The Ultimate Brokeback Forum

Author Topic: Character Analysis of Jack Twist  (Read 385372 times)

Offline cythera4

  • Expert
  • ****
  • Posts: 508
Re: Element: Character Analysis of Jack Twist
« Reply #30 on: January 29, 2006, 11:24:32 PM »
as far as when Jack falls in love with Ennis,does anyone notice it"s not necessarrily a sexual attractionl. Ennis is giving himself a good soaping and wash within feet of Jack,and jack does not even take a quick glance.

As the review in the New Yorker pointed out, this  is wonderful acting--Jack is dying to look but pretending disinterest. The original story makes it clear he DOES look, while the screenplay suggests he's playing it cool, impassive. Jake suggests a lot of submerged desire here, imo.

Offline peteinportland

  • Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 2063
Re: Element: Character Analysis of Jack Twist
« Reply #31 on: January 30, 2006, 12:29:34 AM »
There is actually discussion about this scene in the Jack and Lureen thread. It would be interesting to hear thoughts on the posts that are on that thread about this scene and the one that follows when Jack meets Lureen.

Offline alma

  • Pawin the white
  • Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 1834
  • Shut up about Alma; This ain't her fault.
Re: Element: Character Analysis of Jack Twist
« Reply #32 on: January 30, 2006, 01:47:01 PM »
Does anyone else fall to pieces with the shot of Jake G asking whether Ennis is going to go back to sheep herding next year?.  His eyes are just astonishing. For two straight actors to get this close to the characters is amazing.

That is my favorite look of the entire movie. Jake Gyllenhaal does it flawlessly - speaks volumes of yearning and hope and unexpressed feelings... yet it isn't desperate. Just such a sbutle movement of the face but so powerful.

Thanks for bringing that out. I keep meaning to mention it.

I agree that Jack falls in love a lot faster than Ennis and thought it had to be before he washes Ennis's wound.

I also wondered if Jack's initial anger at Ennis's coming back to camp late had less to do with food and more to do with missing Ennis.

helen_uk

  • Guest
Re: Element: Character Analysis of Jack Twist
« Reply #33 on: January 30, 2006, 01:51:40 PM »
I also wondered if Jack's initial anger at Ennis's coming back to camp late had less to do with food and more to do with missing Ennis.

Oh, absolutely!  How many times as kids did we have our parents  sick with worry about us when we were late, and to show that as anger when we did finally turn up!

Offline alma

  • Pawin the white
  • Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 1834
  • Shut up about Alma; This ain't her fault.
Re: Element: Character Analysis of Jack Twist
« Reply #34 on: January 30, 2006, 01:53:28 PM »

As the review in the New Yorker pointed out, this  is wonderful acting--Jack is dying to look but pretending disinterest. The original story makes it clear he DOES look, while the screenplay suggests he's playing it cool, impassive. Jake suggests a lot of submerged desire here, imo.

This is more superb acting by Jake. If you watch his throat muscles, they tell the whole story. He is pretending but he can barely hang on. He keeps swallowing and his jaw tenses ever so slightly and lets go. Really amazing.

The camera work is perfect too, keeping Ennis hazy in the background and focusing all the energy on Jake's face, leaving us wanting what he wants.

Offline westexer

  • Experienced
  • ***
  • Posts: 219
Re: Element: Character Analysis of Jack Twist
« Reply #35 on: January 30, 2006, 02:22:50 PM »
I haven't seen much mention, if any, of the scene in the bar with the rodeo clown. Jack moves over, makes some complimentary comments and offers to buy the guy a beer. The clown seems taken back by this and, while remaining cordial, couldn't get away from Jack fast enough. This seems to anger/embarrass Jack. The bartender who has seen it all, makes the comment about calf-roping and Jack slams his still full beer down, makes a comment about not being able to afford a "ropin' horse," and storms out.

Why was the rodeo clown so quick to move away from Jack? Were there rumors about Jack and the clown knew them and didn't want to become yet another rumor? The screenplay says "There is something, a frisson, a vibe, that gives the CLOWN an uneasy feeling...although he remains perfectly friendly..." and goes over to a group of macho guys around the pool table and seems to make a comment about Jack though it is only in his non-verbal head gesture seemingly toward Jack that I make the assumption the comment was about Jack.

I can't find this scene in Annie's prose...what is it meant to indicate? That Jack is just an out there guy always looking to make friends and do good for someone or is he testing the waters to see if there is any hint of opportunity?

Here's a piece of a previous post I had that might shed some light on it:

Overall, from an external standpoint, I act very much like Jack.  I smile and approach and talk and joke and focus on people and get to them before they know me, then self reveal as I get more comfortable.  Here in Lubbock, that's just sorta the way it's done and that's shown really well by Jack in Brokeback.  For example, in the bar, if the rodeo clown had accepted the drink and returned the raised eyebrow and entered into conversation the way the ranch foreman at the dance had, they would have entered into quiet casual conversation and at some point when one of them was comfortable, he woulda asked, "Are you Family" which is code for are you gay - are you a part of my family.  Cause here, if you're gay, you're family.  Now in that scene, the rodeo clown's been hit on before, cause he knew what was going on, but most wouldn't have known a thing cause it woulda been common for the clown to be bought a drink if he'd saved a rider's ass at the rodeo. It's the raised eyebrow that turned him away.

Offline aevkc

  • Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 5854
  • Alright, sassafras....
Re: Element: Character Analysis of Jack Twist
« Reply #36 on: January 30, 2006, 02:46:17 PM »
Sorry, I don't have the link, but it's on the "How BBM affects women" thread.  Anyway, a straight columnist just wrote a great article about BBM.  In the article he talks about how Jack is more "manly" (in the usual way it's thought of) than Ennis because, "Jack stands up to his father-in-law.  He stands up to his father.  He stands up."  I loved those lines and think they express a lot of what makes Jack so appealing and also what makes me so sad for him.  He stands up for what he wants, but still comes away without it.  Okay, I'm going to cry again...
Common response to Lost: UGH! I SHAKE MY FIST AT YOU, LOST! (But then I come back for a hug, because who am I kidding?)--Therese O'Dell

"True love is friendship set on fire."--French proverb

"If you're not yelling at your kids, you're not spending enough time with them."--Reese Witherspoon

Offline ImEnnisShesJack

  • Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 4347
Re: Element: Character Analysis of Jack Twist
« Reply #37 on: January 30, 2006, 04:44:29 PM »
Does anyone else fall to pieces with the shot of Jake G asking whether Ennis is going to go back to sheep herding next year?.  His eyes are just astonishing. For two straight actors to get this close to the characters is amazing.

That is my favorite look of the entire movie. Jake Gyllenhaal does it flawlessly - speaks volumes of yearning and hope and unexpressed feelings... yet it isn't desperate. Just such a sbutle movement of the face but so powerful.  Thanks for bringing that out. I keep meaning to mention it.  I agree that Jack falls in love a lot faster than Ennis and thought it had to be before he washes Ennis's wound.

I also wondered if Jack's initial anger at Ennis's coming back to camp late had less to do with food and more to do with missing Ennis.

Jake is a very physical actor.  Subtle changed in posture, facial tension, and those eyes convey more than the words in the script.  I've got a couple of fan generated movie collages where the film clips are in slow-motion - the subtlety of Jake's eyes and posture are exaggerated - and you can just see why this role was PHYSICALLY demanding, not just because of the love scenes, but because Jake uses his whole body to convey his character's state of mind.  It is truly pure art.
"And when he shall die,
Take him and cut him out in little stars,
And he will make the face of heaven so fine
That all the world will be in love with night."
~~Heath Ledger 1979-2008~~

Carol8159@yahoo.com

Offline trinket

  • Mrs. Robinson
  • Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 5475
  • That ain't the point!
Re: Element: Character Analysis of Jack Twist
« Reply #38 on: January 30, 2006, 05:23:33 PM »
I agree.
Jake does an outstanding job with the slightest of gestures and facial expressions.
Where Jack and Ennis are talking before they separate after that first summer.
They are standing by Jack's truck, Jack asks Ennis if he thinks he'll "do this again next summer."
After Ennis gives his answer he says to Jack, "and you?"
Jack looks at him and says he might go help out on his daddy's ranch and the close up of Jack as he is looking at Ennis and says "maybe"(about coming back next summer) kills me.
Have you noticed that hopeful, longing look on Jake's face and the way he slightly raises his eyebrow??
KILLS ME!!!
JAKE on his roll as 'Dastan' in 'The Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time' ~ "The appeal of playing this part for me was feeling that eight-year-old side of myself. . . . . .This was really an opportunity to go to that side of myself which I felt was a little tired of taking myself so seriously."

kumari

  • Guest
Re: Element: Character Analysis of Jack Twist
« Reply #39 on: January 30, 2006, 06:04:44 PM »
I love that the question of when Jack falls in love was posed to this thread.
Jack is much more self aware than Ennis, so you have to think that he knows what he is feeling before Ennis knows what he is feeling.
Ennis asks the Basque for soup for his little darlin', but you get the feeling that he doesn't even know why he's doing it.
When Jack is bitching about not wanting to sleep with the sheep, he knows why he's doing it.
Part of him doesn't like sleeping in the smelly pup tent, but the greater part of him hates spending so much time away from Ennis.
I agree with many of you that Jack fell in love somewhere between his first glance at Ennis, and their breakthrough conversation around the campfire. The more he learned about the harsh realities of Ennis' life, the more he admired him. The more he wanted to get close to him and to give him the comfort and companionship that Ennis needed so desperately.

Offline In Tears

  • Experienced
  • ***
  • Posts: 195
Re: Element: Character Analysis of Jack Twist
« Reply #40 on: January 30, 2006, 06:37:44 PM »
I agree.
Jake does an outstanding job with the slightest of gestures and facial expressions.
Where Jack and Ennis are talking before they separate after that first summer.
They are standing by Jack's truck, Jack asks Ennis if he thinks he'll "do this again next summer."
After Ennis gives his answer he says to Jack, "and you?"
Jack looks at him and says he might go help out on his daddy's ranch and the close up of Jack as he is looking at Ennis and says "maybe"(about coming back next summer) kills me.
Have you noticed that hopeful, longing look on Jake's face and the way he slightly raises his eyebrow??
KILLS ME!!!

Amen.  I'm amazed at JGs gestures, more thank acting - this is high art. 

My nominations for JG's other killer BBM facial work:

Spots E's campfire from the mountaintop
E bathes
E notices shirt is missing
Leaving Signal in truck
"Maybe you ought to get out of here..Texas maybe?"
Divorce trip in truck (up and back)
E's fear of the white truck and rejection
Cruising Jimbo and Randall
Randall's proposition
E breaks down in final BBM scene
Of course, the dozy embrace
Final shot as E's truck leaves

Simply making this list fills me with awe for JG's acting ability.



"Later, that dozy embrace solidified in his memory as the single moment of artless, charmed happiness in their separate and difficult lives."

Offline peteinportland

  • Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 2063
Re: Element: Character Analysis of Jack Twist
« Reply #41 on: January 30, 2006, 06:39:30 PM »
Sorry, I don't have the link, but it's on the "How BBM affects women" thread.  Anyway, a straight columnist just wrote a great article about BBM.  In the article he talks about how Jack is more "manly" (in the usual way it's thought of) than Ennis because, "Jack stands up to his father-in-law.  He stands up to his father.  He stands up."  I loved those lines and think they express a lot of what makes Jack so appealing and also what makes me so sad for him.  He stands up for what he wants, but still comes away without it.  Okay, I'm going to cry again...

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11102003/

Offline lovebbm

  • Membership_deactivated
  • Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 602
  • Beautiful New England
Re: Element: Character Analysis of Jack Twist
« Reply #42 on: January 30, 2006, 06:42:49 PM »
I agree.
Jake does an outstanding job with the slightest of gestures and facial expressions.
Where Jack and Ennis are talking before they separate after that first summer.
They are standing by Jack's truck, Jack asks Ennis if he thinks he'll "do this again next summer."
After Ennis gives his answer he says to Jack, "and you?"
Jack looks at him and says he might go help out on his daddy's ranch and the close up of Jack as he is looking at Ennis and says "maybe"(about coming back next summer) kills me.
Have you noticed that hopeful, longing look on Jake's face and the way he slightly raises his eyebrow??
KILLS ME!!!

Amen.  I'm amazed at JGs gestures, more thank acting - this is high art. 

My nominations for JG's other killer BBM facial work:

Spots E's campfire from the mountaintop
E bathes
E notices shirt is missing
Leaving Signal in truck
"Maybe you ought to get out of here..Texas maybe?"
Divorce trip in truck (up and back)
E's fear of the white truck and rejection
Cruising Jimbo and Randall
Randall's proposition
E breaks down in final BBM scene
Of course, the dozy embrace
Final shot as E's truck leaves

Simply making this list fills me with awe for JG's acting ability.


Oh yes, all of that.  Though he should win BSA for that 1st scene by the truck...breathtaking.  Did anyone else notice how his mouth and voice trembled ever so slightly when he said 'unless the army comes & gets me' or the like... just the thought of it (or thinking about leaving Ennis) gets him instantly scared and choked up...just in that second.

Offline cythera4

  • Expert
  • ****
  • Posts: 508
Re: Element: Character Analysis of Jack Twist
« Reply #43 on: January 30, 2006, 07:15:22 PM »
My nominations for JG's other killer BBM facial work:

Spots E's campfire from the mountaintop
E bathes
E notices shirt is missing
Leaving Signal in truck
"Maybe you ought to get out of here..Texas maybe?"
Divorce trip in truck (up and back)
E's fear of the white truck and rejection
Cruising Jimbo and Randall
Randall's proposition
E breaks down in final BBM scene
Of course, the dozy embrace
Final shot as E's truck leaves

Simply making this list fills me with awe for JG's acting ability.


Oh yes, all of that.  Though he should win BSA for that 1st scene by the truck...breathtaking.  Did anyone else notice how his mouth and voice trembled ever so slightly when he said 'unless the army comes & gets me' or the like... just the thought of it (or thinking about leaving Ennis) gets him instantly scared and choked up...just in that second.

Honestly, who would have thought he was such a great actor? I really believe he is the emotional core of the film. I can understand why everyone is praising Heath, but without a sense of what he's giving up--without seeing this beautiful, tender, generous boy give so fully of himself--you wouldn't feel anything for Ennis. I can't imagine a better definition of Best Supporting Actor--he makes Heath's accomplishment possible.

On top of that, I do believe that Jake must understand, as I don't think Heath does, the nature of longing for another man. Heath has said in interviews that the scenes of physical intimacy were in a way easy for him since he could draw directly on his own resistance and trepidation. But Jake not only gives himself over to these scenes with heartbreaking frankness, he seems to grasp how gay love, in such contexts, has to be tentative--not show too much desperation when you ask "see you next summer?", look away quickly when Randall gives him the eye, wonder what it is he might have said or done that made the rodeo clown spurn him. Jake's early scenes with Lureen also have this amazing truthfulness: he's flattered this girl likes him and wants him, but not sure what to do since he really, deep down, doesn't want her back. It is, quite simply, a brilliantly considered, fully detailed, and immaculate performance.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2006, 07:18:26 PM by peteinportland »

Offline alma

  • Pawin the white
  • Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 1834
  • Shut up about Alma; This ain't her fault.
Re: Element: Character Analysis of Jack Twist
« Reply #44 on: January 30, 2006, 07:48:27 PM »
On top of that, I do believe that Jake must understand, as I don't think Heath does, the nature of longing for another man. Heath has said in interviews that the scenes of physical intimacy were in a way easy for him since he could draw directly on his own resistance and trepidation. But Jake not only gives himself over to these scenes with heartbreaking frankness, he seems to grasp how gay love, in such contexts, has to be tentative--not show too much desperation when you ask "see you next summer?", look away quickly when Randall gives him the eye, wonder what it is he might have said or done that made the rodeo clown spurn him. Jake's early scenes with Lureen also have this amazing truthfulness: he's flattered this girl likes him and wants him, but not sure what to do since he really, deep down, doesn't want her back. It is, quite simply, a brilliantly considered, fully detailed, and immaculate performance.


 ;D Such a great post and so accurate. Just wanted you to know how much I appreciated it.