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Author Topic: Last Scene w/ Ennis and Jack Together  (Read 778184 times)

Offline Melisande

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Last Scene w/ Ennis and Jack Together
« on: January 07, 2006, 10:32:47 AM »
Discuss Ennis' and Jack's last scene together here, including the "dozy embrace".   
« Last Edit: May 16, 2006, 06:29:39 AM by peteinportland »
let be, let be

Offline ImEnnisShesJack

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Re: Scene: Last Scene w/ Ennis and Jack Together
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2006, 08:22:54 AM »
The dozy embrace is still my favorite.  It shows Ennis' love for Jack and his own need to nurture.  Ennis is so closed up in the rest of the movie, this is the one time we really see him without all the walls.  The easy intimacy between the two boys is beautiful.  They really did have their own little world up there on Brokeback.

And the way Jack leans into him, rolls his head to the crook of Ennis' arm while Ennis hums the song from his childhood.  Please.  Just stick a knife through my heart!  So tender, so gentle, so intimate.  The warmth radiated from the screen into the audience to enfold all of us into their embrace.

More of Ang Lee's genius on the screen. 
"And when he shall die,
Take him and cut him out in little stars,
And he will make the face of heaven so fine
That all the world will be in love with night."
~~Heath Ledger 1979-2008~~

Carol8159@yahoo.com

Offline brokebackLJ

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Re: Scene: Last Scene w/ Ennis and Jack Together
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2006, 11:54:28 AM »
I thought the final conversation they have is so explosive, like you don't know what's gonna happen when Ennis like walks up the hill up to Jack, but it's great that Jack really holds his own and doesn't back down...I have a copy of the screenplay and I've transcribed the scene from it, so here it is for anyone who wants it:


JACK
Tell you what, we could of had a good life together, a fuckin' real good life, had us a place of our own. You wouldn't do it Ennis, so what we got now is Brokeback Mountain. Everything built on that. It's all we got, boy, fuckin' all, so I hope you know that if you don't never know the rest. Count the dam few times we been together in nearly twenty years. Measure the fuckin' short leash you keep me on, then ask me about Mexico and tell me you'll kill me for needin' somethin' I don't hardly never get. YOu got no idea how bad it gets.
I'm not you. I can't make it on a couple of high-altitude fucks once or twice a year.
(pause)
You're too much for me, Ennis, you son of a whoreson bitch
(pause)
I wish I knew how to quit you.
WE PULL BACK.
Like vast clouds of steam from the thermal springs in winter, the years of things unsaid and now unsayable--admissions, declarations, shames guilts, fears--rise around them.
ENNIS stands as if heartshot, face gray and deep-lined.
Fights a silent battle, grimaces.
ENNIS
Then why don't you?! Why don't you let me be? It's because of you, Jack, that I'm like this. I'm nothin'. I'm nowhere.
JACK starts towards him, but ENNIS jerks away.
ENNIS
Get the fuck off me!
Jack moves towards him again, and this time, ENNIS doesn't resist.
JACK
Come here...It's all right. It's all right...damn you, Ennis.
And then...they hug one another, a fierce, desperate embrace--managing to torque things almost to where they had been, what they've just said is no news: as always, nothing ended, nothing begun, nothing resolved.
CUT TO FLASHBACK: EXT: BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN, WYOMING: CAMPFIRE: NIGHT: CONTINUOUS: 1963:
JACK and ENNIS, much younger.
JACK and ENNIS have finished the last meal of the day. JACK stands by the campfire, warming himself. He stands that way for a few moments, alone.
Then WE SEE two arms encircle him from behind: it is ENNIS.
They stand that way for a moment, JACK leaning back into ENNIS.
ENNIS's breath comes slow and quiet, then he starts to gently rock back and forth a little, lit by the warm fire tossing ruddy chunks of light, the shadow of their bodies a single column against a rock. ENNIS hums quietly.
Nothing mars this moment for JACK, even thoughe he knows that ENNIS does not embrace him face to face because he does not want to see or feel that it is JACK he holds--because for now, they are wrapped in a closeness that satisfies some shared and sexless hunger, that is not really sleep but something else drowsy and tranced--until ENNIS, dredging up a rusty phrase from the childhood time before his mother died, says:
ENNIS
Come on now, you're sleepin' on your feet like a horse.
(pause)
My mama used to say that to me when I was little...
They stand like that for another moment.
ENNIS
...and sing to me...
ENNIS sings low, a childhood song, from some long-ago memory.
ENNIS
I got to go.
Gives JACK a little shake, a gentle push, and JACK stumbles ever so slightly in the direction of his tent. Stops.
Hears ENNIS'S spurs jingle as he mounts his horse.
ENNIS
...See you in the mornin'...
A shuddering snort from ENNIS'S horse, the grind of hoof on stone, and ENNIS rides away, a very young JACK watching him go.
CUT TO EXT: WYOMING MOUNTAINS: TRAILHEAD: MORNING: PRESENT: CONTINUOUS: 1981:
WE ARE BACK TO THE PRESENT as JACK, much older now, watching the pickup truck, and his other half, fade away into the distance, that dozy embrace solidified in his memory as the single moment of artless, charmed happiness in their seperate and difficult lives.

Offline PetterG

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Re: Scene: Last Scene w/ Ennis and Jack Together
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2006, 12:07:10 PM »
JACK
Come here...It's all right. It's all right...damn you, Ennis.
And then...they hug one another, a fierce, desperate embrace


OMG - now I understand why You have been so 'upset' about this scene.

once more Jack is conforting Ennis - totally forgetting his own pain - this was not in the novel
if you cannot fix it - you've gotta stand it
if you cannot stand it - you gotta fix it

Offline brokebackLJ

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Re: Scene: Last Scene w/ Ennis and Jack Together
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2006, 12:16:18 PM »
I never really thought about that. How Ennis never comforts Jack, it's always the other way around and the one time Jack needs the comfort, he's rejected....but it brings him back to a place where they both didn't need anything, but each other....:(

jiml

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Re: Scene: Last Scene w/ Ennis and Jack Together
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2006, 12:21:40 PM »
I wish I knew how to quit you.
WE PULL BACK.
Like vast clouds of steam from the thermal springs in winter, the years of things unsaid and now unsayable--admissions, declarations, shames guilts, fears--rise around them.
ENNIS stands as if heartshot, face gray and deep-lined.
Fights a silent battle, grimaces.
ENNIS
Then why don't you?! Why don't you let me be? It's because of you, Jack, that I'm like this. I'm nothin'. I'm nowhere.
JACK starts towards him, but ENNIS jerks away.
ENNIS
Get the fuck off me!
Jack moves towards him again, and this time, ENNIS doesn't resist.
JACK
Come here...It's all right. It's all right...damn you, Ennis.
And then...they hug one another, a fierce, desperate embrace--managing to torque things almost to where they had been, what they've just said is no news: as always, nothing ended, nothing begun, nothing resolved.
CUT TO FLASHBACK: EXT: BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN, WYOMING: CAMPFIRE: NIGHT: CONTINUOUS: 1963:
OK, is this the way this goes in the final cut of the film? It says Ennis stands "as if heartshot", jerks away, and then doesn't resist as Jack continues to him to comfort him. Doesn't Ennis collapse onto the ground in the film? To me, that is sending a different message, but I could just be mis-remembering the sequence.

Offline Scott88

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Re: Scene: Last Scene w/ Ennis and Jack Together
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2006, 12:24:51 PM »
I think the description still holds.  Ennis DOES allow Jack to comfort him on the second try, but he also collapses from the grief and pain of finally verbalizing these emotions.  And they're still holding each other when the scene fades-in to the flashback.

kumari

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Re: Scene: Last Scene w/ Ennis and Jack Together
« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2006, 12:28:57 PM »
This scene always reminds me of the sucker punch scene on Brokeback when they are about to come down from the mountain. Jack is trying to comfort Ennis after the knee in the nose accident, and Ennis rewards his concern by decking him.
You can see that Jack is hurt, but he loves Ennis, and he understands him.
Even when he unleashes his anger in this scene, Jack cannot leave Ennis in pain and fiercely embraces him, still trying to staunch the "bleeding."
These two scenes together makes the ending even more devastating. Who will comfort Ennis after Jack is gone? Who will shush and calm the skittish horse?

jiml

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Re: Scene: Last Scene w/ Ennis and Jack Together
« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2006, 12:29:29 PM »
I think the description still holds.  Ennis DOES allow Jack to comfort him on the second try, but he also collapses from the grief and pain of finally verbalizing these emotions.  And they're still holding each other when the scene fades-in to the flashback.
I guess the difference for me goes to the description that "what they've just said is no news: as always, nothing ended, nothing begun, nothing resolved." In the screenplay, I can accept that progression. When seeing Ennis collapse on screen, it's hard for me to think that nothing has changed. Ennis seems completely broken.

kumari

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Re: Scene: Last Scene w/ Ennis and Jack Together
« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2006, 12:33:04 PM »
I think the description still holds.  Ennis DOES allow Jack to comfort him on the second try, but he also collapses from the grief and pain of finally verbalizing these emotions.  And they're still holding each other when the scene fades-in to the flashback.
I guess the difference for me goes to the description that "what they've just said is no news: as always, nothing ended, nothing begun, nothing resolved." In the screenplay, I can accept that progression. When seeing Ennis collapse on screen, it's hard for me to think that nothing has changed. Ennis seems completely broken.

kumari

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Re: Scene: Last Scene w/ Ennis and Jack Together
« Reply #10 on: January 08, 2006, 12:36:22 PM »
Sorry my message didn't come through, my son decided to push a few buttons.
What I meant to say is that I agree that these two scenes played differently for me between the book and the film.

Offline Scott88

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Re: Scene: Last Scene w/ Ennis and Jack Together
« Reply #11 on: January 08, 2006, 12:40:09 PM »
Quote
I guess the difference for me goes to the description that "what they've just said is no news: as always, nothing ended, nothing begun, nothing resolved." In the screenplay, I can accept that progression. When seeing Ennis collapse on screen, it's hard for me to think that nothing has changed. Ennis seems completely broken.

No, I agree.  In the film, it does feel more monumental.  Like they have reached an impasse.  But what ultimately would have happened, I think, is never fully resolved because Jack dies too soon after for any of us to ever know for sure.

We all have own theories, though. ;)

Offline jfitz19

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Re: Scene: Last Scene w/ Ennis and Jack Together
« Reply #12 on: January 08, 2006, 03:16:00 PM »
I posted this n the Main Discussion Forum, but think that it might be more rrelevant here.  My theory on what followed for Jack.

Regarding the question, has Jack decided to “move on” from Ennis at the end of the film, here’s my take.  For the most definitive answer, I think we have to go directly to the film and screenplay, remembering that there is nothing gratuitous in Ang Lee’s film. 

Here, sequentially, is what leads me to conclude that Jack is giving very serious consideration to moving on.  However, at the time of his death, he has not made an irrevocable decision.

1.On Jack and Ennis’s last night together, just after Jack has told Ennis that he is sleeping with the ranch foreman’s wife, Jack says, Tell you what,” then there is a significant pause before he says, “Truth is sometimes I miss you so much I can hardly stand it.”  Ang Lee leave some room here for the viewer to wonder if Jack may have been getting ready to be more forthcoming to Ennis at this time.  However, we don’t really know.  (Note, according to the screenplay, this scene takes place approximately three years after Jack’s scene with Randall.)

2.Just before the final confrontation the next morning Jack states that he is going up to visit his parents for a day or two.  Why did this remark find its way into the film?  It has to have some significance.
 
3.At the end of the confrontation Larry and Diana use the same language that Annie uses to describe the outcome, “And then… they hug one another, a fierce desperate embrace—managing to torque things almost to where they had been (my emphasis), for what they’ve just said is no news:  as always, nothing ended, nothing begun, nothing resolved.”

4.The next scene we see is the flashback followed by Jack’s last look at Ennis driving off.  Jack looks resigned, disappointed, unhappy, etc.  The viewer must conclude what he is thinking, but happiness is not in the picture.  Plus, he has plenty of time to think on the way up to his parent’s place.
 
5.After the Cassie interlude, which indicates that a considerable amount of time has passed, we see Ennis receiving the “deceased” postcard.  This is important because it indicates that after the final get together until the time of his death, Jack did not communicate anything to Ennis to indicate that there had been a change in the relationship.

6.Ennis visits Jack’s parents and the father says, “Jack used a say,” and he goes on to talk about Jack bringing Ennis up.   Then he says, “Then this spring he’s got another fell ‘a goin a come up here with him…”  This is a huge change for Jack. At the least the viewer is led to conclude that he has given serious thought to building a life with Randall.  He’s had years to think about this.  What other reason could possibly bring him to say this to his folks? 

We do know that Jack, protective of Ennis to the end, has never breathed a word about this other relationship.  And we have no idea how Randall defines it—something serious or just fooling around.  Knowing Jack, he could have had totally unrealistic expectations of Randall, so an attempt by Jack to build a life with Randall could have been just as ill fated.

My conclusion:  Jack has taken steps in an attempt to move beyond Ennis, but any such move (obviously) has not been carried out.  Until such time as he tells Ennis about his deal with Randall, he’s still tied to Ennis.  Moreover, if he is really trying to move on, the viewer can realistically hypothesize that he can’t bring himself to inflict the hurt on Ennis he knows that his moving on will cause.  He’s had plenty of time to communicate the news.

lynn

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Re: Scene: Last Scene w/ Ennis and Jack Together
« Reply #13 on: January 08, 2006, 03:35:48 PM »
Here, sequentially, is what leads me to conclude that Jack is giving very serious consideration to moving on.  However, at the time of his death, he has not made an irrevocable decision. ...

At the least the viewer is led to conclude that he has given serious thought to building a life with Randall. 

The last time I saw the movie I came to the same conclusion. What led me there is what happens BEFORE this scene. During the next-to-last camping trip, Jack is angry that Ennis yet again refuses his suggestion to move to Texas. After this scene we see Jack talks to Randall at the bar/club. And during THIS scene, in the background, I'm almost sure the song playing (after the fast fiddle music) is "I don't want to say goodbye..."

Assuming every song was placed by Ang for a particular reason, I think this indicates that Jack is starting to think of "saying goodbye", or at least considering an alternative to meeting his needs for a relationship.

Offline canmark

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Re: Scene: Last Scene w/ Ennis and Jack Together
« Reply #14 on: January 08, 2006, 03:54:17 PM »
The last time I saw the movie I came to the same conclusion. What led me there is what happens BEFORE this scene. During the next-to-last camping trip, Jack is angry that Ennis yet again refuses his suggestion to move to Texas. After this scene we see Jack talks to Randall at the bar/club. And during THIS scene, in the background, I'm almost sure the song playing (after the fast fiddle music) is "I don't want to say goodbye..."

Assuming every song was placed by Ang for a particular reason, I think this indicates that Jack is starting to think of "saying goodbye", or at least considering an alternative to meeting his needs for a relationship.

Or it could mean that he is thinking about how he really doesn't want to say goodbye. The next line in the song is "All I want to do is live with you." That was always Jack's wish. And that was something that Ennis, after all those years, never seemed to be willing to give. So it's perhaps with regret that Jack gives in to temptation, seeing if someone else will give him what Ennis won't: companionship and someone to live with. I find it so sad when he shoots back to Ennis with "We could have had a good life... but you didn't want it."

What Jack wants seems so small, yet is so big. And this has been true for gay people throughout history. Two men could live together as roommates and nobody cares. But if they live together as lovers, all hell breaks loose.
... yet he is suffused with a sense of pleasure because Jack Twist was in his dream.