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Author Topic: Gay Cinema  (Read 544151 times)

Offline tfferg

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Re: Gay Cinema
« Reply #3600 on: April 09, 2018, 06:37:48 PM »
I can't wait to see that! I loved Harris Dickinson in Beach Rats.

The image of him in the Caravaggio painting also reminded me of Canadian artist Evergon's early polaroids:



That's interesting!

Offline tfferg

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Re: Gay Cinema
« Reply #3601 on: April 09, 2018, 07:56:03 PM »
Nadie nos mira (Nobody's Watching) is an Argentinian film directed by Julia Solomonoff. Guillermo Pfening plays Nico Lencke, an actor in his 30s who leaves a successful career in Rivales a TV soap – his character goes into a coma - and his troubled relationship with Martin (Rafael Ferro) the producer to chase his dream of a film career in New York.

Although Nico is gay, most of the screenplay depicts the insidious effects on the immigrant in New York of the struggle to re-establish a career, obtain permanent residence and simply to survive rather than gay issues until late in the piece.

While waiting for a New York producer struggling to obtain the finance for an indie film he is to feature in about Mexican illegal immigrants, Guillermo scrapes a very precarious living as a bartender, apartment cleaner and resorts in desperation to shoplifting and to an opportunistic scam. He is reluctant to accept payment when he  babysits the son of Andrea, a wealthy Argentinian friend (Elena Roger). Need forces him to agree to work as the permanent nanny taking care of Theo. Guillermo tries to get other movie roles, but an arrogant New York producer tells him he needs to work out, darken his blond hair to qualify for Latino roles and get rid of his accent which she claims is too heavy for other roles. The shooting of the indie film would give him the basis to apply for a green card. He tries to sleep on a sofa with what looks like a one-room apartment shared with a woman friend who brings a succession of women home late at night.

The tone of the film is leisurely, humane and warm-hearted. A highlight is the relationship between Guillermo and baby Theo who is calm and happy with him and his excellent care, but squirms and grizzles when his often absent father tries to hold him.

When taking Theo to a park, Guillermo falls into conversation with illegal immigrant Latina nannies who assume he is Theo's father. They vanish when there is the likelihood of police appearing. They discuss their lives, sometimes ironically, and their treatment by the parents of their little charges.

Guillermo lies in phone calls with his mother in Argentina, claiming he is doing well. He erects a facade of success when Pablo (Marco Antonio Caponi) his co-star in Rivales visits. When Guillermo finally after months of not answering takes a phone call from Martin who announces his imminent visit, it turns out to be only a few hours stopover between flights, but what happens at the airport raises Guillermo's hopes.

By Christmas, facing the uncertainties of the indie film project and his immigration status, Guillermo has to make a decision when confronted with the humiliating and lonely realities of his marginal, class, ethnic and economic position and again when he finds out what Martin has decided in terms of both his role in the soap and their relationship.

Guillermo's invisibility in New York is not due to his gay identity and it's Martin's duplicity that makes their relationship dysfunctional. However, Guillermo is a resilient person.

Offline tfferg

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Re: Gay Cinema
« Reply #3602 on: April 10, 2018, 06:44:23 PM »
Al Berto, is a 2017 Portuguese biopic directed by Vicente Alves do Ó, set in the old fishing town of Sines in 1975 where the poet returns from Brussels after the Carnation Revolution which ended the 40-year Salazar dictatorship.

The then joyful, fearless Al Berto (Ricardo Teixeira) moves illegally into his condemned family mansion which had been expropriated by the revolutionary government. Sines is being transformed by the construction of a huge petrochemical complex. Al Berto welcomes a homeless family who have fled the war for independence in Angola and soon the house is filled with bohemian young local people and visitors interested in the arts. It becomes a centre of cultural experimentation and sexual liberation. Al Berto has an open love affair with aspiring writer João Maria (José Pimentão), much to the outrage of the latter's influential, hypocritically conservative father. There is a constant round of parties and disco dancing. The two men are close to Sara (Raquel Rocha Vieira), an aspiring poet opposed by her fisherman's widowed mother who also banishes her niece Clara who was befriended by Al Berto.

Many of the conservative townspeople are judgmental and scandalised by the behaviour of the people at the house. Having never experienced freedom, they are not prepared for its sudden appearance.

After several confrontations and an attempt to win over the conservative townspeople by holding poetry reading and reception, the inevitable happens. After discovering João Maria's affairs with others, Al Berto moves back to Lisbon.

Obviously, Portugal has changed a great deal since 1975 and has adopted progressive policies and laws. In some ways, it is more advanced than Australia. The municipality of Sines contributed to the funding of the film.

Watching the film, I had an odd time warp feeling and I wondered what prompted the director to make it. I read up and found that Al Berto was the pen name of a famous cult poet, Alberto Raposo Pidwell Tavares (1948-1997). The director knew him. João Maria was actually Vicente Alves do Ó's half brother. He inherited his diaries from which he derived the  material for the film. Al Berto's period in Sines had not been documented before. All the events in the film, some quite extraordinary, did really occur. The Al Berto of the Sines period is apparently quite different from the darker persona of his poetry. Vicente Alves do Ó also wanted to make a point about stereotyping by people who are frightened by social change and difference now.

It's a dramatic film.

Offline tfferg

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Re: Gay Cinema
« Reply #3603 on: April 11, 2018, 11:37:37 PM »
First feature director Jennifer Gerber left her home town of Hot Springs, Arkansas, a hotbed of fundamentalist religion and studied at Columbia in New York. When she decided that there was a need in the current political climate in the US for realistic stories from the Deep South to show the beauty of the country but also the psychology of fundamentalists. A friend alerted her to a play on stage in New York by Samuel Brett Williams who is also from Hot Springs, though they had never met. They collaborated on adapting the play to make The Revival.

Jennifer Gerber shot the film in Hot Springs with a small crew including some of her more open-minded film students from the University of Central Arkansas after the others dropped out.

The cinematographer was John Wakayama Carey who also photographed Rökkur and he does depict some local landscapes as the camera follows the conflicted lead character walking outside of town as he wrestles with his conscience.

Eli (David Rysdahl) returns from studies at Harvard with his pregnant wife June (Lucy Faust) to begin preaching at his late father's Southern Baptist church in Hot Springs. He is desperate to open the minds of the dwindling traditional fire-and-brimstone-loving congregation to his intellectual conception of the religion. Trevor (Raymond McAnally), a huge, divorced, recovering alcoholic hunter who is a member of the board, pressures him to conduct an annual revival (the first, in fact) to win adherents back from the popular sensationalist mega churches. He  and Eli worry the Southern Baptist authorities are likely to close their church down.

Another parishioner, Jimmy (Stephen Ellis) wants Eli's guidance because he has the hots for his first cousin. He is angry about Eli's interpretation of the descent of Jesus when he discovers marriage to a cousin is illegal in Arkansas.

Eli is attracted to Daniel (Zachary Booth, who co-starred in After Louie) a sexy drifter who turns up at a church potluck just to get a free meal. Eli continues to seek him out for reasons unrelated to Christian charity as the church would understand it. He sets him up in a secluded cottage in the woods outside of town where his father had hidden Eli's alcoholic mother. His treatment of Daniel's injured hand goes beyond medical. He spends more and more time there making love with Daniel and going home very late at night or not at all, even after he discovers Daniel's illegal activity and orders him to stop.

June angrily confronts Eli. She has known from the beginning and gossiping others have noticed Eli and Daniel together.

Later while Eli is driving through the night listening yet again to a sickening, habitually homophobic rant on “Christian” radio (voiced by David Carl) which is always playing in the car and praying for a sign from God to resolve his conflicted conscience, June goes to the cottage to confront Daniel. Unfortunately, even with an assisted listening device, I couldn't understand Lucy Faust's words due to her voice quality and manner of speaking. Eli incredibly interprets what happens to him on the road as the answer to his prayers.

What follows after June leaves the cottage is just horrible.

If you already know about the psychology and behaviour of “Christian” fundamentalists, I would not recommend this film. If you don't and you have a strong stomach, you might consider it.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2018, 03:37:35 AM by tfferg »

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: Gay Cinema
« Reply #3604 on: April 12, 2018, 06:55:37 AM »
Actually, that sounds like a very interesting film.

I really should start making a list of these films. ...  ::)

Offline tfferg

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Re: Gay Cinema
« Reply #3605 on: April 12, 2018, 07:23:18 PM »
The last film I saw at MQFF was an Israeli-German film The Cakemaker, the first feature directed by Ofir Raul Graizer who also teaches cooking.

It's a film about grieving. The idea for it came when Ofir Graizer heard that a married man he knew with a wife and three children was secretly having affairs with men. His wife only found out when he died. The director thought that she  wouldn't be able to mourn while feeling angry. He also thought about the perspective of the grieving lover. Graizer decided to make a film with a wife and her dead husband's lover in the kitchen together and see what happens.

Thomas (Tim Kalkhof) is a big, stolid-looking expert pastry cook who runs a successful small cafe in Berlin. Heterosexually married Israeli construction engineer Oren (Roy Miller) whose company operates in both countries is a customer. They fall in love and stay together when Oren regularly comes to Berlin to work. Oren always takes a box of Thomas's cinnamon cookies back to his wife in Jerusalem. When Oren forgets his keys when he leaves for Israel, Thomas phones him repeatedly to no avail. He eventually learns Oren has died suddenly in Israel.

Seemingly having no family or friends in Berlin, Thomas ups sticks and travels to Jerusalem where he tracks down Oren's non-religious widow Anat (Sarah Adler) who has just reopened a cafe Oren had been setting up for her. Her religious brother-in-law Moti (Zohar Shtrauss) has obtained the essential kosher certificate for it. Thomas is eventually able to persuade Anat to employ him as a dishwasher, not knowing who he is.

Melodrama follows, of course, especially with the characters of their specific different nationalities and religions.

While Anat is openly emotional, Tim Kalkhof rarely shows Thomas's feelings. He doesn't articulate them either. There is only one brief flashback scene of Thomas and Oren embracing on a bed in Berlin; there are no flashbacks of Oren and Anat together, though Oren tells Thomas he will never leave her and their son.

I think the film draws on some truths about fluidity in sexual attraction and relationships, but Ofir Graizer's approach is so restrained that it doesn't do much to illuminate gay/queer desire. I didn't find it sexy. The focus is rather on Thomas's silent need for connection and companionship. I found a number of scenes of Thomas looking impassive or making and decorating cookies went on too long.

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: Gay Cinema
« Reply #3606 on: April 19, 2018, 01:24:21 PM »

[...]

hey, does the search function work on this forum? if so, i see there's no discussion of the film KING COBRA. james franco in a "true story" about porn star brent corrigan. wow. i'm glad that james franco finally came out as gay. or "a little gay", whatever that means. the movie looks a bit creepy: [...] and betrayal... but i'm not a fan of franco, partly because he stayed in the closet so long... (i do like dave franco tho, haha)

[...]


I noticed Jimmy wrote this many months before IMDB says the movie came out/was released. It may have been traveling around LGBT Film festivals for some time before a release.


I watched a little of King Cobra on Netflix last night........I don't know, is that Gay Cinema??  ;D ;D ;D

James Franco seems to be pretty good at kissing a guy though........he's one busy actor anymore, seems to be everywhere!


--King Cobra

I watched this last night. The title refers to the name of a porn company. It's basically about two gay porn producers who begin
fighting over a popular hot young thing and the fighting escalates.

I was intrigued because it stars Christian Slater, Molly Ringwald, James Franco and Alicia Silverstone. (It does?) Garrett Clayton
is the "popular hot young thing". I don't know this actor, but he has a good deal of credits on imdb, including a two year stint on
a TV series I'm not familiar with, called The Fosters, and a role in the Hairspray Live! production that one of our members (Sparky)
won a production design Emmy for.

It's about the porn business, I was going to say the seedier side of the porn business, but I don't know if there's an opposite side.
I was entertained enough by it. James Franco's been in a lot of strange roles, so I was more intrigued with Christian Slater playing
a role I'd never seen him come near previously. It's based on a true story I'd never heard about before. There's about 7-8 minutes
of interesting outtakes on the dvd.


Offline gattaca

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Re: Gay Cinema
« Reply #3607 on: April 19, 2018, 05:33:23 PM »
I saw the film a few months ago.  Quite a flip and certainly outta character for many of the stars.  And seedy it is. V.

Offline Flyboy

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Re: Gay Cinema
« Reply #3608 on: April 19, 2018, 07:40:17 PM »
So we can all agree we like seedy films with Christian Slater and James Franco??!  :o :o :o ;D ;D ;D

I just like the way Franco kisses other guys, I know it's 'just acting' but he always seems to INTO IT at the time!
Loved Franco with Sean Penn in Milk, great scenes together!  :-* :-* :-*

Online Sara B

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Re: Gay Cinema
« Reply #3609 on: April 19, 2018, 11:36:01 PM »
I loved him in Milk too - and hurt for him. A very sensitive performance.
“When we grow older still we’ll speak about those two young men as if they were two strangers..... And we’ll want to call it envy, because to call it regret would break our hearts.”

Call Me by Your Name, André Aciman.

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: Gay Cinema
« Reply #3610 on: April 20, 2018, 10:48:08 AM »

I don't know the source of the quote, but I read this one recently
that was attributed to James Franco:  "I'm gay in my art, but I'm
straight in real life."

Whatever that means, heh!


Offline Gazapete

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Re: Gay Cinema
« Reply #3611 on: April 20, 2018, 11:18:35 AM »
I also loved Milk, but I am not sure about how I feel about James Franco. He is a good actor, but...

Offline Flyboy

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Re: Gay Cinema
« Reply #3612 on: April 20, 2018, 06:54:32 PM »
James always looks sooooo kissable, a person couldn't resist, could they??  ;D ;D ;D

Offline tfferg

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Re: Gay Cinema
« Reply #3613 on: April 26, 2018, 06:11:55 PM »
This week I've seen two gay short films with happy endings too, Chance from the UK and Since The First Day We Met

The latter is a  terrific 4-minute short by 18-year old Maryland student Saul Singleton about a deaf student whose mother moves him to a mainstream hearing school.

This week is Digital Pride Festival Week. I came across links to the films in Gay Star News.

Offline Uli

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Re: Gay Cinema
« Reply #3614 on: May 01, 2018, 03:08:48 PM »
Not sure if I should post here or in the TV thread... But, well, it‘s gay and there is also a movie, so....

I finally watched Looking!
Bingewatched series one and two over the last two days...  :"> :D
I am so glad they at least made that movie to tie up loose ends. Can‘t wait to see how it will end for all of them.

Patrick is eliciting motherly feelings... Am I the only one?  :D
When I feel the warmth of your very soul
I forget I'm cold and crying
When your lips touch mine and I lose control
I forget I'm old and dying

Martin L. Gore - Damaged People