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Author Topic: Larry McMurtry  (Read 54940 times)

Offline michaelflanagansf

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Re: Larry McMurtry
« Reply #15 on: September 22, 2006, 11:59:09 AM »


FYI,  I see where "Commanche Moon" is being made into a mini-series. If it's as good a production as "Lonesome Dove" was, we're in for a real treat. I continue to read the book (Moon)-- always amazed at McMurtry's description of the American west -- vivid and fascinating!

Yes!  And Larry McMurtry's not the only BBM affiliated person involved with the production - Linda Cardellini (Cassie) plays Clara Forsythe in this production.  And, of course, L.M. is working with Diana Ossana on this too.
I do my thing, & you do your thing. I am not in this world to live up to your expectations, and you are not in this world to live up to mine. You are you and I am I, and if by chance we find each other - it is beautiful. If not it can't be helped.

Fritz Perls - A Gestalt Prayer

Offline ConstantReader

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Re: Larry McMurtry
« Reply #16 on: September 22, 2006, 06:27:21 PM »
From Inside Oscar: the Unofficial History of the Academy Awards

Reading the names of the Best Actress nominees, [Gregory] Peck paused for the ovation that erupted when Patricia Neal's picture was flashed on the screen.  The winner was Patricia Neal for Hud.

Offline Nikki

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Re: Larry McMurtry
« Reply #17 on: September 22, 2006, 06:35:10 PM »


FYI,  I see where "Commanche Moon" is being made into a mini-series. If it's as good a production as "Lonesome Dove" was, we're in for a real treat. I continue to read the book (Moon)-- always amazed at McMurtry's description of the American west -- vivid and fascinating!

Yes!  And Larry McMurtry's not the only BBM affiliated person involved with the production - Linda Cardellini (Cassie) plays Clara Forsythe in this production.  And, of course, L.M. is working with Diana Ossana on this too.

BTW in the mini-series of "Lonesome Dove" Angelica Huston played Clara Forsythe -- she was much younger of course -- did a great job and IMO really nailed the character of Clara. I'll be interested to see what Cardellini does with the role.
The shirts hanging on a nail shudder slightly in the draft.

If he does not force his attention on it, it might stoke the day, rewarm that old, cold time on the mountain when they owned the world and nothing seemed wrong.

Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive
But to be young was very heaven!

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Re: Larry McMurtry
« Reply #18 on: September 22, 2006, 06:58:18 PM »
Nikki and all,

I just ordered Comanche Moon today, so it will be good to talk about it here.  And I looked in Lonesome Dove the other day to read a page or two, it also looks very interesting, and approachable.  Since you read that already Nikki, I'll be glad to compare impressions with you on that one also.  (Still wondering where all this reading can be fit in though.  Might be a while.)

If anybody heard when Comanche Moon will be on TV, please be sure to post something here -- I don't get around to the TV schedules very often.  Thanks.
Jack's from Texas.
Texans don't drink coffee?

Offline Nikki

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Re: Larry McMurtry
« Reply #19 on: September 22, 2006, 07:10:50 PM »
Nikki and all,

I just ordered Comanche Moon today, so it will be good to talk about it here.  And I looked in Lonesome Dove the other day to read a page or two, it also looks very interesting, and approachable.  Since you read that already Nikki, I'll be glad to compare impressions with you on that one also.  (Still wondering where all this reading can be fit in though.  Might be a while.)

If anybody heard when Comanche Moon will be on TV, please be sure to post something here -- I don't get around to the TV schedules very often.  Thanks.

In the profile of Diana Ossana in the TDS today, it says that "Comanche Moon" is set for 2006 -- just keep checking the schedule.

"Moon" takes place about 20 years before "Dove" -- the two protagonists are older in "Dove" and characters and plots are tied up. They both stand alone, so if you have the "prequels" to both and they're shorter, check them out first. You may want to watch the mini-series of "Dove" which is on DVD -- filmed years ago and is spectacular. I saw the DVD right after I read the book last summer.
The shirts hanging on a nail shudder slightly in the draft.

If he does not force his attention on it, it might stoke the day, rewarm that old, cold time on the mountain when they owned the world and nothing seemed wrong.

Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive
But to be young was very heaven!

Offline michaelflanagansf

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Re: Larry McMurtry
« Reply #20 on: September 22, 2006, 07:39:47 PM »
From Inside Oscar: the Unofficial History of the Academy Awards

Reading the names of the Best Actress nominees, [Gregory] Peck paused for the ovation that erupted when Patricia Neal's picture was flashed on the screen.  The winner was Patricia Neal for Hud.

Thanks for this ConstantReader!  I know that the selection was very popular - much like Cloris Leachman's was for 'The Last Picture Show'.
I do my thing, & you do your thing. I am not in this world to live up to your expectations, and you are not in this world to live up to mine. You are you and I am I, and if by chance we find each other - it is beautiful. If not it can't be helped.

Fritz Perls - A Gestalt Prayer

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Re: Larry McMurtry
« Reply #21 on: September 22, 2006, 07:49:01 PM »
If anybody heard when Comanche Moon will be on TV, please be sure to post something here -- I don't get around to the TV schedules very often.  Thanks.

In the profile of Diana Ossana in the TDS today, it says that "Comanche Moon" is set for 2006 -- just keep checking the schedule.

Oh, thanks Nikki, but I mistyped my question.  Didn't mean to say "If anybody heard" -- meant to say "If anybody hears" -- meaning, yes I read the profile of Diana Ossana in the TDS today and I read that it will be on in sometime in 2006.  BUT since I don't watch much TV and don't usually check the schedules, I might well miss it.

So if anybody does happen to hear earlier in the week when it's actually supposed to be on, would just appreciate a note here.  That's all.  Again, thanks.
Jack's from Texas.
Texans don't drink coffee?

Offline ConstantReader

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Re: Larry McMurtry
« Reply #22 on: September 26, 2006, 05:49:06 PM »
As far as I have been able to determine, four movies have been made based on Larry McMurtry's novels and a fifth which he was
a contibutor to the screenplay. Below is a list of the four and the Academy nominations and awards they have won.  Not a bad
list.  The fifth movie was Texasville, a sequel (of sorts) to The Last Picture Show. I found a couple reviews of the book
which were so-so and of the movie which basically said it was good but not great.


1963
 Best Picture: Hud
 Best Actor: Paul Newman
*Best Actress: Patricia Neal
*Best Supporting Actor: Melvyn Douglas
 Best Director: Martin Ritt
 Adapted Screenplay
*Cinematography (BW)
 Art Direction

1971

 Best Picture: The Last Picture Show
 Best Supporting Actor: Jeff Bridges
*Best Supporting Actor: Ben Johnson
 Best Supporting Actress: Ellen Burstyn
*Best Supporting Actress: Cloris Leachman
 Best Director: Peter Bogdanovich
 Adapted Screenplay: Bogdanovich/McMurtry
 Cinematography
 
1983
*Best Picture: Terms of Endearment
*Best Actress: Shirley MacLaine
*Best Supporting Actor: Jack Nicholson
*Best Director: James Brook
*Adapted Screenplay
 Art Direction
 Sound
 Original Music
 Editing
 
2006
 Best Picture: Brokeback Mountain
 Best Actor: Heath Ledger
 Best Supporting Actor: Jake Gyllenhaal
 Best Supporting Actress: Michelle Williams
 Cinematography
*Director: Ang Lee
*Original Score: Gustavo Santaolalla
*Adapted Screenplay: Larry McMurtry/Diana Ossana
 
 
 
« Last Edit: September 26, 2006, 09:28:08 PM by ConstantReader »

Offline michaelflanagansf

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Re: Larry McMurtry
« Reply #23 on: September 26, 2006, 07:52:02 PM »
As a followup to your message C.R., here is a webpage from the Internet Movie Database that has all awards associated with Larry McMurtry (it includes awards for television shows, so it includes things like the Western Heritage Award for 'Streets of Laredo'):

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0573505/awards
I do my thing, & you do your thing. I am not in this world to live up to your expectations, and you are not in this world to live up to mine. You are you and I am I, and if by chance we find each other - it is beautiful. If not it can't be helped.

Fritz Perls - A Gestalt Prayer

Offline michaelflanagansf

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Re: Larry McMurtry
« Reply #24 on: September 26, 2006, 08:00:09 PM »
I was interested by the link I posted that connects Larry McMurtry and Ken Kesey - apparently McMurtry wasn't a Merry Prankster, but was a friend of Kesey's throughout that period.  It's mentioned here at the very beginning of the wikipedia article on McMurtry:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larry_McMurtry
I do my thing, & you do your thing. I am not in this world to live up to your expectations, and you are not in this world to live up to mine. You are you and I am I, and if by chance we find each other - it is beautiful. If not it can't be helped.

Fritz Perls - A Gestalt Prayer

Offline ConstantReader

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Re: Larry McMurtry
« Reply #25 on: September 26, 2006, 09:30:13 PM »
In my original post I said that BBM was based on a McMurtry novel.  Not true, of course, it was based on Annie Proulx short story.  I have corrected the glaring mistake.

Offline Nikki

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Re: Larry McMurtry
« Reply #26 on: September 29, 2006, 06:52:59 PM »


Just finished reading "Leaving Cheyenne" written by McMurtry when he was only 27, and his second book after "Horseman, Pass By" (from which the movie "Hud" was made.) Cheyenne" takes its name from an old cowboy song: My foots in the stirrup, My pony won't stand; Goodbye, old partner, I'm leaving Cheyenne.

The story centers around three main characters: two men and a women who share a love from childhood to the present. While the love depicted is more unorthodox than we're used to, it has a haunting bittersweetness that held my interest untill the end. A New York Times Reviewer wrote, If Chaucer were a Texan writing today, and only 27 years old, this is how he would have written and this is how he would have felt.

McMurtry's style is descriptive, his characters interesting, and the story never flags. The town of Thalia is later reproduced at length in his fourth novel, "The Last Picture Show," but in "...Cheyenne" it is just a minor blip in the landscape.

A couple of observations McMurtry's characters make are homespun and typical of the writer whose Texas background inhabits his "people." At one point a father tells his son that it's better to be rich than poor -- the boy says, "That ain't what the Bible says." Dad replies, I know there's fools in the world who say poverty is holy, but let them go without shoes some cold winter, like I did when I was a kid, and then see how holy they think it is. Being poor just makes people little and mean, most of the time. It's a damn degrading thing.

Another time talking about getting rid of a politician, a man says I wish there was some way to run him out of the country...that's the damn trouble with democracy. You got to wait around and vote, and then the people are so stupid they put scroungy sonsofbitches back in office. Sounds pretty familiar to me!

This was one of McMurtry's shorter books and well worth the read. One critic wrote, "McMurtry's style never turns melodramatic or sentimental." His love stories are never sugary or squalid, yet there is a resonance that runs through relationships that leaves the reader reflecting on what might have been.
The shirts hanging on a nail shudder slightly in the draft.

If he does not force his attention on it, it might stoke the day, rewarm that old, cold time on the mountain when they owned the world and nothing seemed wrong.

Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive
But to be young was very heaven!

Offline CANSTANDIT

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Re: Larry McMurtry
« Reply #27 on: September 29, 2006, 07:33:12 PM »
I got to meet Mr. McMurtry, very briefly, years ago...you would not believe how humble and unpretentious he really is-unless of course you saw how he dressed at the Oscars!  :D

A seriously nice, gentle person, and was stunned at my compliments of his writing; I was stunned that he was stunned.

He was the essence of humility, he really was.


Offline Nikki

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Re: Larry McMurtry
« Reply #28 on: September 29, 2006, 07:58:38 PM »
I got to meet Mr. McMurtry, very briefly, years ago...you would not believe how humble and unpretentious he really is-unless of course you saw how he dressed at the Oscars!  :D

A seriously nice, gentle person, and was stunned at my compliments of his writing; I was stunned that he was stunned.

He was the essence of humility, he really was.



CSI, how lucky for you -- I would love to meet him!  BTW I read where what he wore at the Oscars is sort of Texas style dress -- jeans, boots and a tx jacket -- can u picture J&E in that get up! Swoon!!
The shirts hanging on a nail shudder slightly in the draft.

If he does not force his attention on it, it might stoke the day, rewarm that old, cold time on the mountain when they owned the world and nothing seemed wrong.

Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive
But to be young was very heaven!

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Re: Larry McMurtry
« Reply #29 on: September 30, 2006, 03:11:20 PM »


Just finished reading "Leaving Cheyenne" written by McMurtry when he was only 27, and his second book after "Horseman, Pass By" (from which the movie "Hud" was made.) Cheyenne" takes its name from an old cowboy song: My foots in the stirrup, My pony won't stand; Goodbye, old partner, I'm leaving Cheyenne.

McMurtry's style is descriptive, his characters interesting, and the story never flags. The town of Thalia is later reproduced at length in his fourth novel, "The Last Picture Show," but in "...Cheyenne" it is just a minor blip in the landscape. ...

A couple of observations McMurtry's characters make are homespun and typical of the writer whose Texas background inhabits his "people." At one point a father tells his son that it's better to be rich than poor -- the boy says, "That ain't what the Bible says." Dad replies, I know there's fools in the world who say poverty is holy, but let them go without shoes some cold winter, like I did when I was a kid, and then see how holy they think it is. Being poor just makes people little and mean, most of the time. It's a damn degrading thing.   ...

Thanks for this post, Nikki.  Haven't read this one either but it sounds like a good one for that "someday" list.

Interesting what you said about Thalia being mentioned here very briefly.
Jack's from Texas.
Texans don't drink coffee?