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Author Topic: The New Yorker - Discussion  (Read 69278 times)

Offline Ellen (tellyouwhat)

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #30 on: October 24, 2007, 08:24:19 AM »
MB did you read the article by Oliver Sacks (a few issues ago) -- I am pretty sure it was Oliver Sacks --

about the man who had such severe amnesia that he couldn't keep a journal, although he kept trying?

He would write:  10:00 a.m., Just woke up.  then the next entry would be like:  now it's 12:30, I am finally awake this time.  and on and on.

He remembered nothing but he always seemed to recognize his wife, even without knowing her name.  If she visited him (in the facility where he ended up) the phone would be rining by the time she got home, and he would be pleading -- "Come and see me, it's been so long!"

Emotionally, he was craving her, but did not remember the visit that day.

Then she found out he could still read music!  He could follow a piece of music sequentially and play and sing and do harmony and all of it!  Based on this activity, he eventually got a foot hold again in some part of life.

Conclusion -- (I think) some skills, and emotion, are in a different part of the brain than memory. 
sometimes I think life is just a rodeo the trick is to ride and make it 'til the bell --john fogerty

Offline Rosewood

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #31 on: October 24, 2007, 12:17:25 PM »
Current issue arrived yesterday.
Wonderful short story by John Burnside (The Cold Outside)
who's written for them before.
But I gotta' tell you, wonderful as the writing is and I admit it hooked me
into its loop so that I read the damn thing at the kitchen table while
in the middle of several other things that just got shunted aside...
I'm still thinking about the story this morning and still wondering
what on earth it was  REALLY about.

Does that ever happen to anyone else?

Someone please read this story and explain to me what they think it's about
and maybe that'll give me a clue.

And yet I loved the writing and the main character and the feeling
the story gave me.
Go figure.

Great scary pumpkin cover, by the way.
Dick Cheney.
He's so easy.  ;D



"Tut, tut, child," said the Duchess.
"Everything's got a moral if only you can find it."
                                                  Lewis Carroll

Offline Ellen (tellyouwhat)

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #32 on: October 31, 2007, 11:05:56 AM »
Rosewood, you probably already have your new mag by now.  I went through the Dick Cheney one yesterday, but did not yet read the fiction.

OMG did anybody read that article about CHOCOLATE?  I imagined it grew in beans like coffee but it is more like a big pod. 

Very interesting how it needs to be processed.  So difficult you can hardly imagine that it was ever discovered.

I used to visit Ashland Oregon every summer (where the little independent chocolate company, subject of the story, is located)  I swear I had one of those little chocolate bars.  Haven't been back to Ashland in a while, haven't seen one since.

I will read the fiction as soon as I get a chance.
sometimes I think life is just a rodeo the trick is to ride and make it 'til the bell --john fogerty

Offline CANSTANDIT

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #33 on: October 31, 2007, 11:08:11 AM »
darn, still not getting the New Yawkuh..I think my subscription picks up again this Monday...darn. I've entered some photocap contests, though! :D :D I just go on line-can't compete with some of these geniuses, though. did you see the 'I think we're going to need a bigger spear' one?? ;D ;D ;D

Offline Ellen (tellyouwhat)

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #34 on: October 31, 2007, 12:28:14 PM »
oh yeah I loved that.

sometimes I just can't get a handle on them.  For the life of me could think of nothing for the aliens and the desert island, but the peeps did a good job.   I did enter the angel contest though.  But it was the first one I tried.  hmmm, I am not a finalist.   >:( :D

That one with the guy in the cradle I let pass. 

Now if I can't think up something for Mr. Potatohead in a bar.... ;D

I am always amazed what people come up with.
sometimes I think life is just a rodeo the trick is to ride and make it 'til the bell --john fogerty

Offline CANSTANDIT

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #35 on: October 31, 2007, 03:28:45 PM »
oh yeah I loved that.

sometimes I just can't get a handle on them.  For the life of me could think of nothing for the aliens and the desert island, but the peeps did a good job.   I did enter the angel contest though.  But it was the first one I tried.  hmmm, I am not a finalist.   >:( :D

That one with the guy in the cradle I let pass. 

Now if I can't think up something for Mr. Potatohead in a bar.... ;D

I am always amazed what people come up with.
I did Mr Potato Head, and the guy in the crib. But I thought of a better one for the guy in the crib after: "So, was the Apgar your first clue?" ;D
I thought it was funny, anyway... too late!

Offline Ellen (tellyouwhat)

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #36 on: October 31, 2007, 04:26:57 PM »
^^^^LOL

yep, that was a good one!
sometimes I think life is just a rodeo the trick is to ride and make it 'til the bell --john fogerty

Offline Ellen (tellyouwhat)

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #37 on: November 01, 2007, 08:56:39 AM »
Current issue arrived yesterday.
Wonderful short story by John Burnside (The Cold Outside)
who's written for them before.
But I gotta' tell you, wonderful as the writing is and I admit it hooked me
into its loop so that I read the damn thing at the kitchen table while
in the middle of several other things that just got shunted aside...
I'm still thinking about the story this morning and still wondering
what on earth it was  REALLY about.

Does that ever happen to anyone else?

Someone please read this story and explain to me what they think it's about
and maybe that'll give me a clue.

And yet I loved the writing and the main character and the feeling
the story gave me.
Go figure.

Great scary pumpkin cover, by the way.
Dick Cheney.
He's so easy.  ;D



LOL I studied that Jack o lantern and thought of trying to do it for real!  (but I was too lazy)


Rosewood, I read the story yesterday, and I admit to being a bit baffled by it.  But I think --

There was the contrast with Bill's life with Sall, compared to the wild and dangerous life of the boy.  And yet the two of them maintained a conversation as much at a distance as he and Sall had in their entire marriage.

I don't know, is the point that Bill has this brush with a wilder world, and realizes he has chosen his steady life?

Is he really so passive -- blaming Sall for keeping them from visiting their daughter -- but why wouldn't he just go on and do it?

What ever "happened" between Caroline and Sall?  There seemed to be some foreshadowing there but then we never really found out.  Unless I didn't read it carefullly enough.

He saw that the boy was willing to travel miles for some adventure, even though he had to come back to his boring village -- the boy was willing to dress in obviously non-male attire but not pretend to be female, and they had their conversation but never once referred to the strangeness of the situation, his clothing -- although they talked about the gash in his leg.  As matter of fact as possible.

more thoughts?
sometimes I think life is just a rodeo the trick is to ride and make it 'til the bell --john fogerty

Offline Rosewood

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #38 on: November 01, 2007, 10:32:39 AM »


LOL I studied that Jack o lantern and thought of trying to do it for real!  (but I was too lazy)


Rosewood, I read the story yesterday, and I admit to being a bit baffled by it.  But I think --

There was the contrast with Bill's life with Sall, compared to the wild and dangerous life of the boy.  And yet the two of them maintained a conversation as much at a distance as he and Sall had in their entire marriage.

I don't know, is the point that Bill has this brush with a wilder world, and realizes he has chosen his steady life?

Is he really so passive -- blaming Sall for keeping them from visiting their daughter -- but why wouldn't he just go on and do it?

What ever "happened" between Caroline and Sall?  There seemed to be some foreshadowing there but then we never really found out.  Unless I didn't read it carefullly enough.

He saw that the boy was willing to travel miles for some adventure, even though he had to come back to his boring village -- the boy was willing to dress in obviously non-male attire but not pretend to be female, and they had their conversation but never once referred to the strangeness of the situation, his clothing -- although they talked about the gash in his leg.  As matter of fact as possible.

more thoughts?

I kept thinking that maybe the boy was the 'angel of death' and Bill had willingly picked him up
on the highway. But that's probably too dramatic. IF this story had been written in the fifties, it would
probably be so, though. Don't you think?

Maybe you're right about the contrast thing. Maybe that's what the author is trying to show.
The contrast of two lives that pass in the night - literally.

The scene in the truck shows me that Bill is the sort who prefers to remain unfazed no matter what.
He is passive, as you say, Ellen, to the extreme. So he can't really blame anyone else for his circumstances
since he seems content enough. It's easier NOT to go see the daughter, so he doesn't. It's easier
to go along to get along, so he does. The cancer will soon kill him so he will sit and wait for it.

Upon second and third thinking, I couldn't figure out if I even liked this guy.
Although I did like his compassion for the boy. I mean, there aren't many who would have picked
up the kid in disguise. That's what i thought, by the way, that the kid was in disguise. Trying to fool
himself into being someone else the way some people do. Don't know if the kid was a real cross-dresser
or not - do you? I couldn't figure it out. Maybe he was. Or maybe he'd just come from some sort of
masquerade party. It is the Halloween issue after all... Didn't ruffle Bill's feathers though,
as the conversation went along and they were so matter-of-fact about it.

I think the boy was obviously courting danger and excitement and seemed nonplussed about having
found it. Don't know what to make of it except that with this attitude, I don't see him living
to a ripe old age.

Bill sort of reminded me of me.
I tend towards the passive as well. Hate that about myself.
I never ask personal questions of ANYONE. And yet, people always reveal themselves
to me anyway. Must be the challenge...

Anyway, having added these thoughts to yours, I still can't quite get what the story was
REALLY about. But maybe that's it. Maybe there's no point.
And that's the point.
"Tut, tut, child," said the Duchess.
"Everything's got a moral if only you can find it."
                                                  Lewis Carroll

Offline CANSTANDIT

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #39 on: November 01, 2007, 11:23:23 AM »
Hi, I'll join this thread more actively when I get my first new issue.

J

Offline CANSTANDIT

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #40 on: November 14, 2007, 03:17:52 PM »
Got back in the swing....anyone read, "The Dog"?? Very AP'ish, as if she went all cosmo and modern....author has same eye for nuance and realistic detail.

I've been doing the cartoon caps, having a blast. God those people are smart...

I got the e-mail about New Yorker Xmas cards, 20 for 19.95-that's pretty good and the cartoons are hilarious.

Really feel more in touch now that I have it. What a great Xmas gift a subscription  would be for one of my relatives who is no longer living near the city...

anybody here?? I am thinking, too, of getting one of those daytimers. Those are awesome!

Offline Ellen (tellyouwhat)

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #41 on: November 17, 2007, 09:02:44 AM »
Hi, I am here.   :)


My usual problem, I read the New Yorkers out of order, and I get my copy later than Rosewood does.

I haven't come across "The Dog" yet.  I'll look for it.

Last night I read "Or Else" which is in the Nov 19 issue.  Wow, I thought it was a fabulous story.  I will post on it more later when I have time.


CSI, remember Mr. Bones?

My husband talks to me often about humor, how jokes that are funny in some circumstances, but cruel and maybe, all too true.

After some reflection on our recent forum experience, I was thinking about that story again.  How the narrator of the story (the daughter) found that year of minstrel jokes really painful.


cartoon - My favorite cartoon in this issue was the one about "Business Casual Ethics."   ;D ;D ;D
sometimes I think life is just a rodeo the trick is to ride and make it 'til the bell --john fogerty

Offline Ellen (tellyouwhat)

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #42 on: November 17, 2007, 09:10:13 AM »

Upon second and third thinking, I couldn't figure out if I even liked this guy.
Although I did like his compassion for the boy. I mean, there aren't many who would have picked
up the kid in disguise. That's what i thought, by the way, that the kid was in disguise. Trying to fool
himself into being someone else the way some people do. Don't know if the kid was a real cross-dresser
or not - do you? I couldn't figure it out. Maybe he was. Or maybe he'd just come from some sort of
masquerade party. It is the Halloween issue after all... Didn't ruffle Bill's feathers though,
as the conversation went along and they were so matter-of-fact about it.

I think the boy was obviously courting danger and excitement and seemed nonplussed about having
found it. Don't know what to make of it except that with this attitude, I don't see him living
to a ripe old age.

Bill sort of reminded me of me.
I tend towards the passive as well. Hate that about myself.
I never ask personal questions of ANYONE. And yet, people always reveal themselves
to me anyway. Must be the challenge...

Anyway, having added these thoughts to yours, I still can't quite get what the story was
REALLY about. But maybe that's it. Maybe there's no point.
And that's the point.


I think there is a point, Rosewood.  But I'm not sure what it is  :P


The thing I found most disturbing about the story was the way he seemed to relate to his wife -- a sort of tolerance, and a distant disdain.  But, seen through his eyes, I don't know I kind of feel sorry for her, while Bill was feeling sorry for himself.

The boy -- I think his cross-dressing, whether for halloween or not, definitely had a sexual edge to it that was more than just a costume.

Here is another point -- Sall, you can picture her wearing conservative woolen clothing -- everyone is in a costume, sort of, clothes tell people who we are.  In a way, there is always a chance for deception, in women's hair styles, in criminals wearing ties into a court room --

maybe I'm rambling here. 
sometimes I think life is just a rodeo the trick is to ride and make it 'til the bell --john fogerty

Offline CANSTANDIT

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #43 on: November 17, 2007, 03:39:24 PM »
Hi, Ellen.....yes, I am rereading some of the toons as we speak; and that is a good point about Mr Bones. The unfortunately thing is, his family had no escape from him...!

Isn't it interesting that it seems to tie in with the wife's pregnancy? or did we talk about that??

I just did another cap to the judge doing the dishes in court pic-we'll see what happens- :D

I just got the 11/19 issue-out in bf arizona here, it takes a few days longer, I think.. ::) pony express, or something. So I'll have to catch up.

Regards,
Jo

Offline Ellen (tellyouwhat)

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #44 on: November 17, 2007, 04:29:59 PM »
Oh hey, can you do more than one?

Dang I am trying to think of something for that judge.

We should not share our ideas, of course, or else we would be influenced.  but maybe we can compare on Monday once the contest closes.  :D
sometimes I think life is just a rodeo the trick is to ride and make it 'til the bell --john fogerty