The Ultimate Brokeback Forum

Author Topic: Overlooked Films--Great films (most of) the world missed  (Read 96990 times)

Offline Sara B

  • Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 42859
Re: Overlooked Films--Great films (most of) the world missed
« Reply #345 on: May 27, 2017, 11:32:32 AM »
Very nice. And as some of the positive comments said, it all seemed so simple and low-key...
“When we grow older still we’ll speak about those two young men as if they were two strangers..... And we’ll want to call it envy, because to call it regret would break our hearts.”

Call Me by Your Name, André Aciman.

Offline Paul029

  • Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 4596
Re: Overlooked Films--Great films (most of) the world missed
« Reply #346 on: May 27, 2017, 12:19:19 PM »
Did you watch any of the other video from that
poster?
Yes, I did, Lyle. Great movies, and very addictive.  :)
And thanks again for the link.

Here's a couple:

Jane Fonda Tuesday Weld Anthony Perkins Rock Hudson Lauren Bacall Natalie Wood Judy Garland 1965:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJzsryffz5s

Kirk Douglas Lauren Bacall Paul Newman Lee Remick Ben Gazzara Janice Rule Malibu 1965:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MsvJHwHHQg

Among the comments, the poster, Luke Sacha, wrote that:
we're trying to raise funds for the production of a doc feature showcasing [Roddy’s silent 16mm Kodachrome movies] Here's an 8 minute sample assembly including interviews with Roddy and Kirk Douglas. Hope you find it interesting: "Hollywood 1965" Offline Assembly
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=230xIF7XOsA&t=0s

He apologizes for the “15 seconds of bars and tone at head” of the sample.  ;D
...there was no real scent, only the memory of it, the imagined power of Brokeback Mountain...

Online Lyle (Mooska)

  • Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 19421
Re: Overlooked Films--Great films (most of) the world missed
« Reply #347 on: May 27, 2017, 01:22:45 PM »
Thanks!  I missed the one at the first link!

I loved to see Suzanne Pleshette; always liked her for some reason.
(I saw her and Tom Post on together in the grocery store once.)

Knowing how many of these celebrities had health issues due to smoking,
it's disheartening to see the prevalence of it, though I remember it quite
well. It was all pervasive and almost no limit on where you could smoke.
That was something not good in "the good ol' days."

Offline Jeff Wrangler

  • Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 5046
Re: Overlooked Films--Great films (most of) the world missed
« Reply #348 on: May 28, 2017, 03:01:30 PM »
I loved to see Suzanne Pleshette; always liked her for some reason.

I did, too, Lyle, from all the way back to Disney's The Ugly Dachshund.  :D

I was very sad when she died.

Offline Paul029

  • Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 4596
Re: Overlooked Films--Great films (most of) the world missed
« Reply #349 on: February 15, 2018, 04:34:46 AM »
Dorothy Malone obituary
Hollywood star who won an Oscar for her role in Written on the Wind and appeared in the TV soap Peyton Place died in Dallas, Texas on January 19, aged 92.

From The Guardian:

Although the Hollywood star Dorothy Malone appeared in only a handful of works of distinction in a fairly lengthy career, they were good enough to secure her place in film history. On those occasions when the role permitted, most notably in two flamboyant melodramas directed by Douglas Sirk, Written on the Wind (1956) and The Tarnished Angels (1957), Malone revealed what a talented performer she could be, one capable of projecting a potent blend of cynicism, sexuality and intelligence. However, she was probably most familiar to the general public as Constance MacKenzie in Peyton Place (1964-68), one of the first primetime TV soap operas.

In Written on the Wind, Malone played Marylee, an oil heiress, sister of an alcoholic playboy Kyle Hadley (Robert Stack). She’s in love with Kyle’s best friend Mitch (Rock Hudson), but he’s in love with Kyle’s pregnant wife Lucy (Lauren Bacall). Jealous, Marylee convinces Kyle that Lucy’s baby really belongs to Mitch. Her wild erotic dance to a loud mambo beat, intercut with scenes of her father’s fatal heart attack, is one of the great sequences of 1950s Hollywood melodrama. “It was a miracle that I got her to do the scene,” Sirk recalled. “She was very prudish ... I even had to watch my language. If I said, ‘This scene needs more balls’, she’d walk off the set.” Malone, upstaging even Bacall, won the best supporting actress Oscar.

Sirk reunited Malone, Hudson and Stack for The Tarnished Angels, skilfully adapted from the William Faulkner novel Pylon. Stack played a daredevil pilot performing at air shows with Malone as his neglected parachutist wife. She is the film’s fulcrum – vulnerable, naïve and yet with a fierce sexuality – caught between her disillusioned husband and a run-down alcoholic journalist (Hudson). The latter reacts towards her with a mixture of lust and pity, bragging that he “sat up half the night discussing literature and life with a beautiful, half-naked blonde.”


I’ve also seen The Tarnished Angels, of course:



Rock Hudson and Dorothy Malone in The Tarnished Angels


...there was no real scent, only the memory of it, the imagined power of Brokeback Mountain...