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Offline killersmom

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The Daily Sheet May - August 2019
« on: May 06, 2019, 08:17:33 PM »



Tuesday, May 6th, 2019



Annie Proulx Feels a Change In The Air

Annie Proulx is in Montreal this weekend to accept Blue Metropolis’s Grand Prix. As events honoring literary eminences go, this one stands out as more than a satisfyingly apposite match of festival and recipient. It marks a great writer’s return to a city where she took crucial early steps on her life’s path, and to a province where her family has significant roots.

“Montreal seemed to me to be so vividly alive and free from the strictures of Yankee New England, where my Quebec ancestors ended up in the textile mills.”

Interviewed by email from her home in Washington state — “a few hours from Victoria” is how she describes the location — Proulx, 83, was recalling her first impressions of the city where she obtained a master’s degree in history in the 1970s.  Enduring a daily 60-mile commute from her home in St. Albans, Vt., Proulx — whose paternal grandfather emigrated from Quebec to New England as a teenager — attended Sir George Williams University just as it was transitioning into Concordia. Asked for some of her abiding memories of that time, she responded with an evocative, impressionistic, time-capsule list.

Annie Proulx Feels a Change In The Air



Brunei Will Not Enforce Death Penalty for Gay Sex

Brunei has announced it will not enforce the death penalty for gay sex – a significant U-turn on policy for which it faced widespread criticism.  The small southeast Asian country’s Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah extended a moratorium on the sentence in a bid to alleviate an international backlash led by high-profile individuals such as George Clooney and Sir Elton John.  Brunei provoked an uproar when it rolled out its interpretation of Islamic laws, or Sharia, on 3 April, punishing sodomy, adultery and rape with death, including by stoning.

The tiny oil-rich state has consistently defended its right to implement the laws, elements of which were first adopted in 2014 and which have been rolled out in phases since then.  But in a rare response to criticism levied at the country, the sultan said the death penalty would not be imposed in the implementation of the Syariah Penal Code Order (SPCO).

The law’s implementation, which the United Nations condemned, sparked celebrities and rights organisations to seek a boycott on hotels owned by the sultan, including the Dorchester in London and the Beverley Hills Hotel in Los Angeles.  Several multinational companies have since put a ban on staff using the sultan’s hotels and some travel companies have stopped promoting Brunei as a tourist destination. The Police Federation, which represents more than 119,000 officers in England and Wales up to the rank of chief inspector, also lent its support by moving its annual bravery awards away from the Dorchester hotel.

Brunei Will Not Enforce Death Penalty for Gay Sex



How Lesbian Potlucks Nourished the LGBTQ Movement

Jen Martin and Liz Alpern lived in “that house.” Many queer friend groups have one. It’s the kind of place where a pot of soup is always boiling, where bread is always in the oven, where someone is always willing to read your tarot cards. Friends stopped to visit the Brooklyn apartment on weeknights. It was a space to cook and eat, to work and relax.

For years, Alpern, a chef, had contemplated expanding her house’s welcoming vibe into a formal event, a soup night that would promote queer chefs. After the 2016 presidential election, as Alpern wondered how to support swelling social justice movements, she thought: Why not turn her soup idea into a fundraiser? The first event—a donate-what-you-can dinner—happened the night after the 2017 Women’s March. Protestors returned to New York from D.C. with sore feet and crumpled banners. Exhausted but still revved up, they piled into a local cafe for soup and community. The love, says Kathleen Cunningham, a Queer Soup Night organizer along with Martin and Alpern, was palpable. Yet friends kept asking: What kind of soup could they bring to the potluck?

“We have this joke in Queer Soup Night land: that we’re not a potluck,” Alpern says. But it’s no wonder the trios’ friends were expecting collective cooking. Potlucks have been a hallmark of queer women’s spaces since the 1950s, when the Daughters of Bilitis, the U.S.’s first modern lesbian organization, began meeting in secret over coffee in San Francisco. Nowadays, the potluck is synonymous with lesbian tradition—so ubiquitous that lesbians have been known to potluck everything from protests to sex parties.

How Lesbian Potlucks Nourished the LGBTQ Movement




Stop Dismissing Bisexual Women Like Miley Cyrus

In a recent article for The Spectator, feminist activist Julie Bindel wrote: “Why are boringly straight women claiming to be lesbians?” In it she accuses singer Miley Cyrus and others of being “lesbian tourists” masking their heteronormativity in a bid to be more “interesting”.  Not long ago, Cyrus, who identifies as queer, described her marriage to Liam Hemsworth as “redefining, to be fucking frank, what it looks like for someone that’s a queer person like myself to be in a hetero relationship”.

While Cyrus’s statement is hyperbolic – she is far from the first queer woman to be in a relationship with a man – Bindel’s argument is far more problematic, ignoring the idea that people can be attracted to more than one gender. And it speaks to a broader issue of biphobia in the lesbian community, where dismissing bisexual women as “confused” or simply non-existent can be rampant.

Bisexuals exist, I promise. There is a clear “B” in the LGBT+ acronym that so many seem unable to acknowledge. If you’re struggling to remember, it’s the “bacon” in the new M&S Stonewall sandwich.  Not only do they exist, but they also struggle with discrimination. Forced to straddle between the straight and gay world, not being fully accepted into either, bisexuals are far more likely to have mental health issues than their lesbian counterparts.   

Stop Dismissing Bisexual Women Like Miley Cyrus




Death In Uncanny X-Men #17 Is a Trans Panic Murder

Uncanny X-Men #16 ended on a cliffhanger that has begun to feel familiar within the pages of Matthew Rosenberg’s run: a woman has died. Today’s body: Rahne Sinclair, codename: Wolfsbane. Original New Mutant, former mutant of Genosha, government agent for X-Factor, investigator for X-Factor, operative for X-Force. Scotswoman. X-man.  Rahne, we’ve seen over and over and over again, knew how to survive. She was trained by Charles Xavier, Magneto, and Logan; she was smart and capable.  And now she’s dead.

Issue #17, which was released May 1, endeavored to show us how. I wish Rahne wasn’t dead, but even moreso, I wish we didn’t have to see how she died.  There’s a lot to say about the mutant metaphor. A great deal of it has already been said. (You can even listen to a live episode of Jay & Miles X-Plain the X-Men about the metaphor, its potential, its limitations.) But I will do my best to be brief and clear here:   There is power in the mutant metaphor. It’s why we’re still reading these comics, nearly 60 years after their creation. There is power in telling stories from the perspective of the outsider.

Mutants, we’re told, could be any one of us. One’s mutation reveals itself at or around puberty. When childhood ends, the weirdness begins. The things that make you unlike your peers reveal themselves to you.

Death In Uncanny X-Men #17 Is a Trans Panic Murder



About 1 in 1,000 Babies Born 'Intersex,' Study Finds

Cases in which a newborn's genitals make it unclear whether the child is a boy or girl may be more common than once believed, researchers say.  One example of what's known as ambiguous genitalia is a baby girl with an enlarged clitoris that looks more like a small penis, the study authors explained.  In some cases, infants have external sex organs that don't match their internal reproductive organs. For example, a female infant can have external sex organs that resemble male genitals but have typical internal female organs -- ovaries and a uterus.

In these so-called "intersex" cases, treatment may be delayed until puberty or adulthood so that patients and doctors can make shared decisions, according to the study's first author, Dr. Banu Kucukemre Aydin, a researcher at Istanbul University in Turkey, and her colleagues.   For their study, the researchers analyzed data on nearly 14,200 newborns. Of those, 18 had ambiguous genitalia. That's a rate of 1.3 in 1,000 births -- much higher than the rate of one in 4,500 to 5,500 reported in previous studies, Aydin said in a news release from The Endocrine Society.

Fifteen of the newborns were diagnosed with 46, XY DSD, a condition in which a male infant can't use testosterone properly or testicles don't develop properly. Babies with the condition had lower birth weights, the investigators found. In addition, preeclampsia -- a pregnancy complication characterized by high blood pressure -- was common in those pregnancies.

About 1 in 1,000 Babies Born 'Intersex,' Study Finds



LGBT+ Ally Penny Mordaunt Named UK Defence Secretary

The UK government’s equalities minister Penny Mordaunt has been named Defence Secretary.  The Conservative politician, who has been a prominent supporter of LGBT+ rights in government, will continue in her role as Minister for Women and Equalities while also replacing the sacked Gavin Williamson as Secretary of State for Defence.

In the equalities brief, the minister has been a strong proponent of LGBT+ rights, vowing to outlaw conversion therapy, and pressing forward with plans to reform gender recognition laws for trans people.  Mordaunt, the MP for Portsmouth North and a member of the Royal Navy Reserves, is the UK’s first female Defence Secretary.

Speaking at Stonewall’s Workplace Conference on Friday (April 26), the minister said that including LGBT+ people in military service “wasn’t just the right thing to do morally, but a matter of operational effectiveness,” adding: “You can’t fight a war if you are busy obsessing over someone’s sexuality or hiding who you are.” Mordaunt praised “the wonderful Captain Hannah Graf,” a transgender British Army officer who was named Stonewall’s Trans Role Model of the year.  Noting that gay troops were banned from serving until 2000, the minister continued: “The change in the army on LGBT rights is like the difference between bayonets and smart missiles, yet it happened so much more rapidly and that should serve as an inspiration to us all.”

LGBT+ Ally Penny Mordaunt Named UK Defence Secretary



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: Sara B,  KillersMom, CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Offline killersmom

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Re: The Daily Sheet May - August 2019
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2019, 06:28:45 PM »



Tuesday, May 14th, 2019



Anne Hathaway Gets A Star on The Walk of Fame

A star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame was unveiled Thursday to honor Oscar-winning actress Anne Hathaway, a day before the release of her latest film, "The Hustle."  The star is the 2,663rd since the completion of the Walk of Fame in 1961 with the first 1,558 stars. The ceremony was livestreamed on walkoffame.com.

Awkwafina, who co-starred with her in the 2018 heist comedy "Ocean's 8," and Dee Rees, who directed Hathaway in the political thriller, joined the honored actress in speaking at the late-morning ceremony in front of the TCL Chinese Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard. 

Hathaway first gained fame in 2001 in her motion picture debut in "The Princess Diaries," as shy high school student Mia Thermopolis, who learns she is heir to the throne of a European kingdom. She also starred in its 2004 sequel, "The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement." Hathaway's next film credits included "Brokeback Mountain," "The Devil Wears Prada" and "Get Smart."

Anne Hathaway Gets A Star on The Walk of Fame



Marriage Equality Boosted Employment

Progress towards marriage equality within the U.S. has been extremely rapid in the last twenty years. In 2004, Massachusetts became the first state to legalise same-sex marriage. Following its example, more and more states approved marriage equality until the ruling in 2015 of the US Supreme Court legalised same-sex marriage at the federal level. Were these amendments to marriage law a revolution with a profound impact for gays and lesbians? Or were they just a formal statement recognising that times have changed, but without substantive consequences beyond more marriage (and divorce) licenses?

There are reasons to believe that the economic consequences of same-sex marriage legalisation could be large. Similar past reforms – such as the passage of unilateral divorce laws – have substantially increased female labour force participation (Fernández et al., 2014). On the other hand, the effect could be small. LGBT activists have achieved several successes in the last twenty years, sustaining a steady, gradual improvement in attitudes towards homosexuality, that would now be reflected in the law.

The impact of same-sex marriage legalisation on employment is also unclear ex-ante. Access to marriage may have led to increased commitment among partners (Badgett, 2009) and lower economic uncertainty, as well as shifts in taxation, health insurance benefits, and adoption laws. These changes could have discouraged some individuals in a same-sex relationship from both being employed.

Marriage Equality Boosted Employment


Megan Rapinoe to Pose For Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue

The Sports Illustrated Swimsuit issue has celebrated the female body ever since its debut in 1964. And this year, in its 56th annual installment, the issue is making history by featuring the first out lesbian on its pages.

Professional soccer star Megan Rapinoe, a member of both the United States Women’s National Team and the Seattle Reign FC, posed on the beaches of St. Lucia. The striker was joined by fellow national team members Alex Morgan, Abby Dahlkemper and Crystal Dunn for the spread.

“I think it’s really quite a bold statement by Sports Illustrated to be honest because it has been seen as sort of this magazine only for heterosexual males,” Rapinoe, who helped Team USA win a gold medal in the 2012 Summer Olympics, told the magazine. “I think so often with gay females in sports, there’s this particular stereotype about it and there’s such a narrow view of what it means to be gay and be athletic.”  “I think our view is still way too narrow of gay people in general,” she added. “Stereotypes still very much persist and they are just such incomplete views of who we really are as people, so I think for that reason it’s really important to just continue to push those boundaries.”

Megan Rapinoe to Pose For Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue



Stop Dismissing Bisexual Women Like Miley Cyrus

In a recent article for The Spectator, feminist activist Julie Bindel wrote: “Why are boringly straight women claiming to be lesbians?” In it she accuses singer Miley Cyrus and others of being “lesbian tourists” masking their heteronormativity in a bid to be more “interesting”.  Not long ago, Cyrus, who identifies as queer, described her marriage to Liam Hemsworth as “redefining, to be fucking frank, what it looks like for someone that’s a queer person like myself to be in a hetero relationship”.

While Cyrus’s statement is hyperbolic – she is far from the first queer woman to be in a relationship with a man – Bindel’s argument is far more problematic, ignoring the idea that people can be attracted to more than one gender. And it speaks to a broader issue of biphobia in the lesbian community, where dismissing bisexual women as “confused” or simply non-existent can be rampant.

Bisexuals exist, I promise. There is a clear “B” in the LGBT+ acronym that so many seem unable to acknowledge. If you’re struggling to remember, it’s the “bacon” in the new M&S Stonewall sandwich.  Not only do they exist, but they also struggle with discrimination. Forced to straddle between the straight and gay world, not being fully accepted into either, bisexuals are far more likely to have mental health issues than their lesbian counterparts.   

Stop Dismissing Bisexual Women Like Miley Cyrus



Indya Moore Is the 1st Transgender Woman to Cover Elle Magazine

FX’s Pose broke barriers when it debuted last year; co-created by Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk and Steven Canals, it was the first network television show to feature a predominantly transgender cast. Equally genderqueer is its writers’ room, including luminaries like Janet Mock and Our Lady J—both of whom also serve as producers on the Golden Globe-nominated series.

But if there is a breakout star of Pose’s ensemble cast, it’s Indya Moore, who heart-wrenchingly brings the beloved character Angel to life, infusing what might have become a stereotypical sex worker’s narrative with grace, vulnerability and hopeless romanticism. Now, Moore breaks new ground as the first transgender woman to grace the cover of Elle magazine.

For those who may take issue with the fact that we point out Moore’s gender identity, it’s a major component of her strikingly transparent cover story in the June issue, which opens with a midnight trip to the pharmacy for hormones. (Note: Moore typically opts for they/them pronouns, but agreed to be referred to as she/her for Elle’s story; we are following suit.)  “It’s like my whole life I’ve been doing this, you know. It’s not a big deal,” Moore tells writer Jada Yuan. “It’ll be 10 years next year.”

Indya Moore Is the 1st Transgender Woman to Cover Elle Magazine


Google Adds Gender Fluid Emojis

Google is releasing 53 new gender-fluid emoji on Pixel phones in beta this week, and will add them to all Android Q phones later this year. Fast Company reports that the emoji, which have been specifically designed to appear neither male nor female, are Google’s attempt at simplifying the emoji keyboard with more universal characters. It’s a modern interpretation of emoji’s previous default: the little yellow man.

The number of emoji has ballooned to over 3,000 since the original 176 symbols were released back in 1999. Some of these are entirely new characters and symbols, but others are new race and gender combinations for existing emoji. The current approach is more inclusive, but it has its problems. It makes the emoji keyboard more difficult to parse, and even then it’s almost impossible to include every possible combination of skin tone and gender in emoji featuring multiple people.

Another problem is that emoji designs sometime have different genders when the core Unicode standard doesn’t specify one. For example, Google’s design for the person in a sauna is female, but on iOS the character is male. This means the emoji’s gender can change when messages are sent between platforms, creating confusion.

Google Adds Gender Fluid Emojis



Madonna's Speech at the GLAAD Awards

While being honored at GLAAD's 30th Annual Media Awards Saturday night, Madonna took the chance to explain why she has long identified with the LGBTQ community.  When the singer took the stage to accept the organization's Advocate for Change Award, she gave a heartfelt speech.

"Why have I always fought for change? That's a hard question to answer," she said. "It's like trying to explain the importance of reading, or the need to love. Growing up, I always felt like an outsider, like I didn't fit in. It wasn't because I didn't shave under my armpits -- I just didn't fit in, OK.  The first gay man I ever met was named Christopher Flynn. He was my ballet teacher in high school and he was the first person that believed in me, that made me feel special as a dancer, as an artist and as a human being. I know this sounds trivial and superficial, but he was the first man to tell me I was beautiful."

Madonna's Speech at the GLAAD Awards



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: KillersMom, CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

We count on you to send us your news items, questions, and nominations for posts of the day.
If you have items you’d like to see published, send them to CellarDweller115.

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Offline killersmom

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Re: The Daily Sheet May - August 2019
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2019, 10:02:35 PM »



Tuesday, May 21st, 2019



James Schamus Comedy Acquired By Wolfe Releasing

Wolfe Releasing has taken U.S. rights to director Rhys Ernst’s coming-of-age comedy Adam starring Nicholas Alexander (I Love You Phillip Morris), Bobbi Salvör Menuez (Nocturnal Animals, I Love Dick), Leo Sheng, Chloë Levine (The OA) and Margaret Qualley (Fosse/Verdon, Once Upon A Time In Hollywood).  In the film, awkward teen Adam (Alexander) spends his last high school summer in New York City with his big sister, Casey (Qualley), who throws herself into the city’s lesbian and trans activist scene. When Casey’s friend Gillian (Menuez) mistakes Adam for a transgender man at a party, he must keep up a charade to win over the girl of his dreams. Adam and those around him experience love, friendship and hard truths during the Summer of 2006.

The film made its world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival and will be released theatrically this summer. Adam also features performances from Ana Gasteyer (Mean Girls), Jari Jones (Port Authority) and Mj Rodriguez (Pose).

Pic was financed by Meridian Entertainment, produced by James Schamus (Brokeback Mountain) of Symbolic Exchange and Howard Gertler (How To Survive A Plague) of Little Punk and adapted into a screenplay by the novel’s author Ariel Schrag (The L Word). Jennifer Dong and Figo Li of Meridian Entertainment serve as the film’s Executive Producers alongside Avy Eschenasy, Charlie Dibe and Joe Pirro.

James Schamus Comedy Acquired By Wolfe Releasing



Nevada Bans So-Called Gay and Trans Panic Defenses

Nevada has become the fourth state to prohibit the use of so-called gay and trans panic defenses, following California, Rhode Island and Illinois.  Senate Bill 97, which was signed into law Tuesday, prohibits defendants from using a victim’s sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression as a defense in a criminal case.

Briana Escamilla, the Nevada state director for the Human Rights Campaign, a national LGBTQ group, said it was “long past time” for the state of Nevada to institute this legislation.  “These 'defenses' send the destructive message that LGBTQ victims are less worthy of justice and their attackers justified in their violence,” Escamilla wrote in an email. “Every victim of violent crime and their families deserve equal justice, regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity.”

The bill was proposed by the Nevada Youth Legislature, a state program that gives high school students an opportunity to present bills to the Nevada Legislature.  Former Nevada state Sen. Valerie Wiener, a Democrat, told NBC News that Olivia Yamamoto, a high school student who is the chair of the Nevada Youth Legislature, was inspired to propose the bill after one of her classmates was murdered.

Nevada Bans So-Called Gay and Trans Panic Defenses


First Trailer of 'Batwoman' Released

The Australian actress Ruby Rose suited up as the title character in the trailer for the forthcoming CW show "Batwoman." The sneak peek, which dropped Thursday, gives viewers a glimpse at the lesbian superhero’s origin story — and villain-crushing moves.

After her love interest, Sophie (Megan Tandy), is kidnapped, the leather-wearing, motorcycle-riding heroine is determined to find her. However, like any good superhero, Kate Kane (Batwoman’s “civilian” name) needs the proper attire.

“I need you to fix his suit,” Batwoman, looking at Bruce Wayne’s Batman ensemble, tells his assistant.  “The suit is literal perfection,” the assistant replies.  “It will be,” Batwoman says, “when it fits a woman.”

Trish Bendix, a culture writer and editor who frequently covers LGBTQ issues, called the series “groundbreaking.”

First Trailer of 'Batwoman' Released



Bisexual Eurovision Winner Shares Beautiful Message of Acceptance After Win

Eurovision champion Duncan Laurence has shared an important message of acceptance following his win.  The bisexual 25-year-old is the Netherlands entry to the popular music contest where he performed his powerful ballad Arcade.  The singer-songwriter and former contestant on The Voice Of Holland sent a message in support of the LGBTI community. He explained people should be seen for ‘who they are’ regardless of their sexuality and gender identity.   

As 2018 winner Netta handed him the iconic Eurovision glass microphone trophy, Laurence said: ‘I think the most important thing is that you stick to who you are and see yourself as I see myself, as I see Sergey, as I see Chris, as I see you, just a human being.’

‘As a person who has talents, who, with this trophy, will in however many years stick to what they love – even if they have a different sexuality.’  He furthermore added: ‘Stick to what you love and make the best of it, and love people for who they are. That’s the most important message. Dream big.’  Asked how his victory felt, he replied: ‘First of all I get to meet Netta, that was the best present, and then I got this trophy from her.’

Bisexual Eurovision Winner Shares Beautiful Message of Acceptance After Win



Trans Dads Tell Doctors: 'You Can Be A Man and Have A Baby'

When Jay Thomas, 33, decided he wanted to get pregnant in 2016, he spoke to his physician.  Thomas, a cook who lives in Louisville, Kentucky, explained to his doctor that he and his wife, Jamie Brewster, 33, a bank employee, are both transgender, and that he had been on testosterone for more than two years. The physician said Thomas had likely gone through early menopause, and that if they were able to conceive at all, he would have to go off the hormone for at least 18 months.

But none of that turned out to be true, according to Thomas, who gave birth to the couple’s son Dorian, 2, less than a year after that doctor’s appointment.

“We got pregnant in three months,” Thomas said.  One of the most persistent myths transgender men and nonbinary people hear from doctors is that testosterone has sterilized them, experts say. While testosterone does block ovulation, trans men can get pregnant if they are not taking it regularly.  It’s just one example of the misinformation and discouragement transgender men say they face from the medical establishment when they decide to get pregnant — a problem advocates and experts blame on a lack of training and research around transgender health care, as well as doctors’ biases.

Trans Dads Tell Doctors: 'You Can Be A Man and Have A Baby'


8 Reading Recommendations With Canon Asexual Representation

As a person who identifies on the asexual spectrum, I rarely find representation concerning this part of my identity within mainstream media. In a previous article about asexual representation, I had bemoaned the lack of/problematic representation of asexual characters on television, highlighting Riverdale and the erasure of asexual-aromantic representation with its version of Jughead.

Luckily, print fiction, especially young-adult fiction, has made significant strides in showcasing this part of the LGBTQIA+ community, featuring the nuanced representation that’s so very lacking on the big or small screen. From books that focus primarily on romance to adventurous swashbuckling pirates, asexuals are beginning to be seen on the page in all types of stories.

Here are eight noteworthy books that feature explicit and excellent asexual representation.

8 Reading Recommendations With Canon Asexual Representation



"Last Day of Spring" is About Ways To Be A Supportive LGBTQ Ally

It can be difficult to find time to finish a video game, especially if you only have a few hours a week to play. In our biweekly column Short Play, we suggest video games that can be started and finished in a weekend.

Last Day of Spring is a sequel to one of my favorite games from last year, One Night, Hot Spring. The original visual novel followed a 19-year-old transgender woman named Haru as she goes on an overnight hot spring trip for her oldest friend Manami’s 20th birthday. It deals with a lot of Haru’s experiences about not being treated or seen as the woman she is and the anxieties those experiences create. While parts of the story can get heavy, things generally turn out well for Haru. One of the reasons for that is Erika, Manami’s other friend who joins them on the trip. In certain endings, Haru and Erika end up spending a lot of time together talking, which leads them to become close friends after not knowing each other at all before the trip.

Last Day of Spring picks up a few months after one of those endings with the player now following Erika. It specifically starts on April 1st of this year when Erika is watching the announcement of the new Japanese Imperial era’s name. She learns from Manami that Haru’s 20th birthday is coming up in a few days. Erika decides that they should do something special. The game unfolds with her trying to plan a spa day for the three of them.

"Last Day of Spring" is About Ways To Be A Supportive LGBTQ Ally



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: KillersMom, CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

We count on you to send us your news items, questions, and nominations for posts of the day.
If you have items you’d like to see published, send them to CellarDweller115.

To subscribe to The Daily Sheet, click the “Notify” button at the top or bottom of the page.
When a new issue of TDS is posted, you will be notified by e-mail.

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