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Author Topic: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.  (Read 5037 times)

Offline Sara B

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #60 on: April 10, 2018, 11:23:12 AM »
I watched "The Darkest Hour". Good, I thought.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2018, 02:01:19 PM by Sara B »
There were only the two of them on the mountain flying in the euphoric, bitter air, looking down on the hawk's back and the crawling lights of vehicles on the plain below, suspended above ordinary affairs....

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #61 on: April 10, 2018, 12:33:30 PM »

Agree.

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #62 on: April 12, 2018, 11:21:12 AM »

--Decision Before Dawn

When I was talking about The African Queen recently I looked up it's Oscar noms and wondered why it
hadn't gotten a Best Picture nomination, even though it was nominated for many others. I noticed then
a film that "had" gotten a Best Picture nomination that had been elusive over the years in terms of its
availability to be seen, Decision Before Dawn, was on the list. I hadn't checked for a long time and found
it has been released on DVD and so I rented it.

The story is about Americans, in the waning days of WWII, using selected German POW's, potentially unreliable,
to act as spies on their own country and gather intelligence. It's based on true accounts of war files that were
released and this story is from a 1949 book about the subject, Call It Treason.

It stars Richard Basehart, Gary Merrill and Oskar Werner. Hildegarde Neff has a supporting role.

There are some extra features on the dvd, like newsreels from the time, and this film apparently was deemed and
promoted as an IMPORTANT picture. The director is seen being presented an award for the film and the trailer for
the film tells everyone how the movie is important and has to be seen. It touts that it was all shot on location in
the places the story took place.

On location was becoming more and more prevalent after the war when audiences demanded more realism.  I think the
film suffers from aging over the years. I don't think the location footage helps the film that much, though it is interesting
to think about. The WWII TV series Combat looks just as good as this film, and that was primarily done on the MGM backlot.

The film also suffers from the myriad of WWII films that have been made since then. The story of using Germans to spy on their
own country is what's interesting about this film and what that means to everyone. By the time of these events it was clear to
most people Germany was going to lose the war so Americans tried to find like-minded Germans to help them win it, but these
people were not without their conflicted ideas. The U.S. is still fighting about Civil War statues, for instance, and despite the evidence
in front of their faces, people are still choosing to support Trump.  I Believe one reason the film was deemed so important in 1951 is
that it was trying to show people that not all Germans were in lock step with their leaders and that working against them was the
right thing to do for Germany in the long run. It's probably why it was chosen as a Best Film nominee, though only garnered one
other nomination for film editing.

1951 had some great films nominated for Best Picture...they were:
An American in Paris
Decision before Dawn
A Place in the Sun
Quo Vadis
A Streetcar Named Desire

In fact, it was thought that either A Place in the Sun or A Streetcar Named Desire would be the winner,
but it turned out that An American in Paris won.  MGM was embarrassed enough by the win that they
took out an ad in the trade papers the next day showing "Leo the Lion" holding an Oscar and saying,
"Honest!  I was just standing in the 'Sun' waiting for a 'Streetcar'."

Although there's much to be admired in An American in Paris, it shouldn't have won over those other
two classics. I'd have even placed The African Queen in the running over Quo Vadis and Decision Before Dawn.
The passage of years has proved it to be worthy of that. The fact that An American in Paris won that year
probably short-changed the chances a year later for MGM's Singin' in the Rain which is often cited as the
best musical Hollywood's ever produced. That garnered only 2 nominations, for scoring and Supporting Actress.
And this was in a year when the picture winner is most often touted as the worst choice ever made by AMPAS:
The Greatest Show on Earth.

But we've rolled our eyes, and more, many times since then, too, eh?

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #63 on: April 12, 2018, 11:40:17 AM »

By the way, has anyone else ever seen Decision Before Dawn?

Also on the DVD was a newsreel showing Hildegarde Neff getting her hand and feetprints put
in cement at Grauman's Chinese Theatre, and an interesting fact emerges from this: She
put on a shoe and put in the prints for Oskar Werner as well, standing in for him as he was
not able to get there from Europe. They said it's the first time someone stood in for someone
else at the hand & footprint ceremony at the Chinese Theatre. I wonder if that was the only
time?  I mean, why would you do that anyway? Strange.

Also, I don't know who is responsible for putting the DVD out in the marketplace, but the
menu for the extras has the title Newsreels and for the Chinese Theatre segment they have
it listed as:

WALK OF FAME INDUCTION
ON THE SIDEWALK.

WTF?  I thought it was something about the Hollywood Walk of Fame, but I knew that wasn't
instituted until 1959. A lot of people have jobs they should not.

There was also 5 previews for some Fox war films that I've not heard of, so I watched
them to see if I'd be interested. One of them was a war story in the Philippines and touted
as one of the stars was Jack Nicholson! That came out of the blue. It's a 1964 film called
Back Door to Hell. (b&w) He'd already had 20 film and TV credits by then!

Operation Gobi was another film trailer. A 1953 film in color. It looked very boring.

Another film was listed as You're in the Navy Now, but in the trailer Gary Cooper says the title
is The U.S.S. Teakettle (1951). (IMDB lists that as an alternate USA title.) The trailer also seems to
not have the dialogue soundtrack throughout most of the trailer for some reason, just the music.

I can't remember one of them now, but there was also the trailer for Decision Before Dawn with an
extensive paragraph from Hedda Hopper telling everyone how important the picture is and that
Hollywood has made one of the all-time greats.  Leave it to Hedda to over accessorize.  :)

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #64 on: April 15, 2018, 01:56:58 PM »

--The Unsinkable Molly Brown

I'd never seen a full widescreen version of this film before until last night. I saw it on TV back in the day and the VHS pan & scan version.
I was also familiar with the Broadway Cast Album with Tammy Grimes (Tony winner) in the lead role.

I've never seen a stage production, but something tells me it has to work better than the movie version. I liked some of it, but overall the
movie feels a lot longer than the running time would suggest. It's a little over two hours without the Overture and Exit music. The first big
problem is Debbie Reynolds in the first third of the film. She plays the character almost in full caffeine mode that there's nowhere to escape.
The songs she sings during this time are some of the best in the film, but for some reason she screams all of them. Knowing that they always
pre-recorded the songs for playback while filming, you have to ask why this was. They have musical directors and vocal people at these sessions
and surely they wouldn't have wanted her to sing these songs in a yelling mode. If she was advised to do this, it was a really bad decision. It
just feels downright unnatural.

Then there's Harve Presnell. He has a beautiful voice, but he comes across odd-looking for much of this film. Also, that voice seems at odd
with his character, even though the same kind of singing voices were heard in Oklahoma, which didn't jar from that film. The songs in this
film also don't blend well with the story in between them. It always seems the story is a weight to overcome until you get to the next song,
and it's often an uphill battle. It seemed there was one segment without any songs for at least twenty minutes.

Opening up the stage version to show lavish sets and scenery doesn't seem to work here, either. The film is really about the characters, but it
too often is overwhelmed by the production values.

Watching the film is a very uneven experience.

It was nominated for six Academy Awards, including Debbie Reynolds, who is good in the second half of the film, but uneven overall.
This same year Audrey Hepburn was famously not nominated for her role in My Fair Lady. Part of the reason talked about was because
many thought it unfair Julie Andrews didn't get the part, but also because her singing voice was dubbed. I'd have given the nomination
to Audrey dubbed than Debbie not dubbed. Though it is nice that Debbie got a nomination, her only one in her career.

Interestingly, Molly Brown did not win any of it's Oscar nominations and those categories all went to the two other musical films
that year, My Fair Lady or Mary Poppins.  Molly Brown was nominated in these categories:

BEST ACTRESS
ART DIRECTION (Color)
CINEMATOGRAPHY (Color)
COSTUME DESIGN (Color)
MUSIC (Scoring of Music--adaptation or treatment)
SOUND




Offline morrobay

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #65 on: April 15, 2018, 03:19:59 PM »
TCM is showing A Taste of Honey (1961).  I've only seen it once, long ago, so I'm watching it again. 

I was all about the gritty British movies in the mid-60s, my favorite is The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner - I watched that over and over again, as they ran it as "movie of the week" daily on one of the Philly TV stations...Tom Courtney was marvelous.
“Remember the days you prayed for the things you have now.”

Offline oilgun

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #66 on: April 15, 2018, 03:26:06 PM »


I saw A Quiet Place today, the horror film with John Krasinski and Emily Blunt. It's very effective but a couple of things annoyed me. They live in a world where the slightest noise might get you killed by these Alien like creatures. They eat off kale leaves because regular dishes would make too much noise FFS! They walk barefoot along paths that have been covered with sand or soot or something in order to muffle any noise. And yet, they decide to get pregnant. Yeah, a crying baby is just what you need in that environment. And don't get me started on the nail that is inexplicably sticking out on the basement stairs that is never removed even after one of the characters steps on it.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2018, 03:34:32 PM by oilgun »
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Offline morrobay

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #67 on: April 15, 2018, 03:35:39 PM »
I found a trailer for Loneliness...it warns: "suitable for adults only"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4asUxvijYQ8


First time I ever heard the hymn Jerusalem...I think it was brilliant how the director, Tony Richardson, set the hymn, sung by residents of a borstal, against the backdrop, shown between clips of the boys singing, of one of the boys being hunted down after absconding, caught, and thrown in a cell with a warden as he wraps a chain around his hand to beat him...

'Jerusalem' from 'The loneliness of the long distance runner
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rk9dLy58rsc
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Offline Sara B

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #68 on: April 15, 2018, 11:51:21 PM »
TCM is showing A Taste of Honey (1961).  I've only seen it once, long ago, so I'm watching it again. 

I was all about the gritty British movies in the mid-60s, my favorite is The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner - I watched that over and over again, as they ran it as "movie of the week" daily on one of the Philly TV stations...Tom Courtney was marvelous.
I saw them all when they came out, and was particularly moved by Taste of Honey, with the sad gay (queer in those days) friend. I’m not too into grittiness at the moment though. How did you find it this time, Nancy?
There were only the two of them on the mountain flying in the euphoric, bitter air, looking down on the hawk's back and the crawling lights of vehicles on the plain below, suspended above ordinary affairs....

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #69 on: April 16, 2018, 12:23:28 PM »
--The Greatest Showman

A musical called Barnum opened on Broadway in 1980 and ran a long time. I had the cast album of it
and I liked most all the musical numbers in it. I then saw a production of it at the Pantages Theatre in
Hollywood. I cannot recall who the lead actor was right now, but the lead actress was the original Broadway
lead, Glenn Close. I liked it a lot.

This recent film is also about P.T. Barnum.

Have you ever sat down with a bag, say, of Doritos and started eating them and loving it, but you keep
eating them and after awhile wish you'd stopped sooner than you did? That's kind of the experience I had
watching this film. I was enjoying it, but after awhile felt it was just repeating itself and I'd had enough.

With a title like "The Greatest Showman" you want to experience some wonder at what you're being shown,
and in that regard I often felt it was being forced on you instead of shown to you and then you feel the wonder.

For example, there's a scene with some elephants and tigers and it's obvious, at least with the tigers, that they
are CGI inserted. That doesn't make for "wonderment" while watching it, it just makes you feel cheated out of
something. I keep saying that film tricks used to be called "special effects" because it was special for those who
made them and for the audience seeing them. Now it's just visual effects aka routine. Also, Barnum's "oddities"
are all presented to you in a way that you are practically told you "have" to like them, not coming to your own
conclusion about them and any voice in the movie that has a different opinion is immediately seen as Snidely
Whiplash.

I thought that one of the most exciting scenes in the film was with Zac Efron and Zendaya, performing a
choreographed song number that involves swinging around the stage on ropes, but you even feel cheated
somewhat by that, because they are "singing" while doing it and no one could sing that perfectly while being
jerked around on ropes.

I don't mean to say that the film is bad or unwatchable, but, like eating Doritos, it's something you might enjoy
enough while doing it, but afterwards you really haven't gotten anything more substantial out of it than that.
___

I looked up some reviews of the film and they're pretty evenly split, but the negative ones are really pretty
negative.

This quote from one reviewer encapsulates both sides of the critics reviews:

"I love beautiful, well-crafted, profound musicals with cleverly rhymed lyrics. Fortunately, I also enjoy shallow
throwaway puff pieces with catchy tunes, lyrics that are purely functional, and meandering subplots."

After the initial blast of reviews and many critics disparagement of it (its got a 55% rating on RT), this is
a rare film nowadays that hasn't disappeared almost immediately from theatres and managed, after 4 months,
to draw in audiences (audiences give the film an 88% rating) and just recently it was noted that it's box office
managed to tie La La Land's box office.

This is good news for those of us who would like to see more musicals, and original musicals at that, being
made. If they make money, there'll be more incentive to make them!

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #70 on: April 16, 2018, 03:19:48 PM »
I saw A Quiet Place today, the horror film with John Krasinski and Emily Blunt. It's very effective but a couple of things annoyed me. [...]     And yet, they decide to get pregnant. Yeah, a crying baby is just what you need in that environment. And don't get me started on the nail that is inexplicably sticking out on the basement stairs that is never removed even after one of the characters steps on it.

Well, when she tells him she's pregnant this thought crosses everyone's mind in the audience, but you aren't suggesting that people weren't still going to have sex were you? The spectre of AIDS at its height didn't deter many people from not having sex, did it?

Actually, many questions crossed people's minds about a lot of things in this film, but because of the nature of the film you couldn't really slow it down to answer each and every one of them. You just have to accept it and move on. I heard someone in the audience wondering where they got all those red lights from.

As for that nail, yes, one wonders why that wasn't addressed immediately, but am I wrong, but I thought so much was happening at that point that it had to be let go and hopefully dealt with asap, though it wasn't.

I do think the movie works as is if one let's go immediately of any questions that might come to mind. It's a tense 90 minutes. I don't know all the details, but apparently the director, and star, John Krasinski, removed a whole lot of scenes from the script that were backstory. I guess all the backstory scenes. In one sense, that would've given us more answers to a lot of things, but also gave us safe space to relax during this film, but it might not have worked that way, either.

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #71 on: April 16, 2018, 03:22:09 PM »

--1941

I've always thought of this film as like a wind-up toy that you let loose and it jumps around and sputters and you get tired of it pretty quickly. Still, there's a lot that interests me here, but sitting through it in one sitting is not recommended, which is why I watched it in half hour increments over five nights this week.

The original film release was two hours. After it was made they cut almost a half-hour out of it to release it, but subsequent TV viewings and DVD releases had restored it to it's near 2 1/2 hour running time! And, further, there's an extra 8 minutes of deleted material as a bonus!

I wouldn't recommend it to anyone unless, like me, you have an interest in it other than the story you're presented with. The things that interest me are its period Los Angeles setting and all the trappings of that time period, the miniatures they made of Pacific Ocean Park and Hollywood Blvd. and environs, the non-CGI special effects, the dozen or more cameo appearances by celebrities who were wandering around the Warner Bros. studio that Spielberg got to appear in crowd scenes here and there, stuff like that. I also really do like the score of this film and one of the features on the DVD is that you can just play the musical audio track of the film.

Also, a lot of the young actors in the film are handsome and appealing, people like Bobby DiCicco, Tim Matheson, Perry Lang, Treat Williams and the notable Wendie Jo Sperber!

You'll find comedians like John Candy, Dan Aykroyd and the inexplicable character in this film, Wild Bill Kelso played by or inhabited by John Belushi. Was he on drugs the entire time he was in this film? I still wonder what exactly he was supposed to be in this film.

You'll find Hollywood stalwarts in this film like Robert Stack, Warren Oates, Christopher Lee and Ned Beatty. Everyone from Slim Pickens to Toshiro Mifune! If you look closely you'll find Lenny & Squiggy from Laverne & Shirley. You'll even find Laverne, Penny Marshall. You'll find Hollywood directors like John Landis and Sam Wood, who was about to direct The Big Red One film and tapped Bobby DiCicco for a role in it. You'll see character actors like Lionel Stander (Hart to Hart) and Dub Taylor. Wait, did I just see Patti Lupone, James Caan and Mickey Rourke? You did.

Did I just see 10 vats filled with thousands of gallons of colored paint collapse? A house roll off a cliff? A character in the film who is actually a wooden dummy? Two dinosaurs like in Jurassic Park? You did.

Another extra on the DVD is several written reviews of the film, and all but one of them is negative! LOL!

I do admit this film has a fascination to me that I can't fully explain. I mean, the first time I saw it the night it opened at the Cinerama Dome in Los Angeles, I had a headache when I left the theatre. I thought that was just one of those things, so I went back to see it again and had a headache when I left the theatre for the second time!


Part of the interest, I'm guessing is from the history I learned it was based on.  (Cont'd.)

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #72 on: April 16, 2018, 03:28:32 PM »
Part of the interest, I'm guessing is from the history I learned it was based on.  (Cont'd.)

MAYBE (?) I'm going out on a limb thinking anyone is interested in this, but even if one person finds it worthwhile, that would be great. If not, I had a nice time dwelling on it for awhile myself!

(cont'd)

The film IS loosely based on several true life things that happened in Los Angeles and environs that I learned more about subsequently.  Not only the war jitters of the west coast populace, but this film combined several stories in one stew pot. One was the Zoot Suit Riots between military servicemen and Latinos. That occurred in June of 1943. Another was the Bombardment of Ellwood, an oil field near Santa Barbara shelled by a Japanese submarine. That was February 23, 1942. The third, and most notable, is known as The Great Los Angeles Air Raid, or The Battle of Los Angeles, which occurred February 24-25, 1942. Sometime in the evening, people thought they were being attacked by Japan, someone reported enemy aircraft, Air raid sirens sounded throughout Los Angeles County and a total blackout was ordered and thousands of Air Raid Wardens were summoned to their positions. The 37th Coast Artillery Brigade began firing .50 caliber machine guns and 12.8-pound anti-aircraft shells into the air at reported aircraft and "all hell broke loose" when the jittery populace got involved. What people were firing at was never really explained. The military blamed it on it's standby excuse of a "loose weather balloon." The insistence and persistence of many that they saw "something" morphed into people believing it was a UFO. Incidentally, the Oscars that year were held the day after this event, on February 26, 1942.

It's such a part of Los Angeles history that the local Fort MacArthur military Museum near San Pedro has had a recreation of it every year since 1991, when it was initially considered a one-off event for the 50th Anniversary. It is now an annual fundraising event for the museum. I'd never heard a thing about this before I discovered information about it and, when I did, I vowed to attend which I did last year which happened to be the 75th Anniversary of the occasion.

The experience lasts from 3pm to 11pm and begins when you enter Fort MacArthur which is dressed as though it is 1941. The personnel are all dressed in period uniforms and the place has vintage military vehicles and machinery all around the area. Further, there are plenty of 1941 and earlier car models all around with period items to give you a sense of recreating the era. Anyone attending is encouraged to dress in period attire and nearly everyone does in one way or another. (When I was there a spitting image of Winston Churchill was there! Gen. MacArthur, too.) At first you can roam the grounds and see where the military guns were placed to defend the coast. There is a museum filled with items pertaining to the WWII experience from a Los Angeles point of view. Everything is done to make you feel as though you've gone back in time to 1941. In the late afternoon you climb the embankment where the Pacific Ocean is in full view and a simulated fight between an American and Japanese warplane is taking place in the skies over the Pacific!

There's a gift shop with all sorts of historical and military information available to buy. There are booths with other WWII
related attractions you can find out about. If you need a restroom, there are military styled latrines you have to use.

There is a commissary of sorts set up where you can buy dinners and eat them outside. (I had fish & chips.) Nearby there is a dance floor set up near the hill and a dance band stage in close proximity. Another location provides beer and/or wine.

Around 4:00 p.m. you can be given simple dance instructions for the WWII dances one might be familiar with. Around 6 p.m. Dean Mora and the Ft. MacArthur Officers Orchestra arrives and begins playing. Many many people crowd the dance floor. The Master of Ceremonies, "Colonel Maxwell DeMille" occasionally stops the dancing for special musical numbers, either sung by 40's style crooners or chanteuses' or some groups reminiscent of the Andrews Sisters. A few specialty dance numbers are performed, some by individuals doing tap dances and some others doing fantastic jitterbug routines.

Also, at one point in the evening, there is a ceremony by which someone from Ft. MacArthur calls out each decade and asks military veterans from those decades to come forward and stand and be recognized. If the decade had a major war in it, they announce it as, say, "WWII veterans". Unfortunately, most all decades have had a major war in them.

All through the evening, between the orchestra playing, and on a couple occasions even interrupting it, the MC comes out to, at first, give out information as a warning that something may have been spotted in the sky up the coast, but it's probably a rumor, until these announcements get more and more ominous, until the moment arrives when a blackout is called for and the air raid commences. And I mean a full blown louder than you can imagine air raid occurs, with tanks and anti-aircraft guns firing into the night sky until the all clear is given that the crisis is over.
   
The band plays another hour or so and then the evening winds down. I loved the whole experience and would like to go again. I can't tell you how much I enjoyed watching all of the dancing, especially everyone in period dress. What surprised me was how many young people were there, people in their twenties and, indeed, I struck up a conversation with a Ft. MacArthur military person who happened to tell me that he is surprised and gratified that over the years that more and more young people have been coming to this event every year. And with nearly everyone in period dress it really felt like you were back in that time period. Most of the guys who were there dressed in military uniforms...soldiers...sailors and the like...but some dressed in period suits and many Latinos came in zoot suits! Apparently, I found out later on, that the museum actually hires a few re-enactors to come in period dress, just in case many attendees do not. That didn't seem to be a problem.  This event in itself has become so popular that a downtown L.A. nightclub, The Cicada Club, in a period building, has a special 1940's weekend and many people who go to the Air Raid event go there as well for dinner and dancing.

Here's the announcement for this past February's event:
(They left the 75th ANniversary part, but the 75th was last year.)


If you search Great Los Angeles Air Raid of 1942 re-enactment or such, there's quite a few
videos online. I chose a couple if anyone's interested. (The Air Raid part sounds very tame
and much quieter on the youtube videos!)

This is a youtube video from last year when I went. The first part is photographs of the event throughout the day.
It sure gives you the sense of the time period that was on display. The last couple minutes is the Air Raid.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OdZor5Yvjo


This video is from 2012. It shows the dance band area at night.
I chose this one because at about :55 it shows a couple men dancing together.
At about 1:40 the MC stops the music to calm down a brawl between some army guys.
(Staged I imagine though I don't know for sure.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NnZQEcXWf0s

Anyone want to go with me next year?

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #73 on: April 20, 2018, 11:17:55 AM »

--All the Money in the World

Gattaca and Oilgun saw this film awhile ago and commented on it in the recent film thread:


Quote
gattaca on December 27, 2017, 10:13:11 AM »
Saw "All the Money in the World" last night and thought Scott's work re-shooting all the scenes replacing Spacey with Plummer absolutely amazing.  As for the film, it's really hard to like this film which strives so hard to make us not-like the Getty family, regardless of this story's basis in reality.   It seems the positive outcomes from Getty's empire are the Getty Art holdings in LA. 

Michele Williams's performance is absolutely outstanding.  We may be watching another Oscar nomination for her for sure.

The story also takes liberty with some elements post story which seem relevant - but Scott had to stop somewhere. 

I really cannot recommend this film outside of watching William's (and Christopher Plummer's) performance - unless you want to be subjected to a repeated triage about the 0.01%...

Cheers, V.


Quote
oilgun on January 28, 2018, 02:35:18 PM »
All the Money in the World I mainly went to see how successful the whole Spacey/Plummer switch turned out but ended up quite enjoying it. Thanks mostly to Michelle William's and Christopher Plummer's performances. Also, French actor Romain Duris is excellent as one of the kidnappers. As for the horribly miscast Mark Whalberg I agree with this reviewer's comment: "If Scott was replacing stars, he might as well have yanked Wahlberg while he was at it."    It's not a great film but it is effective and in today's climate it makes you want to take the guillotines out of storage.


I enjoyed this film and thought Michelle Williams was very good in it. Frankly, I think Kevin Spacey would have been better in the role than Christopher Plummer and I wonder if there'll be a time "that" film will ever see the light of day, simply for the unusual situation where we have the same film, but one part is played by two different people.

(Just a thought that occurred to me: If that version were to be screened in a theater sometime, would Spacey be eligible for a nomination?)

On the dvd there is a short extra about recasting the film and reshooting the part with a different actor. What i thought was insidious about this
was that this segment does not explain the reason for doing it. At some point if people watch this segment you would not know why they did it.
This elimination of people's lives as though they never existed is an abhorrent idea to me, akin to book burning, as an example.

People like Kevin Spacey, Charlie Rose and Al Franken have all disappeared from the face of the earth after being high profile persons in their
respective fields. Same with Kathy Griffin and Billy Bush. The worst of all, though, gets a pass to sit in the White House, not to mention dozens
of others in the administration who deserve to disappear.

The Bible verse comes to mind:

Judge not, that ye be not judged. For with what judgment ye judge, ye shall be judged:
and with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again. And why beholdest
thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine
own eye?




Offline morrobay

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #74 on: April 21, 2018, 05:40:31 PM »
On tonight...

Makes the Brad Pitt one look pathetic...as if anyone could do a decent remake to follow Sinatra, Davis Jr, Martin, Lawford, even Bishop...

One and only...

Ocean's Eleven (1960)
Veterans of the 82nd Airborne Division devise an elaborate plot to simultaneously rob five casinos on New Year's Eve.

Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr., Peter Lawford, Angie Dickinson

9:00 - 11:15 PM TCM (64)
“Remember the days you prayed for the things you have now.”