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Author Topic: Awards Aftermath - Part 2  (Read 234712 times)

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: Awards Aftermath - Part 2
« Reply #60 on: February 02, 2008, 01:23:34 PM »
That article just needed to be posted here in all
it's entirety.  Did my heart good this morning.

January 29, 2008
The Oscars: Crash, the ’05 Scourge That Just Won’t Go Away
by S.T. VanAirsdale

There’s a special place in hell for the creators of Crash, the race-baiting ensemble melodrama that condescended, exploited, and shrieked its way to Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay, and Best Editing Oscars in 2005. Evidently, there’s also a place on the Starz Network, which announced a deal with writer-producer-director Paul Haggis, co-writer Bobby Moresco, star-producer Don Cheadle, and even jilted producer, Bob Yari, among others, to adapt the film as a television series.

“Crash introduced a whole range of fascinating characters and engrossing, intertwined stories that are ideally suited for developing into a TV series,” Starz programming boss Stephan Shelanski noted Monday in a press release. Haggis wasn’t far behind, saying in the same statement that he initially planned Crash as an episodic show: “I am thrilled it’s coming full circle and can’t wait to see how it expands and transforms.”

Later Monday, Reuters reported that Cheadle would take an active role in rounding up as much of the original cast as possible. Characters portrayed by actors who opt out—think Matt Dillon’s racist cop, or Terrence Howard’s angry TV producer—would likely not appear in the series. Furthermore, Cheadle noted in the statement, the small-screen Crash will engage in histrionics in more attenuated, sustainable doses:

“This series will present an opportunity to delve into many subjects, not just race relations in L.A.,” said Cheadle. “I don’t think you can do 13 episodes on that subject and keep people interested. The challenge will be to craft the series’ characters in such a way as to get beneath the skin that supposedly differentiates them and create entertaining story lines that show the hurdles and obstacles we all struggle to overcome day to day.”

Even the film’s most enthusiastic champions (I’m talking to you, Roger Ebert) must cringe at the ignominy of a Crash franchise, compounding the soul-piercing guilt they face every day since the film outmaneuvered Brokeback Mountain for Best Picture nearly two years ago. On the bright side, the chances for a No Country for Old Men series—with Anton Chigurh popping holes in hayseeds around the Southwest while looking for a new bounty each episode—or a There Will Be Blood series (The Young Daniel Plainview Chronicles, perhaps? The Real World: Little Boston?) just improved dramatically.

S.T. VanAirsdale is the founder and editor of the New York film culture site The Reeler.

CondéNet
Copyright © 2008 CondéNet. All rights reserved.

Offline Zuraffo

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Re: Awards Aftermath - Part 2
« Reply #61 on: February 04, 2008, 12:22:20 PM »
Lyle,

I don't know why you still are so obsessed with the Oscar's Loss.

I frankly think it is their loss and I have been so successful at blotting out Oscar from my life that I have completely forgotten about it. None of my friend talk about Oscar no more as any who tried will get blank stares and conversations soon die. In "WTH are you talking abt, WTF is Oscar anyway" kind of way.

In any case I don't think Oscar deserve any attention. Even if I don't hate them for snubbing BBM, it still doesn't measure up. (Japanese's "Departed"? Do they even care?)

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: Awards Aftermath - Part 2
« Reply #62 on: February 04, 2008, 02:06:27 PM »
Zuraffo,

Hey!  Long time no hear!  Hope you are well.

On the one hand, I see you checked in to this thread to see what was happening...lol...
On the other hand, as you can see by that article, I'm not the only one who still thinks
about this...

I don't know if I'd use the word obsessed in my feelings about the oscar loss, but
because I love movies and have followed the oscars as long as I can remember and
because I love Brokeback Mountain, it is certainly something I am quite interested in.
What I decided a long time ago was that, as it is certainly something that I cannot
change, what I "can" do is make sure the reason Brokeback Mountain lost the bp
award is not forgotten.  (The reason being homophobia in large part.)  So, when I see
articles like the one in last November's issue of Entertainment Weekly that state
homophobia was the reason, I can applaud that.  When the next week I see a letter
in the magazine from academy president Bruce Davis refuting it, I can write to him and
to EW and on the internet and rebutt it with all the knowledge I have about it.  This snub
did hurt alot of us and what I can do is always set the record straight, so to speak, so
that the reason is never lost or diluted.

As for the academy and the oscars...  If I blot out the academy it means I am blotting
out something in my life that gives me a great deal of pleasure.  I live in Los Angeles and the
academy has a plethora of film screenings each year in two of the best equipped theatres in the
world for showing any kind of film and any kind of print.  I have seen nearly every film that
I've always wanted to see on a big screen.   And they always show the BEST available prints.
Many times people involved in making the films are there to talk about them.  I got to see
Sidney Poitier at an In the Heat of the Night screening.  I met a dozen people who were
in or worked on one of my favorite films, The Sting, and I got to talk to most of them—
Charles Durning, Dmitra Arliss, Harold Gould, Henry Bumstead, Sally Kirkland and David S. Ward
among them!    I met Arthur Hiller, Feyard Nicholas and Karl Malden in the bathroom!  I saw Olivia
DeHavilland in person for a tribute evening to her!  I saw a restored silent film called Speedy that the
Harold Lloyd family had sponsored.  I saw June Lockhart telling stories—reminiscing about working
with Gary Cooper and Stanley Kubrick’s right hand man telling what it was like to work with him in all
candor and honesty, meaning the good and the bad.  I saw some people who worked and lived for a time
with James Dean when they filmed Giant.  I saw John Schlesinger’s partner (boyfriend, mate, lover—to be
clear) talking about him and Midnight Cowboy.

*****(About the Harold Lloyd screening:  For $5.00 on a rainy L.A. night, I went to the theatre and saw a
spectacularly restored film from 1927.  The silent score was performed by an orchestra.  Afterwards, and
after remarks from all of his relatives, we got to go up to the gallery and see a selection of framed portraits
of the famous people of Harold Lloyd's time that were all autographed to him--a gift that his wife had
occasioned for him.  The one I remember most was Amelia Earhart's.  A signature you could only see in a
certain light because she wrote it on a dark part of the photograph--and considering her fate it was really
eerie.  After that, an unexpected champagne and dessert reception was held.  All for $5.00! )*****

I saw a 50th anniversary commemoration of D-Day hosted by Bob Hope and special guests.  I saw a
two-day GWTW weekend with David O. Selznick's personal print of the film and a six hour "making of"
seminar with film clips, screen tests, etc. which included makers of the film who were still with us at the
time.  I saw a tribute to Richard Rodgers hosted by Julie Andrews.  I saw Jackie Cooper talking about Skippy and The Champ that were made in the early 1930’s!  I've seen exhibitions in the gallery devoted to people
like W.C. Fields or Hitchcock.  All kinds of movie poster displays or photography exhibits.

I could go on for a long time.

So, yes, I desperately wanted Brokeback Mountain to be included on that imperfect list of films
that won Best Picture, because we all want to be part of the family, as I’ve said.  I daresay if we all
personally chose the Best Film of the year we’d have entirely different lists of 80 films.  But each
year the oscars is a way to see and talk about the best films of the year.  To argue about them and
even trash them.  That’s what oscar was designed to do.  And, yes, this one hurt me to the core and
even made me rethink a multitude of things.  If felt like a betrayal, a spouse cheating on you or any
number of other references.

But, as I hope I’ve explained, I get a great deal of pleasure from the academy.  And there are a huge
group of peeople within that academy who absolutely agree with us about Brokeback Mountain.  And
I don’t know if this is a quote from someone else, but on a television commercial once the narrator
begins by saying "If something is loved, it shows."  And on August 4th when the academy has their
screening of Brokeback Mountain, it will be seen by all how much Brokeback Mountain is loved.

Lyle P.

Offline dback

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Re: Awards Aftermath - Part 2
« Reply #63 on: February 04, 2008, 06:42:08 PM »
What I really (REALLY) don't get is, the best thing about "Crash" was the acting, which admittedly was often remarkable in more than one scene, regardless of how one felt about the movie's overall structure, manipulativeness, coincidence, stereotyping, etc.   So, they're making a TV series, and none of the original actors will be in it? Why on Earth would anyone then watch it?
"No reins on this one."

Offline lauren

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Re: Awards Aftermath - Part 2
« Reply #64 on: February 04, 2008, 07:00:54 PM »
What I really (REALLY) don't get is, the best thing about "Crash" was the acting, which admittedly was often remarkable in more than one scene, regardless of how one felt about the movie's overall structure, manipulativeness, coincidence, stereotyping, etc.   So, they're making a TV series, and none of the original actors will be in it? Why on Earth would anyone then watch it?

Hardly anyone saw the film, so I doubt many people are going to watch the series. The film was boring and the TV series will be too--I have no idea why they think this is a good idea. 

Offline Lola

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Re: Awards Aftermath - Part 2
« Reply #65 on: February 04, 2008, 07:10:30 PM »
What I really (REALLY) don't get is, the best thing about "Crash" was the acting, which admittedly was often remarkable in more than one scene, regardless of how one felt about the movie's overall structure, manipulativeness, coincidence, stereotyping, etc.   So, they're making a TV series, and none of the original actors will be in it? Why on Earth would anyone then watch it?

I posted this in the TV thread;

Crash, the movie which unexpectedly won best film at the Oscars two years ago, is being turned into a TV series.
Thirteen one-hour programmes will be made US cable channel Starz. The show is expected to premiere in August.

Crash focused on racial and ethnic tensions in Los Angeles and was made with a relatively small budget.

Paul Haggis, who co-wrote and directed the original, will be executive producer. Actor Don Cheadle will join the team and could reprise his role.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/7215017.stm



As you know (or maybe don't, lol) I liked the movie and I bought it shortly after it came out on DVD.   But never thought it would beat out Brokeback for best picture.  And I agree the acting was what made the movie.

If Don Cheadle does come on board for the series, I think people will tune in, people will probably tune in anyway, this is just the kind of show that alot of people go for.  ::)
 
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Offline Zuraffo

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Re: Awards Aftermath - Part 2
« Reply #66 on: February 05, 2008, 04:51:28 AM »
Lyle,

I understand. I haven't been back for a long time. Actually I just checked in after Heath's tragedy.

It is not so hard for me to forget about oscar because it has never been important to me in the first place. It will be nice if AMPAS decided to honor BBM again. Personally I want to see them repeal their erronous decision, and that might bring some satisfaction back. But then again, I have never been a great Oscar supporter. So there isn't any love loss between us.

I accept that in art people are entitled to their preference. All I can say is, so far AMPAS' preferences have been so remote from mine that their endorsement has ceased to carry any meaning at all.

Being obsessed isn't a bad thing. Great artists usually are. I think AMPAS owed you one for being such an ardent supporter. And maybe they can decide to reward you by admitting their mistake. ;) (That will never happen.)

Offline graylockV

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Re: Awards Aftermath - Part 2
« Reply #67 on: February 05, 2008, 04:50:49 PM »
I don't want to rehash all the points discussed regarding Oscar outrages, e.g., Citizen Kane - like it or hate it, was a great movie - and did not win Best Picture because of pressure from W.R. Hearst, etc.  And there have been all the other outrages, down to the most egregious one, i.e., Brokeback Mountain.

What I would like to ensure is that no one forgets the outrage. 

Despite the horrible, tragic circumstance of his death, I take real satisfaction in reading the various comments on Heath Ledger's career that salute his outstanding performance in Brokeback Mountain, and in some cases, acknowledge that it was ridiculous for that film to be snubbed by the Oscars.

From now on, I want to see the following phrase as often as possible:  "Heath Ledger's legendary performance in Brokeback Mountain."   It was , as Daniel Day Lewis stated, "perfect."

Oscars are often forgotten except by Oscar geeks, and even Oscar geeks pride themselves in their ability to cite the "should have wons."  Heath's tragic and untimely death will continue to add to the legend of this movie.

So while I no longer allow myself to become overheated at the subject, I will continue to stoke this flame as long as there are venues for discussion of "awards aftermath" and "Oscar outrages."  I kinda feel like I'm on a mission!
Beulah, peel me a grape.

Offline Lola

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Re: Awards Aftermath - Part 2
« Reply #68 on: February 05, 2008, 04:59:23 PM »
Your on a mission from God! lol

I remember a friend of mine watched BB with her husband (he is a REAL film buff) his comments on the movie were simply "it was flawless" and it was.

And when we talk of Heath's death we are reminded of that flawless performance.  A performance that was so flawless it didn't win an Oscar and it was in a movie that was so flawless that it didn't win best picture.  :P


My only problem is that it wasn't the cast and crew of Crash's fault that they won, they all worked hard I am sure.  And PSH I am sure worked very hard on Capote and felt he deserved a win.


And the people who are nominated this year are all putting their heart and souls into parts and they are hoping for a win.  And as a fan of many of them, I can't help but cheer them on.

And one day it may be Annie or Michelle or Jake up there again (or Ang) and we will be routing for them, I know I will.

 
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Offline Lola

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Re: Awards Aftermath - Part 2
« Reply #69 on: February 05, 2008, 06:20:26 PM »
 
FUNGURL

Offline divina

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Re: Awards Aftermath - Part 2
« Reply #70 on: February 10, 2008, 01:00:52 AM »
Quote
And one day it may be Annie or Michelle or Jake up there again (or Ang) and we will be routing for them, I know I will.

But never Heath...because they were too cowardly when they had the chance. Sorry but no interest in this farce of a show. Heath was too good for those phonies anyway.
The meeting of our flesh like hands come together to pray ~ B73

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: Awards Aftermath - Part 2
« Reply #71 on: February 11, 2008, 02:02:47 AM »
Marit Allen, the un-nominated costume designer for Brokeback Mountain,
tonight won the Bafta Award for her costume design of La Vie en Rose.  Of course, her win was bittersweet, but glad she got some
recognition.  I never did understand why she wasn't nominated for
her Brokeback Mountain work, especially when costumes themselves
were a huge plot point in the film.  And I'm not just talking academy here.
I don't think she was nominated anywhere for that work.  Anyway,
her talent was recognized tonight.

Offline ingmarnicebbmt

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Re: Awards Aftermath - Part 2
« Reply #72 on: February 11, 2008, 04:30:22 AM »

Yeah - better late than never...

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Offline BayCityJohn

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Re: Awards Aftermath - Part 2
« Reply #73 on: February 11, 2008, 07:29:12 AM »
Sorry I wasn't able to put together an event for Oscar Night this year, but there is still an option for anyone in the SF Bay area.



MEMORIAL TRIBUTE TO HEATH LEDGER



SUN-MON FEBRUARY 24-25

Brokeback Mountain

The Castro Theatre
429 Castro Street,
San Francisco, CA 94114

http://www.castrotheatre.com/p-list.html

Sunday: (12:30p), 3:10p, 6p, 9p; Monday: 6p, 9p

Once a virgin, always a virgin

Offline Flyboy

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Re: Awards Aftermath - Part 2
« Reply #74 on: February 11, 2008, 06:00:22 PM »
Thanks for the info John, now we are SF John, huh? Left the past behind, moving on. Good for you, I do miss my Fav avatar though, haha........you know what I mean......carry on........