usually make all mine at once....placing them on parchment or wax paper. Fill a good sized frying pan (perhaps a bit less then 3/4s full) with oil and then fry those bad boys up. Keep an eye on them as the skins fry fast and you want to make sure that the meatball is cooked. Flip the wonton once and fry to a golden brown. Serve with a good dipping sauce or by themselves. I guarantee you will be a hit with these tasty treats. They may take a bit to prepare, but they are really easy and fairly inexspensive....but they pack alot of goodness into each little triangle.  Enjoy!


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: PatSinnott on January 04, 2007, 05:19:16 PM
What with the cold, rainy weather (and the need to, ahem, recover from the treats of holiday season) anybody have some favorite soup recipes?

(If I missed ones already here in the thread, could you point me to which pages?)

Thanks!
I made this one for Christmas, and liked it. 

Cream of Carrot Soup

1/4 cup butter
5 medium carrots, peeled and chopped
1 onion finely chopped
4 cups chicken stock or broth
1/2 cup rice
1 cup half and half

Melt butter in large saucepan. Add carrots, onion and salt. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes, giving mixture a stir twice.  Add chicken stock and rice.
Simmer, covered, for 45 minutes until carrots are very tender.  Blend in a blender.  (Careful not to put too much in the blender as I blew the top off, it took two batches and I had to put the blended soup into a clean pot.)
Reheat, adding half and half and serve.  Makes 1 1/2 quarts about 6 servings.

Only comment, it was too creamy for my taste.  Next time I'm going to cut down on the half and half to 3/4 cup.
Now the bad news:  PER SERVING
Calories - 277
Fat - 14g (8g sat)
Cholesterol - 40mg
Sodium - 721mg
Protein - 8g

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on January 04, 2007, 10:10:43 PM
Here's my favourite soup! Originally posted sometime in October, I think, but worthy of a rerun.


Lentil Soup

2 small onions
2 - 3 cloves of garlic (or more, especially if you have a cold coming on)
1 tsp nice curry powder, add more later if you wish
1 cup red lentils, dried - you don't need to soak them or prepare them in any way
4 cups vegetable stock
a couple of bay leaves, if you have them
1/2 lime or lemon

Chop the onions and garlic and fry them lightly along with the curry. When the onions are soft, but before they brown, add lentils, stock (or, of course, water and stock cubes), and bay leaves. Boil until the lentils are done, along the lines of 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, add lime or lemon juice to taste (I squeezed half a lime over the pot and found it to be perfect), maybe some more curry, and serve with some nice bread.

This fills you up very gently and warms you, especially if the curry powder is on the spicy side. It's also extremely easy to make, costs next to nothing and is the kind of dish you don't need to plan or go shopping for in advance, since all the ingredients - except maybe the lime/lemon - keep almost forever and are widely found lurking in people's pantrys.

And if you know your Old Testament, you'll know that when Esau sold his rights as the first-born son to his younger brother Jacob, the price was a bowl of Jacob's lentil soup.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fernly on January 05, 2007, 12:06:54 PM
Pat and Laurentia, thanks! Both soups sound real good (and thanks for the warning about the blender :o)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on January 07, 2007, 10:13:06 PM
man, this thread always makes me hungry!!

pat -- your meal recipe post sounds good and different... tomato pudding, wow! and the carrot soup recipe too. the rice thickener is an interesting twist. i love carrot, and other thick vegetable soups in winter. pumpkin and squash soup takes well to interesting flavors, ginger, curry, etc.

for a lower calorie, salt, animal fat, etc., carrot soup you can skip the butter, use less half and half and low sodium vegetable or chicken stock. i don't know the exact recipe but i use a lot more carrots, organic , which are peeled and boiled. i also use a handblender instead of a blender, and always top it with freshly grated nutmeg and cracked black pepper... yummy. 


sugercheryl -- your wontons sound like the kind my mom made!!  she also did shrimp, with ginger, sesame, etc, for flavoring. i must admit the onion soup mix sounds tempting!!! i used to help her fold those things. we made huge trays of them at the holidays, folding for hours, using egg white and water instead of milk, with two pans of oil set up for frying, lots of towels laid out for draining excess grease. a chore!!  i only helped because i could eat them right away. ;) :D  we served them with a chinese mustard type of dip, and a sweet and sour pineapple sauce.


i haven't been adventurous in the kitchen lately, but i have been making lots of snacks. my favorite are cheddar cheese roll ups: a bit of grated extra sharp cheddar melted onto toasted corn tortillas (i use a cast iron skillet), then topped with anything, avocado, onion, green onion, cilantro, beans or a bean paste, sour cream, a spicy tomatillo sauce, slivers of canned green chili or nopales, even large capers or slivers of kalamata olive. watercress is good too, as are basil leaves, if you don't have cilantro. i suppose a simple cabbage slaw could be nice. use lots of green stuff for crunch and nutrition.

get the ingredients ready in little bowls and stand at the stove and get into production mode, layering the other stuff on top of the cheese. roll them up when ready and secure with toothpick (or just fold in half -- this is basically a quesadilla). heating them this way on the skillet gives the tortilla a bit of a crunch, which is nice with the melty cheese.

other snacks include peanut butter and jelly and banana sandwiches (LOL), pita and white bean hummus with carrot sticks, etc.... and hot dogs. we just blew through a pack of nathan's, lol.   with baked beans, yum. i bought them because a slash story i'm reading has jack and ennis roasting hot dogs and it was so good i craved them. my bf wondered where the chips were, told him them chip bags are hard to pack. :D

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on January 19, 2007, 06:22:35 PM
bruschetta:

mmm... ok, bread again. not very low carb but it's such a great taste.

italian bread is cut into nice thick chunks and toasted.

then as soon as it's out of the toaster oven or broiler, rub on all sides with the cut edge of a clove of garlic. the heat of the toast will "melt" the garlic. then drizzle on some good olive oil.

you can of course add things on top, like chopped tomatoes and basil, but the tomatoes have to be very good, or it ruins the bread~! ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Bobbie on January 30, 2007, 07:31:33 AM
So, is everybody on a diet?   ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on January 30, 2007, 07:40:21 AM
No. But I should be!  lol.

Reading jimmy's posts in here always makes me hungry!  How he stays so skinny eating all that stuff is beyond me!  (Luv to you jimmy!!)

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on February 01, 2007, 03:20:13 AM
^^^ skinny? girlfriend, it's all about vertical stripes, and you ain't seen me in a skin-tight t shirt lately....  :P :P ;) ;D

SO not on a diet -- today was too much spicy pork bbq korean style. smoky and hot.. with kimchee, spinach and sesame, bean sprouts lightly sauteed. just a little rice... "carbs," ya know...

lately, breakfasts have been one BIG smoothie -- about 28oz of one banana, some rice milk, plain yogurt, blueberries, strawberries or peaches (usually frozen), the juice of some oranges, or a lemon and lime, water, and sometimes honey or maple syrup. all whirred up in a skinny high sided glass pitcher with my fave kitchen tool: the hand blender. i'll enrich this with toasted bagel sometimes. :-X
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Jer009 on February 04, 2007, 12:23:13 PM
Folks, I have got a question: Some time ago I printed out a recipe from this thread called, "Asparagus Rarebit a la Molly Katzen/Moosewood." My question is, Why isn't there any asparagus in the recipe? Was it an oversight? And what does "Rarebit" mean? I'm an occasional cook and I am just wondering if anyone with more experience knows.

That said, this sounds like a dandy topping for steamed broccoli or cauliflower. Thanks!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on February 17, 2007, 06:51:20 PM
Jimmy, just made pad thai tonight because Carol was jonesing- and since I'm trying to do that whole South Beach thing, I realized that noodles might be on the bad side for another week or so.  So what to use as substitute?

"angel hair" shredded cabbage (for cole slaw) and shredded broccoli slaw!

Guess what?  It worked!  Since I can have all the veggies I can stand and lean protein, pad thai actually becomes almost carb-free and probably higher in fiber (broccoli slaw is made with the stems - more fibrous.)  Carol ate the rice noodles since she isn't horribly concerned about her waistline.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on February 17, 2007, 08:00:56 PM
that is SO not pad thai! that's wang sar wei!!   LOL ;) ;D ::)

sounds yummy tho! and zeroish carbs... where there's a will there a way. i'm a big fan of cabbage slaws... red cabbage mostly, and you know what they say about cruciferous vegetables... :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on February 18, 2007, 03:01:19 PM
they make you fart?   :o :o :o :o

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on February 24, 2007, 01:14:30 PM
LOL......  heidi, bend over it's time for YOUR spanking!  ;D ;D ;D 

now,,,, just because you're in bay city right now doesn't mean you have to go off your diet,,, keep doing the south beach thing up in northern michigan and all that... ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on March 08, 2007, 06:14:13 PM
snack time:

sweet seville oranges, segmented and free of membranes or any seeds, in a bowl with the extra juice, drizzled with a little good honey, maybe some fresh cracked pepper or a dusting of cinnamon powder.

no whipped cream. no sugar. no extra carbs... :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on March 08, 2007, 07:47:30 PM
Folks, I have got a question: Some time ago I printed out a recipe from this thread called, "Asparagus Rarebit a la Molly Katzen/Moosewood." My question is, Why isn't there any asparagus in the recipe? Was it an oversight? And what does "Rarebit" mean? I'm an occasional cook and I am just wondering if anyone with more experience knows.

That said, this sounds like a dandy topping for steamed broccoli or cauliflower. Thanks!

a little late, but i do not remember the katzen/moosewood recipe,,, but i googled welsh rarebit and came up with some info. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_rabbit) ...no rabbit in it either! so maybe the asparagus is just a slur. :D ;)

if you google "asparagus rarebit" you'll come up with the recipes,,, here's one that actually uses the wonderful vegetable:

Asparagus Rarebit

2 T. Butter
2 T. Flour
1/2 t. Salt
1/4 t. Freshly ground pepper
Dash cayenne pepper
2 t. Dry mustard
1 T. Worcestershire sauce
1 c. Ale
1 1/2 c. Flour
4 c. Shredded cheddar cheese
1 lb. Asparagus
Toast triangles

In double boiler or medium sauce pan over medium heat, melt butter and add flour. Mix until a roux is formed. Add salt, pepper, cayenne, mustard and Worcestershire sauce. Mix well. Next add ale, blend all ingredients together and bring mixture to a bare simmer.

Cut asparagus into 1-inch lengths, reserving the tips for garnish. Steam the spears in salted water for approximately 5 to 7 minutes. Remove from heat, drain and set aside.

In a mixing bowl toss flour and shredded cheese together. Gradually add cheese to the saucepan, stirring until completely melted. Allow the mixture to simmer, but do not boil. Just prior to serving add asparagus to the cheese mixture. Stir the mixture and allow it to cook for approximately 5 minutes. Serve on toast triangles and garnish with asparagus tips.

recipe from the epicurean website. (http://www.epicurean.com/articles/asparagus-the-supreme-vegetable.html)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on March 08, 2007, 07:56:13 PM
alma would probably make this for ennis and the kids!! here's a chicken/asparagus recipe anybody could do. must have oven. right now this sounds very very delicious!! for the american cheese, i would probably subsitute a medium cheddar, and might try a can of cream of mushroom soup instead.


Asparagus Divan

4 Chicken breasts
1 lb. Asparagus
1 T. Melted butter or margarine
1 Can condensed cream of chicken soup
1 t. Lemon juice
Salt and ground pepper to taste
1 c. Shredded American cheese
1/2 c. Toasted slivered almonds

Heat oven to 350° F. Arrange chicken breasts in baking dish; top with asparagus and butter. In a small mixing bowl combine soup (undiluted), lemon juice, salt and pepper. Spoon mixture over asparagus; sprinkle with cheese and almonds. Bake at 350° F for 25 to 30 minutes or until creamy and bubbling.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: PatSinnott on March 08, 2007, 08:55:52 PM
We used to eat Welsh Rarebit when I was a child.  Another variation was a Turkey Devonshire (days after Thanksgiving), which is a base of toast, a layer of crisp bacon, shredded turkey, smothered in the rarebit sauce.  We used to buy Stouffer's rarebit sauce, I don't know if they still make it.  ???

Here's a recipe I got from our house mother at the fraternity way back in college for EZ Chicken Divan.  I still make it today for pot lucks, etc.

Four boneless, skinless chicken breasts, steamed until cooked, and then cooled so they can be chopped into bite size pieces.
1 bag of broccoli florets, steamed until cooked.
1 can cream of chicken soup
1 scant cup of mayonaise
2 tbls of lemon juice (reconstituted is fine)
2 tbls of dijon mustard
1 tsp of poultry seasoning
1 tbl salt
1 tsp pepper
1 package of shredded sharp cheese
1\2 cup bread crumbs with 2 tbls melted butter mixed in

Preheat oven to 325.
In baking dish layer shredded chicken meat on bottom, then brocolli.
Mix soup, mayo, lemon juice, mustard and seasonings in bowl and mix thoroughly.
Spread mixture over chicken/brocolli and smooth with spatula.
Cover with shredded cheese, and then buttered bread crumbs.
Bake for 30 to 35 minutes until top browns and sauce bubbles.

Makes 6.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Jer009 on March 09, 2007, 11:23:48 AM
Thanks, everybody!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on March 23, 2007, 01:50:10 AM
you're welcome jer,,,,  hope the asparagus rabbit comes out fine! :D ;) speaking of rabbit -- here is a nice recipe for


carrot juice with a "twist":

rinse but do not peel the vegetables. run through an electric juicer:

about 10 lovely carrots
1 or 2 small sweet apples
a small hunk of fresh ginger
one half of a beet,,, for colour

pour into fluted parfait glasses and swerve with a smile. :D

--> try to use organic carrots, you'll find the flavor is sweeter and has less bite; the apples add sweetness too, and the ginger has a warming effect.

men, if you drink this every day for an extended period of time, take precautions when using a trough style urinal -- you will surprise anybody standing nearby with your pink flow.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on March 23, 2007, 02:19:43 AM
Haven't been here for a while. But loving asparagas season! In a cookbook of Amish recipes found one for asparagas pie that I make 2 or 3 times each spring. Have loaned the book out so can't reproduce the exact recipe but it involves

- a big bunch of asparagas, cut into 2" lenths and steamed until barely tender
- some hard boiled eggs, sliced
- Bechamel sauce with the addition of a bit of celery salt and curry powder (was surprised the Amish use that). Those two spices are kind of key to the taste so don't omit.

In a partially-baked pastry shell layer the asparagas and egg slices and spread the bechamel sauce over it. The sauce will be thick but will melt into the other ingredients during cooking. Bake until top is golden.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on March 23, 2007, 05:48:51 AM
oooh!  and that is fairly South Beach Diet friendly!!!


merci, mme. gris!  I will try that this spring.

(pie crust pastry or puff pastry for the shell?)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on March 23, 2007, 06:06:23 AM
I've never tried puff pastry for this.

I know virtually nothing about South Beach diet. What makes it compatible?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on March 23, 2007, 06:16:42 AM
Low carbs, very little refined white flour & sugar. 

Whole grains vs. whole wheat.  High fibre.

It helps reverse a physical condition called Insulin Resistance and also effects PreDiabetic Syndrome.  Lowers your cholesterol (esp. with a mild to moderate exercise regime) and blood pressure.  All by changing your diet.  No drugs.  It's actually a very healthy way to live.  Eliminates a lot of the processed foods and pre-prepared foods.  Makes you eat REAL foods.  It will force your body to use up your excess fat stores to generate the sugars your body needs (ketogenesis).  It's actually pretty easy and not nearly as restrictive as people think.  AND IT WORKS for weight loss. 

You aren't doomed to never eat grains and carbs again - but you bring them back into your diet slowly and then try to make the better carb choices.  Whole fruit (for fibre) instead of juice and that kind of thing.  Have a salad with one slice of pizza instead of 3 slices of 'za.  Etc.

I've lost just under 20 pounds in 7 weeks.  The first couple of months are always the most dramatic.  I should be at my goal weight in about a year.  And it's easy to maintain - when your weight creeps up, you just cut back on the carbs...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on March 23, 2007, 08:24:24 PM
• heidi, that's awesome about your dieting success!

let me add that juicing two meals a day, and eating whatever you want (within reason) for dinner can be a great way to lose weight. i lost about 20 lbs doing that after college, and it's stayed off ever since.

by juicing i mean using a juicer for juicing fresh vegetables and fruit. that way you get the benefit of the living enzymes that nature provides -- something you will never find in canned, bottled, or carton juice since everything is pasturized these days.


• chapeaugris, the asparagus dish sounds delish!!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on March 24, 2007, 02:00:38 AM
Heidi, there's a recipe for zucchini pancakes I make often that would suit your diet. It has barely any flour.

Grate a pound or so of zukes (small ones best for this), lightly salt them and leave for 15 minutes. Then squeeze the juice out of them by the handful.

Beat together 3 or 4 eggs and a packet of feta cheese, crumbled (I don't remember how feta cheese comes packaged over there. It's about a cup full).

Add a tablespoon or so of chopped mint leaves and a bunch of scallions, finely chopped. When I don't have mint I use dill or cilantro -- it's all good.

Mix the zukes into the egg-cheese-scallion mix and stir well. Finally, add a couple of tablespoons of flour to bind it all together. If the mix seems too dry, add another egg. Too wet, add some more flour.

Cook like pancakes and serve with yogurt.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on March 24, 2007, 03:13:10 AM
^^^  omg, i can't believe how good that sounds, scallions plus mint with the feta cheese~!

i suppose it's fried in butter... or some ghee!  sounds yummy, chapeaugris!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on March 24, 2007, 05:01:41 AM
^^^  omg, i can't believe how good that sounds, scallions plus mint with the feta cheese~!

i suppose it's fried in butter... or some ghee!  sounds yummy, chapeaugris!
Exactly!

We always eat the pancakes with potatoes prepared like this:

Cube a couple of pounds of potatoes (about 3 cm2) and spread in roasting pan. Squeeze a lemon over them, stir in some pressed garlic (we use lots), salt and several tablespoons of olive oil. Mix well, then add boiling water to pan until the potatoes are not quite covered. Put in 375 F or 200 C oven with the fan on until the water has evaporated and the potatoes are nicely browned. At some point when the water is almost gone, stir the potatoes so they brown evenly.

In London we lived in a neighborhood populated with Turkish Kurds and Greek Cypriots and I learned to cook a lot of dishes using feta, spinach, olives, lemons and mint from the corner grocery.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on March 25, 2007, 03:49:05 AM
^^^ thanks for the yummy recipes -- so easy, and the boiling water is a new twist. i imagine it helps to speed up the process, resulting in a softer dish. i am going to try that next time!

your old london neighborhood sounds awesome. here in LA we have glendale, with many persian/armenian markets where there's plenty of good feta and stuff like mint. i find myself shopping there instead of the big chains, the selection is unique and often less expensive. recently they had big, sweet, giant globe grapes. they never show up in the bigger markets!

...but i won't soon forget the souvlaki stands in greece, there was a guy that sold then near our house on the beach -- a little cart with a  wood charcoal furnace grilling cubes of lamb on spits. i can almost see the guy folding the pita around the fragrant meat, pulling out the skewer and handing it to me, can taste the coolness of the yogurt sauce and feel the greasy-transparent paper the sandwich was wrapped in. sigh... like nothing i've found in the U.S. since.

(http://www.athensguide.com/photos/souvclose.jpg) (http://www.athensguide.com/souvlaki.html)

(click on pic for link)

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on March 25, 2007, 10:54:06 PM
Those are kind of like doner kebabs that are ubiquitous in Turkish neighborhoods in Europe. In Germany, they have almost become the hamburger of that country as there are so many Turks and the Germans have developed a taste for them. I didn't really care for them when I lived in London because they were so greasy. (I had been a vegetarian for 17 years until I moved to London and was just kind of transitioning so I didn't eat much red meat anyway.) For a quick bite I used to buy this flat, pita-like bread that was baked with a little feta and a lot of mixed herbs. Also stuffed grape leaves. I miss all that. While I love French food, the French are not especially adventurous gastronomes. They like the cuisine of the countries they colonised and that's about it!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Jer009 on March 26, 2007, 10:48:12 PM
Laurentia--
I've fixed the Fancy Tomato Beans about three times since I saw them on this thread back in September '06. I'm always amazed at how tasty they are! Thank you for giving me a favorite for years to come.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on March 27, 2007, 06:43:34 AM
^^^^ curious, had to look for laurentia's Fancy Tomato Beans recipe. i remember it now, because of the sage! it's a great, easy and quick recipe. here is the link:

http://www.davecullen.com/forum/index.php?topic=8751.msg218814#msg218814


and while i'm at it, here's a drink recipe that lyle posted, the Brokeback Mountain Cocktail from the wyn resort in las vegas... no sage in this like you might expect,,, but it does contain mint.. :)

http://www.davecullen.com/forum/index.php?topic=8751.msg220012#msg220012

cheers!




• chapeaugris, i'm surprised at the limited palates of the french! i like those flat breads with feta that you describe, they're good, and the stuffed grape leaves, yummy... i love the slighty bitter taste and  smooth texture of the leaves. the dolmas, in greek restaurants here, are often served with a sort of creamy lemon sauce. damn, i'm hungry just thinking about them! i think the armenian restaurants call them "sarna"...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on March 27, 2007, 05:21:19 PM
Those are kind of like doner kebabs that are ubiquitous in Turkish neighborhoods in Europe. In Germany, they have almost become the hamburger of that country as there are so many Turks and the Germans have developed a taste for them. I didn't really care for them when I lived in London because they were so greasy. (I had been a vegetarian for 17 years until I moved to London and was just kind of transitioning so I didn't eat much red meat anyway.) For a quick bite I used to buy this flat, pita-like bread that was baked with a little feta and a lot of mixed herbs. Also stuffed grape leaves. I miss all that. While I love French food, the French are not especially adventurous gastronomes. They like the cuisine of the countries they colonised and that's about it!

I had a Döner Kebap for the first time a year ago last week, on my first trip back to Germany in 30+ years. It tasted quite good!

And Kim, I've been meaning to ask, do you get any Louisiana French fare where you live in southern France? At least in the larger cities? Either Cajun (cadien) or Creole?

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on March 28, 2007, 07:02:23 AM
Heidi, there's a recipe for zucchini pancakes I make often that would suit your diet. It has barely any flour.

Grate a pound or so of zukes (small ones best for this), lightly salt them and leave for 15 minutes. Then squeeze the juice out of them by the handful.

Beat together 3 or 4 eggs and a packet of feta cheese, crumbled (I don't remember how feta cheese comes packaged over there. It's about a cup full).

Add a tablespoon or so of chopped mint leaves and a bunch of scallions, finely chopped. When I don't have mint I use dill or cilantro -- it's all good.

Mix the zukes into the egg-cheese-scallion mix and stir well. Finally, add a couple of tablespoons of flour to bind it all together. If the mix seems too dry, add another egg. Too wet, add some more flour.

Cook like pancakes and serve with yogurt.

OOOOH!  SOunds yummy!  I bet I could use soy flour to up the protein and lower the carb factor....

(fets cheese comes both ways - blocks and crumbled.  I love it, Carol hates it. lol!)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on March 28, 2007, 11:54:59 PM
And Kim, I've been meaning to ask, do you get any Louisiana French fare where you live in southern France? At least in the larger cities? Either Cajun (cadien) or Creole?
Toulouse is the only city I know well, and I have never seen a cajun/creole restaurant there, or read a review of one, or heard mention of one anywhere. I think the French are only familiar with the music, if anything. You are more likely to get dishes like that in an American-themed restaurant, along with Tex-Mex stuff and of course with the obligatory movie memorabilia and 50s kitsch on the walls. There was such a place in Toulouse for a while and I made the mistake of ordering a Blackened Something and it was practically inedible.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on March 28, 2007, 11:58:36 PM
OOOOH!  SOunds yummy!  I bet I could use soy flour to up the protein and lower the carb factor....
If I were you I would use chickpea flour instead of soy. It has a more neutral flavour (if I'm remembering correctly how soy flour tastes) and chickpeas marry better with feta and zuchini anyway.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nax on March 30, 2007, 03:13:52 AM
Just come across this one - fabulous tasting.

Two versions of a fruit Shrikand from southern India.  Easy and delicious.

Strawberry Shrikand

Ingredients
For the strawberries
250g/9oz strawberries, hulled and halved
2 tsp caster sugar
2 tsp balsamic vinegar


Pineapple and Pomegranate (Grenadines) Shrikand

Ingredients
For the Pineapple & Pomegranite
1 ripe pineapple, trimmed and cut into 2cm cubes
Seeds of two pomegranates
2 tsp caster sugar
2 tsp balsamic vinegar

For the shrikand
250ml/9fl oz Greek-style yoghurt
4 cardamom pods, cracked and the seeds removed and crushed
pinch saffron strands, soaked in 1 tbsp boiling water (do this an hour before you need it)
Seeds from a Vanilla pod*
3 tbsp fine caster sugar
25g/1oz flaked almonds, toasted

Method
1. For either fruit combinations place fruit  in a bowl with two teaspoons caster sugar and the balsamic vinegar. Cover with cling film and leave to marinate for one hour.
2. For the shrikand, place the yoghurt, cardamom seeds, Vanilla seed pod mass, saffron (and saffron water) and caster sugar into a bowl and mix well.
3. To serve, place equal portions of the fruit into four sundae glasses. Place a quarter of the shrikand on the top of the strawberries in each glass. Top with the toasted almonds.

* Split a new vanilla pod along it's length then using the back of a knife run it along the split sides to harvest the vanilla seed mass.  The pod can be used several times to flavour milk, but what I like to do is put the pod int a glass jar (which has a good tight lid - coffee jar) with about a half a kilo of caster (fine granulated) sugar and leave it for a couple of months.  The result is vanilla sugar that can be used to add real vanilla zing to your cooking - cakes pancakes, flavouring deserts.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on March 30, 2007, 03:43:28 AM
Sounds fantastic! I will definitely try this when strawberry season starts. But the Balsamic vinegar sounds decidedly un-Indian. Do they normally use something else?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nax on March 30, 2007, 04:52:21 AM
Sounds fantastic! I will definitely try this when strawberry season starts. But the Balsamic vinegar sounds decidedly un-Indian. Do they normally use something else?
Possibly - I never saw it when I was out there.  It does work and indeed try just tossing strawberries in a little balsamic vinegar - sugar to taste, quite nice.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on March 30, 2007, 06:35:29 AM
OOOOH!  SOunds yummy!  I bet I could use soy flour to up the protein and lower the carb factor....
If I were you I would use chickpea flour instead of soy. It has a more neutral flavour (if I'm remembering correctly how soy flour tastes) and chickpeas marry better with feta and zuchini anyway.

I stand corrected!  You are right...not as bitter and more nutty. 

woot!  I'm all over this like a duck on a junebug.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Laurentia on April 04, 2007, 07:09:47 AM
Laurentia--
I've fixed the Fancy Tomato Beans about three times since I saw them on this thread back in September '06. I'm always amazed at how tasty they are! Thank you for giving me a favorite for years to come.

I'm so glad to hear that!  :-*  They're my favourite too, and I keep spreading the recipe.

Haven't been around in a while, but I love to see this thread being busy again! I'm definitely going to try the zucchini pancakes and the Shrikands.

On the fast food issue, I went vegetarian before I started going out much, so I've actually never had kebab (I know, it's like never having tasted pizza)! Falafel, though, is BIG where I live. There's a huge market for it, lots of little falafel shops with kitsch interiors and some of them have their own special salads they'll put in the bread with the falafel if you want them. There's even a chain, called Falafel No 1, that only exists in my town (population ca 250 000), and they use a recipe for the falafel mixture that the founder's father came up with. All the units - there are about ten of them as far as I know - have a picture of the old man on the wall. The falafel culture is definitely one of the things that make this town so great to live in.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on April 05, 2007, 12:43:22 PM
Oh, I love falafel. I really miss it. *sigh* Believe it or not, sometimes living in rural France really sucks from a culinary point of view.  :-\
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on April 06, 2007, 06:32:54 AM
but surely you can get chick peas and/or fava beans in france...

Quote
Falafel is made from fava beans or chick peas or a combination of the two. The Egyptian variation uses exclusively fava beans, while other variations may only use chick peas. Unlike many other bean patties, in falafel the beans are not cooked prior to use. Instead they are soaked, possibly skinned, then ground with the addition of a small quantity of onion, parsley, spices, bicarbonate of soda and deep fried at a high temperature. Sesame seeds may be added to the balls before they are fried; this is particularly common when falafel is served as a dish in its own right rather than as a sandwich filling.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on April 06, 2007, 09:16:26 AM
Sure, I could make falafel from scratch. But I miss the convenience of being able to buy a falafel sandwich or rollup. You can sometimes find falafel mix in health food stores here but it's hideously expensive.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on April 07, 2007, 10:10:44 AM
And the falafel mix isnt' as good as the real thing.

:(  I didn't think about not being able to find the falafel stalls and kebab vendors.......
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on April 09, 2007, 03:11:54 AM
Maybe this should go on the Humor thread, but it seems appropriate here too, since Jimmy comes this way sometimes:

I got a spam email about stock tips with this nonsense phrase as the subject:
"A gnash a saucepan"

 ??? ???
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on April 09, 2007, 07:50:52 AM
LOL  that is truly bizarre...  i was in the housewares dept of macy's on saturday with friends, telling them how much i loved my 12" stainless steel saucepan! :D  and my stainless wok.. ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on April 27, 2007, 10:24:06 AM
what do you guys do, if anything, with loquats? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loquat)

two trees out back are just loaded with the things, but all i ever do it pull them down and eat them.

they're so cute and fuzzy too, and the seeds, so smooth! they remind me of my childhood in greece, along with figs.

(http://www.doyletics.com/images/loquats.jpg)

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on April 27, 2007, 04:40:45 PM
geez!  I was hopin' you were cookin' again!

I'm hungry! lol.


Wikipaedia says loquats are good for jellies jams http://plantanswers.tamu.edu/fruit/loquat.html

and tarts and pies. 

Here is a recipe for Loquat Chutney:   http://www.foodreference.com/html/loquat-chutney.html

Also good for wine I guess....



They have medicinal qualities and are good for the digestion and are an expectorant.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on April 28, 2007, 06:45:49 AM
...i like to rub them on my lips before i eat them. ;D

yes, i figured a loquat chutney might be good! i've been putting them in smoothies, and i guess they're good in fruit salads too (or so they say)...

i thought it was interesting to learn that the tree blooms all at once and the loquats ripen pretty much all at the same time. :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ImEnnisShesJack on April 28, 2007, 06:57:19 AM
jimmy, do you suck the flesh dry without taking off the skin?   >:D




I imagine they are quite tasty - although I am not so phallicly-driven as you - I don't think I've ever seen one.  Damned Midwest!  I REALLY want to move to warmer climes....
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on April 28, 2007, 07:34:03 AM
jimmy, do you suck the flesh dry without taking off the skin?   >:D




I imagine they are quite tasty - although I am not so phallicly-driven as you - I don't think I've ever seen one.  Damned Midwest!  I REALLY want to move to warmer climes....

::)      as a matter of fact, i do. ;) :D

uh huh, they're a mild small fruit with a fragrant aroma -- like an apricot almost. my neighbor calls them a poor man's apricot and says they're a bother... more for moi!!

what? move from the midwest and no longer be able to make snowmen?  :D  the thing about the california coast is you can always drive two or three hours and go skiing.. if ya want. but the fruit, the fruit! i just picked up some grapefruit and lemons on the way home from work... off a tree, heheh.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ybwc on May 27, 2007, 11:59:59 PM
sweet potato with roasted sunflower seeds. I picked this up today at the deli of my town's one and only supermarket and I almost flipped a kidney it was so darn good. I'll be heading back to get the full ingredients. it was just so delicious and healthy.

another thing I picked up was a blueberry peach crumble-fresh. man was that good too. the advantages of living in a tiny community.

I can't to tell you how many times I watched my Mom and grandma make old fashion plain donuts and cinamon buns, and table buns to name a few.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on May 28, 2007, 02:34:42 AM
sweet potato with roasted sunflower seeds. I picked this up today at the deli of my town's one and only supermarket and I almost flipped a kidney it was so darn good. I'll be heading back to get the full ingredients. it was just so delicious and healthy.
I am waiting impatiently for this... :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 30, 2007, 11:46:35 AM
oh,, i googled "sweet potatoes with sunflower seeds recipe" and found several that sounded good!

mmm, blueberry peach crumble, that sounds really nummy.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 01, 2007, 03:15:15 AM
okay, so i'm walking down lankershim on this smoggy blue moon day and a woman with a baby stroller rolls up to me and in a sing-song voice says something with a huge smile on her face. i discerned that she was probably central american, and i smiled back and said, "oh, i'm sorry, i don't speak spanish!" a baby was kicking from under the roof of the stroller, which was quite large and covered with a gay, brightly colored blanket.

before i could go she took a tan hand and swept back the blanket to reveal a large aluminum bakery tray loaded with cookies!

QUANTO! i asked. (i know a little spanish).

and she said, TRES, one dough-lar.

i asked what flavors, and she says, "estrawbeddie, peenapple... and banewah."

"banewah?"

"ba-NEEWAH"

"banana?"

she then broke one cookie open to reveal a lemony colored custard filling, popped one half in her mouth, and handed the other half to me.

it melted in my mouth. i moaned a little. her smile got wider.

i gave her a five dollar bill and said, "three dollars."  she filled a small bag with a medley of cookies. each one was shaped like a turtle, with little legs, a head and a tail, and the shell being the flaky pastry that was mounded from the fillings.

i should have given her a ten, said five dollars, and told her to keep the change. that good! and her smile and radiant voice was like angel song to my ears. i should have taken a pic of her handiwork, but between me and the BF, they're history.

does anybody know if there's a name for these luscious, turtle shaped cookies?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Ellen (tellyouwhat) on June 18, 2007, 08:06:42 PM
^^^^

Wow, were they all filled?  No I don't know the name -- she might have been from any Central American or South American country.

Have you gone back to Lankershim to look for her?   ;D


I came in here to say, I am pressed to entertain my son during summer vacation, and so I came up with this idea of "cooking camp" which started today.  He has renamed it "cooking adventures."  I had to roust him out of bed at 10:00, so it wouldn't be lunch time when we started (the idea is to have some sort of food ready by lunch time, since we have to eat anyway.)

"oh, cooking camp" he said, with a groan.

I drove him to a farmer's market and we bought a bunch of funny looking vegetables.  We were looking specifically for artichokes, but they were not there.  I bought as much "local" as I could -- Texas grown tomatoes and peaches, but unfortunately I have been spoiled for most of my life on the California produce, so the Texas stuff still comes up short.  ANYWAY there are a few surprises, and that's what makes this adventure worthwhile -- the YELLOW cherry tomatoes are fabulous, for example.  We bought locally grown berries and other fun stuff --

But the whole point was that we were going to make homemade MAYONNAISE in our kitchen, because mayonnaise is his favorite condiment.  He doesn't care for ketchup or mustard, mayonnaise covers all the bases.

We used a recipe from the Joy of Cooking which came out very runny -- egg yolks, lemon juice, a cup of oil, salt an pepper.  Maybe we didn't whip it properly, but it tastes good.  The yellow tomatoes are especially enhanced by this sauce.

Nowadays people are feint of heart with raw eggs, but the book says it should last for 48 hours if we keep it cold.

Tomorrow, we will find artichokes at Whole Foods or someplace --

I think the point of this story is that, despite much eye-rolling and shrugging, I heard him bragging about this to his friend later in the day!

 ;D ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 20, 2007, 07:04:04 AM
heheh,, -- cooking adventures!  that sounds so fun..  i think when kids realize the simplicity of good nutrition and cooking they grow up with bolder tastes.. and are more 'adventurous' in the kitchen. sorry about the mayo...   maybe the egg felt lazy... ;) humidity may have something to do with it.. or is that meringue?

hummus makes an interesting sandwich spread... with grilled chicken in pita bread, stuff like that. cram lots of healthy fillers in too, weird greens (that's a lesson in itself,,, he'll be out picking dandelion leaves for a salad!), tomato, onion, slices of cooked beets or radish slivers..

i can't wait to hear more adventures from cooking class as summer progresses!! ;)  how old is your son? i found a camping site with recipes geared for kids.. not all require a campfire, but if so, you could always fire up the grill! http://www.chuckwagondiner.com/categories.php?id=10

what about bananas foster? that's a quick, fun dessert... the flaming alcohol is optional ;) but it's a great excuse to eat ice cream....

oh --  the lankershim cookies were all filled,,, a semi-flaky pastry with a simple pinched and rolled edge encasing the fillings... but relatively flat..  haven't seen her since then but i hope she rolls by the worksite again!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Lola on June 20, 2007, 01:07:11 PM
I have to go to a pot luck on the weekend.  I thought this sounded quick and easy:


Crockpot barbecued meatballs, made with frozen prepared meatballs or your own homemade meatball recipe.

INGREDIENTS:

3 pounds frozen meatballs
2 medium onions, cut in wedges
1 bottle beer, 12 ounces
1 1/2 cups ketchup
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 cup brown sugar

PREPARATION:

Combine all ingredients in the slow cooker. Cover and cook on low 8 to 12 hours.
About 96 meatballs, but this recipe is easy to cut in half. Also, you can use your own homemade meatballs, first browned in oven or skillet.


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 20, 2007, 08:39:28 PM
lola that sounds good and very easy! i wish i had a crock pot... i bet the beer gives it a nice twist. my aunt and uncle made beer battered fish in their tavern on the lake in wisconsin, and it was soo good... beer in chili's nice, too.

---

i've been eating tofu "meat" lately, a vegan restaurant in irvine, CA called "wheel of life" serves chinese food with no meat but the menu says "broccoli beef" and "lemon chicken" or "sweet and sour pork"...

it's AMAZING. and they say it's flavored all naturally, without artificial flavors. i don't know how they get that chicken taste, but it must be chinese wisdom! the owner is an older gentleman that looks GREAT for his age, and he's a very strong supporter of vegan lifestyles...

anyway... that's all, i'm hungry now :D

oh wait -- new find: raw organic cacao beans... my friend gave me a bag because he hated them, but they're not bad. i just eat them like nuts. they're supposedly waaaaaaay high in antioxidants, with a fair amount of caffeine and other things that give you zip.

they have natural MAO inhibitors too, so you get a sort of high when eating them, or so they say. they're also used as a weight loss food as they stave off hunger or something. i haven't noticed much of that, or the high, but i do feel energized. i'm nibbling them at work lately. they have a bitter, chocolately taste, but there's something else too, a sort of red wine flavor.

here's a pic:

(http://rawintent.co.uk/images/ASIRaw%20Intent%20New%20Site%20017.jpg)

and some info: www.rawcacao.com
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Ellen (tellyouwhat) on June 21, 2007, 01:51:39 PM
^^^^

fascinating, I'm going to look for those!

When I'm in Europe (about three times in my life, including a couple weeks ago) I find these great chocolate bars that have-- can't think of the French description now -- but I found them in Switzerland on the other trip-- they have chards or tiny bits of crunchy cacao beans.  At least I think that is what the label is telling me.  I have tried to find them on the internet, but no luck.  And usually when I buy one I just stumble on it and think -- oh, here it is, why didn't I buy TEN?

If anyone knows where to find those in the US hook me up!

-----------------------------------------------------------

Jimmy -- I wonder if those cookies were a type of empanada but sweet?   ???
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 22, 2007, 06:58:25 AM
^^^ no, those cookies were thinner than en empanada.. :)

some online recipes say to crush up cacao beans and put them in smoothies, so it sounds like they'd put it in a chocolate bar for crunch. i've never heard of that before, but sounds good!


======= it's summer, and time for a picnic!

one of my favorite picnic meals is cold chicken, a good pasta or potato salad (linda, you should post your german potato salad recipe, if you haven't already!) or other salad, like a coleslaw...  and corn on the cob or cold roasted beets with goat cheese... i really do need to plan a day out in nature, maybe the beach or something and dig out the old picnic woven wood picnic basket...  i'm going to post a couple of picnic-perfect food recipes i saw in a magazine:


herb roasted chicken with mustard marinade

1/2 cup minced shallots
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
1/2 cup olive oil
1/3 cup whole grain mustard
1 cup chopped fresh parsley
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1 tsp crush red pepper flakes
1 five-six pound whole roasting chicken, cut into pieces

mix together shallots and vinegar. whisk in olive oil, then add the mustard, parsley, lemon juice and pepper flakes.

place chicken in a large baking dish, pour over marinade and turn chicken to coat. cover and place in fridge for at least 1 hour to marinate.

preheat oven to 450 F.  remove chicken from marinade, and sprinkle with salt and pepper, and roast for approx. 45 minutes.


lemony green beans

1 1/2 lbs green beans, trimmed
3 tbs fresh lemon juice
2 tsp balsamic vinegar
1 tbs olive oil
3 tbs chopped fresh chived
2 tsp grated lemon peel

cook beans in boiling salted water until crisp-tender, about four minutes. cool the beans in a bowl of ice water, then drain in colander.

whisk together lemon juice, vinegar and olive oil. pour over green beans and toss to coat. mix in chives and grated lemon peel, add salt and pepper to taste.


a refreshing picnic drink is a pomegranate spritzer -- equal amounts of pomegranate juice and sparkling water, with a little fresh squeezed lemon or lime juice. mix together and pour over ice. you can make this on the spot.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on June 22, 2007, 01:39:52 PM

When I'm in Europe (about three times in my life, including a couple weeks ago) I find these great chocolate bars that have-- can't think of the French description now -- but I found them in Switzerland on the other trip-- they have chards or tiny bits of crunchy cacao beans.  At least I think that is what the label is telling me.  I have tried to find them on the internet, but no luck.  And usually when I buy one I just stumble on it and think -- oh, here it is, why didn't I buy TEN?

If anyone knows where to find those in the US hook me up!
Ellen, I will bring some when I come to the States in August and mail them to you. (Sorry folks, this offer only extends to Ellen because she brought me maple syrup when she came to France earlier this month, even though we were unable to meet in the end.)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 22, 2007, 07:02:13 PM
Ellen, I will bring some when I come to the States in August and mail them to you. (Sorry folks, this offer only extends to Ellen because she brought me maple syrup when she came to France earlier this month, even though we were unable to meet in the end.)

do you know what they're called?  they're not those chocolate bars with the blue and gold label, are they?

and isn't teuscher a swiss chocolate ? they had a store in SF off union square..... mmmmmmmmmmmmmm.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on June 23, 2007, 12:11:35 PM
I made your herb roasted chicken w/ mustard marinade tonight, Jimmy/gnash, as I had a chicken on hand. It was delicious. I told the family where I got the recipe and my husband said I've had more hits from this thread than from the $35 cookbook I brought back from the States recently.  :D

Last year I found a roast chicken recipe on a food blog by a French woman living in the US. She got it from a magazine article over there. It sounds totally implausible but really works. First preheat the oven to 500 ° F / 250 ° C for at least 20 minutes. Put the chicken in a roasting pan and cover it with about 9 tablespoons of kosher salt (I don't measure anymore, just grab fistfuls of salt and press it into the bird.) It helps to rinse the chicken first and then pat it dry with paper towels so it's a touch damp, which helps the salt stick better. Then grind a whole lot of pepper over it. Put it in the oven and leave for an hour. That's it.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 23, 2007, 03:46:03 PM
hey!! that's was fast!! glad it was a success... i think the whole grain mustard would provide a good texture too, they must get crunchy.

i've heard about the salted chicken recipe, but with cups and cups of salt. i think you bake it and then peel the crusty salt layer off before eating it? if not, then wow!! lol. it's amazing the salt doesn't totally ruin the chicken, must be kitchen magic, hehe.

oh -- speaking of crunchy -- i tried the raw cacao beans with honey last night -- very good! more like a candy bar.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on June 24, 2007, 05:08:23 AM
The version I used doesn't use cups and cups of salt, but an awful lot. Since it falls off easily there's a limit to how much you can manage to put on the chicken unless you completely bury it. The skin becomes very crusty (and salty!) and the meat very moist. We use this good quality, grayish sea salt from the Guérand region of Britanny and it makes the skin more palatable than using plain old white kosher salt.

I even had green beans for the meal but didn't use your recipe because the vinaigrette seemed too close to the chicken marinade. I prepared them in a way that also uses vinegar, though. You sauté a sliced red onion in butter and olive oil till soft while cooking the beans till crisp. Then dump the drained beans into the onions, stir around until all is coated and season with salt and pepper. At the end, shove the beans to the side of the pan and add a couple tablespoons of white wine vinegar (even better, walnut vinegar) and let it bubble up, then stir it all together.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Ellen (tellyouwhat) on June 24, 2007, 09:06:10 AM

When I'm in Europe (about three times in my life, including a couple weeks ago) I find these great chocolate bars that have-- can't think of the French description now -- but I found them in Switzerland on the other trip-- they have chards or tiny bits of crunchy cacao beans.  At least I think that is what the label is telling me.  I have tried to find them on the internet, but no luck.  And usually when I buy one I just stumble on it and think -- oh, here it is, why didn't I buy TEN?

If anyone knows where to find those in the US hook me up!
Ellen, I will bring some when I come to the States in August and mail them to you. (Sorry folks, this offer only extends to Ellen because she brought me maple syrup when she came to France earlier this month, even though we were unable to meet in the end.)


 :-* :-* :-*

thank you!!

I'm at my mom's in St. Louis right now, Jimmy when I get back home I will put up the exact wording on the label (the chocolate bar is hidden from my husband, I hope he doesn't find it while I'm gone .... ;)   )
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on June 25, 2007, 02:10:14 AM

herb roasted chicken with mustard marinade

1/2 cup minced shallots
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
1/2 cup olive oil
1/3 cup whole grain mustard
1 cup chopped fresh parsley
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1 tsp crush red pepper flakes
1 five-six pound whole roasting chicken, cut into pieces

mix together shallots and vinegar. whisk in olive oil, then add the mustard, parsley, lemon juice and pepper flakes.

place chicken in a large baking dish, pour over marinade and turn chicken to coat. cover and place in fridge for at least 1 hour to marinate.

preheat oven to 450 F.  remove chicken from marinade, and sprinkle with salt and pepper, and roast for approx. 45 minutes.

Thanks a lot for this - we had this on Saturday (though not at a picknick) and it turned out to be the most delicious chicken I've eaten in a long time!
(I should maybe point out that I love mustard...  ::))
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 25, 2007, 03:24:39 AM
--thanks ellen!!  "meet me in st. louis" comes to mind, hahha.. ;)


--katie, glad the chicken recipe is yummy! it's good cold, i bet. that's funny you like mustard -- my bf was telling me just yesterday at breakfast how a childhood friend of his just LOVED mustard and would put them on pancakes (along with syrup and butter!! it's a southern thing, apparently).. anyway, her dad also made fresh pickles, the best dills ever, apparently, and how he made for his mustard loving daughter a special mustard pickle that she craved...!


--chapeaugris,,,  your green bean (haricort vert?) recipe sounds easy and good. i'm a big fan of red onions so this sounds great,, and because of the vinegar, i bet it's good cold too! and yes on the salt,, i was thinking that subsituting a specialty salt, like pink or something, might be a good idea.

speaking of COLD -- i'll be posting a cucumber/beet soup that sounded good if i can find the recipe. i think i posted a gazpacho recipe earlier (darn it for not having a search function any longer!) in this thread, but this one is a very colorful twist on that classic.... it looks like a smoothie :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on June 25, 2007, 03:53:24 AM
--katie, glad the chicken recipe is yummy! it's good cold, i bet. that's funny you like mustard

My mum says that I already loved mustard when I was small.
Apparently I was sucking on my thumb all the time and she wanted to get me off that habit. So others recommended her to smear mustard on my thumb but she knew that this would have achieved exactly the opposite!  ;D

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on June 25, 2007, 03:57:41 AM
speaking of COLD -- i'll be posting a cucumber/beet soup that sounded good if i can find the recipe

Anybody interested in a recipe for beetroot risotto?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 25, 2007, 05:13:20 AM
^^^ i'd be interested in anything with beets!! beets are one of my favorite veggies... roasted with olive oil, salt and pepper -- yummy.

that's hilarious about your mom's thumb sucking therapy!! i can picture you as a little girl with yellow thumbs, LOL.. ;) :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on June 25, 2007, 05:18:59 AM
Katiebre's mustard story reminds me of the first time I went to England and ordered a ploughman's lunch at a pub. Being used to the tame American stuff in a squeeze bottle, I slathered mustard on a piece of bread with cheese and took a bite. I understood then what breathing mustard gas might have felt like during WWI. I couldn't talk for 10 minutes!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 25, 2007, 05:35:52 AM
^^^ lol! yes it can take your breath away for sure!! i did that with an eggroll and some of that super hot chinese yellow mustard a few times! :D  gosh, mustard is great, isn't it? i love that gooey sweet-hot mustard, on sandwiches...

ok, here's that summertime beetz-pacho recipe:


chilled beet and cucumber soup

8 medium beets, trimmed and washed
1 tbs butter
1 large spanish onion, chopped fine
1 large carrot, peeled and chopped fine
1 tbs sugar
3 tbs red wine vinegar
4 cups vegetable (or chicken) broth
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

1  unwaxed "english" cucumber, grated
1 1/2 cup sour cream or plain yogurt
3 tbs fresh dill, chopped fine
2 tbs chives, chopped fine


preheat oven to 375F. roast beets in covered roasting pan for approx 1 hour, until tender when pierced with fork. let cool, then remove skins and cut in quarters. set aside.

melt butter in large saute pan over medium heat. add onions and carrots and saute until onions are translucent. add beets, sugar, and stock. simmer for 20 minutes, remove from heat and let cool for 20 minutes.

place beet mixture and vinegar in food processor or blender and puree in batches. or use a hand blender. add salt and pepper to taste. pour into a pitcher and CHILL. 

when ready to serve, stir in sour cream (or yogurt), chives, dill, and the grated cucumber.


---> i bet this is good with toasted garlicky baguette rounds topped with a smear of fresh basil-infused goat cheese!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nax on June 25, 2007, 05:51:56 AM
When are we going to start the BBM recipie book?  There's enough material in here to do one!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on June 25, 2007, 05:54:10 AM
that's hilarious about your mom's thumb sucking therapy!! i can picture you as a little girl with yellow thumbs, LOL.. ;) :D

Well, she didn't use that therapy, knowing how much her little girl loved mustard, and that it would have meant I'd never have taken that thumb out of my mouth again! Anyway, seems like I got over the habit eventually as I'm "clean" today  ;)


Beetroot risotto

250 g beetroot, cooked, peeled and diced (equivalent of 500 g fresh beetroot, according to the recipe book)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 small onion, chopped into very small pieces
350 g risotto rice
350 ml warm vegetable broth
salt, freshly ground pepper

a piece Parmesan cheese (not ground!)
sage leaves, chopped


Heat olive oil in a big saucepan and sauté the onion.
Add all of the rice, then add one ladle of vegetable broth, stir, and let the rice absorb the broth.
Add the diced beetroot, and some more broth.
Stir and let the rice absorb the broth, then by and by add more broth and let the rice absorb it until the rice is soft and cooked.
Add the sage leaves before serving.

Serve with Parmesan shavings.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on June 25, 2007, 06:00:32 AM
Katiebre's mustard story reminds me of the first time I went to England and ordered a ploughman's lunch at a pub. Being used to the tame American stuff in a squeeze bottle, I slathered mustard on a piece of bread with cheese and took a bite. I understood then what breathing mustard gas might have felt like during WWI. I couldn't talk for 10 minutes!

My sympathies!

I was telling in the diner the other day how in a Japanese restaurant I once mistook green wasabi for guacamole and took a biiiiiig bite!
That surely shut me up for a while  ;)

________

And now for something completely different:

I'd be interested in recipes involving sage as we have a massive sage bush in the garden and that beetroot risotto is about the only recipe I have for sage. My son loves sage and enjoys eating the leaves straight from the plant!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nax on June 25, 2007, 08:04:02 AM
there is a recipie in here for tomatoes with sage, I'll try to find it.

EDIT: here it is:-  http://www.davecullen.com/forum/index.php?topic=8751.msg218814#msg218814
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on June 25, 2007, 08:13:06 AM
Bist ein Schatz!

When it says "two cans of white beans" - would that be baked beans or just plain white beans?
(Which I would not normally use out of a can but soak them myself, but it should be manageable figuring out the right amount...)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nax on June 25, 2007, 08:29:13 AM
Bist ein Schatz!

When it says "two cans of white beans" - would that be baked beans or just plain white beans?
(Which I would not normally use out of a can but soak them myself, but it should be manageable figuring out the right amount...)
Canned bean not baked beans. Pinto or flageletti (or something like that) would be fine, canned in brine not a sauce - or soak your own.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Nax on June 25, 2007, 08:29:59 AM
A nice thing to do with sage leaves is simply dip them in batter and fry them  ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on June 25, 2007, 08:41:06 AM
Canned bean not baked beans. Pinto or flageletti (or something like that) would be fine, canned in brine not a sauce - or soak your own.

OK, thanks, just checking!

A nice thing to do with sage leaves is simply dip them in batter and fry them  ;)

I think I gained a kilo just by reading this!  ::)
(I don't normally fry battered things but google seems to be giving many hits for batter recipes, so that should be fine.)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 25, 2007, 05:55:26 PM
thanks for the risotto recipe, it sounds easy and good! i may have posted a recipe for brussels sprouts earlier,,, fresh sprouts steamed a bit, then browned in butter/olive oil, crushed garlic and fresh sage. it's very simple.

i found this side dish at allrecipes.com and it sounds pretty good.. a little rich, but it has mushrooms!! it calls for dried sage but you could certainly use fresh sage. just use less, or dry what you have growing, perhaps.

CREAMED ONIONS with SAGE  "Tender, sweet, creamy onions fragrant with the scent and taste of sage."

24 small onions
10 fresh mushrooms, sliced
4 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2 cups whole milk (or half & half)
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons dried sage
2 teaspoons lemon zest
2 teaspoons lemon juice
4 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
2 pinches paprika

Peel onions a trim slightly at the top and bottom. Boil the onions gently in salted water until tender (about 30 minutes). Drain, set aside.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Butter one shallow baking dish.

In a medium pan, saute the sliced mushrooms in the butter. Stir in the flour. Stir in the milk, salt, sage, 1/2 of the lemon peel and all of the lemon juice. Cook, stirring over medium heat until sauce thickens.

Place the cooked onions in the prepared baking dish and pour the mushroom sauce over them. Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for about 20 minutes. Sprinkle the top with the chopped parsley, remaining lemon peel and paprika to taste.

(serves six)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on June 26, 2007, 05:43:38 AM
thanks for the risotto recipe, it sounds easy and good! i may have posted a recipe for brussels sprouts earlier,,, fresh sprouts steamed a bit, then browned in butter/olive oil, crushed garlic and fresh sage. it's very simple.

Seems an unusual combination but I'm going to try it!

CREAMED ONIONS with SAGE  "Tender, sweet, creamy onions fragrant with the scent and taste of sage."

I'm not a great fan of onions, but I suppose they get milder when cooked?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 26, 2007, 06:22:31 AM
^^^  put some mustard in with it, you'll love it! :D ;)

seriously ---- yes, onions can be quite sweet when cooked -- especially the ones that are "sweeter" to begin with, like those vidalia onions. i think there's a sweet hawaiian onion at the markets, too.... i'm a big fan of red onions tho,,, and use them often, either raw or cooked.

::burp::   i just had a quesadilla sprinkled with onions and cilantro,, and some tomatillo salsa. i know lots of people hate cilantro, but to me it's one of life's great food pleasures!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on June 26, 2007, 07:04:05 AM
i know lots of people hate cilantro, but to me it's one of life's great food pleasures!

Yes!

Funny - I had a liberal helping of dried coriander leaves in my salad today  :D

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 26, 2007, 07:27:21 AM
there is a recipie in here for tomatoes with sage, I'll try to find it.

EDIT: here it is:-  http://www.davecullen.com/forum/index.php?topic=8751.msg218814#msg218814

aaah, laurentia's fancy tomato beans recipe!!

(i can see ennis preparing this.. and jack eating it!)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on June 26, 2007, 07:40:59 AM
Pork chops smothered in onions & sage

Pork chops
olive oil
a skillet
several onions, peeled, halved & sliced
dried & fresh sage
some dry white wine


Rub the pork chops with salt, pepper and some dried sage

Sauté them in olive oil until cooked through. Remove to a plate.

Sauté the onions in the fat until good and soft. Add a couple of glugs of wine, salt & pepper and some chopped fresh sage, bring to a boil and let it reduce a little. Then put the chops back in the pan, cover them with the onions and let heat through for another 5 minutes.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 26, 2007, 08:55:35 AM
^^^ i love the simplicity of your recipe, and i love your icon!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on June 26, 2007, 09:02:23 AM
Speaking of tomatoes:

Has anyone come a cross a "tomatoe bread pudding" recipe, or have one.

Casserole style, with bread, tomatoes, onion, brown sugar and crushed red pepper flakes.  Baked till its all carmelized.  Food for the gods, if you ask me.


Had a recipe, but can't find it.   Help.....
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on June 26, 2007, 09:39:10 AM
I just googled "tomato bread pudding" and it gave a lot of results so you should try that and see if the version you had in mind is there. If you find it, post it or post the link because it sounds fantastic. Another one for the implausible-but-good recipe list.  :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on June 26, 2007, 09:48:45 AM
Thanks, I'll do that.  Duh????
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 26, 2007, 12:00:27 PM
this baked dish has tomatoes and breadcrumbs and sugar... from a clipping i've had for 10 years! you could certainly add red pepper flakes or onions. ;)  it's robust and intense, with great flavor. you could scatter nasturtium petals on top too, for color and a slightly peppery flavor.


(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/tomatoes_provencale.jpg)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on June 27, 2007, 07:41:42 AM
Thanks,

Tomatoe dishes such as this are indeed robust and intense.  I went thru all my clippings and cookbooks last night and found my
recipie.  I'll post it tonight maybe I'll even make it this weekend, it a great dish for the fall or winter.  This one works best with good italian canned tomatoes.

btw, fresh tomatoes are now in our farmers market,  sprinkled with salt pepper a bit of olive oil and fresh basil Mmmmmmmm.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: maturben on June 27, 2007, 09:03:48 AM
howdy, folks----I tend to lurk here and decided to comment:

         the Walla Walla onions from Washington state are also a very nice sweet onion (I will even eat those those raw (as I will Vidalia from Georgia); generally speaking raw onions and I don't get along----agita, dyspepsia

and I saw Brussles sprouts mentioned----nutmeg!  also great in dishes with mushrooms or spinach, but don't over do it

bob
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on June 27, 2007, 09:28:21 AM
bob:

I do my creamed spinach with frozen spinach and then do a white sauce -- nutmeg yes, but very very easy on it. Mmmmmm.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: PatSinnott on June 27, 2007, 03:18:54 PM
Speaking of tomatoes:

Has anyone come a cross a "tomatoe bread pudding" recipe, or have one.

Casserole style, with bread, tomatoes, onion, brown sugar and crushed red pepper flakes.  Baked till its all carmelized.  Food for the gods, if you ask me.


Had a recipe, but can't find it.   Help.....

Here's one I posted back around Christmas:

Tomato Pudding
5 cups (1-inch) cubes country style bread (discard crust)
1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter, melted
1 (14 1/2 oz) can whole tomatoes in juice
2/3 cup water
1/2 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1 tablespoon tomato paste
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sauce such as Tabasco
Put oven rack in middle of oven and preheat to 400.
Toss bread cubes with butter in a 13 x 9" baking dish.
Puree tomatoes with juice in a blender 5 seconds, then transfer to a small saucepan along with water, brown sugar, tomato paste, salt, and hot sauce.  Bring mixture just to a simmer, then pour over  bread, stirring to combine.  Bake, uncovered, until edges are beginning to caramelize...35 - 40 minutes.  Cut into squares and serve as side vegetable.

I haven't made this, it was sent to me by a friend....
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on June 27, 2007, 10:17:49 PM
OK, as promised, here it is.  I suggest you adjust the sugar and/or red pepper flakes to your liking.  But it should have a bit of kick.

Dean’s Escalloped Tomatoes

4 Servings

1   29 oz, can whole tomatoes (3 ½ cups)
1   Medium onion, rough chopped
6   Slices DRY white bread, break up in chunks
½ c   Sugar – can add more to taste
1 stick   Butter, melted
1 t   Red pepper flakes
   Salt to taste – takes more than you think.
   Pepper

Preheat oven to 350F.  In large bowl, add to bread chunks:  Onion, tomatoes, sugar, red pepper flakes, salt and pepper.  Drizzle 3 T of melted butter.  Mix all ingredients carefully.  Put in 8x8 Pyrex that has been sprayed with Pam.  Drizzle remaining butter over top.

Bake approximately 1 hour.  Should be thick and crusty on top.  Look for dark carmelization.  Do not use too deep of a baking dish as you want as much of the ingredients exposed to the heat.

Seasoned and sweetened properly this should cause one to perspire under the eyes while making a perfect glutton of oneself!

Cross Creek belongs to the wind and the rain, to the sun and the seasons, to the cosmic secrecy of seed, and beyond all, to time. ~~ Cross Creek, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

d


Transcribed from a hand-written recipe from Dean a good friend from Florida.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 28, 2007, 02:58:28 AM
well, aren't we all masculine with our robust, red-peppery tomato casseroles!! ;) :D ;D  ...tomatoes and bread crumbs... it's a good thing.

nutmeg is great -- with carrot soup it's nice to have an actual nutmeg on hand to grate over the bowl. and pastistio, the greek "lasagne" with white sauce, is nothing without nutmeg! :)  i found this online but it sounds very authentic, because of the cheese. some recipes call for italian cheeses.. wtf?  ;)

PASTISTIO

For Meat filling:
3 tbsp butter
2 large onions, chopped fine
2 lbs ground lamb
4 tbsp tomato paste
1 cup dry red wine
1 tsp cinnnamon
1/2 tsp pepper
1 tbsp salt

for Macaroni:
1 lb elbow macaroni
1 1/2 tsp olive oil

For White sauce:
6 cups milk
1 cup butter
1/2 cup flour
generous pinch nutmeg  :D

To finish:
1/2 cup breadcrumbs
3 cups grated kefalotyri (a hard greek cheese)
6 eggs
3 tbsp butter

In large skillet, melt butter, cook onions until soft, not brown, about 10 minutes. Add meat, stirring until brown. Add tomato paste, wine, cinnamon, salt and pepper. Turn down heat, cook uncovered, stirring occcasionally for about 1 hour.

Boil the macaroni in salted water with the oil until al dente. Drain.

For the sauce:  Heat the milk until scalding. Remove from heat. In large casserole over low heat, melt butter, sift the flour into buttter and stir constantly for five minutes. Slowly whisk in hot milk and add nutmeg, stir until thickened. Remove from heat and let cool.

Preheat oven to 350 F. Butter a large baking dish ( I use a very large rectangular corning ware -- a glass 9 x 13 is too small). Stir 1/4 cup breadcrumbs and 1 1/2 cups cheese into the meat. Sprinkle bottom of baking dish with 2 tbsp breadcrumbs. Spread 1/2 of macaroni on bottom of dish. Cover with 1/2 cup of cheese. Spread all the meat filling over this.

Beat 1/2 cup of the cooled sauce into the eggs. Stir back into the rest of the white sauce. Stir in 1/2 cup cheese.

Pour half the sauce over the meat and smooth with a rubber spatula, top with remaining macaroni and 1/4 cup cheese.
Add remaining sauce smooth over and sprinkle with remaining breadcrumbs and cheese. Dot with butter.

Bake for 50 minutes or until the top is golden brown. Let sit for 15 minutes. Cut in squares. Serves 12.

      OPA!!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on June 28, 2007, 03:08:50 AM
i know lots of people hate cilantro, but to me it's one of life's great food pleasures!

Then you should like this:

(http://img329.imageshack.us/img329/2429/blackenedchickengx6.jpg)

(Sorry for the tattered image - but that saves me a lot of typing!)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 28, 2007, 05:48:17 AM
katie, the blackened chicken pasta sounds wonderful, and totally easy to prepare... i'm a sucker for cream sauces on pasta!

blackened chicken... LOL.. i'll never forget the first time i went out on a date with this guy -- he wanted to impress me and took us to a swank restaurant in SF. he ordered some blackened salmon with cajun spices. when his dish arrived, he complained that it was BURNT. lol. the waiter tried to explain the process to my friend, to no avail... we ended up switching entrees with each other. :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on June 28, 2007, 06:34:47 AM
I should have mentioned with the recipe above that "a handful" of fresh coriander leaves is way not enough (at least not with my hand size  ;)), when we were served this dish at the house of friends it was rather a half-inch solid layer of green leaves on the top!  *yummy*
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 28, 2007, 07:48:03 AM
^^^ sounds good to me!  i also love parsley, and green onions for that matter. green. it's a good thing, lol. :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on June 28, 2007, 09:48:14 AM
katie, the blackened chicken pasta sounds wonderful, and totally easy to prepare... i'm a sucker for cream sauces on pasta!

blackened chicken... LOL.. i'll never forget the first time i went out on a date with this guy -- he wanted to impress me and took us to a swank restaurant in SF. he ordered some blackened salmon with cajun spices. when his dish arrived, he complained that it was BURNT. lol. the waiter tried to explain the process to my friend, to no avail... we ended up switching entrees with each other. :D

I presume there was no second date, Jimmy!  :D

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 28, 2007, 12:25:04 PM
LOL fritz!  we became good friends after that, and he sharpened his culinary tastes, too. :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: maturben on June 28, 2007, 01:00:53 PM
jimmy---speaking of carrot soup----have you tried/made carrot orange soup and speaking of oranges---orange tomato soup----either one can be served hot or cold

bob
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on June 28, 2007, 01:24:07 PM
jimmy---speaking of carrot soup----have you tried/made carrot orange soup ...

... which is nicely seasoned with ground coriander!

(seems to be coriander week  :D)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 28, 2007, 01:51:33 PM
i've had carrot orange JUICE! and other things... but not a soup... what do you do, just add some OJ to sweeten and add tartness? i bet blood oranges would work nicely!

katie, i'm smililng my mom always calls it "coriander" but living in LA i got so used to "cilantro".  :)

my hamster loves coriander, btw!  :D  (no citrus for the hammies)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on June 28, 2007, 02:03:06 PM
i've had carrot orange JUICE! and other things... but not a soup... what do you do, just add some OJ to sweeten and add tartness? i bet blood oranges would work nicely!

katie, i'm smililng my mom always calls it "coriander" but living in LA i got so used to "cilantro".  :)

So at least you know what I'm talking about  ;)

For making that soup I'd gently fry some onions (or do without  ;)), then add carrot pieces and boil them in vegetable broth.
When they are cooked, go in with the blender.
Then season with salt, perhaps white pepper, OJ and ground coriander.
                                                                                         ^^^ But you wouldn't say "ground cilantro", would you?

We once got the Internationalist cookbook (most interesting!) as a gift from friends, and if it wasn't for that I'd have no clue what cilantro means. It's from that book that I learnt that it's the same as coriander leaves.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: PatSinnott on June 28, 2007, 02:42:32 PM
What with the cold, rainy weather (and the need to, ahem, recover from the treats of holiday season) anybody have some favorite soup recipes?

(If I missed ones already here in the thread, could you point me to which pages?)

Thanks!
I made this one for Christmas, and liked it. 

Cream of Carrot Soup

1/4 cup butter
5 medium carrots, peeled and chopped
1 onion finely chopped
4 cups chicken stock or broth
1/2 cup rice
1 cup half and half

Melt butter in large saucepan. Add carrots, onion and salt. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes, giving mixture a stir twice.  Add chicken stock and rice.
Simmer, covered, for 45 minutes until carrots are very tender.  Blend in a blender.  (Careful not to put too much in the blender as I blew the top off, it took two batches and I had to put the blended soup into a clean pot.)
Reheat, adding half and half and serve.  Makes 1 1/2 quarts about 6 servings.

Only comment, it was too creamy for my taste.  Next time I'm going to cut down on the half and half to 3/4 cup.
Now the bad news:  PER SERVING
Calories - 277
Fat - 14g (8g sat)
Cholesterol - 40mg
Sodium - 721mg
Protein - 8g



This is a great tasting soup....
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: maturben on June 28, 2007, 05:04:39 PM
re carrot orange soup----just something I improvised from stuff in the refrig e.g. left over cooked carrots, canned mandarin oranges (with juice), chix broth----threw everthing into the blender, whirred it up; and then put into pot on stove, heated it up added a dollop of sour cream (plain yogurt would work) little s & p, dash cinnamon----voila!!  first course for supper

since there was a bit left over which I refridgerated and had the next day for lunch the  realized that the soup was good hot or cold---have seved it both ways since

have not tried adding coriander or cilantro (the tastes of which are quite different imho) but will

the tomato orange soup is soooo easy----Campbells tomato soup thinned with OJ (fresh, frozen) basil

need to try both with blood orange

bob
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 28, 2007, 10:51:25 PM
bob, i love your cooking style! freestyle men's kitchen inprovisational gymnastics, haha. i'm much the same way, eyeballing measurements and all that. maybe that's why i never liked baking bread or pastries, because of the exacting ingredients.

hmm, i thought coriander and cilantro were the same thing... you know, like ketchup and katsup,, hehe.

i'm craving dill. i could go for some poached salmon with dill, green beans, and some quinoa salad.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on June 29, 2007, 02:26:21 AM
hmm, i thought coriander and cilantro were the same thing... you know, like ketchup and katsup,, hehe.

For all I know, they are.
In that cookbook I mentioned they were given as synonyms, and according to Wikipedia they are the same, too:
"The leaves are variously referred to as coriander leaves, cilantro (in the United States, from the Spanish name for the plant), dhania (in the Indian subcontinent, and increasingly in Britain), Chinese parsley or Mexican parsley."
When you enter "cilantro" you are actually redirected to the page for coriander.

Ground coriander is made from the ground fruits of the plant, so there's obviously some difference there: It's from the same plant but a different part of it.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 29, 2007, 03:23:48 AM
http://www.ihatecilantro.com/          ;D

maybe there's an ihatecoriander wesbsite too... ::) 

i used to go to a mexican restaurant in northern california, and there by there exit door was a small mirror that said "coriander check" on the frame.. :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 29, 2007, 03:41:21 AM
okay enough of the cilantro bashing. so what if julia childs didn't like it. she didn't like arugula either!  hmm... arugula? ...yes, aren't you?


Cilantro Lime Dressing

1 cup packed cilantro
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup lime juice
1/4 cup orange juice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
Pinch of minced garlic

Puree cilantro, olive oil, lime juice, orange juice, salt, pepper and garlic in a blender or food processor until smooth.


--------------------


apparently, it's also effective in removing toxic metals from the body.. got mercury?

http://www.newmediaexplorer.org/chris/2006/02/19/cilantro_chelation_that_can_save_your_life.htm

plants hold the secret to good health!  ...that link has recipes for that cilantro pesto made with almonds, another healthful food.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: maturben on June 29, 2007, 06:28:54 AM
re coriander/cilantro---same plant but different in taste cf. nutmeg and mace

love baking bread as kneading dough can be a great stress releaver (perhaps caused by having to be more exact in measuring?)

OT--"freestyle---improvisational gymnastics---eyeballing measurements"---hmmm---could also be applied to one's sex life :o ::) :-* >:D

bob
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 29, 2007, 07:28:32 AM
OT--"freestyle---improvisational gymnastics---eyeballing measurements"---hmmm---could also be applied to one's sex life :o ::) :-* >:D

bob

...you know, we never did get to mince together in auntie's kitchen last year!! :D ;) ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: maturben on June 29, 2007, 07:52:28 AM
re mincing---you're right we didn't, but we did sorta prance around a shopping mall

who knows but we may get a chance again as I am giving thought to visiting Linda (not sure when exactly and I haven't actually mentioned it to her; she does seem to be booked up)

later,
bob
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 29, 2007, 03:26:04 PM
^^^ well, she allows mincing, that's for sure.. :D ;) ;D  and that city is certainly a destination spot!!

speaking of mincing, i just got a white kyocera ceramic knife the other day and i can't tell you how weird it is to use because it looks like white plastic tableware! i'm still not used to seeing this bright white knife in the kitchen, but using it is a joy. they make black ceramic knives too, but i wonder why they won't make them in other colors,,, wouldn't mind cutting yellowfin tuna with a purple blade, hahaha. here's a web pic i found:

(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/tuna2.jpg)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on July 19, 2007, 10:32:29 AM
Wasn't someone after recipes using sage a while back? Was visiting friends in Italy earlier this month and one night we had tortellini served with sage butter -- so simple and just right with ham-filled pasta. Just melt some butter and chopped fresh sage in a pan and then swish the cooked pasta around in it and serve.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: killersmom on July 19, 2007, 01:46:46 PM
As I was culling my outbox, ran across this recipe. I know it is not healthy, but oh so good.
Makes very few cookies, so just increase the measurements.

Double Chocolate Cherry Cookies

1/4 cup butter, softened
6 TBLS sugar
2 TBLS beaten egg
4 tsp milk
1/4 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 cup all purpose flour
3 TBLS baking cocoa
1/8 tsp baking soda
1.8 tsp salt
1/2 cup semisweet chocolate chunks
1/4 cup dried cherries

In a small mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar. Beat in egg, milk and vanilla.
Combine the flour, coca, baking soda and salt; add to creamed mixture and mix well.
Stir in chocolate and cherries.

Drop by rounded TBLS  2 inches  apart onto baking sheets lightly coated with nonstick cooking spray.
Bake at 350o for 12-14 minutes or until firm. Cool for 1 minute before removing to a wire rack.
Yield 10 cookies
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: killersmom on July 19, 2007, 02:07:18 PM
Here is my recipe for Hot German Potato Salad. It has been a hit for as long as I have been cooking (and that has been a long time  :P ) and with just about anyone I serve it to. I cook it in a pressure cooker, but it can also be done in the oven.

GERMAN POTATO SALAD

6 slices bacon, diced (reserve the bacon pieces)
6 medium to large potatoes, diced
1 large onion, diced
2 Tablespoons sugar
1 Tablespoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon prepared yellow mustard
1/2 teaspoon celery seed
1/3 cup vinegar

Brown bacon, drain

In the bacon drippings, combine all of the ingredients except for the potatoes. Mix well.
Toss potatoes in the mixture, making sure the potatoes are mixed well.

Cook for 5 minutes in a pressure cooker after the pressure regulator starts rocking slowly. Cool cooker at once.

If cooking in an oven, cook in a covered dish, preferably a big enough one in which the potatoes are in one layer. Cook at 350o for 45 minutes. Uncover and cook 10 minutes more or until the top is browned a little.
Mix potatoes and serve warm. Sprinkle the bacon pieces over it right before serving.



Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on July 19, 2007, 04:38:50 PM
As I was culling my outbox, ran across this recipe. I know it is not healthy, but oh so good.
Makes very few cookies, so just increase the measurements.

Double Chocolate Cherry Cookies

1/4 cup butter, softened
6 TBLS sugar
2 TBLS beaten egg
4 tsp milk
1/4 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 cup all purpose flour
3 TBLS baking cocoa
1/8 tsp baking soda
1.8 tsp salt
1/2 cup semisweet chocolate chunks
1/4 cup dried cherries

In a small mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar. Beat in egg, milk and vanilla.
Combine the flour, coca, baking soda and salt; add to creamed mixture and mix well.
Stir in chocolate and cherries.

Drop by rounded TBLS  2 inches  apart onto baking sheets lightly coated with nonstick cooking spray.
Bake at 350o for 12-14 minutes or until firm. Cool for 1 minute before removing to a wire rack.
Yield 10 cookies

Yum! Makes a whole bunch if cookies if you're serving to friends or two big ones if you're stuffing yourself.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: killersmom on July 19, 2007, 06:00:31 PM
LOL Fritz  :-* :-*
Had not thought of that, but a very good idea!!!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on July 26, 2007, 04:23:08 AM
yummmmmy german potato salad! so good with grilled brats~!!  with swiss cheese! on a french roll! :D

those cookies DO sound sinful! the cherries, dried, must really add a new dimension..

okay here's what i've been buying at the dollar store:  orange "cheddar" cauliflower!  (http://www.parkseed.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/StoreCatalogDisplay?storeId=10101&catalogId=10101&langId=-1&mainPage=prod2working&ItemId=5085&PrevMainPage=advsearchresults&scChannel=Vegetables%20AS&SearchText=p16.v231;s1.Cauliflower&OfferCode=TH1)

(http://www.parkseed.com/product_images/5085.jpg)

they contain 25 times more beta carotene than white varieties, and i don't know if it's just my imagination but it seems to taste better. sweeter? this would be good prepared with the roasted curry recipe posted earlier in this thread (it already looks tinted by tumeric), but i've just been steaming it (avoiding firing up the oven in our hot LA summer), tossing it in some butter, seasoned salt and cracked pepper.

i bet this would make an interesting cauliflower soup with that vivid color.

here's wikipedia's cauliflower page.  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cauliflower)interesting info, plus the purple and green varieties.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on July 28, 2007, 12:41:19 AM
LOL -- i just found the easiest recipe in the world on about.com... as long as you have a juicer. the clean up would be more difficult!



Raw Vegan Banana Ice Cream Sorbet Recipe

You absolutely won't believe just how easy, and how tasty, this recipe is. As an added bonus, banana sorbet is a raw and living foods recipe, suitable for those following a raw foods diet.

INGREDIENTS:

Frozen bananas  (peel the bananas before freezing)


PREPARATION:

Push frozen bananas through juicer.



Thats it! Depending on what kind of juicer you have, the resulting sorbet may not come out the spout like juice does but will collect inside near the blade. If this happens, simply scrape the sorbet off the blade after every banana or two. Enjoy immediately or freeze for later, since your banana sorbet will melt quickly!



it was this,,,, or bananas foster.  :D ;)

i bet this would be yummy topped with toasted walnuts and a sprinkle of grated nutmeg.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on August 06, 2007, 03:57:19 AM
here's a recipe that is easy, and healthful. my bf is on his veggie kick again, but is including fish -- so we have to find things to satisfy his needs... :D



grilled squid (or shrimp) with bean salad

3 cups cooked white beans (i use two cans of cannellini)
1 cup diced celery
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup chopped fresh italian parsley, plus a few celery leaves
olive oil
fresh lemon juice
salt

1lb cleaned squid (or shrimp)
1/4 tsp smoked paprika, or paprika

rinse beans, drain, toss together with the celery, garlic and parsley. add 3 tablespoons of olive oil and 2 tablespoons of lemon juice, add salt to taste.

cut squid bodies open then cut into long rectangles about 1/2" wide, cutting the tails in half. thread the rectangle and tails onto skewers. season squid with some salt. prepare a very hot grill, rubbing grill surface with olive oil to avoid sticking (grill should be very clean). before grilling, brush squid with olive oil, and cook without moving them around, about 1 minute, then turn over and grill other side. grill until just firm, do not overcook!

(if cooking shrimp, peel and de-vein shrimp, and cook as you would the squid, but a little bit longer.)

arrange beans in large bowl, sprinkle with paprika, then place grilled squid on top. squeeze some lemon juice on top of everything and serve immediately.



Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on August 15, 2007, 06:23:23 AM
Hmm, I hadn't watched this thread for a while and it's nice to see there's new stuff come in.

German potato salad - doesn't sound like anything I've come across here but what the heck - it sounds delicious!
I can look up my mum's recipe for potato salad. It's a cold salad, but extremely delicious and without mayonnaise.

I was planning to post 3 recipes, one of which I will have to look up ...some time later ("Mushrooms oregano").

Veggies & fish - one recipe that I was going to post fits this description perfectly. It is very simple and surprisingly delicious every time, it is my son's favourite dish (apart from pasta without sauce...), and it is in fact filling up my stomach right now!


Swedish Summer Soup

3 medium sized potatoes --> peel and dice
1 leek --> cut in slices and wash thoroughly
200 g fillet of a white fish (I use pollock) --> dice
100 ml cream
750-1000 ml hot vegetable broth
salt, pepper
a handful of chopped parsley
oil/butter

Heat the butter in a large saucepan and add the leeks.
Gently fry them for a couple of minutes, then add the potatoes.
Cover with vegetable broth and let simmer for about 10 minutes or until the veggies are cooked (sooner rather than later).
Puree with an immersion blender (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immersion_blender), then season with salt and pepper.
Turn down the heat to a minimum, throw in the fish and leave for 5 minutes.
Stir in the cream and serve with parsley sprinkled on top.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on August 15, 2007, 06:28:02 AM

Spaghetti with spinach and feta cheese

Spaghetti (or any other type of pasta you like)  (you all know what to do with them and when so I won't mention them in the recipe  ;))
deep frozen pureed spinach, thawed (of course you can work with fresh spinach leaves, but this is a lot easier!)
garlic, chopped
onions, chopped
rosemary, chopped
feta cheese, diced
salt, pepper
olive oil


Heat the olive oil and add the chopped garlic, onion and the chopped rosemary leaves.
After a few minutes add the thawed spinach, mix, let it heat through.
Season with salt and pepper.

For serving: Put pasta on plate, add spinach sauce on top and serve with feta pieces sprinkled on top.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on August 15, 2007, 11:39:26 AM
About this potato salad...

Most German (cold) potato salads are dressed with mayonnaise, and often they contain hard-boiled eggs (brrrrr - hard-boiled eggs are one of the very few things I won't eat!). My mum's version is very different - savoury, refreshing and of course absolutely delicious!


Potato salad

- Cook some firm potatoes in their skins until they are well done. Using firm potatoes is absolutely essential as otherwise you will end up with a mushy heap instead of potato salad!
- Cool down the potatoes with cold water and peel them while they are still warm.
- Cut them in slices and put them in a salad bowl.
  Don't cut up all potatoes straight away, but after each batch pour some warm vegetable broth over them and let them soak it up.
  Add potatoes and broth little by little. Don't use too much broth, don't let it float!
- Finally season with salt and pepper and vinegar. Be careful with the salt, as the vegetable broth will already contain some.
- Add onions, pickled gherkins and tomatoes - all chopped.

Guten Appetit!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on August 15, 2007, 11:43:34 AM
Another one of my favourites!
It is in a herbs cook book that I bought in California and that I always associate with that trip, even though the book is actually English.


Mushrooms Oregano

This dish makes a lovely starter, snack or side dish and can be eaten warm or cold.

2 tbsp olive oil
500 g (1 lb) small button mushrooms
2 teaspoons salt
2 garlic cloves, chopped
1 tbsp fresh oregano leaves
juice of half a lemon
pepper

Heat the oil in a pan and add the mushrooms.
Cook for a minute, then add the salt.
Cook, stirring, for 5 minutes then add the garlic, oregano, lemon juice and pepper.
Mix well.
Remove from heat as soon as the mushrooms soften.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on August 15, 2007, 04:06:17 PM
Hmm, I hadn't watched this thread for a while and it's nice to see there's new stuff come in.

German potato salad - doesn't sound like anything I've come across here but what the heck - it sounds delicious!
I can look up my mum's recipe for potato salad. It's a cold salad, but extremely delicious and without mayonnaise.

*snip*

German potato salad here is like German chocolate cake. You'll never see or taste the like in Germany!  :D

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on August 16, 2007, 08:22:46 AM
German potato salad here is like German chocolate cake. You'll never see or taste the like in Germany!  :D

What an excellent reason to visit the States then, to get to know some German cuisine  ;)

But I will certainly try Linda's recipe (you remember, anything involving mustard is too appealing!).
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on August 16, 2007, 10:10:29 PM
wow, you're kidding about the german potato salad! there's not a german recipe with bacon and onion in a sort of vinegary dressing? i thought it was from the "old country!" even the german deli here sells their version of this side dish. my favorite was at bender's brat haus, where a grilled bratwurst was always *so* much better with a side of their warm potato salad.

but your mom's recipe sounds really good, katie! low fat, too, so that's nice. all of the recipes are appealing, not only for taste but simplicity. the swedish summer soup is something i could go for right now. i'm freezing my buns off in san francisco, LOL. and a hot creamy soup sounds delish.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on August 17, 2007, 01:54:23 AM
That potato salad is very intriguing, Katie. When you say "use firm potatoes" do you mean don't cook them until they are completely done, so they can absorb some liquid? Or is there a variety of potato one shouldn't use? (I'm guessing what Americans call baking potatoes and the Brits jacket potatoes...)

I wonder if it's called "German" potato salad in America on account of the Amish and Mennonites who are of German stock. Maybe they started making potato salad with mayo and all that once they were in the US so the rest of the population assumed it was a German dish.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on August 19, 2007, 09:44:17 AM
Hi guys, sorry for the delay in answering, I was out for a couple of days...  :D

wow, you're kidding about the german potato salad! there's not a german recipe with bacon and onion in a sort of vinegary dressing? i thought it was from the "old country!" even the german deli here sells their version of this side dish. my favorite was at bender's brat haus, where a grilled bratwurst was always *so* much better with a side of their warm potato salad.

The recipe doesn't really sound like anything I'm familiar with.
Just from reading it I would think of Bratkartoffeln (fried potatoes) or a potato bake.
Then again, I'm almost sure that every family in Germany has their own proven recipe for potato salad, so who knows....
But generally, we'd consider a salad a cold dish.

but your mom's recipe sounds really good, katie! low fat, too, so that's nice. all of the recipes are appealing, not only for taste but simplicity. the swedish summer soup is something i could go for right now. i'm freezing my buns off in san francisco, LOL. and a hot creamy soup sounds delish.

Yes, they are very simple. Just that potato salad does take some time, what with boiling the potatoes first and then slicing them damn hot things and letting them slowly soak up the vegetable broth.


That potato salad is very intriguing, Katie. When you say "use firm potatoes" do you mean don't cook them until they are completely done, so they can absorb some liquid? Or is there a variety of potato one shouldn't use? (I'm guessing what Americans call baking potatoes and the Brits jacket potatoes...)

No, you need to choose the right variety of potatoes.
There's firm potatoes and floury potatoes. If you peel them before you cook them it's rather easy to tell the difference: The firm ones will keep their shape and come out as the same yellow oval things that you started with (just cooked, of course!). The floury ones will tend to disintegrate and come out as a rather mushy affair.

For this salad it's absolutely essential to use firm potatoes.
When I first tried to do it on my own, still as a student, I had no concept of different types of potatoes and simply bought the first bag of potatoes that came along. When I then prepared the salad, poured broth over the potatoes and carefully mixed them, they disintegrated and the result looked more like creamed potatoes than a salad. (No idea what I did that night, since I had promised to bring a salad for a party...)

I found this description (http://www.agfpn.nl/agf?waxtrapp=mcdSsHknOlnOnHEuEvE) on floury and firm.
Surprisingly, most results that I find seem to be British, not American. Is this distinction not so common in the US? If it's any help, I would not buy potatoes for this salad that are described as fluffy or good for mashing. Rather those that are described as keeping their shape and being good for salads (see here (http://www.healthypotato.com/nutrition/varieties.asp)).

As for cooking them, they should be well cooked, so rather a little longer than usual (don't ask me why, that's what my mum said  ;)).
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on August 19, 2007, 09:48:52 AM
Jimmy, here's another absolutely simple dish involving fish and veggies.
I posted this on the BBM Lovesick Diet thread recently.

Steamed fish:

Get yourself a piece of fish fillet (I like to use pollock), of course fresh is a lot better than deep frozen. Sprinkle it with salt and some lemon juice.
Chop up some veggies, I recommend onions, carrots and celery sticks, but instead of the celery I am sure bell peppers or courgettes/zucchini would work well, too.
Put a little  oil in a frying pan (you need to have a lid for that pan!) and heat it up. Saute the veggies on moderate heat for about 5 minutes.
Season them with salt and pepper and spread them evenly in the pan.
On top, carefully place the fish.
Cover the pan with the lid, turn down the heat, and let the whole lot steam until the fish is done. (It will turn opaque on the outside, and you can check the inside by gently lifting the layers of fishmeat ( ???) with a knife).
Potatoes go well with that.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on August 22, 2007, 10:38:54 AM
ooh YUM ^^^   that fish recipe does sound super easy, and it's one that would work well in baked in parchment paper too, wrap everything up with butter or oil, herbs, etc. and let it steam for a bit!

yes what a difference a potato makes!

i prefer the firmer red potatoes for salads, or the yukon gold type. i recently boiled some (soft) potates in chicken stock with a spoonful of dried garlic flakes. the potatoes pretty much soaked up the stock,,, when done i mashed them up and added a touch of butter and some skim milk. mashed potatoes basically, but i didn't have to add salt and the garlic and stock gave it enough flavor that they didn't need a gravy.

of course i'm supposed to be avoiding white potatoes (empty calories) altogether and sticking with yams instead. one yam has more nutrition than 33 million white potatoes... or something like that ::) :D

the german potato salad i'm familiar with doesn't contain mayonnaise, it's in a sort of sweet and vinegary almost slippery dressing, you can serve it cold or at room temperature too. it's the bacon that makes it unique, i guess.

oh man, now i'm hungry again!!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 04, 2007, 02:41:47 AM
linda has plums from her backyard and asked me about a plum compote recipe. mine is simple -- plums, lemon juice, and raw sugar... but i went online and found a couple more that were nice too:

(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)Plum compote: plums cooked in a vanilla infused syrup

2 lbs. plums, pitted and cut in half or quarters depending on the size
10 Tablespoons superfine sugar
1 vanilla pod, split lengthwise
pinch of salt

Place the plums in a large bowl and sprinkle with the sugar. Toss gently to coat. Add a pinch of salt and the split vanilla pod and stir. Allow the fruit to rest at room temperature for 10 minutes. Place the fruit into a saucepan and cook over low heat for 30 minutes. Stir occasionally to prevent sticking.

Serving ideas:

• May be eaten plain, warm or cold.
• Serve with a mild farmer's or goat cheese.
• May be used as a filling for crepes.
• Use as a pastry filling. Using a refrigerated pie crust, cut a few 4-inch rounds from the crust. Place some of the plum compote on each round, fold over, seal and bake.
(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)


easy! and yummy too. it's also good over ice cream, or stirred into plain yogurt. i bet it's good with cottage cheese? (i love cottage cheese with fresh raspberries and honey.) compote. it's something nice to do when you have a boatload of plums and want to get rid of them before they get all soft and mushy.

oh -- here's a link to a page with a nice story, plus pics, and a yummy plum compote recipe (http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives/rosewater-plum-compote-recipe.html) using rose water.


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 04, 2007, 02:50:44 AM
...found this recipe via a friend's post on LJ. it sounds really yummy:


(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)Delicious Chickpea Curry

4 cups water
2 cubes vegetable bouillon
1 cup raisins
1/4 cup olive oil
2 onions, chopped
1 tablespoon minced garlic
2 tablespoons minced ginger

2 cinnamon sticks
6 whole cloves
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon ground turmeric
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon ground cumin

2 (19 ounce) cans garbanzo beans (chickpeas)
1 medium yam, peeled and diced
1 pear, peeled and cubed
salt to taste
1 cup chopped fresh cilantro


Place water, bouillon cubes, and raisins in a saucepan over high heat. Bring to a boil, and simmer until bouillon cubes dissolve. Meanwhile, heat olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, garlic, and ginger; cook and stir until the onion has softened and turned translucent, about 5 minutes. Add cinnamon sticks, cloves, cayenne, turmeric, coriander, and cumin; cook for about 3 minutes until fragrant, stirring constantly. Stir garbanzo beans, yams, and pear into onions; pour in hot vegetable stock and raisins. Bring to a simmer, then reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until the vegetables have softened and the sauce has thickened, about 1 hour. Season to taste with salt and stir in chopped cilantro before serving.
(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)


umm, to make things easier, you could probably use a good curry powder mix instead of all those spices (from cinnamon sticks to cumin) in the ingredients list...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 04, 2007, 03:12:57 AM

(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)one more thing ---

rose water & orange blossom water

 --- in the little bottles they sell at middle eastern markets... i add a splash of that to a pitcher of plain filtered water to make it a little more appealing. it's very refreshing and it a nice surprise when you want something to quench your thirst but don't want anything... um,,, caloric.

it's also good in recipes too, but i've never used it for that. and you can add a little to sweeten, or at least add fragrance, to your bath water... if you want.

 ;)
(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://market.treasureshidden.com/images/703176.jpg)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on September 04, 2007, 03:25:26 AM
I made a plum and blackberry crumble recently. Not enough flour left for the crumble so I substituted ginger snaps (the English kind, not the too-sweet American ones) whizzed to powder in the food processor. Came out great.

Another neat thing to do with blackberries is toss them with a fistful of rose geranium leaves (they smell like roses) and leave them overnight. The flavour is much subtler than adding rosewater.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on September 04, 2007, 03:27:36 AM
it's something nice to do when you have a boatload of plums and want to get rid of them before they get all soft and mushy.

Yeah, it's plum season!

I got a small load of plums from my neighbour a few weeks ago - I opened and pitted them and froze them, it yielded 1 kilo (2 lbs).
And a few days later my dear wonderful neighbour friend stood on my doorstep and gave me over 3 kilos of plums, all pitted and ready to use!!! Isn't she sweet??! I froze them, too.

I find that's ideal when you have so much of them and it takes the pressure off you to use and eat them straight away.

Another favourite is plum crumble (with vanilla ice, hmmmm!), and us Germans are terribly fond of plum cake (Zwetschgenkuchen). We put a layer of dough that's been prepared with yeast (similar to a pizza dough, but of course without olive oil - use butter instead - or salt) on a baking tray and cover it with halved plums, add some streusel if you like - yummy!!!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ChrisW on September 05, 2007, 03:56:46 AM

Another favourite is plum crumble (with vanilla ice, hmmmm!), and us Germans are terribly fond of plum cake (Zwetschgenkuchen). We put a layer of dough that's been prepared with yeast (similar to a pizza dough, but of course without olive oil - use butter instead - or salt) on a baking tray and cover it with halved plums, add some streusel if you like - yummy!!!
absolutely, I found a great recipe on Sunday
http://www.bernhards.at/recipes/plumtart.php
(http://i167.photobucket.com/albums/u143/chriswilson1_2007/100_7491.jpg)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on September 05, 2007, 06:11:51 AM
absolutely, I found a great recipe on Sunday
http://www.bernhards.at/recipes/plumtart.php

This looked and sounded so inspiring (because it's different from the yeast dough that we'd normally use) that I went downstairs, took some of my plums out of the freezer and started on that tart straight away. It looks lovely.

I like the photo - I take it that it is the tart you made?
What a charming idea to show us the photo!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on September 05, 2007, 07:01:36 AM
^^^ i'll answer that, katiebre --- yes that's her tart!!  the photo is deceiving, it's really giant sized! it almost looks like a plum pizza :D :D

how cool we're all enjoying the plums of the season... they're up there with apricots for me, not only in flavor but for their exquisite form! i find them to be quite erotic, heehee.. i like how they hang from trees in twos, and their range of color is amazing. i love the deep purple plums with the white layer that mattes them out so beautifully. springtime plum blossoms are pretty too, and a short glass of japanese plum wine, well chilled, is a real treat.

check out this interesting recipe with fantastic photos. the pan he uses for browning the breadcrumbs is great -- gotta love a well-used pan!!

My Boyhood's Hungarian Plum Dumplings (http://fxcuisine.com/default.asp?Display=21)

szilvás gombóc.  what a name and what a combination: potatoes and plums... who knew?  ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on September 05, 2007, 08:17:04 AM
^^^ i'll answer that, katiebre --- yes that's her tart!!  the photo is deceiving, it's really giant sized! it almost looks like a plum pizza :D :D

It does look big even in the photo. After all we've got the A4 sheet as a size reference.

(All this talk about tarts reminds me of a story one of our English lecturers at college once told us: He had once had a Japanese student who was very interested in learning idiomatic expressions. One of those expressions was "he's got a finger in every pie". Well, the poor man got mixed up and later said "he's got a finger in every tart"  ;D)

szilvás gombóc.  what a name and what a combination: potatoes and plums... who knew?  ;)

Sounds delicious. Very high in carbohydrates, though.
But potatotes and plums are combined in some parts of Southern Germany as well, where potato soup and plum tart (with yeast dough, of course) go together. And that's not having the cake as dessert, but as a side dish while eating the soup. Personally, I find the idea quite revolting.

And now I'm waiting for my man to come home, to greet him with the fresh tart cake, after he passed his big final exams today!  :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on September 05, 2007, 09:04:11 AM

My Boyhood's Hungarian Plum Dumplings (http://fxcuisine.com/default.asp?Display=21)
szilvás gombóc.  what a name and what a combination: potatoes and plums... who knew?  ;)

Jimmy:

Couldn't help but notice the following line from the link above

"Dumplings as big as apples simmered and then rolled in a bed of buttered bread crumbs, cinammon and ...."

 ;D   . . . I wonder if it was a freudian slip about her boyfriend.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on September 05, 2007, 09:22:12 AM
The plum tart that montezumae posted the recipe for is just lovely, light and fluffy and tasty.
Very much recommended!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ChrisW on September 05, 2007, 02:03:17 PM
Hello folks!
Well glad that was a success! We have just finished eating the last bit of that here in Oxfordshire, UK.
When we lived in Ireland, our Bavarian friend used to make that for us, but I never tried it until I realised that the wet weather in the UK this summer has had the effect of giving us a bumper plum crop. We also have lots of apples, so that's the next thing.. I thought those plums would last for ages, but no, they are nearly all gone, my lunch has been organic Greek yoghurt + those plums (and that's it folks..no additives, nothing) - it's a great combo.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on September 17, 2007, 07:08:59 AM
This past weekend we had such a lovely pasta sauce, I just have to share it!

It is with avocado, one of my favourites, and I found it an unusual idea to put this in a pasta sauce.
(Did I ever tell you how in a Japanese restaurant I mistook that lethal green wasabi for guacamole and took a biiiiig bite? (http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a19/freeTheInternet/Smiley/x-Small/SetMeFire.gif))


Avocado tomato pasta sauce

(for 2 people)

- pasta
- 1 avocado
- 1-2 tablespoons of lemon juice
- 1 tomato
- 1 clove of garlic
- fresh parsley (I used coriander leaves instead and bet that it was even better that way)
- 50 grams of cream
- freshly ground white pepper
- cayenne pepper

Cook the pasta.

Halve the avocado and either peel it or take the flesh out with a spoon. Mash the avocado with a fork and mix in the lemon juice.
Wash the tomato and dice it finely.
Peel the garlic and chop finely.
Wash the parsley, discard the hard stems and chop finely.

Put the avocado purée into a saucepan and combine with the tomato, garlic, parsley and cream. Mix. Warm the sauce up, but do not let it boil.
Season with salt, white pepper and cayenne pepper and serve with the pasta.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on September 17, 2007, 07:23:13 AM
And we had a lovely salad for lunch today, since I had to find some use for the rest of the cabbage that I bought for yesterday's lovely vegetable dish of curried cabbage with peppers and almonds  :D



Cabbage salad with lime dressing

(For 3 people)

- 2 cloves of garlic
- 4 tablespoons of lime juice
- 3 twigs with mint leaves
- some coriander leaves
- some fresh dill
- 7 tablespoons of olive oil
- 350 g white cabbage
- salt, freshly ground black pepper
- raisins (that's what the recipe said but I didn't like the idea, left them out and never missed them)


Cut the cabbage up into thin strips, wash it and leave in a sieve to let the water drip off.

Peel the garlic and crush it into a big bowl. Add salt, pepper and lime juice, and mix well.
Wash and chop the herbs, and add them to the dressing.
Add the olive oil and beat the dressing until everything is well mixed.

Add the cabbage, mix with the dressing and leave to infuse it for about 30 minutes. If using, sprinkle with raisins just before serving.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ChrisW on September 18, 2007, 03:42:51 AM
^^^ i'll answer that, katiebre --- yes that's her tart!!  the photo is deceiving, it's really giant sized! it almost looks like a plum pizza :D :D

how cool we're all enjoying the plums of the season... they're up there with apricots for me, not only in flavor but for their exquisite form! i find them to be quite erotic, heehee.. i like how they hang from trees in twos, and their range of color is amazing. i love the deep purple plums with the white layer that mattes them out so beautifully. springtime plum blossoms are pretty too, and a short glass of japanese plum wine, well chilled, is a real treat.

check out this interesting recipe with fantastic photos. the pan he uses for browning the breadcrumbs is great -- gotta love a well-used pan!!

My Boyhood's Hungarian Plum Dumplings (http://fxcuisine.com/default.asp?Display=21)

szilvás gombóc.  what a name and what a combination: potatoes and plums... who knew?  ;)
Thanks for this - what a pity I ate all the rest of the plums for my lunches, raw with thick Greek-type yoghurt. The German students we have visiting were going to make their version of this, that will have to wait for another day.
Meanwhile, they made Flammkuchen for us and two house guests on Saturday (and that was just the first of three courses!)
(http://i167.photobucket.com/albums/u143/chriswilson1_2007/100_7626.jpg)
- the recipe is here somewhere, in German, I'd have to translate it.
It was pretty good, it comes from Alsace/Elsass and was pretty much like what I once ate in a restaurant near Strasbourg. The dough was a bit too think - but it tasted great! It's a bit like pizza with creme fraiche, chopped onions and chopped smoked bacon.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on September 18, 2007, 03:50:16 AM
Meanwhile, they made Flammkuchen for us and two house guests on Saturday (and that was just the first of three courses!)
(http://i167.photobucket.com/albums/u143/chriswilson1_2007/100_7626.jpg)
- the recipe is here somewhere, in German, I'd have to translate it.
It was pretty good, it comes from Alsace/Elsass and was pretty much like what I once ate in a restaurant near Strasbourg. The dough was a bit too think - but it tasted great!

Oooooooh, how I love Flammkuchen!
(And did you have to post this just before lunch...?  ;))

If you get around to scanning or copying it, I would love to have the recipe for trying to make some here at home.
(And I don't even need a translation  :D)

Did you bake it in your normal oven? Usually Flammkuchen is done in a special type of oven, but of course that's not something you'd have at home.


Now that autum is approaching, it's the season for Federweißer (young wine that is still fermenting, it's in a state somewhere between juice and wine), which goes well with onion tart (Zwiebelkuchen). If anybody is interested I can look the recipe up and post it.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: desertrat on September 18, 2007, 04:02:05 AM
since katie asked me to post it:  :)

pumpkin gnocchi

you need: onions, pumpkin, gnocchi, cheese, chili powder, salt, pepper, paprika and nutmeg. i added some bacon to suit the carnivores  ;)

fry onions (and bacon cubes, if you want them), then add pumpkin cubes and cook. cook the gnocchi and then put everything in a big oven pan. sprinkle cheese over it and season with chili, salt, pepper, paprika and nutmeg. bake till the cheese is has a nice, golden colour.


bon apetit !
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ChrisW on September 18, 2007, 04:09:18 AM
Flammkuchen (Elsaesser Art) 3 Personen

500g Teig (Hefeteig reicht fuer 1-2 Bleche), je nach Dicke
300g Speck
2 Zwiebeln
1 Knoblauchzehe
200g Schmand oder Creme Fraiche (je Blech)
1 Bund Schnittlauch

200 deg C Umluft /15-20 min
Creme Fraiche in eine Schuessel, 1 Knoblauchzehe pressen, Schnittlauch schnibben,
-> verteilen -> Speck (???) -> Zwiebeln in Scheiben

- and that's all they had written down. One of the mums dictated it over the phone!

(http://i167.photobucket.com/albums/u143/chriswilson1_2007/100_7624.jpg)
- action shot of the dough being rolled out -
 


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ChrisW on September 18, 2007, 04:16:47 AM
so Katie- yes, just our ordinary fan oven. these guys are trainee chemists,  they always say cookery and chemistry have a lot in common  :D
So only the minimum seems to be written down, and maybe I can't read all the writing.
You are more than welcome to post a proper recipe in English based on this.
The dough was yeast raised.
I asked them how they did it, since we have a breadmaker which could also be used for making pizza dough.
Actually they did it very quickly by hand, they made a well in the flour, added a lot of dried yeast and milk, mixed it quickly with their hands, and rolled it out. I think if they had waited longer they would have got the proper thin dough. Anyway it tasted pretty good!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on September 18, 2007, 04:24:01 AM
so Katie- yes, just our ordinary fan oven. these guys are trainee chemists,  they always say cookery and chemistry have a lot in common  :D
So only the minimum seems to be written down, and maybe I can't read all the writing.
You are more than welcome to post a proper recipe in English based on this.
The dough was yeast raised.
I asked them how they did it, since we have a breadmaker which could also be used for making pizza dough.
Actually they did it very quickly by hand, they made a well in the flour, added a lot of dried yeast and milk, mixed it quickly with their hands, and rolled it out. I think if they had waited longer they would have got the proper thin dough. Anyway it tasted pretty good!


The recipe will work OK for me, it's got all we need!
No problem for the translation, but you can help me for the "Speck" - under what name would you find it in the shops? Bacon? Rashers (well, they'd be too thin)?

I'm surprised to read that they used yeast for the dough. Normally the dough under Flammkuchen seems so flaky, I wouldn't think of yeast.
And of course you're right, normally that type of dough needs some time to rise properly.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on September 18, 2007, 04:24:28 AM
since katie asked me to post it:  :)

pumpkin gnocchi

Yummy....!

Thanks a lot, Martina!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ChrisW on September 18, 2007, 04:53:43 AM
The recipe will work OK for me, it's got all we need!
No problem for the translation, but you can help me for the "Speck" - under what name would you find it in the shops? Bacon? Rashers (well, they'd be too thin)?

I'm surprised to read that they used yeast for the dough. Normally the dough under Flammkuchen seems so flaky, I wouldn't think of yeast.
And of course you're right, normally that type of dough needs some time to rise properly.
- Katie, I am very pleased to hear it makes sense! I asked, I think they said smoked bacon. The only reason I have time for this is that I seem to have some virus today so have stayed at home; I'll find out, though! I have a headache, but I don't blame the food.  :D Grr.. I'll be fine...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on September 18, 2007, 05:17:26 AM
So here's the English version of Montezumae's recipe for Flammkuchen.


Tarte flambée/Flammkuchen, Alsatian style

(for 3 people)

Yeast dough, made from 500g flour - this will be enough for 1-2 trays, depending on the thickness of the dough
300g smoked bacon, diced
2 onions, sliced
1 clove of garlic
200g Crème Fraîche per baking tray
1 bunch of chives, chopped


Roll the dough out in very thin layers and place on the baking tray/s.
Pour the crème fraîche into a bowl, add crushed garlic and chives. Mix.
Spread this mixture on the dough.
Sprinkle bacon and onion evenly over the tarte.

Bake in a fan-assisted oven at 200 °C for 15-20 min.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on September 18, 2007, 05:18:02 AM
- Katie, I am very pleased to hear it makes sense! I asked, I think they said smoked bacon. The only reason I have time for this is that I seem to have some virus today so have stayed at home; I'll find out, though! I have a headache, but I don't blame the food.  :D Grr.. I'll be fine...

Get well! soon!  :-*
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ChrisW on September 18, 2007, 07:42:13 AM
Katie, thanks so much!! Very kind. And thanks for the get-well wishes.  :-*
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 08, 2007, 07:54:14 AM
okay, i did it. i opened a can of beans, warmed them up, and poured them back in the can and ate them. i even ate the FAT blobs that were in there, they melted in my mouth and i reminded myself that some chinese people LOVE pork fat and consider it a delicacy.

it was a very brokeback moment.   ::) 

i swear, every time i open a can of beans i think of jack twist and balls as big as apples. ;) :D

---

in other news, i'm still thinking about that wonderful dim sum brunch i enjoyed in SF with all the other brokies in attendance. the seared black sea bass, the orange infused cabbage salad with walnut... the dumplings as big as plums and the very tasty soft shell crab and other seafood delicacies. i love this style of eating, like spanish tapas, and the japanese manner of dining on small portions of food on artfully crafted dishware.

on the homefront, it's been homemade pizza bagels and lots of raw vegetable salads. grated zuchinni, grated jicima, grated raw beet and carrot salads, served with a vinaigrette dressing. toasted sesame seeds add crunch. when mounded on the plate in separate servings, the effect is rather like different flavors of ice cream, but with living enzymes.  i'll usually eat this with rye-crisps or those ak-mak crackers. it makes a nice light lunch and is so easy.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Jer009 on October 09, 2007, 05:52:38 PM

---

in other news, i'm still thinking about that wonderful dim sum brunch i enjoyed in SF with all the other brokies in attendance. the seared black sea bass, the orange infused cabbage salad with walnut... the dumplings as big as plums and the very tasty soft shell crab and other seafood delicacies. i love this style of eating, like spanish tapas, and the japanese manner of dining on small portions of food on artfully crafted dishware.

That dim dum in San Francisco was awesome, and it was so great being there with fellow Brokies!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on November 06, 2007, 08:03:55 PM
^^^  jer, i'm STILL thinking of that halibut, errr, sea bass.. :) ;)

okay -- mexican food. . .

i found a place that makes the best best "black corn fungus" tacos, according to a review in the los angeles weekly...  has anybody had this stuff? it's called huitlacoche. i'm intrigued. when we had a garden i noticed that some of the corn would be husked to reveal black mold on the kernels, and if that happened we tossed the whole ear. i cannot imagine that people have found a use for it (if that's what the fungus is)... i understand they also make a soup of it as well..

oh wait, i found something about it on wikipedia: CORN SMUT. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_smut)

oh god, what a name... sounds ghoulish, haha...  apparently it's like a mushroom. now i'm even more intrigued.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on November 07, 2007, 01:59:49 PM
jimmy,  as you know I do know a bit about Mexican things.    Huitlacoche was used by the Aztecs in food.
If I remember correctly, it has also been used in southern cooking.

I've seen it fresh, canned, in soups, in tacos, and in a few other ways, and all I can say is  ~~ blech  ~~
It's black, crumbly but slimy in an unusual manner.    I rarely turn my nose up to anything edible,  >:D ,
but this sucks.    IMHO.

However, if you ever come across it, I would recommend you try it -- I like some foods that people wouldn't
touch with a 10 foot pole.  Like,  tripe, calves brains, liver, sweetbreads, and cow udders (better known as tripas).   :D  :D  :D  :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on November 07, 2007, 05:58:03 PM
oh, iiuuugghh.. black and crumbly AND slimy? that sounds like a VERY odd texture..

okra is often avoided for its slimy texture but i love that in southern cooking.. hmm....

and wow, i love mushrooms,,, but the photo of the fungus growing on the corn was very strange looking to say the least. they call them tumors! weird.

well, i'll try a 'corn smut' taco when we can get down to 'anojitos distrito federales' in east LA...and let you know... they also have fried squash blossoms, that sounds even better. i'm up for most anything, once.... but yeah, some things are easily avoidable, like those things you mentioned.

i will eat chicken livers on occasion, however, and like them fried with garlic, deep fried like chicken, or in a sour cream sauce over egg noodles.. :D

-----> tripas is cow udders?       omg....what do they do with those? do they stuff them? :D :D



Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Miaisland on November 17, 2007, 10:34:41 AM
Wow, there IS a thread for cooking!

Yesterday we talked about Thanksgiving dinner at the Diner. So now I am inviting family for a stuffed turkey dinner next weekend (two of them are chefs). Hope for some more help...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on November 17, 2007, 11:39:13 AM
However, if you ever come across it, I would recommend you try it -- I like some foods that people wouldn't
touch with a 10 foot pole.  Like,  tripe, calves brains, liver, sweetbreads, and cow udders (better known as tripas).   :D  :D  :D  :D
Are you sure tripas are cow udders? In French we have tripes which are intestines.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on November 19, 2007, 08:52:48 AM
^^^ oh yeah -- tripe is that kinda waffley looking white stuff, isn't it?
in menudo? which i've never tried, because i hear it contains tripe..! ;)


yes miaisland, there is a recipe thread! :D  there's also the brokeback mountain lovesick diet thread, which also contains lots of recipes! thanksgiving?


(http://images.jupiterimages.com/common/detail/43/51/23035143.jpg)


PARSNIPS

i like to scrub 'em, peel 'em, halve or quarter 'em if they're big... then toss 'em in a touch of oil, salt, pepper.
then roast them (along with beets, carrots, turnips, and other root veggies) in a 400-450F degree oven.
this brings out a natural carmelization of their sugars... stir them halfway through for even browning.

the aromas! when they are crunchy-soft, they're done!

i understand they're also good boiled and mashed...

now, we hardly ever eat parsnips except around thanksgiving, or winter holidays,
but i think that they're available year around. they have a flavor i've come to love...

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on November 19, 2007, 08:58:45 AM
more on parsnips. i found this from the wonderful kitchengardeners.org website. ooh, baked in orange juice... interesting.


(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)(http://www.kitchengardeners.org/pics/parsnips010307.jpg)(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)Did you know?

“The 1st Century Roman Emperor Tiberius was reportedly so fond of parsnips that he imported them from the Rhineland, ordering his cooks to boil them gently and serve them in honey nectar,” writes John Peterson in Farmer John’s Cookbook.

Parsnips have fallen from favor since Tibe’s time. Like most root vegetables, they’re not the most beautiful produce on the block.

“They may not be glamorous, but when cooked, they have the combined sweetness of a carrot along with an appealing parsleylike herbaceous quality and subtle nuttiness,” writes Cathy Thomas in Melissa’s Great Book of Produce.

Parsnips will form a sturdy base for stews and soups, casseroles and other winter-friendly dishes.
(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)

(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)Storing tips
Refrigerate parsnips in a plastic bag in the crisper drawer; they’ll keep a couple of weeks.

Preparation tips
Trim the ends and peel the parsnips. (Younger parsnips, which will be smaller and smoother, don’t need peeling.) When cutting them, make uniform sizes so they’ll finish cooking at the same time.

Cooking tips
Young parsnips can be grated into salads or sliced as crudites, Peterson writes. If you’re of a mind to honor Tiberius, boil them in water or chicken broth, then add butter, salt and pepper. Fresh tarragon, minced orange zest or ground cinnamon are complementary flavors, Thomas writes.

Like any self-respecting root vegetable, parsnips are great roasted. “If you haven’t tasted a properly roasted fresh parsnip, then you haven’t tasted a parsnip,” claims Andrea Chesman in The Garden-Fresh Vegetable Cookbook. “Roasting brings out the hidden nutmeg and sweet nuances of parsnips.” Just brush them with a little oil and roast them in a 400- to 425-degree oven until they’re easily pierced with a fork.

“Bake sliced parsnips in a covered casserole with enough orange juice to barely cover them,” add the authors of The Moosewood Restaurant Kitchen Garden. “When the parsnips are almost tender, uncover so the juice thickens.”

The emperor liked his boiled gently and served in honey nectar.
(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on November 19, 2007, 10:08:41 AM
However, if you ever come across it, I would recommend you try it -- I like some foods that people wouldn't
touch with a 10 foot pole.  Like,  tripe, calves brains, liver, sweetbreads, and cow udders (better known as tripas).   :D  :D  :D  :D
Are you sure tripas are cow udders? In French we have tripes which are intestines.

You are absoutely right, it is not the udder, but the tubing that carries the milk -- they can also be interstines (aka, chitterlings), and of which I don't partake.  ;D

And now, for the waffly thing -- that is tripe and it's a part of one of the 4 stomaches in a cow.  Used in Menudo in Mexican cooking and in a famous French recipie that its names escapes me at the moment.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on November 19, 2007, 10:14:22 AM
 . . . and regarding parsnips.    Roasted, along with other veggies are great -- I would also recommend them pureed (sp.) with a bit of butter. Mmmmmmm . . .
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on November 19, 2007, 10:22:56 PM
pureed sounds good, like mashed taters. i've added parsnips and mashed them in with potatoes... with lots of butter..!!

glad we got the tripas thing straightened out -- it was udderly confusing.. ;) ::) :D

okay well i just made bagel pizzas. four of them (two bagels halved) for each of us for dinner. i'm going ghetto lately with low-brow cooking, but they did have mushrooms, pepperoni, and chopped red onion. lots of cheese and marinara, some oregano, garlic... i prefer them slightly burnt and crispy. i bow to the invention of the toaster OVEN!!


speaking of low-brow cooking, i met guy once that seemed to survive on a diet of ham sandwiches and canned soup. i looked forward to our saturday morning brunches, white bread with mayo and mustard, thin slices of ham and swiss cheese, pickle relish. a bowl of steaming soup in big colorful mugs with broken handles. we'd watch cartoons naked and eat those things, sometimes going through half a loaf of wonder bread...

then later, when i had to help a friend make food for a block party, i suggested his ham sandwiches, they thought it was too ghetto, but i persisted and they were the hit of the tables. i found that by cutting off the crusts and cutting them in little triangles, alternating the bread in white/rye or wheat/white combinations, they looked VERY swanky. we made tons of them that afternoon in assembly-line fashion. add to that other fillings -- herbed cream cheese and smoked salmon, curried chicken salad, egg salad with italian parsley and minced olive...  sigh.... sometimes the simple things in life are all that is needed to be happy. ye, i'm repeating myself, o well~!


happy almost thanksgiving, everybody!

(http://www.diamondvues.com/archives/thanksgiving%20turkey.jpg) (http://www.diamondvues.com/archives/thanksgiving%20turkey.jpg)

look how pretty they are with feathers and without stuffing!
it's no wonder ben franklin felt they should be our national bird.
makes sense too... i mean, just how many eagles to we eat each year?

:) :) :)

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on November 20, 2007, 05:49:43 AM
your post above reminds me of survival diets -- so here's a question.   What is the oddest food you've ever had to survive on (think of college days).

OK, I'll start.


When I was young (about the time that dirt was invented, to some of you) and in college and oh, so poor --
I ate countless cans of corn and saltines with butter (actually it was margarine).

The Keebler Baker and I developed a very close relationship.   :D



mod:  went out looking for that Baker on the Saltine box, but couldn't find it - can't remember if it was Sunshine, Keebler or Nabisco, but I did find this - of which I happen to have one.
Seem like I never lost my taste for saltines, I still love them.

(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2243/2049344993_e75e8f5f42.jpg?v=0)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on November 20, 2007, 06:48:12 AM
aahhahah, saltines, my dad loved those, buttered, with his spaghetti, it was his garlic toast. :D   corn and saltines... odd... funny tho, i had a lunch yesterday of baked beans (from a can, bush's) and bagel chips.  oh me oh my..   ;D

hmm, my college days survival food, i guess........ was pasta with garlic and olive oil and parm cheese. i'd add zucchini, and milk if i had it. it's actually a recipe i still use. also, tuna was a standby, canned -- with rice and soy sauce. japanese style.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on November 20, 2007, 07:03:15 AM
I sure miss bagels. I tried making them a few times but they lacked that bagely taste (I did use a recipe from a bagel cookbook). But I'm sure if I went back to live in the USA (an extremely remote possibility) I would miss a whole lot more things from here.

I'll have to try those parsnips cooked in OJ. Use to be they were impossible to find here but since so many Brits have been moving to the area more farmers around here are growing them to sell at the Saturday market.

People still ask me if we do Thanksgiving at home here. No -- not enough Americans around to make it seem like a holiday and besides, if you want a whole turkey you have to order it two months in advance because all the turkeys alive in the fall are being fattened for Xmas. I know some Americans in Toulouse who really, really wanted to do Tgiving with a turkey but didn't plan ahead. So they bought as many parts as they could find and stitched them all together with cooking twine to make a Frankenturkey.


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on November 20, 2007, 09:33:51 AM
jimmy -- your survival food sounds alot better than mine....  ;)

Frankenturkey...  snork    "valk 'dis way."   ;)


OK, finally found the little devil...


(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2120/2050551820_6051f04854.jpg?v=0)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on November 20, 2007, 11:12:51 AM
...

 I know some Americans in Toulouse who really, really wanted to do Tgiving with a turkey but didn't plan ahead. So they bought as many parts as they could find and stitched them all together with cooking twine to make a Frankenturkey.



LOL! gosh, couldn't they just do a roast or something? ;) :D

mmmm but turkey is good. i love deep fried turkey, a rib shack in oakland used to have that, i used to watch them drop that big bird into the vat of oil, and come back in an hour to enjoy it's goodness... slathered with their hottest barbecue sauce, of course!

gerry i love those old cracker boxes!  the nabisco tin, looks oddly like a band-aid container!

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on November 23, 2007, 02:24:33 AM

(http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f211/killersmom/Living%20in%20SF/Thanksgiving07060.jpg)

two unique sidedishes

thanksgiving was a hoot... :D :D :D

my parsnips and carrots baked in fresh oj juice...
with lynn's spinach and grits casserole... yummy!!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Katiebre on November 26, 2007, 08:29:56 AM
Haven't been here in ages...

However, if you ever come across it, I would recommend you try it -- I like some foods that people wouldn't touch with a 10 foot pole.  Like,  tripe, calves brains, liver, sweetbreads, and cow udders (better known as tripas).   :D  :D  :D  :D

Gerry, you'd want to stay away from calf's (or any age of cattle's) brains, unless you want to get BSE/CJD a few years down the road...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on January 30, 2008, 08:15:15 PM
(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l59/castlehills/BBM%20IMG%20Posts/IMG_0254.jpg)

Time to get this cooking thread going again.  This is a quick salad/side dish we had tonight.

Green Beans over a half avocado (of course, you can't see the avocado, but it's there.)

Vinaigrette of:  red wine vinegar, 2 cloves garlic through a press (I like garlic), salt, pepper, big pinch of sugar.
Add 3 or more times of olive oil as the amount vinegar.   No need to premix, just add the ingredients
directly on to the beans and toss really really well.     Chopped tomato to garnish (be sure and salt the tomato).       Enjoy.


gerry
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: huntinbuddy on January 30, 2008, 09:22:23 PM
I agree, time to fire up the burners on this thread.

Chicken Chili Casserole

1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup finely chopped onion
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon oregano
3 tablespoons corn meal
2 1/2 cups chicken broth
1 cup tomato sauce
4 cups chopped or shredded cooked chicken
2 cups whole kernel corn
15 1/2 ounce can black beans, rinsed and drained
1 1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
3 cups tortilla chips (6 to 8 ounces)
1 1/2 cups finely shredded mild cheddar cheese
1/2 cup finely shredded Monterey jack cheese

In a large stockpot or Dutch oven, heat the oil over medium heat.  Add the onion, garlic, chili powder, cumin and oregano.  Saute for 3 minutes, or until the garlic is fragrant.

Add the corn meal, stirring for about 2 minutes.  Slowly add the broth and tomato sauce, then bring the mixture to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes.

Add the chicken, corn, beans, salt and pepper.  Simmer, uncovered for 30 minutes.  Stir frequently to prevent sticking.

Lightly coat a 9 by 13 inch baking dish cooking spray.  Line the dish with enough tortilla chips to cover the bottom.  Spoon the chili mix over the chips, then top with the remaining chips and sprinkle with the cheeses.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees, bake the chili, covered for 20 minutes.  Uncover and bake for an additional 20 minutes, or until the cheese has melted and the chili is bubbling.  Serve immediately.  Serves 6.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: PatSinnott on January 30, 2008, 09:38:26 PM
Here's a really simple salad that I've gotten a lot of raves for.  I'm going to a friend's for dinner Saturday and he asked I bring it.

Two peeled Avocados, cut into bite sized pieces.
One can of Hearts of Palm, cut into 1/2 inch slices.
1/3 lb Meunster Cheese, cut into 1/2 inch cubes.

Mix together and serve.
Serves 4.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on January 31, 2008, 07:51:21 PM
OK, let's start seeing some of those Super Bowl Favorites....... I really don't have any,
unless you count beer and pretzels....   :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: huntinbuddy on January 31, 2008, 10:06:14 PM
Can't do much for the pretzels .....but how about......

Beer Cheese Dip

8 cups (2 pounds) sharp cheddar cheese, shredded
1 medium onion, finely minced
1/2 teaspoon Tabasco sauce
2 tablespoons cream-style prepared horseradish
1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
1 bottle flat beer

Combine cheese, onion, Tabasco sauce, horseradish, red pepper flakes and garlic. Add enough beer for desired consistency of dip.
Serve with crackers, chips, or veggies.
Makes about 8 cups.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: huntinbuddy on January 31, 2008, 10:15:37 PM
This one is for Terry when I was giving him grief for Missouri having a stellar football season

http://www.davecullen.com/forum/index.php?topic=852.2145

When Pigs Fly Appetizer

4 boneless pork chops, cut into 3/4-inch cubes
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 (14-ounce) bottle hot-style ketchup
3 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 to 3 teaspoons hot pepper sauce
1 teaspoon dried thyme, crushed
1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed
1/2 teaspoon lemon pepper
In large skillet heat oil over medium-high heat. Cook and stir pork cubes for 4 to 5 minutes or until pork is just done. Remove excess fat from skillet; reduce heat to low. Add remaining ingredients to skillet, stirring to coat pork cubes. Cover and cook about 1 minute or until heated through.
Transfer to warm serving dish; serve with toothpicks.
Serves 8.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on February 01, 2008, 06:34:42 AM
Can't do much for the pretzels .....but how about......

Beer Cheese Dip


Charlie:  This does sound good and should serve a good amount of people, 2 pounds of cheese  :o    :D .   Thanks.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: dejavu on February 01, 2008, 11:22:48 AM
Time to get this cooking thread going again.  This is a quick salad/side dish we had tonight.

Green Beans over a half avocado (of course, you can't see the avocado, but it's there.)

Vinaigrette of:  red wine vinegar, 2 cloves garlic through a press (I like garlic), salt, pepper, big pinch of sugar.
Add 3 or more times of olive oil as the amount vinegar.   No need to premix, just add the ingredients
directly on to the beans and toss really really well.     Chopped tomato to garnish (be sure and salt the tomato).       Enjoy.


gerry

Looks good, Gerry, and thanks for explaining that it's tomato, not red pepper.   ;D

I couldn't tell in the Diner...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on February 01, 2008, 01:58:11 PM
Can't do much for the pretzels .....but how about......

Beer Cheese Dip


Charlie:  This does sound good and should serve a good amount of people, 2 pounds of cheese  :o    :D .   Thanks.

LOL yaw, i think two lbs of cheese is gonna make them football fans happy. got chips? ;D

ok --- i have a question about the recipe tho, so hold up.

do the cheese just float around in the beer, or do it get melted. or what.

it sounds a little strange as it is :P though i do like the ingredrients...
i could see adding chopped green chilis up in there howevah.
or maybe something green, like parsley or another erb.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on February 01, 2008, 02:15:27 PM
okay, here is my superbowl appetizer idea:

LITTLE SMOKEY SAUSAGES IN BARBECUE SAUCE

1 or more packages of those little smoky sausages (precooked)
1 or more bottles of prepared barbecue sauce of your choice.

boil pot of water, add sausages. return to boil and cook until heated through, about 5 mins.
drain water from sausages, add barbecue sauce, reduce heat and simmer for a while.
transfer to chafing dish or mini crock pot to keep warm. or just serve in bowl.
this is good also with mini cubes of sharp cheddar cheese on the side.

serve with little tiny forks with footballs on the end like they had at bed bath and beyond, or toothpicks.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on February 01, 2008, 02:21:55 PM

LOL yaw, i think two lbs of cheese is gonna make them football fans happy. got chips? ;D

ok --- i have a question about the recipe tho, so hold up.

do the cheese just float around in the beer, or do it get melted. or what.

it sounds a little strange as it is :P though i do like the ingredrients...
i could see adding chopped green chilis up in there howevah.
or maybe something green, like parsley or another erb.

Jimmy -- I just assumed it all would goes in a crockpot for 72 hours ....bwahahahaha....
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on February 01, 2008, 02:42:35 PM
here is another football party appetizer. (who am i kidding, i never watch football) :D

BEER BOILED SHRIMP

- fresh, whole raw shrimp IN SHELLS, about 1/2 lb per person. (you can cut off the head but it's not necessary)
- old bay shrimp seasoning packet (or other dry seasoning for shrimp)
- lots of beer

fill a big pot about about 2/3 the way full with beer, or beer and water (or just water), bring to rolling boil. add a couple teaspoons of the shrimp seasoning. add shrimp in and cook until pink (about 3-4 minutes for medium large shrimp, more or less or smaller or jumbo shrimp). transfer cooked shrimp to strainer to drain excess liquid, then transfer to a large bowl. toss the cooked shrimp with a little more of the seasoning mix for flavor. you can serve them hot, as is, or let cool to room temp. you can also prepare ahead and refrigerate.

serve with cocktail sauce and lemon wedges.

and lots of napkins lol. messy but good.


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on February 01, 2008, 02:46:34 PM
Jimmy -- I just assumed it all would goes in a crockpot for 72 hours ....bwahahahaha....

ohh! well that's good if you have a crockpot, LOL. if it's melted tho, that does sound good.  :D

i wonder also if pat's avocado/palm/cheese recipe requires a salad dressing... i can picture that tossed with a raspberry viniagrette.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on February 01, 2008, 02:59:18 PM
Jimmy -- I just assumed it all would goes in a crockpot for 72 hours ....bwahahahaha....

ohh! well that's good if you have a crockpot, LOL. if it's melted tho, that does sound good.  :D

i wonder also if pat's avocado/palm/cheese recipe requires a salad dressing... i can picture that tossed with a raspberry viniagrette.

I thought the same.... the raspberry sounds good and all you would need to do is change the red wine vinegar in my green beans to a raspberry vinegar and change out the garlic for shallot.... ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: huntinbuddy on February 01, 2008, 04:39:58 PM
Beer Cheese Dip


LOL yaw, i think two lbs of cheese is gonna make them football fans happy. got chips? ;D

ok --- i have a question about the recipe tho, so hold up.

do the cheese just float around in the beer, or do it get melted. or what.

it sounds a little strange as it is :P though i do like the ingredrients...
i could see adding chopped green chilis up in there howevah.
or maybe something green, like parsley or another erb.
Jimmy,

I think it could be either way, but with that much cheese, and only one bottle of beer, I don't believe the cheese would float.  If the cheese is finely shredded, it should mix well,  however, if it is more coarsely shredded, I would think a few minutes in the oven or microwave, would make it better.  Hope this helps....charlie
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on February 01, 2008, 05:32:58 PM
^^^ thanks for the explanation -- i didn't think of it being mixed up w/o melting or something... and gerry's crock pot idea sounds good, sorta like a fondue.



let's not forget the good ol' chicken wing.... this link has an extremely extensive list of recipes:

http://homecooking.about.com/library/archive/blpoul38.htm

interesting names include: engine-revving chicken wings, nipponese chicken wings, bronzed chicken wings, lacquered chicken wings, mahogony glazed wings, burn your fingers chicken wings, the bear's chicken wings (LOL), vegan chicken wing dings, cola chicken wings, etc...


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: PatSinnott on February 06, 2008, 11:02:33 AM
Jimmy -- I just assumed it all would goes in a crockpot for 72 hours ....bwahahahaha....

ohh! well that's good if you have a crockpot, LOL. if it's melted tho, that does sound good.  :D

i wonder also if pat's avocado/palm/cheese recipe requires a salad dressing... i can picture that tossed with a raspberry viniagrette.

I don't use any dressing, but it would be nice to try different variations.
Eat a bit without dressing, and see if you'd prefer a bit more punch.
The three flavors and textures just go together well.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on February 06, 2008, 06:25:02 PM
^^^ thanks for the explanation pat, it sounds even more intriguing now.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: killersmom on February 06, 2008, 10:16:36 PM
I was just reading this and thought of a good crock pot recipe I have.

2-3 lb roast (depending on size of crock pot)
Any cut as crock pot cooking makes them all tender.

1 envelope of dry Ranch dressing mix
1 envelope of dry Italian dressing mix
1 envelope of dry Brown gravy mix

Blend together and add 3 cups cold water to dry mixture
Pour over the roast.
Cook on high for 4 hours or low for 8 hours.

You can brown the roast beforehand if you want, but it does not matter.

 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on February 07, 2008, 06:05:57 AM
^^^ thanks for the explanation pat, it sounds even more intriguing now.

I agree jimmy -- and Pat, I'm gonna try it without first as I do like all those 3 items....

 . . . and linda -- the pot roast would sound like a great recipe for the cabin ... it would all be ready by dinner time.
also, I've always thought those small packets carry a bunch of flavor...no doubt it turns out good . . . and some good
french bread to mop.    thanks.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: killersmom on February 07, 2008, 02:51:04 PM
It has a great flavor, Gerry, and would be perfect for the cabin.
The french bread for sopping is always good.
Gravy and bread just go together.

I love it because it is so simple with such good flavor.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: huntinbuddy on February 07, 2008, 05:08:23 PM
I was just reading this and thought of a good crock pot recipe I have.

2-3 lb roast (depending on size of crock pot)
Any cut as crock pot cooking makes them all tender.

1 envelope of dry Ranch dressing mix
1 envelope of dry Italian dressing mix
1 envelope of dry Brown gravy mix

Blend together and add 3 cups cold water to dry mixture
Pour over the roast.
Cook on high for 4 hours or low for 8 hours.

You can brown the roast beforehand if you want, but it does not matter.

 
That sounds delicious Linda;  I cook roasts all the time in my crock pot / slow cooker.  I have always used one packet of Lipton (or generic) onion soup mix with the required water for flavoring.  But what you have here is quite different.  I'm going to try your recipe this weekend.  Thanks!!  Charlie
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on February 08, 2008, 07:53:22 AM
Just got a bunch of venison ready for making into jerky.

Any recipes out there you would like to share?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: killersmom on February 08, 2008, 02:18:29 PM
Sorry Gerry. We always made sausage and chili out of our venison.
I'll go look in my wild game cookbooks and see if I can find something.
Wish I had firsthand suggestions, but just don't.
Do you need how to make it or what you can use it for after curing it?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: killersmom on February 08, 2008, 02:26:54 PM
That sounds delicious Linda;  I cook roasts all the time in my crock pot / slow cooker.  I have always used one packet of Lipton (or generic) onion soup mix with the required water for flavoring.  But what you have here is quite different.  I'm going to try your recipe this weekend.  Thanks!!  Charlie

I think you'll like it, Charlie. It gives it a little taste of Beef Stroganoff, but with a kick because of the italian dressing mix. It is good with rice or noodles as a side as well as traditional potatoes. Let me know what you think.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on February 08, 2008, 08:55:38 PM
I was looking for a jerky recipe.   Guy who gave me the venison (3 lean fillets) gave me the following recipe...

Cut strips with the grain no longer than 3inches long and no thick than 1/4 inch.

Dry, season with jerky seasoning -- cover on a plate, marinade overnight.

Next day.... put on cake racks, and place in 185 degree oven, door ajar for 1 hour 15 minutes....

I've tasted his jerky and its very good.

  or you can do the same thing but instead of the oven, hang on cotton string in garage for 3 to 5 days.

I'll go with the oven.    Did part of it tonight and will do the oven route tomorrow..... I'll let you 'all know how
it goes.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: huntinbuddy on February 10, 2008, 11:50:33 AM
Omelet in a Bag

This is an old classic, which I make for breakfast many times when I have a day off and an hour to play in the kitchen.  Good served with toast and jelly, fruit or coffee cake, orange juice; or for myself, a glass of good merlot.

 INGREDIENTS
2 eggs
1 tablespoon butter
2 tablespoons milk
2 slices ham, chopped (optional)
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
2 tablespoons chopped onion (optional)
2 tablespoons chopped green bell pepper (optional)
2 tablespoons chopped fresh tomato (optional)
2 tablespoons chopped mushrooms (optional)
1 tablespoon chopped black olives (optional)
dash of seasonings which can include black or crushed red pepper,
garlic powder, cajun seasoning....whatever you desire

DIRECTIONS
In medium mixing bowl, melt butter in microwave for 1 minute, add milk, and crack two large eggs, beat with mixer or whisk for minute.  Into a quart size resealable freezer/storage bag, add the contents of the bowl and other optional ingredients or whatever you like in a good omelet.  Press out most of the air, and seal. Shake or squeeze to mix all ingredients uniformly together.

Since the prep time takes about 15 minutes, bring a large pot of water to boiling while preparing the ingredients;  lay the bag flat into boiling water can cook for exactly 15 minutes, turning with tongs every 5 minutes.  I typically, add about a 1/2 tsp of cooking oil to the freezer bag before filling it and roll it together to gently coat the inside of the bag.  It helps keep the omelet from sticking, but generally without the oil there is little problem with sticking.  After 15 min., remove from water, open the bag, or slit it down the side as it can't be used a second time, and roll the omelet onto a plate and drain any excessive moisture from the cooked ingredients. 

This method makes a delicious omelet, and you don't have all the hassle of cooking it in a skillet, folding, turning,etc. and hoping it holds together and looks good when you get done!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on February 11, 2008, 05:47:26 AM
OK, made some of the jerky over the weekend and it was OK....
should have used more of the seasonings.    So last night
after I got home, I made some more with additional seasoning.
This time I made my own -- kosher salt, lot's of mortar-cracked pepper,
garlic and onion powders and I added a bit of crushed red pepper flakes (the
one you put on pizza).

Added a bit of Worcestershire sauce to the meat and then added the seasonings.
Marinating and will dry it in the oven this evening.    I'll report back.

btw, the batch I made Saturday -- was all gone by Sunday -- went great with
beer Saturday night.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on February 11, 2008, 05:56:14 AM
Omelet in a Bag




 . . . well, I've never heard of this -- a real new one for me.                     I like your addition of Merlot.    ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: huntinbuddy on February 11, 2008, 11:55:17 AM
I make omelets many times this way Gerry.  Made a couple yesterday morning.  You can vary the ingredients by volume, or whatever you desire in a good omelet, but the important thing is to keep the eggs to 2, and the boil time in water to 15 minutes.  Try it sometime, you will be shocked at how delicious they are.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on February 12, 2008, 12:07:47 AM
^^^  you can cook/poach eggs in brown paper bags too! it's an old boy scout trick...  oh wait -- that just sounds wrong. ::) :D

eggs in paper sack

When camping, cleaning pots and pans is no fun. No one wants to wait for the water to heat up over the fire and no one likes washing dishes. Solution — Paper Bag. Brown lunch bags work the best. Just place the bacon on the bottom of the bag and crack an egg on top of the bacon. Use a stick to prop the bag over hot coals. Rotate the bag a few times and you have yourself breakfast.

okay, that sounded a bit vague, so here is a better recipe for the same "dish":

INGREDIENTS:

* Two strips bacon (thick)
* one paper lunch bag
* one egg
* one stick

PREPARATION:
Cut bacon strips in two, place at the bottom of the paper bag, covering the bottom. It is important that you have thick strips of bacon as thin ones will stick and adhere to the paper bag when cooked. Crack egg and put in paper bag on top of the bacon. Fold lunch bag down three times and poke a hole through it with the stick, so that the bag is hanging on the end of the stick. Hold over charcoal and watch the grease from the bacon protect the bag and cook the meal.



oh gee, i found another recipe too, utilizing two ziplock bags:

ice cream in a zip lock bag:

INGREDIENTS:

    * One small seal top plastic bag
    * One gallon size seal top plastic bag
    * 1 tablespoon sugar
    * 1/4 teaspoon vanilla
    * 1/2 cup of milk
    * Crushed ice
    * 8 tablespoons ice-cream salt(rock salt)
    * One tablespoon peanut butter

PREPARATION:
In a small seal top plastic bag, pour 1/2 cup of milk, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1/4 teaspoon vanilla. Close the bag and place in a gallon-size seal top bag. Add some crushed ice and 8 tablespoons of ice cream salt(rock salt).

Close the top and shake being careful not to bust the bags. You could also add one tablespoon of peanut butter... yummy!



speaking of eggs and tricks:  http://www.eggs.ab.ca/kids/Tricks/eggtrick010.htm

PS: guess what, linda and i are doing that crock pot roast beef this week!~ :D :D we have the three seasoning packets. now, all i ask is: WHERE'S THE BEEF?   ;D




Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: huntinbuddy on February 12, 2008, 03:45:46 PM

eggs in paper sack

Goodness, the things you learn on this forum!  I have not heard of this one Jimmy!  But I do my share of camping in the warmer months and will give it a try.  But one thing I have to question.....does the bacon generate that much grease so the bag doesn't go up in flames!    At the minimum you are going to have to keep the bag up off the coals a good distance, or it would go up in flames wouldn't it?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on February 12, 2008, 06:50:46 PM

ice cream in a zip lock bag:

INGREDIENTS:

    * One small seal top plastic bag
    * One gallon size seal top plastic bag
    * 1 tablespoon sugar
    * 1/4 teaspoon vanilla
    * 1/2 cup of milk
    * Crushed ice
    * 8 tablespoons ice-cream salt(rock salt)
    * One tablespoon peanut butter

I wonder if the recipe could be increased to a more manageble Serviing Size --- - --  like 2 Cups.   lol

I'm either gonna have to get bigger bags or make more bags.

Thanks jimmy.....    ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on February 12, 2008, 07:38:25 PM
cabin, i've seen some huge ziplock bags... i think you could make a gallon of ice cream if necessary! but that's a heck of a lot of massaging the bags, LOL.

huntinbuddy, i have NO idea how the paper bag doesn't burn. when we went camping as scouts, we used a frying pan to make our breakfasts. :D  ;)

however, i did see firsthand some hupa/yurok indians boil acorn mash in a woven grass basket (over hot coals), so i guess it can be done!

there was also a kids/camping recipe for making eggs in orange rind halves.. but egg and orange flavors?  hmmmm.  :P

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: desertrat on February 13, 2008, 03:00:52 AM

eggs in paper sack



a heck of a lot of massaging the bags


are you guys sure you're still talking about cooking ?  :o :o ::) ;D ;D


about the bags not burning: i think it is the grease/ fat from the bacon that keeps the bag from burning. that's why the bacon has to go in the bag first. i haven't tried that myself though, yet. but i will as soon as the camping season starts again - just because it sounds funny!
but another great technique for getting rid of the dirt in the pans is to simply leave them on the fire after eating and pour water in them - the heating water dissolves all the food leftovers and you can easily discard them later on.  ;) :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on February 13, 2008, 03:46:04 AM
whaa? i'm talkin about makin ice cream!~ ;)

your hot pan of water reminds me of a woman i knew, who, after dinner, would boil water for tea, coffee, etc.,,, then she'd splash any extra boiling water on her stove top... to loosen grease, splatters, etc. and also pour it on her cutting boards to "sterilize" them.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: desertrat on February 13, 2008, 04:15:57 AM
smart woman ! i usually do it whenever i burnt something on the bottom of pans - just pour water in and let the erst heat from the oven do the trick.  ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on February 14, 2008, 05:47:04 AM
Not sure where else to post this suggestion but here goes:


I find that many times I will be on travel.  Come home, then a few days
later see on TV that this city or that has the best "so and so" at some restaurant
or "hole in the wall" the locals have been going for many years.  It's either a local
speciality or something and I just missed it because I didn't even know it was there.
Food Network had a show called "The Best Of" and it was very effective.  However,
I would trust your suggestions much more, than a network show.   ;)


How about sharing the "best" of whatever is in your town -- those restuarants and dives where the locals
have been going for years for the "best this" and "best that".    It can be anything from the best hamburgers,
strudel, local bakery, seafood, candy or whatever.  And it can be from any part of the world.


   Mmmmmmm, maybe this should be in the travel thread.... we'll see.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on February 14, 2008, 07:35:24 PM
It's probably fairly well known, but the best place in New Orleans to get a muffuletta sandwich (huge, delicious, Italian) is a place called Central Grocery in the French Quarter. To die for.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muffuletta

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on February 15, 2008, 03:32:55 AM
my "best of" restaurant-wise:

ahh! well since we're in SF right now, i will have to say san francisco's SWAN OYSTER DEPOT (http://www.roadfood.com/Reviews/Overview.aspx?RefID=365) on polk street, for oysters, shrimp, clam chowder, prawn or crab louis, etc... haven't been there in years, but it's served food for decades (since 1912) and is quite good.

it was a great place to duck into on rainy SF days, climb up on a barstool along the long white marble bar,break sourdough bread and enjoy a cup of chowder... but the oysters! oh my... that's what we used to go for... that and the crab louis -- fresh crab on iceberg lettuce with plain thousand on the side... but the crab! salty, sweet, firm and tender at the same time... magnifico. :D

speaking of seafood -- is berkeley's SPENGER's seafood grotto still open? that was always a fun place to take friends. a bit touristy, but i did like their steamed clams in garlic sauce, and also their huge fried jumbo shrimp. i recall hearing that it was once the busiest restaurant in the world...   how you measure dat? ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on February 15, 2008, 05:53:32 AM
It's probably fairly well known, but the best place in New Orleans to get a muffuletta sandwich (huge, delicious, Italian) is a place called Central Grocery in the French Quarter. To die for.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muffuletta



lol, and here I thought Quiznos invented it.......   :D

The muffuletta sandwich originated in 1906 at Central Grocery, which was operated by Salvatore Lupo, a Sicilian immigrant.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on February 15, 2008, 05:57:04 AM


San Francisco --  Swan Oyster Depot
New Orleans  --  Central Grocery Store (Muffulettas)

Jimmy --

                  Oysters -- probably the worlds perfect food -- nothing needed to down it.    I know that some people will go ewwwww, that's just more for us.     ;D    ;)

Still thinking about what to submit for SA . . .
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ybwc on February 15, 2008, 04:27:01 PM
well I just found a bakery that makes home-made porkn'beans (very nice with home-made bread with butter). add a bit of maple syrup-yum thats great too. thats a good choice for the campfire grub. note to self-keep flap of tent open.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on February 17, 2008, 09:41:36 AM
OK, here goes --

A local spot for the best Fried Chicken called M.K. Davis in San Antonio 
however, it's  better known for it's Chicken Fried Steak.  The pic doesn't
do it justice but it was the only one I could find -- I still prefer the fried chicken
oh, and of course, the onion rings......


(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l59/castlehills/BBM%20IMG%20Posts/MKDavisChickSteak.jpg)

For more than 50 years, it has been serving up chicken-fried steak, enchiladas and schooners of beer on North Flores,
and folks keep coming back for more. During a recent lunch, blue- and white-collar workers and families filled each of the heavy chairs
at the communal tables in the center of the main dining area, while every booth and bar stool was occupied and a line waited near the door.

One bite of an oversized onion ring made it easy to see why. The large cut of onion, lightly battered, had been fried to a delectable
softness where its natural sweetness came through without being greasy or soggy.  
  San Antonio Express-News Dinning Review
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on February 17, 2008, 10:48:59 AM
The summer of the BBQ there, I really came to enjoy chicken-fried steak, Gerry. Not only had some at Mama's Cafe in SA, but also later on when visiting friends in Ft Worth, at a great little place outside of town which served only that, basically.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: CANSTANDIT on February 17, 2008, 12:50:47 PM
Not sure where else to post this suggestion but here goes:


I find that many times I will be on travel.  Come home, then a few days
later see on TV that this city or that has the best "so and so" at some restaurant
or "hole in the wall" the locals have been going for many years.  It's either a local
speciality or something and I just missed it because I didn't even know it was there.
Food Network had a show called "The Best Of" and it was very effective.  However,
I would trust your suggestions much more, than a network show.   ;)


How about sharing the "best" of whatever is in your town -- those restuarants and dives where the locals
have been going for years for the "best this" and "best that".    It can be anything from the best hamburgers,
strudel, local bakery, seafood, candy or whatever.  And it can be from any part of the world.


   Mmmmmmm, maybe this should be in the travel thread.... we'll see.
I'm not much of a cook so I rarely embarrass myself over here  ;) but I can certainly make recommendations:

Rigatony's, Mesa, Arizona, USA-
Lobster Ravioli
Chicken Marsala-yummy
Bruschetta-best I've tasted
Tiramasu is to die for...OMG.



Suzy's Mexican Restaurant, University Rd,, Tempe, Arizona-

The Mariachi's that play while you eat!
Very authentic, simple Mexican fare, and great
relaxed bar and grill atmosphere

The Farmhouse, Gilbert Rd, Gilbert, Arizona-

Open for breakfast and lunch, always a crowd.
Veggie Omelette, among others. Farmhouse dining room atmosphere-two locations down the block from one another.

The Euro Deli-Route 89A, Sedona, Arizona.

Great sandwiches, egg wraps, chocolate candies, mineral water, jarred pickled veggies. Authentic European-style.

The owners are from Poland originally. Best tuna salad I think I've had.


The Coffee Pot, route 89A, Sedona, Arizona
(there is a geo formation known as Coffe Pot Rock nearby)

Awesome pancakes and decaf tea available-not always easy to find in AZ!
and a lovely gift shop up front, with good quality stuff-not tourist crap.


There is a brilliant mexican Restaurant in Benson, Arizona, across from the reailroad tracks-name escapes me,
but its the BEST Mex food I've ever had, and I've been in AZ over 25 years! If I can find the name, i'll post it.
(Its on the way to Bisbee, Arizona, a wonderful old mining town, supported by tourism and the Lavendar Mine, which has great
daily tours and the homes are practically built into the side of the mountain. Jerome, Arizona, off of I-17 North is similiar.
Nothing like an old mining town!)

Maybe this does belong in the travel thread!  :D There is a tremendous amount of touring to be done in Arizona. I still have not done it all!

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on February 18, 2008, 05:36:14 AM

jo --mmm, hungry all over again. that place outside of benson sounds like fun. i do like me some good mexican food!! my bf hates it, so that can be a dilemma, however, he doesn't mind the quesadillas i make at home. there's a suzy's in stockton, CA.... no mariachis, but they have on weekends an old guy that comes in with a casio keyboard that knows some good songs~!  i love chile rellenos, so the mark of a 'good' place is one that does a decent job with that chile, cheese and egg dish. so many places cook them ahead of time and  reheat... they're much better freshly made.

cabin and fritz -- chicken fried steak. yum. fritz, i remember the steaks at mama's being nearly too big for the plates! and those were some big a$$ plates. :D...

....oh... and baked beans and tents... haha. sounds like that scene they supposedly cut out of BBM. ;)






Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: CANSTANDIT on February 18, 2008, 07:37:14 AM
Hi, Jimmy..Hi, Cabin.

yeah the Mex food out here is uneven depending on where you go, but most of it is terrific. Tucson has a couple of great restaurants, too.

I'd love to know if the two Coffee Pots are connected-I'm guessing not. The one in Sedona is called that because of the coffee-pot shaped formation in the distance.

I thought of another place in Sedona, too: Vegi-Liscious, I think is the name, up the street from the Coffee Pot. I tried it out and I was able to eat the food I was served. It was heavy on spices, but was essentially healthy-minded eating.

I had some thick carrot soup-tasted like squash soup; and some other dish made with veggies and curry. A bit too spicy for me, but still quite good. I felt very healthy after eating it- :D

Also: There is the airport above the city in Sedona, and it serves very tasty standard dishes, while you watch the sunset and the planes land and take-off. Very romantic, and also fun. You have to take a very steep ride up the Airport road, literally, and once you get up there its quite the view.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on February 18, 2008, 07:45:30 AM
Fritz -- one of the downfalls in SA is all the good mexican food -- really have to watch the weight
it's all very hi-cal food.    I've already put mexican food on my "occasional" column.   :D
  . . . and that goes for Chicken Fried Steak and all that.


jo -- The Coffee Pot sounds familiar, I think there is one in New Orleans also known for its breakfast,
but not probably the same.

jimmy -- I absolutely agree that a chile relleno is a sign of an excellent restaurant..... many will cook
them ahead, and they kill it.  However, I like my chile rellenos stuffed with picadillo (seasoned ground meat).
. . . and I can make em, just like mama used to.. :)

The chile relleno below has a green chile sauce -- I tend to favor a red sauce, but they're both good.

(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l59/castlehills/BBM%20IMG%20Posts/chiler.jpg)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: CANSTANDIT on February 18, 2008, 07:52:30 AM
I have not eaten breakfast yet..you have no idea how hungry that pic makes me! ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on February 18, 2008, 02:53:07 PM
omg. i'm with you on that, jo...  OH. you said angry. i thought you said hungry. foodian slip hehe. ;)

i've never tried or even seen on menus the chile relleno with meat inside, that sounds really good. ok. i'm going to try and talk linda into going for mexican for lunch. there's a place called el faro that we pass frequently that looks interesting. :D  tonight, for dinner, she's making greek chicken ~ maybe we'll post the recipe later!

i found a great vegetarian cookbook at the library the other day, by jack bishop: a year in the vegetarian kitchen....  but i'm to lazy to retype a recipe. if i find one online i'll link it.

UPDATE: we went to el faro and i had caved in to crunchy and ordered taquitos. a very handsome man behind us had the chili rayenoze and gave us the thumbs up.:D

here is a recipe from the book, and a review. (http://www.thefoodpaper.com/cookbooks/vegetariankitchen.html)

bulgur salad with chickpeas, roasted peppers, and spiced cumin dressing

Fine-grain bulgur, sometimes labeled "good for tabbouleh," is essential to this recipe, because coarsely ground bulgur will not soften when soaked in boiling water. A late-season tomato salad or sautéed cherry tomatoes with Indian flavors complete this meal. Serves 4 as a main course.

1 1/2 cups fine-grain bulgur
3 cups boiling water
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon honey
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
Salt
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
6 ounces drained jarred roasted red peppers, diced (about 1 cup)
1/4 cup minced fresh parsley leaves
1 medium head Bibb lettuce, leaves separated
4 pita breads, warmed and cut into wedges

Place the bulgur in a large bowl. Add the boiling water and set aside, stirring occasionally, until the bulgur has softened, 15 to 20 minutes. Drain the bulgur, shaking the strainer and gently pressing out excess moisture. Return the bulgur to the bowl. Meanwhile, whisk the lemon juice, honey, cumin, cayenne, and 1/2 teaspoon salt together in a small bowl. Whisk in the oil until the dressing is smooth.

Add the chickpeas, roasted peppers, and parsley to the bowl with the drained bulgur and stir to combine. Drizzle the dressing over the bulgur mixture and toss to combine. Line each individual plate with several lettuce leaves. Mound some bulgur salad over the lettuce and tuck some pita wedges into the salad at several places around the plate. Serve.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on February 19, 2008, 06:15:31 AM
jimmy -- crispy taquitos or flautas (the bigger ones) are very good -- I suspect they were filled with chicken.

I'm familiar with the name Faro but as in Farolito or to mean, the little lamp light, usually casting a romantic
glow on a cobbled street.   ;D  There is a very famous song by Agustine Lara called El Farolito.

then again..... Faro also means lighthouse, and there ain't anything romantic about the glow of that thing,
especially in a narrow cobbled street as you stroll.    Nothing against lighthouse, they are beauts, but just not the same.   ;D


(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l59/castlehills/BBM%20IMG%20Posts/farolito-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on February 19, 2008, 06:18:10 AM
regarding the vegetarian cookbook, as the review points out  -- it's that first whiff of barbecue that would make me fail at it.   :D  :D  :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: CANSTANDIT on February 19, 2008, 07:35:02 AM
omg. i'm with you on that, jo...  OH. you said angry. i thought you said hungry. foodian slip hehe. ;)

i've never tried or even seen on menus the chile relleno with meat inside, that sounds really good. ok. i'm going to try and talk linda into going for mexican for lunch. there's a place called el faro that we pass frequently that looks interesting. :D  tonight, for dinner, she's making greek chicken ~ maybe we'll post the recipe later!

i found a great vegetarian cookbook at the library the other day, by jack bishop: a year in the vegetarian kitchen....  but i'm to lazy to retype a recipe. if i find one online i'll link it.

UPDATE: we went to el faro and i had caved in to crunchy and ordered taquitos. a very handsome man behind us had the chili rayenoze and gave us the thumbs up.:D

here is a recipe from the book, and a review. (http://www.thefoodpaper.com/cookbooks/vegetariankitchen.html)

bulgur salad with chickpeas, roasted peppers, and spiced cumin dressing

Fine-grain bulgur, sometimes labeled "good for tabbouleh," is essential to this recipe, because coarsely ground bulgur will not soften when soaked in boiling water. A late-season tomato salad or sautéed cherry tomatoes with Indian flavors complete this meal. Serves 4 as a main course.

1 1/2 cups fine-grain bulgur
3 cups boiling water
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon honey
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
Salt
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
6 ounces drained jarred roasted red peppers, diced (about 1 cup)
1/4 cup minced fresh parsley leaves
1 medium head Bibb lettuce, leaves separated
4 pita breads, warmed and cut into wedges

Place the bulgur in a large bowl. Add the boiling water and set aside, stirring occasionally, until the bulgur has softened, 15 to 20 minutes. Drain the bulgur, shaking the strainer and gently pressing out excess moisture. Return the bulgur to the bowl. Meanwhile, whisk the lemon juice, honey, cumin, cayenne, and 1/2 teaspoon salt together in a small bowl. Whisk in the oil until the dressing is smooth.

Add the chickpeas, roasted peppers, and parsley to the bowl with the drained bulgur and stir to combine. Drizzle the dressing over the bulgur mixture and toss to combine. Line each individual plate with several lettuce leaves. Mound some bulgur salad over the lettuce and tuck some pita wedges into the salad at several places around the plate. Serve.
Mine was a foodian slip! I probably was angry that I was so hungry, and can't just eat what I want.. ;D

Tx for the tips!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on February 19, 2008, 07:57:31 AM
el faro == yes, the logo has a lighthouse! it was gooooooooooooood.

and LOL about the first whiff of BBQ... it's true, there's something about mary meat.  ;)  i do try to balance it out however, with veggie meals. not cooking meat at home helps a lot, i can go weeks w/o preparing meaty dishes.

jo, between you and me -- i could go for a stack of blueberry pancakes right now!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on February 22, 2008, 05:30:09 AM

and LOL about the first whiff of BBQ... it's true, there's something about mary meat.  ;)  i do try to balance it out however, with veggie meals. not cooking meat at home helps a lot, i can go weeks w/o preparing meaty dishes.

(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l59/castlehills/Something.jpg)



This would work for either title.    ;D   ;D   ;D    Wait till Sal gets ahold of this.    8)

    mod:       lol, just noticed the tagline...... "got Milk?   You bet she does!"
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on February 23, 2008, 03:40:48 PM
LMAO  ...  MOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooooo oooh ooh ooh. :D ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: killersmom on February 24, 2008, 05:23:00 PM
Shaker Chicken Noodle Soup
Serves 15

13 cups chicken broth, divided
1/3 cup dry vermouth
1/4 cup butter
1 cup heavy cream
1 pkg 12 oz egg noodles
1 cup thinly sliced celery
1 cup grated carrots
1 1/2 cups water
3/4 cup flour
3 cups diced cooked chicken breasts
(I use chicken tenders, cook whole in a can of chicken broth and then dice)
salt and pepper to taste

1.  Combine 1 cup broth, vermouth, and butter in small saucepan. Bring to a boil over high
heat. Continue to boil 15 to 20 minutes or until liquid is reduced to 1/4 cup and has a syrupy consistency. Stir in cream. Set aside.

2.  Bring remaining broth to a boil in a dutch oven. (heavy pot) Add noodles, celery and carrots. Cook until noodles are just tender.

3.  Combine water and flour in a sealable bowl and shake until smooth.  Stir into broth mixture. Bring to a boil and boil for 2 minutes, stirring constantly.

4.  Stir in reserved cream mixture; add chicken. Season with salt and pepper. Heat just to serving temperature. Do not boil.  Serve with warm bread.

This makes a large amount, but if you have any left, it freezes very well.
Enjoy!!!!

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: huntinbuddy on February 25, 2008, 08:17:15 PM
This sounds delicious Linda, and I am going to give it a try this upcoming weekend.  I particularly like the addition of the vermouth and heavy cream.    Not seen those two ingredients in a chicken soup recipe before.

Charlie
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: killersmom on February 25, 2008, 08:19:19 PM
It gives it a unique taste and the consistency is really more like a stew than a soup.
It is one of my favorite soups, right up there with my Tortilla soup,  and I think you will really like it.
And it is not fattening at all!! ::) ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: CANSTANDIT on February 25, 2008, 08:35:44 PM
Linda, I'm salivating..can't wait to make it. Maybe this weekend, we'll see.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: killersmom on February 25, 2008, 08:42:52 PM
Same here, Jo!!!
I may have to make it this weekend as well!!!!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on February 26, 2008, 06:34:25 AM
Linda:                                                                             Jimmy, I just noticed your creation above ^^^^^^ reminds me of Hirschfeld's Nina.   :D

We'll, you know me and my love affair with soup -- I'm trying it this week . . .
I need a switch...
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on February 26, 2008, 09:09:22 PM
OK, I'm looking for fruit smooties you've tried.  homemade, of course and low in fat.

I've just discovered our blender is great for these kinds of things.....
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: killersmom on February 28, 2008, 03:55:31 AM
Great Gerry.
I really think you will like it!!!!!!!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on March 03, 2008, 06:11:39 AM
Made the Shaker Soup and it was very good.  It had a clean taste and the cream at the end, sweetened it up
and I don't mean sweet like suguar, but sweet like cream soup... I'll keep this one.... I didn't do this, but next
time I'll drop some frozen peas towards the very end.   Thanks linda.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: Stilllearning on March 11, 2008, 07:01:19 PM
I'm not a very good cook, but this is one thing that I can make that people seem to enjoy.  Because I don't like any condiments (oops sorry Ennis, because I don't like mayonnaise  :D), I make a hot German potato salad instead of regular potato salad:

6 medium potatoes
6 strips of bacon
1/2 C chopped onion
2 tsp sugar
2 tsp salt
1 tsp flour
1/8 tsp pepper
3 TBS red-wine vinegar

Cook potatoes until fork tender, then cool them slightly and dice.

Cook bacon until crisp, then drain

Cook onion in 2 TBS of oil until tender, about 5 minutes, then add sugar, salt, flour, pepper.

Gradually stir in red-wine vinegar and 1/2 C water - stir constantly.

Stir in potatoes and bacon and heat through.

Serve and enjoy

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on March 12, 2008, 06:40:53 AM
mmm, i've had linda's shaker soup, and it's good! peas sound like a nice addition too... and german potato salad is my fave. it's so good with grilled bratswurst sandwiches, on toasted french rolls with swiss cheese, chopped onion, and a good mustard. :)

ok... i usually make cole slaw without mayo, using oil and vinegar dressing instead, but today i tried something different. linda had mentioned a cole slaw recipe with apples, and i thought i'd improvise at home. it turned out yummy.

CURRY APPLE COLE SLAW with RAISINS

1/2 med. sized head of red (purple) cabbage
1/2 large apple, peeled and seeded
1 stalk celery
fresh lemon juice
mayonnaise
curry powder (i used japanese)
cracked pepper
tumeric powder

slice cabbage paper into super thin shreds and place in large bowl. finely dice the apple and celery, place in small bowl and toss with juice of 1/2 small lemon. add to cabbage. now add a little mayo, like two blobs. sprinkle in a pinch of curry powder, tumeric powder, black pepper, and a handful of raisins. toss well.

the color of the cabbage turns the mayo pink and the tumeric turns the pink mayo kinda orangey. optional: add some nasturtium petals for a peppery twist and more color. (why not, lol)

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on March 12, 2008, 08:51:15 PM
Thanks for the German PS recipe -- have always liked it and will use this one next time I make it.

jimmy:  Always steered away from curries till I made one from scratch less than a year ago.

Found this great recipe for Thai Green Curry from the American Test Kitchen folks.  Have made it twice
each time it makes enough for 4 separate dishes, so I'm well on my way to really enjoying curry and it freezes well.


btw, I'm a traditionalist when it comes to slaw, but willing to try your recipe.   ;)

gerry
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: killersmom on March 13, 2008, 12:55:34 AM
Green Apple Slaw

2 Granny Smith apples, peeled, grated and patted dry
Zest of 1 lemon plus 1 1/2 tablespoons juice
1/2 cup mayonnaise
1/3 cup chopped chives
1 1/2 tablespoons pure maple syrup
1/2 tablespoon Jamaican jerk seasoning, such as McCormick, divided

In a medium bowl, toss the apples with the lemon zest and juice. Add the mayonnaise, chives, maple syrup and jerk seasoning. Stir to combine and refrigerate
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: killersmom on March 13, 2008, 01:05:03 AM
Mango Slaw

1/4 cup honey
Juice of 2 limes, zest of 1
1 tablespoon hot sauce (eyeball it – and toss in more if you like it spicy!), divided
1 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), divided
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup (about a handful) parsley, chopped
1/4 cup (about a handful) cilantro, chopped
1 ripe mango, cut into strips
1/2 small head purple cabbage, shredded

For the slaw, whisk together the honey, lime juice and zest, hot sauce, 1 tablespoon EVOO, some salt and freshly ground black and pepper in a medium-size mixing bowl. Add the herbs, mango and shredded cabbage to the bowl, and toss to combine. Set the slaw aside to marinate.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on March 13, 2008, 05:14:26 AM
oh hello. EVOO, LOL. that's so cute. well. that mango slaw sounds killer, and the apple slaw sounds interesting too. just apples! what a concept. apples and CHIVES!! now that's one i'm willing to try, i have everything but the jerk seasoning. i'll have to see what's in that.



gerry, yeah curry seems to have limited fans. my bf didn't particularly care for that curried slaw i made the other night! i'm a huge fan of curry -- and there's all kinds. i love the green thai curry paste, and make veggie curries over rice in large amounts. i've also found this groovy indian market with awesome little boxed packets of different kinds of curry mixes... for like 79 cents. OMG. they say to throw in the whole packet, but that's impossible. i use a quarter packet in the recipe (there are some on the back of the box) and it's almost too hot. i cannot imagine how potent it would be to use it all~!

OH i also found an awesome tofu place. they do everything tofu, including "chicken" and "pork" and "beef"... it's a trip. and SO GOOD. it's almost like you'd never know -- they even have the texture down. the "chicken" tears like chicken breast (stringy like) and the "beef" is chewy good. it baffles the mind. i'm waiting for tofu flavored beef, myself.

or Beepple: beef flavored apples. it could happen -- you've seen the Grapples ™ right?   :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on March 14, 2008, 05:38:53 AM
OK, here is my recipe for Cole Slaw:

1 bag of this:
(http://www.concordfoods.com/images/seas_slaw.jpg)


 . . . and follow directions (1 medium head of cabbage and one
cup of mayo). The best slaw I've ever had.  One time recently,
my local grocery store ran out and weeks went by before any of the stores
had any, I paniced.     One weekend, there they were, beautiful new bags of
this stuff.    I bought all they had, for a total of 8, hanging there on a hook
in the produce section.    Now, I give a glance every time I go past the
produce section, just to make sure they're there.    :D  :D  :D

btw, I went to there website and they make all kinds of mixes, however, this
is the only one I use.


http://www.concordfoods.com/produce.html
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on March 16, 2008, 09:39:32 AM
LOL.  ^^^ somewhere in your town is a another guy going nuts because you bought all the packages of HIS fave cole slaw mix! :D  it does sound easy and quick -- their website says it's "tangy sweet-tart," and that sounds delish. :)

i'm a fan of pasta salads too. summer's coming, so salads are real good for picnics and stuff.

there's the classic macaroni salad my grandma made: the elbow macaroni, mayo, peas, celery, salt and pepper... and that's about it. oh -- little cubes of cheddar cheese. (she was from wisconin) :)  i remember finding the texture of the peas and cheese to be quite compelling, along with the crunch of celery. maybe she added onion too, or onion salt..? and a final sprinkle of paprika, and maybe some black olives on top.

it's great with grilled chickenm and corn on the cob, and other "outdoor" stuff.



Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on March 17, 2008, 06:14:32 AM
Ooops, I hadn't thought about my impact of cornering the "cole-slaw mix" market.      ;D          lol

I like hot pasta dishes, I'm afraid that Suddenly Salad mixes has squashed my taste for
cold pasta salads.

Now Mac N Cheese is a whole different story.   If the end of the world should come,
I'd probably corner the market on that right before it happens.

Your dish sounds great -- the bits of crunch add-ons makes for a good addition and
sounds much better than college-days Kraft macaroni and cheese....   :D   :D    :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on March 18, 2008, 06:21:17 AM
it's interesting how the "fancy" restaurants are now offering mac and cheese on their menus. with different cheeses and perfect pasta, they charge 6.50 for a scant cup! and it's not thaaat great, but it's not bad... definitely a cut above kraft.

my bf adds tuna and peas to kraft mac and cheese and makes a splendid version of the stuff, he makes it better than i ever can. :D

i want pancakes now for some reason. i wish we had some ricotta cheese in the fridge. it sounds weird, but it's really good. just mix some in with the batter. a college friend showed me that trick one day at her house... odd, but delicious.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: killersmom on March 18, 2008, 07:34:26 PM
i want pancakes now for some reason. i wish we had some ricotta cheese in the fridge. it sounds weird, but it's really good. just mix some in with the batter. a college friend showed me that trick one day at her house... odd, but delicious.

Cottage cheese is a good addition as well! Odd but delicious too!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on March 18, 2008, 07:40:08 PM
^^^ that makes sense! :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ybwc on March 21, 2008, 10:36:01 AM
it's MAPLE SYRUP TIME: Another one of Mother Nature's Gifts.

The maple trees are flowing now in the bush. This winter was/is long. Sap production can be as early as the end of February. The early light sap is the best because it has the highest concentration of sugar. (Thats how the leaves on the trees grow from the sugary sap).

Quebec is the world's largest producer (land mass 1.6 million square kms) with Vermont as #2(has 9600 sq miles) and the province of Ontario is #3(412,000 sq miles). So vermont produces alot of this liquid gold for such a small state.
All maple sugar is organic/natural-producers make sure the boiling/evapourating vats have no lead etc that could contaminate the syrup production.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYzZ3G_lFX4

enjoy!  and get out to your local sugar camp
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ybwc on March 21, 2008, 10:38:25 AM
here's a better video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0resHDTE4oo&NR=1
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on March 22, 2008, 07:06:43 AM
mmmmmmmmmmmaple syrup... awesome...

so the light color is more desireable? the opposite of olive oil!

such a great sweetener.. naturally. another reason to worship trees! i pour it on cereal sometimes. :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ybwc on March 22, 2008, 08:21:02 PM
 :)
Yes the lighter the syrup the better. the sap "running" season is over when the colour of the sap turns yellowish. The mention of pancakes inspired me to share. I like dutch pancakes the best with peameal bacon and an egg on top.  ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on March 22, 2008, 09:33:31 PM
Peameal bacon? ???

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ybwc on March 23, 2008, 09:29:04 AM
 :D

peameal bacon is another name canadian back bacon. "back" refers to the cut. it has cornmeal on the surface(very very thin layer)  and is very low fat, high protein.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on March 23, 2008, 10:33:16 AM
Sounds delicious! Thanks!

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on March 26, 2008, 04:19:14 AM
mm, pancakes. this is NOT the thread to pop into when you're craving a midnight snack! okay... so i'll post something most of you might not find appetizing at all, but it brings me back to my wonderful childhood when we caught octopus fresh out of the mediterranean ocean and had it prepared right on the beach... mmmmm... tentacles.



OCTOPUS SALAD

2lbs frozen octopus, thawed and rinsed
1/2 cup italian parsley
3 cloves garlic, chopped fine
1 rib celery, halved lengthwise, then chopped crosswise thinly
1 carrot, halved lengthwise, then chopped crosswise thinly
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1/2 tsp fine sea salt
1/2 tsp black pepper
1/4 tsp dried oregano

• cut off and discard head of octopus; cut tentacles into 1" pieces.

• place in heavy pot and cover with water and simmer gently, uncovered, for 45 min to 1 hour until tender.

• drain octopus and cool to room temperature and the transfer to bowl.

• stir in remaining ingredients and toss.

• let stand 30 minutes for flavors to develop.

note: can be made, w/o parsley, 1 day ahead of time and chilled. stir in parsley just before serving.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ChrisW on March 26, 2008, 04:26:56 AM
mmm! :D
- is Italian parsley the flat-leaved stuff (my personal favourite)?
mussels are nmore the sort of thing we can get at here though -
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on March 26, 2008, 04:55:42 PM
yes italian parsley is flat leafed parsley. which is so wonderful for so many things! :D i don't ever buy/use the other stuff.

mussels sound good too... saw a recipe next to the octopus for stuffed mussels, but i'm not apt to eat shellfish like i used to.

there's an anchovy and breadcrumb pasta recipe that also looks good.. all this from gourmet magazine, of course. :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on March 26, 2008, 05:12:49 PM
Mmmmm, sounds delicious!

First got to like octopus and squid in Greece and Italy, and then many years later an Italian lady in the choir would make calimari for every New Year's Eve, and would make some for us, too!

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: ChrisW on March 26, 2008, 05:16:06 PM
yum! I still love mussels - very good in Ireland.
and flat-leaved parsley has been a great standby during the kitchen chaos here. A jug of it - like a flower vase, keep snipping bits off.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on March 27, 2008, 03:56:07 PM
oh wow, i'm glad some people like octopus. i'm a fan of squid too! mmmmmmm. tonight i'm having dinner at a brazilian place. they have the best "frito misto," which for them is fried shrimp, whitefish, calamari, and usually something else... whatever they toss in, i guess. once it was zucchini strips. they serve it with a marinara sauce, and lemons of course.... and it's dusted with chopped fresh parsley! ^_^

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: killersmom on March 27, 2008, 04:10:03 PM
Save a plate for me I am heading down!!!  ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on April 05, 2008, 07:42:29 AM
OK, I'll way in on parsley..... I'll use both, but prefer curly leaf,
has more flavor and makes a better garnish....  :D , sorry, I learned
everything I know, cooking wise from Julia.


Here is dinner from last night...   I had no curly parsley, so used the "other" one....   ;D

noodles, Alfredo sauce, scallops.... Mmmmmmm.

(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l59/castlehills/Food/IMG_0756.jpg)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on April 06, 2008, 10:59:59 PM
^^^  oh wow........... gerry, that looks absolutely delicious... scallops on that plate the size of apples! :D

pan-seared ocean parts are soo good. and you did the right thing by using italian parsley... it is alfredo, afterall! ;)

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: maturben on April 09, 2008, 05:21:37 PM
gerry/jimmy-----apple-sized scallops?!  Granny Smith or crab? ::)

bob

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on April 09, 2008, 07:42:37 PM
Coyote.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: desertrat on April 10, 2008, 02:39:55 AM
spring - it's time for lamb meat ! i found a great recipie lately that i've tried 2 times already now. it's easy and tastes soooo nice....

you need lamb steaks or a whole piece of lamb back. next, you need lots of herbs - the optimum, of course, would to go out into nature and collect them. i did and used danylion leaves, nettles, ribwort, ramson, parsil, watercress, burnet,...
cut the herbs fine and mix them with vegetable oil. now, rub it all over the lamb meat, wrap it in foil and leave it soak in the fridge for at least 12 hours. then, heat a pan with oil and quickly bronze them from all sides. preheat the oven to 180°C (356F), but the lamb into an over dish together with a spoonful of vegetable butter and leave in for 5-20 minutes (5=rare, 10=medium, nice pink colour ! 20=well done).

i usually slice them up before serving, it looks really nice with the herb crust. as a side i've once done herb potatoes and asparagus and once farfalle pasta with an asparagus sauce.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on April 11, 2008, 06:37:36 AM
martina, thanks for the heads up on lamb.  I agree it's time for lamb -- well there's,


chops  (http://www.cleanhomejournal.com/viewdocument.aspx?did=107)  roast  (http://www.mslamb.com/images/loinsroast.jpg)  leg (http://www.cornichon.org/archives/Leg%20of%20lamb.JPG)   

stew  (http://www.australian-lamb.com/lamb/images/inner/print/57.jpg)  . . . and shank (one of my favorites)  (http://farm1.static.flickr.com/209/510404306_1f5ad5376d.jpg)           


 . . . and a host of others (sausages, burgers).  Now I just need to decide....  :)

Now, lamb steaks -- do you mean chops?

and lamb back, do you mean "a rack"?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: desertrat on April 11, 2008, 06:40:13 AM


Now, lamb steaks -- do you mean chops?

and lamb back, do you mean "a rack"?

i guess so - i don't know what the parts are called in the US. just ask for the appropriate parts on a lamb's body - the back pieces are the best  ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on April 12, 2008, 12:16:44 AM
oooh.. the lamb recipe sounds great (love the herbs!) but wow -- i'd like to see the recipe for the farfalla pasta with asparagus sauce!

aaah, lamb. i fell in love with it in greece, when we enjoyed it grilled over a charcoal fire and then stuffed into pita bread with all the right stuff... we'd get it off the man with the little cart on the street. souvlaki. mmmm.  and lamb shanks are probably my fave too -- there's a diner in burbank (dave's) that's owned by a greek family. every wednesday they feature lamb shanks as a special, until it's sold out, which happens too early IMHO!  my bf isn't fond of lamb, says the flavor is too gamey... but i think it's good once in a while.

like every wednesday.  :D

hmm. i haven't been to dave's in ages...  thanks for the reminder!


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: desertrat on April 13, 2008, 03:35:52 AM
too gamey ? there's never such a thing as too gamey.  :D :D
we ate game several times a week in africa, and i just loved it. i can tell you about almost every antelope species in souther africa what it tastes like.  ;D ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: desertrat on April 13, 2008, 03:39:19 AM
oooh.. the lamb recipe sounds great (love the herbs!) but wow -- i'd like to see the recipe for the farfalla pasta with asparagus sauce!


uhm...there isn't really a recipie because i invented it  :-[

here is what i did: i boiled green asparagus for about 15 minutes (till it felt soft). then i cut off the heads and put the rest in a food processor, mashing it into a homogenous paste. then i added sour cream with herbs, salt and pepper. i poured it over the farfalla and decorated it with the asparagus heads. that's it !  :)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: desertrat on April 13, 2008, 03:45:01 AM
another nice recipie that i made for 30 people yesterday..and they finished it up till the last bit, seems they liked it  :D

chickpea and lentille stew

this stew contains brown lentilles, chickpeas, ham, carrots, celery, onions, garic and lots of herbs (parsil, cress, oregano, basil, rosmary and some wild herbs).
i cooked lentilles and chickpeas, fried onion, ham, garlic, carrots and celery and then added the chickpeas and lentilles with a  bit of the water they were boiled in.

a good stew if you have many hungry mouths to feed  ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on April 13, 2008, 08:12:38 AM
martina, i thought the asparagus recipe might be delightfully easy!

sounds great, i suppose it would work with heavy cream too.... i love simple cooking, using no measuring spoons. i do that often with stews, just tossing anything and everything i have on hand and hoping it turns out good. most of the time it works. ;)

ohh antelope.. wow, that sounds very interesting, and i suspect the flavor varied between the types of animals too. i'd love to see some african recipes. i love north african food, the rich stews eaten with injera bread are so good. (oh and that honey wine ain't so bad either!)

my dad hunted here in north america. i wasn't too fond of antelope, preferring deer meat instead... the elk was okay. but antelope, or pronghorn, seemed a bit odd... maybe it wasn't prepared the right way. i usually marinated any game meat for hours, usually overnight, before grilling, and that seemed to help... lots of garlic too.  ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: desertrat on April 13, 2008, 08:17:10 AM
i never do measurements either. that makes writing down recipies so difficult...i make them up on the go and i can naver say how much of what i used  :D
 
on game: my best way of preparation is fire - meat - grill.  ;D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on April 13, 2008, 09:23:17 AM
Jimmy,

Funny you should mention your local eatery with the special lamb shank till it runs out special.  Houston has one also, called Café Pita – Lamb Shanks till they run out (I think it was Thursdays only), located in the Westheimer area well known as the gay area.  Visiting friends to our cabin from Houston are often requested to bring a carryout of shank – Mmmmm, must do again soon.

Btw, unlike your greek restaurant this is the best Bosnian Restaurant in Houston, in fact, it’s the only Bosnian Restaurant in Houston.


Martina, as for game meat.....   not to crazy about it, and that's from someone who can eat tripe., lol    Maybe it was all that venison my brothers would bring during hunting season.

Regarding the use of recipes, it depends when I follow them.   I've learned to cook from memory, meaning, I don't need to read the recipe most times any more.  I've gotten to know the crook of my palm very well (and no comments from the peanut section, lol).    About the only recipe is for baking, or making curries.... those very long list of ingredients used.... and when I want to be sure I want to duplicate the exact flavor/texture of something.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: desertrat on April 13, 2008, 09:26:36 AM
About the only recipe is for baking, or making curries.... those very long list of ingredients used.... and when I want to be sure I want to duplicate the exact flavor/texture of something.


yes, i do the same when baking. i simply can not remember the amounts of ingredients and such.  ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: huntinbuddy on May 05, 2008, 09:09:16 PM
Two weeks, and nobody did any cookin?!?!  Well here is one to try......

Sweet Bourbon Salmon

For those who want something other than beef (which is really expensive now) try this salmon entree which will serve two.

First you have to make the Sweet Bourbon Marinade

1/4 cup pineapple juice
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 teaspoon Kentucky bourbon
2 8-ounce salmon fillets
1/4 teaspoon cracked black pepper
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 teaspoons snipped fresh chives

1.  Combine the pineapple juice, soy sauce, brown sugar, bourbon, pepper and garlic powder in a medium bowl.  Stir to dissolve the sugar.  Add the oil
2.  Be sure all of the skin is removed from the salmon.  Place the fillets in a shallow dish and pour the bourbon marinade over them, saving a little to brush
     on the fish as it cooks.  Put a lid over the fish and refrigerate for at least an hour.  A few hours is even better.
3.  Preheat your barbecue or stovetop grill to a medium / high heat.
4.  Cook the fish for 5 to 7 minutes per side or until each fillet is cooked all the way through.  Regularly brush the fillets with the marinade.
5.  Arrange the fillets on each plate with the chives sprinkled over the top.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: huntinbuddy on May 05, 2008, 09:27:48 PM
Oh hell, if you can afford whiskey, you can afford beef, so why not try ...

Whiskey Pepper Steak

First, make the Whiskey Pepper Sauce

1 tablespoon butter
2 tablespoons chopped white onion
2 cups beef stock or canned beef broth
1/4 teaspoon cracked black pepper
1 clove garlic, pressed
2 tablespoons whiskey
1 green onion, chopped
1 teaspoon cornstarch
1 tablespoon water

For the Pepper Steak (and this will work for other cuts of beef, not just top sirloin callled for here)

1 16-oz top sirloin steak, cut into two portions
2 teaspoons cracked black pepper
2 tablespoons butter

1.  Fire up your barbecue grill
2.  In a saucepan, or deep skillet, make the whiskey pepper sauce by sauteing the white onions in the butter over highheat.
     In about 3 minutes the onions will begin to turn brown.
3.  Add 1 cup of the beef stock to the onions.  Add the cracked black pepper and the pressed garlic as well.  Continue to
     simmer over medium/high heat until the sauce has reduced by about half.
4.  Add the whiskey, green onion, and remaining 1 cup of beef stock to the sauce and let it simmer over low heat while you
     prepare the steaks.
5.  Spread 1/2 teaspoon of cracked pepper over the entire surface of each side of the sirloin steaks and press it into the
     steaks so that it sticks.
6.  Melt 2 tablespoons of butter in a large skillet over medium / high heat.  Drop the steaks into the melted butter and sear
     each side of the steaks for 1 1/2 to 2 minutes or until brown.
7.  When the barbecue is good and hot, grill the steaks for 3 to 5 minutes per side or until they are done to your liking.  Salt
     the steaks lightly as they grill.
8.  When the steaks are just about done, combine the cornstarch with the tablespoon of water in a small bowl.  Stir just
     until the cornstarch dissolves.
9.  Remove the whiskey sauce from the heat and add the cornstarch to it.  Put the sauce back on the heat and continue
     to cook on low heat until the sauce is thickened to the consistency you desire.  Serve the steak doused with the
     whiskey pepper sauce.    This entree will serve 2. 


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 06, 2008, 01:40:52 AM
haha, and you can sip the ingredients too!  both recipes sound really good... i'll order the salmon tonight though, peppered steaks tend to give me heartburn.  :P
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: chapeaugris on May 06, 2008, 03:28:10 AM
Two weeks, and nobody did any cookin?!?!  Well here is one to try......

Sweet Bourbon Salmon
If you want something really simple with salmon and alcohol, try what we had last night, pasta with whiskey-salmon sauce. You just sliver up some smoked salmon, sauté it in butter for literally a few seconds and then add a tablespoon or so of whiskey. Let it sizzle a few more seconds then add a big dollop of crème fraiche (guess it's sour cream in the states) and let it melt. Turn off heat, grind in some pepper and toss in pasta (farfalle is good for this).
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on May 07, 2008, 06:12:01 AM
Speaking of creme fraiche , which I'm sure most people
can't get at their grocery store in the US.  Julia always came up with
ideas on substitutions and if it was good for her, it's good
enough for me.  I make it and use it often:

Ingredients:
2 cups heavy cream
1/2 cup sour cream

Keep in a jar in back of the fridge.

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 07, 2008, 02:30:19 PM
it's interesting about creme fraiche -- it's available here in stores, and there's a big difference to sour cream. it doesn't have the tang that sour cream has, if i recall correctly.  it was rather heavy bodied too. i don't use it in cooking, i only had it once when a woman i know was eating it straight from the container with a spoon, LOL.  i do use ricotta cheese from time to time, and will add that to pasta sauces and other tomato based dishes... and pancakes!

i'll keep julia's creme fraiche subsitute in mind, and also try picking some up and trying kim's salmon farfalle pasta recipe.  :)

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on May 17, 2008, 12:45:56 AM
it's so friggin hot in LA. :D so here's a link to a recipe for cold soba noodles, my mom would whip this up in summertime for us. it's one of my fave meals, usually served with shrimp tempura.

http://www.justhungry.com/basics-cold-soba-noodles-dipping-sauce
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on May 19, 2008, 06:31:56 AM
jimmy,

Sure sounds like the perfect summer meal..... I'll be sure and try it.  About soba, I've seen many kinds and sizes,
any recommendations.   And about dashi, I make it when called for, the flavor is so subtle, I can't seem to notice
the difference in the final dish with all the other flavors that go into a dish.   Any thoughts on Dashi?
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on June 10, 2008, 08:12:50 AM
hey gerry.. OOPS i forgot about the recipes thread...!  ummm... for soba, i have only used buckwheat soba. it comes in little bundles... the square noodles are cool. :D

for dashi, i use dried kelp. it looks like dried rubber LOL and when you soak it it becomes seaweed again. i use it for miso soup, mostly.

or i'll use powdered dashi, which is quicker. :)  i don't know about the subtlety, but i'm sure it makes a difference. in the sauce for the zaru soba, for instance (the cold noodle dish) it wouldn't be as good if you diluted the kaeshi with water.

you can also make dashi with other things, like dried shitake.

omg. i just found out on wikipedia that there's a bukkake soba.  :o ;D

oh great... now i'm craving these darn noodles.. i'm going to see if michael wants japanese food for lunch today. ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: huntinbuddy on July 13, 2008, 08:41:10 PM
How about some summertime grilling favorite recipes?  Here is one I did yesterday, and it was delicious.

Indonesian Chicken Breasts

1/2 cup orange juice
1/4 cup peanut butter
2 teaspoons curry powder
4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves (about 1 pound)
1 medium red bell pepper, cut in half
1/4 cup shredded coconut
1/4 cup currants
Hot cooked rice, if desired

1. Beat orange juice, peanut butter and curry powder in medium nonmetal bowl using a whisk or mixer.
Add chicken, turning to coat with marinade.  Cover and refrigerate, turning once, at least 1 hour but
no longer than 24 hours.

2.  Heat coals or gas grill.  Remove chicken from marinade; discard marinade.  Cover and grill chicken and
bell pepper 4 to 6 inches from medium heat 15 to 20 minutes, turning once, until chicken is no longer
pink in center. (Hint: to prevent chicken from sticking to the grill, brush the grill rack with vegetable oil
or use cooking spray before heating the grill.)

To serve, cut chicken breasts diagonally into 1/2 inch slices and bell pepper into 1/2 inch strips.  Top
chicken and bell pepper with coconut and currants.  Serve with rice if desired.

Makes 4 servings. 
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: huntinbuddy on July 13, 2008, 09:03:53 PM
Here is a nice grilled dish that can be served with hot cooked orzo that has been mixed with a little olive oil and chopped fresh thyme.

Grilled Flank Steak with Nectarines

Honey Ginger Marinade
1.5 lbs beef flank steak
2 nectarines, each cut into 8 pieces

Honey Ginger Marinade

1/4 cup red wine
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup dry sherry
1/4 cup honey
1/3 teaspoon ground ginger
couple small green onions, finely sliced (about 3 tablespoons)
1 clove garlic, finely chopped

Mix all ingredients.

1.  After preparing the Honey Ginger Marinade, make cuts about 1/2 inch apart and 1/4 inch deep in a diamond pattern in both sides of the beef.
Place beef in shallow nonmetal dish or resealable plastic bag.  Pour marinade over beef.  Cover and refrigerate, turning occasionally, at least 4 hours
but no longer than 24 hours.

2.  Heat coals or gas grill.  Remove beef from marinade; reserve marinade.  Cover and grill beef about 4 or 5 inches from medium heat 12 to 14 minutes
for medium doneness, brushing occasionally with marinade and turning once.

3.  Add nectarines to grill for last 5 minutes of grilling, turning once and brushing frequently with marinade.  Discard any remaining marinade.  Cut beef
diagonally across grain.  Serve with nectarines.  Makes 4 to 6 servings.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: huntinbuddy on July 13, 2008, 09:15:40 PM
Can't have a grilled favorite without a nice dessert.  This is as simple as Key Lime Pie, but smoother and creamier.

Key Lime Pie Cheesecake

1 package (8 ounces) cream cheese, softened
1 can (14 ounces) sweetened condensed milk
1 container (12 ounces) frozen whipped topping, thawed
1 cup fresh lime juice (about 5 limes)
1 baked 9-inch pie shell
Lime slices and fresh mint leaves for garnish (optional)

In a large bowl, combine the cream cheese, sweetened condensed milk, and whipped topping.
Stir in the lime juice until well blended and mixture is thick and smooth.  Immediately pour lime
filling into pie shell.  Pie can be served at once, but for best flavor, chill it for about 2 hours.
Garnish with fresh lime slices and fresh mint leaves, if desired.  Makes 6 to 8 servings.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: fritzkep on July 14, 2008, 04:59:57 PM
Yum!!!!!!!

Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 07, 2008, 05:21:53 PM
in honor of gov. palin:



(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)Jellied Moose Nose

1 Upper jawbone of a moose
1 Onion; sliced
1 Garlic clove
1 tb Mixed pickling spice
1 ts Salt
1/2 ts Pepper
1/4 c Vinegar

Cut the upper jaw bone of the moose just below the eyes.

Place in a large kettle of scalding water and boil for 45 minutes.

Remove and chill in cold water.

Pull out all the hairs - these will have been loosened by the boiling and should come out easily (like plucking a duck).

Wash thoroughly until no hairs remain.

Place the nose in a kettle and cover with fresh water.

Add onion, garlic, spices and vinegar

Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until the meat is tender. Let cool overnight in the liquid.

When cool, take the meat out of the broth, and remove and discard the bones and the cartilage. You will have two kinds of meat, white meat from the bulb of the nose, and thin strips of dark meat from along the bones and jowls.

Slice the meat thinly and alternate layers of white and dark meat in a loaf pan.

Reheat the broth to boiling, then pour the broth over the meat in the loaf pan.

Let cool until jelly has set. Slice and serve cold.
(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)


(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/moose_nose.jpg)



"...like plucking a duck."

from weird recipes (http://bertc.com/subfive/recipes/index.htm)
(http://davecullen.com/brokeback/daily/format/placeholder.gif)


Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 07, 2008, 05:33:24 PM

(http://petticoatsandpistols.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/10/witch_fingers.jpg)

halloween is just around the corner!

check out this funky recipe for creepy witch finger cookies. (http://petticoatsandpistols.com/2007/10/31/witch-finger-cookies/)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 07, 2008, 05:44:19 PM

(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/obama_toon.jpg)

presidential cooking

i can't leave the other guy out... here's barack obama's chili recipe. (http://www.recipezaar.com/321236)

george washington's favorite corn cakes (http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2008/04/george-washingtons-favorite-corn-cakes-recipe.html) would probably go well with his dish!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 10, 2008, 08:30:19 PM

(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/cracker_jack.jpg)


omg!

halloween!

it's almost here!!!

a cracker jack recipe! (http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/146/Homemade_Cracker_Jack61218.shtml)

enjoy!!
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on October 12, 2008, 06:40:30 PM
jimmy......

 lol...... my first thought regarding the jellied moose nose were the nose hairs....

               let me know if it really works..... You First......   ;)
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 13, 2008, 01:06:47 AM
i'm more apt to cook bear! :D :D
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: mcnell1120 on October 22, 2008, 03:05:28 PM
jimmy......

 lol...... my first thought regarding the jellied moose nose were the nose hairs....

               let me know if it really works..... You First......   ;)

that is NASTY!!  :o
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 27, 2008, 12:57:54 AM
i'm making a roasted pork loin (with 12 cloves of garlic!) right now, so there will be leftover meat... you know what that means?

(http://taxine.com/fullerspicer/bahn_mi_sandwich.jpg)

BAHN MI vietnamese sandwich time! (http://www.missginsu.com/2008/08/recession-proof-bahn-mi-sandwiches.html#links)

the key to a good sandwich, i think, is the baguette. it has to be just the right kind, not too skinny and chewy, but not too fluffy and big. it has to be big enough to handle the meat, and of course, that delicious carrot filling. that's the best part, the contrasting textures and flavors, like crunchy carrot alongside dense, earthy paté smeared on the bread next to the pork meat. if you have daikon, you can grate some of that in with the carrots for variety. i like to add slices of the hot green jalapeno pepper, raw, with seeds, as a final garnish. oh, and extra cilantro is  great. :D

here's a basic recipe (http://www.missginsu.com/2008/08/recession-proof-bahn-mi-sandwiches.html#links) for bahn mi.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 29, 2008, 04:18:58 AM
i bet you could do this with corn bread mix, too.... a super easy recipe from a website: CHILI MUFFIN CUPS (http://kidscooking.about.com/od/dinnerrecipes/r/chilimuffincups.htm)


These chili muffin cups are the perfect bite-sized kid-friendly dinner. I like to use vegetarian chili for this recipe. But feel free to use chili con carne, white chicken chili or canned chili.

1 12 oz. package refrigerated biscuit dough
4 cups prepared vegetarian chili or chili con carne
1-1/2 cups shredded cheddar cheese


Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Spray a muffin tin with cooking spray.

Separate dough into 8 pieces. Flatten each biscuit into a 1/4-inch thick circle and press into the muffin cups.

Spoon vegetarian chili into each muffin cup.

Bake 12-14 minutes until muffins are golden.

Sprinkle with cheese, and bake another 3-5 minutes until cheese is melted.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: cabin on October 31, 2008, 06:14:33 AM
Hi Nells,  that moose nose dish is different....  ;)

Jimmy-- You are so right--the baguette makes the sandwich...imagine that on Wonder bread. ;D  Looks YUMmmmmy.
            Cilantro, cukes and the sriricha (sp?) part of the contrasts you talk about.  Mmmmmm.
Title: Re: Recipe and Cook's Corner
Post by: gnash on October 31, 2008, 08:47:41 AM
hi gerry... LOL wonder WHUT?   oh man, that wouldn't work at all for this sandwich! :D  it was really yummy... yes, the sriracha or whatever it's called is good, it packs a punch.

it's almost dia de los muertos and you know what that means...a margarita and a great dinner at La Parilla... they do something a dish that they called molcajete, which i love. it's served IN a molcajete... (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molcajete) it's