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Author Topic: Last Scene ("I swear" scene)  (Read 355420 times)

Offline marius

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Re: Scene: Last Scene ("I swear" scene)
« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2006, 11:14:45 AM »
I think that the scene with Alma jr here shows us that Ennis has evolved...prior to this he couldn't really say yes to his daughter, he was always unavailable to everyone. Jack's death has made him realize that he has to show up NOW for his relationships. And he has realized this too late for him and Jack, but not too late for him and his daughter, and so changes his plans so that he can be there to attend her wedding. It allows Ennis some redemption as a character, and the "I swear" is his way of showing up for Jack now, expressing (but not completing the sentence) his love for Jack and his acknowledgement,at long last, of their relationship.

Sorry Diane,

Missed your quote before I sent out mine
Sounds that I totally agree with you.



Offline justmeincal

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Re: Scene: Last Scene ("I swear" scene)
« Reply #16 on: January 12, 2006, 11:43:47 AM »
This is probably way off the mark but....

Ennis agrees to attend his daughter's wedding where she and Kurt will say their vows and swear to love each other forever...

Then the last scene, Ennis says his own vow to Jack, 'I swear';  a commitment to love and cherish Jack for the rest of Ennis' life.

Steve

Offline David

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Re: Scene: Last Scene ("I swear" scene)
« Reply #17 on: January 12, 2006, 04:05:44 PM »
"I swear..." that I regret never giving you the life together that you wanted, and if you were here now, things would be different.

I second that interpretation.
The huge sadness of the Northern plains rolled down on him.

Offline winter

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Re: Scene: Last Scene ("I swear" scene)
« Reply #18 on: January 13, 2006, 12:10:33 AM »
I think the sequence of the shirts, along with the scene with Alma Jr., is key to the intention of the screenplay and Ang Lee's direction. As Ennis finds them in Jack's tiny closet hideaway, Ennis' shirt is enclosed in Jack's "like two skins, one inside the other, two in one." At the end, Ennis "has carefully tucked JACK's shirt down inside his own," acknowledging and protecting their relationship with a love and remorse that keeps him going, indicated in Proulx's italicized prologue to the story. In his scene with Alma Jr. Ennis suddenly agrees to join her wedding when she gives a positive answer to his question "This Kurt Fella ... does he love you?" Taught by Alma Jr.s' love for him and for Kurt (the connection with Jack is indicated by Ennis placing Alma's left-behind sweater in the same closet where he preserves the shirts), his too-late acceptance of love reminds me of Greek tragedy, in which late learning cannot avert disaster, but it adds dramatic and human truth to a story that many of us can share in small ways and large.   

Offline ImEnnisShesJack

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Re: Scene: Last Scene ("I swear" scene)
« Reply #19 on: January 13, 2006, 05:13:57 AM »
This is probably way off the mark but....

Ennis agrees to attend his daughter's wedding where she and Kurt will say their vows and swear to love each other forever...

Then the last scene, Ennis says his own vow to Jack, 'I swear';  a commitment to love and cherish Jack for the rest of Ennis' life.

Steve

I like this POV.  I was just thinking on this scene and what exactly Ennis was swearing to. 
Jack I swear...
...I'm not going to piss away my life this time
...I'm not going to miss out on the important people in my life
...I love you more than I could ever tell you
...I'll make it right in my life

etc.

There are so many things he could have been swearing to.  avowing to.  And my opinion changed on which one is the "right" one.  I'm going to ruminate on this one for a while now.  Thanks Steve!!!  :)
"And when he shall die,
Take him and cut him out in little stars,
And he will make the face of heaven so fine
That all the world will be in love with night."
~~Heath Ledger 1979-2008~~

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Offline DaveinPhilly

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Re: Scene: Last Scene ("I swear" scene)
« Reply #20 on: January 13, 2006, 07:31:43 AM »
"I swear..." that I regret never giving you the life together that you wanted, and if you were here now, things would be different.

I second that interpretation.

Well, I wish that were my interpretation, but something inside me says he meant " I swear..." that I wish I had been there for you, but I just didn't know how...

Also few have made mention of the stunning performance by Kate Mara as Alma Jr. I can't get her out of my head.
It could be like this, just like this, always...

Offline 909dot

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Re: Scene: Last Scene ("I swear" scene)
« Reply #21 on: January 13, 2006, 10:00:26 AM »
     I'm curious...what is the opinion of Alma Jr.s thoughts on her father...I got the distinct impression she knew about him...not details, but that she knew...but they both cant speak of it...for reasons of sadness, hurt, embarrassment...when she says "Yeah daddy, he loves me..." you can feel Ennis wanting to say..."I know what thats like because I was and still am In love..." But he talks about ranging on the Tee-tons...all the characters (except for Ennis and Jack,) just miss each other by a hairs breath....

Todd
"maybe you should get outa there...move someplace different...maybe Texas."

Offline scot5636

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Re: Scene: Last Scene ("I swear" scene)
« Reply #22 on: January 13, 2006, 11:44:23 AM »
I think the sequence of the shirts, along with the scene with Alma Jr., is key to the intention of the screenplay and Ang Lee's direction. As Ennis finds them in Jack's tiny closet hideaway, Ennis' shirt is enclosed in Jack's "like two skins, one inside the other, two in one." At the end, Ennis "has carefully tucked JACK's shirt down inside his own," acknowledging and protecting their relationship with a love and remorse that keeps him going, indicated in Proulx's italicized prologue to the story. In his scene with Alma Jr. Ennis suddenly agrees to join her wedding when she gives a positive answer to his question "This Kurt Fella ... does he love you?" Taught by Alma Jr.s' love for him and for Kurt (the connection with Jack is indicated by Ennis placing Alma's left-behind sweater in the same closet where he preserves the shirts), his too-late acceptance of love reminds me of Greek tragedy, in which late learning cannot avert disaster, but it adds dramatic and human truth to a story that many of us can share in small ways and large.   

Winter, that is good stuff.  I had noticed how Ennis very carefully folds Alma Jr's sweater, but the significance of putting it in the closet with the shirts hadn't occurred to  me. 

Offline konrad

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Re: Scene: Last Scene ("I swear" scene)
« Reply #23 on: January 13, 2006, 01:53:21 PM »
... and he kisses her sweater before he puts it in the closet.
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Offline muse

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Re: Scene: Last Scene ("I swear" scene)
« Reply #24 on: January 13, 2006, 08:50:43 PM »
"I swear..." that I regret never giving you the life together that you wanted, and if you were here now, things would be different.

I second that interpretation.

i like this take on it as well. i'd also like to add that when ennis says "i swear...," i feel as though he is saying it like one lover says to another, "i swear i'd kill you if i didn't love you so much," or "i swear, you drive me crazy sometimes (in a good way)." to me he is kind of saying, "i swear i'd give you hell for leaving me like this if i had the chance."  i don't know if i am explaining myself well. any thoughts?
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Offline wolson

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Re: Scene: Last Scene ("I swear" scene)
« Reply #25 on: January 13, 2006, 10:31:28 PM »
It's funny - I saw Ennis as the noble character in the film (haven't read the book yet).  And that opinion informs my interpretation of the "I swear" scene.  I saw Ennis swearing as something of a continuation of a loving statement..."I swear you'll never understand how much I really loved you...and dangitall, I did."  It informs their final scene together, as well, in that Jack is the symbol of romantic love with the sweeping backdrop; whereas Ennis is the symbol of practical love, pickup truck in the background and all.

Jack is rides Ennis pretty hard emotionally -- and Ennis is trying to tell him, "you dumby, I'm giving up more than you can ever understand to be with you."  I dunno.  I saw Ennis' "I swear" as a statement of pure truth of Ennis' character.

Offline pdxbennett

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Re: Scene: Last Scene ("I swear" scene)
« Reply #26 on: January 14, 2006, 05:36:35 PM »
This "shirts" thing just chokes me because I still wonder if Ennis really does get it.  I caught the significance of his putting his daughter's sweater with a kiss in the same closet as Jack's shirt. 

Does this mean that he has learned what he missed as a result of his crippling repression?  Or does it just mean that he will end up with a closet full of other people's old stuff?

At least his "swearing" is the closest thing to him saying he loved (and accepted) Jack.  It is to damn late for Jack but, oh god, I hope that it is not to late for Ennis.


Offline Nado

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Re: Scene: Last Scene ("I swear" scene)
« Reply #27 on: January 14, 2006, 08:05:08 PM »
I've been thinking a lot about this last scene and have a few thoughts.

What stood out for me, metaphorically, is how the bloodstained shirts remained in a closet. In the friggin' closet! How much longer would Ennis need to grieve and realize that these shirts don't belong there. Ennis has a real chance to take Jack's shirt (and his as well), burn them and have the ashes scattered on Brokeback Mountain.

And it's only then can Ennis move on with his life.

I think this is what Jack would've wanted too.

(Ok. It's official. I'm obsessed!)
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Offline winter

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Re: Scene: Last Scene ("I swear" scene)
« Reply #28 on: January 15, 2006, 12:09:42 AM »
A second view of the film brought home to me the number of parallels, in all the texts that sustain it (A.P.'s story, the New Yorker revision, Matthews' watercolors in the first edition of Close Range, A.P.'s subsequent footnotes on the meaning of "twist," etc., M. and O.'s script, the actors' readings, Lee's choices of takes and his addition of details small and large, not to mention the rare and unhappy phenomenon of dual editors), between Ennis and Jack. Both have been subjected to sadomasochistic treatment from their fathers, involving in the one case a possible hate crime, in the other lifelong alienation, whether Ennis' experience of being forced to witness the corpse of the emasculated rancher or Jack's father's disgust in A.P. with Jack's unmanly circumcision (at whose behest? his mother's? if anyone is prompted to start a thread on this one, feel free). Both are in search not just for each other but also what is involved in loving fatherhood. This second viewing also made me more comfortable with sequence: at first, led to expect a two-part movie, the one involving patient exposition, the second a frantic interleaving of events, I now can appreciate a consistent technique of significant juxtaposition, which is, after all, a technique used to assist interpretation as old as Homer. And a stunning example is the way in which Ennis' rejection of Cassie is interleaved between his last, dramatic confrontation with Jack and the news of Jack's death. Ennis is already engaged in rethinking the relationship in positive terms; in a deeply moving way, the jolt he receives from Texas does not stop the process. The further stages of change, small as they may be, continue (and are beautifully registered by Ledger) until the final moment when he grazingly kisses Alma Jr.'s sweater (as a reader reminds me) rather like a priest quickly kissing his stole, conferring upon his love  for both daugher and friend its sacramental due.   

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Re: Scene: Last Scene ("I swear" scene)
« Reply #29 on: January 15, 2006, 06:37:35 AM »
the scene with him putting the sweater away makes me think how it would have been if he had mustered the courage to share a life with Jack.  I mean, maybe he's thinking about how he could have been helping Jack move in with him by putting some of his things in his drawer.  I hope  I am making sense.