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Author Topic: Brokeback's Impact on Women  (Read 224055 times)

Online killersmom

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Re: Brokeback's Impact on Women
« Reply #2040 on: August 31, 2013, 05:09:27 PM »
Great article, Gary! Ending with:

After all that careful planning Brokeback Mountain opened on just five screens in three cities; Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco. The idea was to capture the ‘gay’ audience early and then reach out to a wider demographic. It appeared risky – there was much resistance to the film across several media outlets – but as the weeks rolled by and the film became a talking point, the number of venues it played at increased and the audience demographic shifted. Initial research shows that for the opening weekends, the audience was 60% of male and 40% female. But in the following weeks, the marketing strategy proved successful because those numbers flipped to 60% female and 40% male. With the film generating several talking points and winning 8 nominations and eventually 3 Oscars, Brokeback Mountain eventually earned $83m at the American box-office and a further $95m internationally. In doing so, the demographic had settled into almost a 50% balance.

Which is exactly what the producers had hoped.
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Offline garyd

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Re: Brokeback's Impact on Women
« Reply #2041 on: August 31, 2013, 05:16:42 PM »
Thanks Linda. 
I think it is important to recognize that the marketing strategy for a film does not always consider the actual content or theme of the film in question.  In other words, the actual advertising will not always reflect or attempt to explain that content of those themes.  The idea is to attract an audience that the marketing team feels will respond favorably to the product once it has been exposed to the product.  This is especially tricky and important with niche films such as BBM. 

Offline B.W.

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Re: Brokeback's Impact on Women
« Reply #2042 on: September 01, 2013, 01:07:00 AM »
Thanks Linda.  
I think it is important to recognize that the marketing strategy for a film does not always consider the actual content or theme of the film in question.  In other words, the actual advertising will not always reflect or attempt to explain that content of those themes.  The idea is to attract an audience that the marketing team feels will respond favorably to the product once it has been exposed to the product.  This is especially tricky and important with niche films such as BBM.  


Yeah.  I don't want to get off-topic but it seems to me that when the filmmakers marketed the film that they didn't openly acknowledge that BBM was a love story between two men. It's understandable why this was done but I think it would have been brave of them to have openly marketed the film as a same-sex love story.  I think it's cool the audience was a even mixture of men and women. That shows you how universal it was.  I often wonder how many lesbians saw and enjoyed the film? There really aren't any popular lesbian-themed movies, at least not as popular as BBM in my opinion.  " THE COLOR PURPLE" and " FRIED GREEN TOMATOES" are to good films that both have strong lesbian relationship subtexts. They could count as being lesbian love stories in a way. 

Note:

  This sort of reminds me of the time that I read a bigoted comment on Steven Speilberg's classic film entitled " THE COLOR PURPLE" on Amazon.com from some guy with a Shakespearean type of name a few years ago. He criticized Speilberg for stating he wished he had explored the lesbian relationship between Celie Johnson and Shug Avery a little deeper. This man referred to the relationship between Shug and Celie as 'abnormal'. What a homophobic idiot! I think he's wrong for viewing the relationship between Celie and Shug as 'abormal'. There's nothing 'abnormal' about showing an abused person what true intimate love can be like with someone who really cares for you even if that person is of the same gender or not.

He also had the nerve to call Whoopi Goldberg ugly! Whoopi Goldberg isn't ugly to me. He also seemed to imply very strongly that he didn't see anything wrong with the abuse that Nettie, Celie, Shug and Sophia had to endure because of the black men who mistreated them who were victims of economic hardship and racism.  He strongly implied that the women deserved such treatment because of the way they acted.  Nettie, Celie, Shug and Sophia didn't deserve to be abused by their fathers, father-in-law or husbands and the women didn't act badly at all if you ask me. Certainly not in the kind of way that would inspire a mentally screwed-up guy with severe anger issues to beat the pulp out of them. A man should never hit a woman.  A woman shouldn't hit a man. Nobody should hit anybody. This guy is quite a misogynistic bastard as well.  I think he's an ugly homophobic bigot and a misogynistic bastard as well who should be ashamed at thinking domestic abuse should be tolerated. That is what I would have told him.
Well, this man who wrote that review is entitled to his own worldview. However, I think is worldview is quite warped and very backwards and shows blatant tolerance for homophobic and misogynistic bigotry, insults based on physical appearance. and domestic abuse.



I find it can be ridiculous that some people will criticize a film on certain themes that make them uncomfortable, especially on themes concerning subjects that don't hurt them in anyway. Judge the film on it's content, not it's themes. That man found the themes to be uncomfortable for him but regardless he is still a homophobic bigot nonetheless and probably shouldn't watch it again. I had a similar experience reading a review on Amazon.com on Anne Rice's book entitled " The Vampire Armand" from the beloved "  The Vampire Chronicles" series. One black man found the fact that the main adult male character had sex with younger adult men to be uncomfortable for him. Some sexual encounters of this male character may have been  with teenage boys and that is kind of gross but I don't think Anne Rice was 'promoting' pederasty at all.  I'm sure she is against pederasty.  She is supportive of LGBT rights though and has a gay son.  He referred to himself a black heterosexual man and that meant he was 'normal'. I'd tell him that being a 'black heterosexual man' does not make you 'normal'. Homosexuality is normal. I don't think this 'black heterosexual guy' is normal. This young 'black heterosexual man' is a hateful homophobic bigot and I'd tell him being a black homosexual man is normal. Being homosexual is normal. As for the implied pederasty? Well, I am a biracial heterosexual women who condemns pederasty but I have no problem with homosexual relationships between two or more grown men. This 'black heterosexual man' is still a homophobic bigot in my eyes and he is not normal but an idiot and maybe shouldn't read the book again. Sorry for ranting but I wanted to share this.


These men who wrote those reviews are entitled to their own worldviews, however some of the elements in the book or movie that they read or watched might deserve to be re-examined by others who feel they may have misunderstood some things.  Their homophobic bigotry should definitely be called-out and criticized.  I don't tolerate or homophobic bigotry or any other type of prejudice. That's just how I am.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2013, 01:30:36 AM by B.W. »

Online BlueJeanJeannie

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Re: Brokeback's Impact on Women
« Reply #2043 on: September 01, 2013, 04:59:21 AM »

Yeah.  I don't want to get off-topic but it seems to me that when the filmmakers marketed the film that they didn't openly acknowledge that BBM was a love story between two men. It's understandable why this was done but I think it would have been brave of them to have openly marketed the film as a same-sex love story.  I think it's cool the audience was a even mixture of men and women. That shows you how universal it was.

You're right. I think BBM is  universal. I've said that myself in many posts and that's how I still feel about it.
 
Does it really matter how it was marketed? After all these years, lots and lots of people still post here because BBM moved them, because they care about the movie. I care about it, even though I only first saw it last year. And I saw it without any marketing!  ;)  I'd just heard it was a great picture, this love story between two guys. That's it. Never, not for one minute, did I think I was watching a "chick flick" - that's the only label for BBM I truly loathe!

When a movie (or music, or a book) hits you, moves you, it's such a personal experience. I think that, in the end, that's far more important than any  marketing campaign.
A marketing campaign needs to make people aware about a 'product', in this case BBM. What happens after people have seen he movie... well, you either like it or you don't.

But what do I know about the movie industry...  ::)





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Online killersmom

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Re: Brokeback's Impact on Women
« Reply #2044 on: September 01, 2013, 11:18:05 AM »
OK, back to BBM impact on women.
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Offline B.W.

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Re: Brokeback's Impact on Women
« Reply #2045 on: September 02, 2013, 03:39:22 AM »
OK, back to BBM impact on women.

Sorry about that.  That's why I made sure to put that 'note' reference in at the end to separate it from my comment on BBM's universal appeal and equal gender viewership of the film.  Being a heterosexual woman myself I cannot say what same-sex love and sexual intimacy between is like or how it feels.  BBM makes me appreciate that I can be open and honest about my relationship with my husband.  I don't think there could be anything worse than having to hide who you love and living a life of repression. Like it or not, denying ones true feelings, keeping you love for someone a secret from everyone else and leading a life of romantic and sexual repression to please others has very severe consequences. Look at SOME of the LGBT religious people from fundamentalist groups who enter mixed-orientation 'relationships' or 'marriages' or lead lives of romantic and sexual repression until death that also hate on LGBT people who accept their feelings and choose to express their sexuality with a same-sex partner. Those are really dreadful options for an LGBT person to pick from.  I don't have to deal with that as a heterosexual woman and I don't think any LGBT person should have to either.  Ennis and Jack for instance were victims of societal homophobia kind of like Alma, Lureen, and Cassie were victims of a misogynistic society which tries to tell women what they should want.


I sympathized with Alma, Cassie and Lureen but I knew they should have left Ennis and Jack alone.  These women wanted to be loved but the persons they loved did not and could not love them back in the way they wanted them to.  Ennis and Jack only loved each other and they never really openly acknowledged that because their feelings for each other were so overwhelming. Luckily Alma and Cassie were able to find nice heterosexual men to settle down with. As for Lureen? Who knows? Homophobia seems to stem from sexism if you ask me. I think many straight women who have fallen into the trap of a mixed-orientation 'relationship' or 'marriage' can appreciate what Alma and Lureen had to go through.  No heterosexual person should find themselves in that situation anymore than a LGBT person should.  It never works. Not really.  It's just going to end up causing each person more pain.  LGBT people belong with other LGBT people and heterosexuals belong with other heterosexuals in a romantic and sexual way. That's really just how it is.


I could never be with someone that is not and never will be attracted to me. I am thankful that I have never had to go through the hellish experience of a mixed-orientation 'relationship' or 'marriage' and I sympathize with any person who has ever been in one or unfortunately is still trapped in one and hope they manage to find a way out and accept themselves for who they are and find someone available whom they are attracted to.  I absolutely do not agree with mixed-orientation 'relationships' or 'marriages' at all. I don't even consider them to be authentic 'relationships' or 'marriages' personally. Their shams in my eyes and they always cause harm. That's just how I personally feel about these circumstances. Being with someone who is not and never will be attracted to you is not a good idea ever.
I've heard so many heartbreaking stories of people whose lives have been ruined by entering this situation. I hope someday more people will get out of these mixed-orientation 'relationships' and 'marriages' and find someone else of their own sexual orientation who can love them.



I'm sorry for the long rant but this is something I felt that I really needed to say. These are just my personal feelings and I felt the need to share them with others who might possibly understand.

« Last Edit: September 02, 2013, 03:54:40 AM by B.W. »

Offline conny

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Re: Brokeback's Impact on Women
« Reply #2046 on: September 10, 2013, 01:20:02 AM »
There's Connie too from the Netherlands, but she's not here very much now.

thanks cally and yes, been here long time now,but not very active anymore
facebook takes lot of my time away and there are sometimes not enough hours in a day
but i recognise the impact of the movie from when i first saw it,since then a lot happened, met lots of wonderful people from here and am still very greatfull i found this forum back then  :)
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Online Sara B

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Re: Brokeback's Impact on Women
« Reply #2047 on: September 10, 2013, 01:25:22 AM »
Hi Conny - good to see you! Sorry I spelt your name wrong :D.

Would love to see more of your photos in the Lens thread.
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Offline conny

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Re: Brokeback's Impact on Women
« Reply #2048 on: September 13, 2013, 12:18:18 PM »
Hi Conny - good to see you! Sorry I spelt your name wrong :D.

Would love to see more of your photos in the Lens thread.

no worry`s cally.
photobucket has gone worse and takes a lot of time, so thats why i don`t post pics anymore.
and FB gets in the way, takes away all my time  ;)
"we are one,but we are not the same"   U2