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Author Topic: Media coverage: how are we seen?  (Read 184718 times)

Offline Kragey

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Re: Media coverage: how are we seen?
« Reply #15 on: March 27, 2006, 06:29:27 AM »
I'm a big fan of the Logo channel. I feel that their programs provide a look at GLBT life from all corners and views; in fact, I distinctly remember watching a show about New York drag queens last week and seeing a special about real-life gay ranchers the next day.

Offline Jack Rance

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Re: Media coverage: how are we seen? and NOT SEEN !
« Reply #16 on: March 28, 2006, 08:15:49 AM »
http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/03/28/MNGL4HUVV31.DTL

TV networks reject ad from church
Say spot welcoming gays is controversial
Wyatt Buchanan, Chronicle Staff Writer

Tuesday, March 28, 2006

 

The nation's major television networks have rejected an ad that shows a gay couple and others being banished from a church, saying it violates their rules against controversial or religious advertising.

The 30-second commercial for the United Church of Christ will begin airing on cable networks and Spanish-language stations next week. The ad, called "Ejector," shows a gay couple, a single mother, a disabled man and others flying out of their pews as a wrinkled hand pushes a red button.

Text on the screen reads, "God doesn't reject people. Neither do we," and a voiceover says, "The United Church of Christ. No matter who you are or where you are on life's journey, you're welcome here."

The church tried to run a similar ad in December 2004 in which bouncers outside a church stopped gay couples, racial minorities and others from entering. The networks also rejected that ad.

The decision by CBS, NBC, ABC and Fox to decline the latest advertisement shows the networks have a narrow view of acceptable images of gays and lesbians, church leader Ron Buford said Monday.

"They are saying, 'You can entertain on 'Will & Grace' and 'Queer Eye for the Straight Guy,' but when it comes to showing you as whole people with the church, that is going to far," Buford said.

CBS spokeswoman Shannon Jacobs said the network has "a long-standing and well-documented policy of not accepting advocacy advertising."

Kathy Kelly-Brown, a spokeswoman for NBC, said the ad "violates our long-standing policy against airing commercials that deal with issues of public controversy."

Representatives for ABC and Fox were not available for comment, but Buford said both networks had told the church they have policies barring religious advertising.

Buford said CBS executives had told him the subject would be considered advocacy advertising until the inclusion of gays and lesbians is common at churches in the United States.

But Jacobs challenged that statement. "That supposed exchange is simply fictitious," she said.

Starting April 3, the ad will run for three weeks on CNN, USA, TNT, BET and eight other cable networks, along with three Spanish-language stations. The church spent $1.5 million on the ads, which will run through the Easter season.

The church filed a complaint against CBS and NBC affiliates in Miami after the networks rejected the first ad in 2004. That complaint is still pending.

E-mail Wyatt Buchanan at wbuchanan@sfchronicle.com.


Offline jim ...

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Re: Media coverage: how are we seen?
« Reply #17 on: April 06, 2006, 05:05:03 PM »
This appeared on my local news tonight. It's a shame that it's even new worthy. Perhaps the American Family Association needs to hear from us.

http://www.afa.net/



Today's Fast Feedback Question:   Wal*Mart Ban of "Brokeback Mountain?" (4/6/06)

The movie “Brokeback Mountain,” is causing controversy, and it’s bringing along Wal*Mart in its wake. The American Family Association says the retailing chain is trying to push a social agenda by selling the movie, which features a love affair between two cowboys. The group claims the film was not a blockbuster and selling it promotes homosexual propaganda. Wal*Mart says it sells what customers want, and it’s not pushing any kind of agenda. In 2003 the group successfully pressured Wal-Mart to stop selling magazines it found offensive. Do you think Wal*Mart should stop selling “Brokeback Mountain”  in light of pressure from family groups, or should the retailer continue to sell the DVD?


 
« Last Edit: April 06, 2006, 05:12:31 PM by jim ... »

BRAD1963

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Re: Media coverage: how are we seen?
« Reply #18 on: April 06, 2006, 06:03:02 PM »
http://www.larodeo.com/glac.php.

The Los Angeles Gay Rodeo is coming Aug 4 - 6

Offline Willhoite

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Re: Media coverage: how are we seen?
« Reply #19 on: April 06, 2006, 09:14:00 PM »
http://www.larodeo.com/glac.php.

The Los Angeles Gay Rodeo is coming Aug 4 - 6

Brad, I see that you are new to posting here. It was the Gay Rodeo guys in Canada who helped with the rodeo scenes in the movie. When I lived out in LA, I went to the LA Gay Rodeo several times.
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Offline Carissa

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Re: Media coverage: how are we seen?
« Reply #20 on: June 09, 2006, 12:10:26 PM »
I don't know if this is the right thread but I think it could fit here.  This is just my observation.  There was a lot of controversy regarding Chad Allen starring in the movie about a Christian missionary, End of the Spear.  The DVD is coming out next week and I was surprised that the star of the movie is not on the cover (though three of the other co-stars are).  Now, I didn't see the movie, so I don't know if these three had bigger parts than Chad Allen's character, but it was his character's story.  He is in the comoercial but not on the dvd cover.  I just thought that it was odd.

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Take him and cut him out in little stars,
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And pay no worship to the garish sun.
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Offline dsmom

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Re: Media coverage: how are we seen?
« Reply #21 on: June 16, 2006, 10:58:43 PM »
This was sent to me by a friend in the UK...he asked me to post it here...

There's a very interesting thing that's happening here in the UK tonight - mixed feelings about it. The top story on all the news is the conviction and sentencing of two men who battered a 24 year old gay man to death last year in London because he was gay. The key thing is that they have been given more severe sentences - life with a minimum tariff of 26 years in prison - precisely because their motivation was homophobia under new hate crime laws that compel judges to impose more severe sentences on crimes which have a proven element of hate crime motivation such as racist and homophobic crime.

The very high profile that has been given to it - and the very lucid, moving statement from the victim's mother, denouncing her son's death and all homophobic crimes committed 'just because a someone is homosexual' shows a real shift in recognising the unacceptability of anti-gay violence in the UK. The police are stressing over and over that they will take a particularly severe line over anti-gay crime and strongly encouraging people to report.

I thought of your pm a few days ago about the man repeatedly stabbed to death and how his killer got away with it over there. This is a really good contrast. It has made me fee both proud of the shift in attitude over here and very upset by the brutal and horrible way that young man died.

His mother was so strong and clear and proud of him on the TV, Jess. All her family were around her and she didn't cry but spoke very vividly.

This is what his mother said:

'In a statement, his family thanked the police, medical staff, victim support groups, witnesses, the judge and prosecution team and all those who had ensured "justice was served".

"In a free and democratic society, Jody's murder was an outrage," they said.

"Jody was not the first man to be killed, or terrorised, or beaten, or humiliated for being homosexual - or for being perceived to be homosexual.

"Tragically, he will not be the last man to suffer the consequences of homophobia which is endemic in this society.


"This is unacceptable. We cannot accept this. No intelligent, healthy or reasonable society could."

It's a good feeling that it's the absolute top news story on TV, very clear that the killers are the ones in the wrong, no hint of criticism because the murder took place in a well-know gay cruising area. And lots of publicity about the extra severity of sentencing because of the new hate crime laws. As well as being upsetting it did make me feel proud of our country and how it's moved forward.

It was interesting that the news story gave figures about rising figures as the gay community becomes more confident and visible gay bashings increase. It's hard to know if that's because of the police encouraging more reporting or if the incidence is rising. The story was very clear that a lot of incidents go unreported.

We (our programme) funds a project which acts as a third party reporting body for gay people experiencing violence and does work in schools against homophobic bullying. We're involved in developoing a Hate Crime Strategy in Bristol with the police etc. They have police officers appointed to work with gay people too. It's come a long way.


There is the light and the dark and all things that live have the power to choose...

Offline Jer009

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Re: Media coverage: how are we seen?
« Reply #22 on: June 28, 2006, 03:36:10 AM »
Just tonight I had Comedy Central on, and they were playing a performance of Carlos Mencia. His routine involves blacks, gays, Asians...he would tell you he's an equal opportunity offender. 

Well, at one point he plays a gay man. I prepared myself for the worst, and I wasn't disappointed. Of course, he begins with a lisp. Hands fluttering. Mincing and lisping and fluttering for all he's worth. Of course, the audience found this "joke" hilarious.

I wanted to reach through the TV set and throttle his neck. I don't know a single gay person with a lisp, or any other of the exaggerated behavior he exhibited while he was playing gay. How can it be, in this day and age, that "jokes"  like that can still get a laugh?
Yes, I understand that some stereotypes are rooted in reality. But doesn't he understand that people seeing his homophobic, mean routine, a portion of them will have their hate and ignorance confirmed by this? And maybe act on it? It's a shorter ride from a comic making jokes and Mathew Shepard being strung out on a fence in the Wyoming winter and being left to die than many may think. Also, the cumulative effect of years of "jokes" like this takes its toll.

I swear, years from now, when homophobia has left this society, we'll look back at performances such as these and shake our heads in wonder that we ever found such things entertaining. Such ugliness and fear. A moral person would feel deeply ashamed.

One of the things that impresses me most about BBM is that it accomplished a minor miracle: after years of gays being the Scary Other, along came a movie which anyone could relate to. The audience came to understand that they were in love, and they were rooting for them! The audience understood that love is love...in many cases, I'm sure, for the very first time, even if it's two men. I think that was shocking to many people, a novel, crazy idea that we have feelings too, and it's the very same feeling as a straight person feels when in love. It's as if they've forgotten we're human too, and this movie made them remember it.
This movie made us human again. Of course, WE knew it already, but apparently it's easy to forget.

Offline jim ...

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Re: Media coverage: how are we seen?
« Reply #23 on: August 25, 2006, 09:46:49 AM »

Offline Lola

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Re: Media coverage: how are we seen?
« Reply #24 on: September 01, 2006, 07:10:25 AM »
August 31, 2006


ZANZIBAR, Tanzania (AP) -- A huge beach party to honor late Queen frontman Freddie Mercury must be stopped because the Zanzibar-born rock star was gay, a Muslim leader said Thursday.

Mercury, who died of AIDS in 1991, violated Islam with his flamboyant lifestyle, said Azan Khalid of Zanzibar's Association for Islamic Mobilization and Propagation.

"That's why he was branded a Queen," Khalid said, adding that anything linking Mercury with Zanzibar's Muslim population would be offensive.

He said that a waterfront restaurant's plans for a September 2 party honoring Mercury's birthday would be stopped.

Mercury restaurant, which was named for the singer, will go ahead with the party, manager Simai Mohammed said.

Mercury, who acknowledged being gay, was born in Zanzibar when the country was still a British protectorate. He was educated in India and moved with his family to Britain in 1964, after a bloody revolution that drove out many immigrants of Indian or Arab descent.

"Our main idea is to promote tourism and Freddie Mercury was from Zanzibar. It's part of our history," Mohammed said. "We are all Muslims and it's not our intention to offend any religion."

Last year some 500,000 tourists traveled to Zanzibar, bringing vital foreign currency to the Indian Ocean island. This semiautonomous part of Tanzania is mostly Muslim.


Zanzibar's government sent a letter asking state-owned media not to report on Mercury's birthday because of the tension between the religious group and the restaurant. The group's aim is for Zanzibar to be ruled based on the Muslim holy book, the Koran. Last year, the group broke up a gay man's birthday party in Zanzibar's Pemba island.


Mercury gained fame as the bravura singer for Queen, whose elaborate and occasionally bombastic songs made the group one of the favorites of the 1970s. The group's hits included "Bohemian Rhapsody," "We Are The Champions" and "Crazy Little Thing Called Love."
 
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Offline aceygirl

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Re: Media coverage: how are we seen?
« Reply #25 on: September 06, 2006, 11:54:25 AM »
60 Minutes aired an interesting episode about ongoing research on gay siblings...i.e. "the more older brothers a boy has, the more likely he is to be gay," plus questions about hormones, a mom's womb, nature versus nurture, etc.

Leslie Stahl did a good job, I thought, of keeping all these hypotheses in perspective. Most importantly, the segment showcases twin brothers, one of whom acts much more "girlie" than the other, and says he wants to be a girl. Their mother, although unsmiling, makes a wonderful point about the fact that despite what she might have wanted her son to act like, she would not suppress him because to do so would cause damage. The boy appears completely comfortable with himself (and his brother does too), painted fingernails, stuffed ponies, pink bedroom and everything. I really hope that this will become the norm for our society--that children will never be made to feel ashamed of who they are.

There were controversial parts to the story, i.e. researchers taped interviewees and studied their body mannerisms...some of that included the "limp wrist" or "lisp" that are often associated with gay  men. Leslie does make a point of saying that "generally but not always" were these mannerisms indicative of one's orientation.

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/03/09/60minutes/main1385230.shtml

Offline aceygirl

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Re: Media coverage: how are we seen?
« Reply #26 on: September 06, 2006, 12:01:18 PM »
Just tonight I had Comedy Central on, and they were playing a performance of Carlos Mencia. His routine involves blacks, gays, Asians...he would tell you he's an equal opportunity offender. 

Well, at one point he plays a gay man. I prepared myself for the worst, and I wasn't disappointed. Of course, he begins with a lisp. Hands fluttering. Mincing and lisping and fluttering for all he's worth. Of course, the audience found this "joke" hilarious.

I wanted to reach through the TV set and throttle his neck. I don't know a single gay person with a lisp, or any other of the exaggerated behavior he exhibited while he was playing gay. How can it be, in this day and age, that "jokes"  like that can still get a laugh?

Carlos Mencia occasionally makes a scathingly good point with his humor, but I agree that he all too often focuses on extreme stereotyping to get cheap laughs. I thought it interesting that he focuses alot on joking at the expense of his "own" race--but he's not Mexican, albeit he's Latino!

FWIW, he did have a fairly amusing segment last year featuring a gay man who "teaches him the ropes." And it's wild that he had a skit about "race Olympics" -- and now ABC is going to do a reality show based on people competing against each other based on race!  :P ::)

The stale cliche of gay stereotypes is unfortunately still firmly in place. I keep saying it, but Bill Maher, a pretty smart and sharp comedian, made so many stupid butt jokes about BBM that I lost several degrees of respect for him.   >:( Until American society, especially male heterosexual society, just friggin' gets over its own insecurities and whatnot, "jokes" relying on ethnic, racial and gender-related stereotypes are here for a long time. *sigh*

Offline Lola

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Re: Media coverage: how are we seen?
« Reply #27 on: September 10, 2006, 07:34:57 PM »
The decision by a Ugandan newspaper to publish the names and locations of alleged homosexuals could lead to a government crackdown against them, a human rights group warns....


http://www.cbc.ca/story/world/national/2006/09/08/uganda-human-rights-watch.html
 
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Offline Lola

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Re: Media coverage: how are we seen?
« Reply #28 on: September 13, 2006, 08:56:08 AM »
Sept. 12, 2006 — James McGreevey's back and Oprah's got him.

No need to explain who Oprah is, but some may have forgotten McGreevey, whose obituary headline will doubtless label him "the first openly gay governor in American history."

For now, McGreevey is alive and well and embarking on a tour to promote his political memoir, "The Confession."

Until now, he has maintained a staunch public silence since the day two years ago when he announced both that he was gay and that he would step down as governor.

After taping his "Oprah" appearance, which will air Sept. 19, the day McGreevey's book comes out, the 49-year-old former chief executive of New Jersey will move on to "Today," the "Late Show With David Letterman," "The View" and "Hannity and Colmes."

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/story?id=2425714&page=1
 
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Offline victopet

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Re: Media coverage: how are we seen?
« Reply #29 on: September 15, 2006, 07:43:53 AM »
I was just reading an article about former NJ Gov. Jim McGreevy's new book, "The Confession" coming out this week.

I live in NJ -- a generally pro-gay state.  But many people here (straight and gay) are cringing over what this book promises to say.

Anyone have any thoughts on this??
Will it help or hurt the gay cause to know how McGreevey was behaving?