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Author Topic: The New Yorker - Discussion  (Read 70118 times)

Offline Brokeback_1

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #45 on: November 18, 2007, 02:52:16 AM »
I'm not reading the NY'er now.

It makes me nervous roflmao
There was some open space between what he knew and what he tried to believe but nothing could be done about it, & if you can't fix it, you've got to stand it

Offline Ellen (tellyouwhat)

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #46 on: November 18, 2007, 08:08:48 AM »
Why?

Too much doom and gloom?

Yesterday I read an article about the loss of honeybee populations.  Which threatens the pollination of a lot of important plants.  You may be on to something, Jack.
sometimes I think life is just a rodeo the trick is to ride and make it 'til the bell --john fogerty

Offline CANSTANDIT

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #47 on: November 18, 2007, 09:03:59 AM »
Oh hey, can you do more than one?

Dang I am trying to think of something for that judge.

We should not share our ideas, of course, or else we would be influenced.  but maybe we can compare on Monday once the contest closes.  :D
no, I misspoke-I meant I did another cap-about the judge. It was the first one for him.  ;)

I think it would be fun to talk about the themes in the pcaps-some people seem to just be 'right', don't they? I always go, why didn't I think of that? I also enjoy when the one I thought was funniest, does NOT get picked-makes me feel less common.. :D


I'll pm you my caption for the judge, so just delete if you don't want to read it.


J

Offline Brokeback_1

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #48 on: November 18, 2007, 09:31:13 AM »
Speaking of caps, the quote out of annie proulx about being an old lady trying to get into the head of 2 19 year old gay kids is tailor made for a cartoon....in or out of the NY'er.
There was some open space between what he knew and what he tried to believe but nothing could be done about it, & if you can't fix it, you've got to stand it

Offline chapeaugris

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #49 on: November 18, 2007, 09:42:57 AM »
Can I ask a favour of you all? When you're discussing an article from one of the recent issues could you be sure and mention the issue date, preferably in bold and ideally at the very beginning of the post? That way I know if I have that issue yet (I have a subscription but it arrives a week or two later than in the US). I'm going to try to participate here but it's a little hard (and frustrating!) when I'm a couple weeks behind.

My parents had a subscription all the years I was growing up, and I've had one ever since I moved to Europe (16 years). I remember the cover from the Brokeback issue but I didn't read the story.

Offline CANSTANDIT

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #50 on: November 18, 2007, 12:39:56 PM »
Sure, thing, Hon. :)

Offline Ellen (tellyouwhat)

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #51 on: November 18, 2007, 01:46:03 PM »
Yes, chapeaugris-- and chances are you and I will get around to the articles at the same time, or I might even be later than you ;D

The story called "Or Else" is from the Nov 19 issue --

I just realized, the article about the honeybees might be from a summer issue I found in the kitchen yesterday.  ::)
sometimes I think life is just a rodeo the trick is to ride and make it 'til the bell --john fogerty

Offline chapeaugris

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #52 on: November 18, 2007, 02:36:09 PM »
Yes, chapeaugris-- and chances are you and I will get around to the articles at the same time, or I might even be later than you ;D

The story called "Or Else" is from the Nov 19 issue --

I just realized, the article about the honeybees might be from a summer issue I found in the kitchen yesterday.  ::)
Well, we only just got the Nov. 12 issue so I'll have to wait a week I guess.

Offline Ellen (tellyouwhat)

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #53 on: November 18, 2007, 02:55:53 PM »
Do you look at the New Yorker photocaption contests on-line? 

I finally figured out that is how to do it, because once I get my mag it is already too late.

Not that it ever occurred to me to try in the past, but I am trying now as a sort of brain twister.


Oh -- did you read the article about the chocolate, the cacao plants etc?  Now I can't remember which issue that was in.
sometimes I think life is just a rodeo the trick is to ride and make it 'til the bell --john fogerty

Offline Rosewood

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #54 on: November 18, 2007, 03:14:16 PM »

I think there is a point, Rosewood.  But I'm not sure what it is  :P


The thing I found most disturbing about the story was the way he seemed to relate to his wife -- a sort of tolerance, and a distant disdain.  But, seen through his eyes, I don't know I kind of feel sorry for her, while Bill was feeling sorry for himself.

The boy -- I think his cross-dressing, whether for halloween or not, definitely had a sexual edge to it that was more than just a costume.

Here is another point -- Sall, you can picture her wearing conservative woolen clothing -- everyone is in a costume, sort of, clothes tell people who we are.  In a way, there is always a chance for deception, in women's hair styles, in criminals wearing ties into a court room --

maybe I'm rambling here. 

Nah, no more than me, at any rate.
This story leads to 'rambling'. Would be interesting to interview the author.

Didn't receive this week's issue. Was the previous one a two week thing?
If not, they owe me an issue. I also forgot to renew, so I'll be doing that this week as well.
Couldn't manage without my TNY.  ;)

Thought I'd insert my favorite cartoon of all time:

A) the one where the dog is lying on the couch speaking to
his psychiatrist who is also a dog. Both very simply drawn which adds to the thing.
The dog/patient says: I bark at everything. Can't go wrong that way.

I mean, I laughed out loud. That is SO ME!! I love this guy's humor. I collect dog cartoons,
so this one is at the head of the group plastered all around my house on different
bullentin boards and/or the refrigerator.

"Tut, tut, child," said the Duchess.
"Everything's got a moral if only you can find it."
                                                  Lewis Carroll

Offline Ellen (tellyouwhat)

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #55 on: November 18, 2007, 04:55:49 PM »
^^^^^

 :D :D 

I would like to know the (dog) psychiatrist's answer!

sometimes I think life is just a rodeo the trick is to ride and make it 'til the bell --john fogerty

Offline chapeaugris

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #56 on: November 19, 2007, 01:06:42 PM »
Do you look at the New Yorker photocaption contests on-line? 

I finally figured out that is how to do it, because once I get my mag it is already too late.

Not that it ever occurred to me to try in the past, but I am trying now as a sort of brain twister.
I totally blank on those. Can never think of anything even though I have managed a few photo captions here. Have you noticed that the vast majority of finalists are men?

Quote
Oh -- did you read the article about the chocolate, the cacao plants etc?  Now I can't remember which issue that was in.
I read it and loved it, mainly because of the guy's total obsession with chocolate. Like when he and the other guy got into the trough full of fermenting cacao pods. The article gave me a burning desire to taste the "honey" that surrounds the seeds inside the pods. That was one fact about cacao that I was completely unaware of, despite the fact that one of our kids did a whole unit on chocolate in primary school.

Offline Rosewood

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #57 on: November 19, 2007, 02:54:00 PM »
Just got the Nov. 26th issue in the mail today, a day early.
Looks like a combo issue.
Will report as soon as I peruse.
"Tut, tut, child," said the Duchess.
"Everything's got a moral if only you can find it."
                                                  Lewis Carroll

Offline Ellen (tellyouwhat)

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #58 on: November 19, 2007, 03:17:04 PM »
Do you look at the New Yorker photocaption contests on-line? 

I finally figured out that is how to do it, because once I get my mag it is already too late.

Not that it ever occurred to me to try in the past, but I am trying now as a sort of brain twister.

I totally blank on those. Can never think of anything even though I have managed a few photo captions here. Have you noticed that the vast majority of finalists are men?

CSI and I are thinking of putting our less embarrassing attempts here in the thread, on the day after the on-line contest closes.  We don't want to influence each other or give away any winning answers.  :D

[quote chapeaugris subjec: chocolate]
I read it and loved it, mainly because of the guy's total obsession with chocolate. Like when he and the other guy got into the trough full of fermenting cacao pods. The article gave me a burning desire to taste the "honey" that surrounds the seeds inside the pods. That was one fact about cacao that I was completely unaware of, despite the fact that one of our kids did a whole unit on chocolate in primary school.
[/quote]

It was fascinating, just thinking about how natives discovered chocolate -- what a long road from its raw form to anything edible or drinkable.

The guy who started the chocolate company is headquartered in Ashland Oregon -- a town I know very well, because for about 14 years I went there every summer for its Shakespeare festival.  It has a thriving tourist economy but also a very salt of the earth population -- and then there are the people like that guy, who are a bit wacko and need a place to express themselves.  I'm pretty sure I tasted one of his chocolate bars the last time I was there.

A friend sent this news item to me:  "The entire city council of Ashland, OR has decided to enter relationship counseling.  The catalyst was Councilman David Chapman's telling Councilman Eric Navickas to "shut your f**ing mouth" during last week's meeting, though Navickas had previously called the city's mayor "a Nazi."  Taxpayers will pay $37,000 for the council's five months of therapy."

So this is where the chocolate entrepreneur lives.  :D




sometimes I think life is just a rodeo the trick is to ride and make it 'til the bell --john fogerty

Offline Ellen (tellyouwhat)

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Re: New Yorker Discussion Thread
« Reply #59 on: November 19, 2007, 03:40:08 PM »
Or Else  fiction in the Nov. 19 issue  SPOILERS


First, I love the title.  Usually you think of it as a threat.  "Or else what?"  So I expected an ultimatum somewhere.  But it wasn't like that at all.  The anti-hero, David, wouldn't know an ultimatum if it bit him in the behind.  He is such a slinking liar and trickster, who lies even when he doesn't have to lie.

I like how the story has layer after layer of discovery -- where we learn that he is acutely aware of what may have been his past mistakes and offenses against the family he wished he could have been part of.

I guess his first friend in the family, Priscilla, changed toward him for two reasons, not only because she outgrew the relationship, but because (at that age) image is everything, and somehow she may not have considered him appropriate for others to even think he might have been her boyfriend.  When a former friend creates distance, it seems (and usually is) absolutely irrevocable.

Why couldn't he have stayed in the town (when he grew up and tried to move there)?  He tried, made a mess of his job -- but did he really have to leave because of that?  I wonder.  In fact, even an accident on black ice doesn't seem like a reason to lose a job.  But maybe he wasn't liked anyway.  I think the main reason it didn't work was because daily life, anywhere, make a place humdrum, and he needed to keep the town special in his mind, as something above workaday responsibilities.

I liked how the story unfolded, one revelation of the past with the family after another, how he apparently has gone over the treasured moments in his mind, wondering exactly what mistake was made in each particular scene, projecting his own disappointment of his parents' meeting with the family onto the others, re-examining moments when he thought he had detected the mother's or the father's pity or disappointment.

I loved how we get to know something of Violet in the end, how really sweet she was about finding David in the house, how surprisingly nice his girlfriend understood the situation and didn't rant or rave at him, just moved on to salvage the weekend. 

All the characters seemed very well-conceived.  Even the ending was not sad.   :)  Or else, it was just a little.

sometimes I think life is just a rodeo the trick is to ride and make it 'til the bell --john fogerty