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Author Topic: Theatre  (Read 152374 times)

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: Theatre
« Reply #870 on: September 25, 2017, 12:34:59 PM »
Yes, it is, but not the same music. He uses passages from works of composer Bernard Herrmann.

Very interesting. (I know who Bernard Herrmann was: great composer of scores for films.)

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I don't think that would be a reason for Matthew Bourne, His works have all been received well in Los Angeles, where he usually brings them first.

Yes, but would they play in Peoria?  :D   

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I can't find out any reasons why. It's interesting, because the last two Bourne productions I've seen in L.A.. there's been conversations with other audience members who've mentioned wanting to see it, without prompting.

I was thinking more generally. I would expect his work would be well received in that Den of Iniquity L.A.  ;D

I can't remember where I saw his Swan Lake (which was interesting and I enjoyed, but "it really wasn't Swan Lake"). PBS, maybe? Or just on DVD.

(Just a word about my comment about Swan Lake. Quite a few years ago, now, the Pennsylvania Ballet paid hotshot choreographer Christopher Wheeldon to make a new Swan Lake for the company. It was a "reimagining," so to speak: A ballet company preparing to debut a new ballet called Swan Lake. I came to think it was OK on its own terms, but only just OK. It wasn't really Swan Lake. While I have enjoyed some modern works, if I had to choose, I would choose my ballets classical. As one of the [obviously gay] gay boys in the movie Center Stage put it, "Ballet is about girls in tiaras and boys in tights." Especially the boys in tights. ...  :D )
« Last Edit: October 01, 2017, 03:53:37 PM by Jeff Wrangler »

Offline Flyboy

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Re: Theatre
« Reply #871 on: October 01, 2017, 03:30:22 PM »
Saw Kinky Boots at the KC Starlight Amphitheater last night. Crazy show, but good performances all around, and a rare PERFECT night for an outdoor venue, couldn't have been better.  Moon over the stage, bright stars all around, and, thank whoever, very little breeze with the cool temps!! People who live in the Midwest KNOW what I mean........

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: Theatre
« Reply #872 on: October 07, 2017, 12:07:20 PM »
^^^

I like the movie, but have not seen the stage version.

(The original movie came out the same year as Brokeback Mountain.)


Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: Theatre
« Reply #873 on: October 07, 2017, 12:10:07 PM »

I saw a recorded copy of Hello, Dolly!, with Bette Midler as Dolly.  The show is so ubiquitous to me that it's hard to get worked up about another version, but it's still really good. I don't know where a friend of mine got this copy of it.

Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: Theatre
« Reply #874 on: October 07, 2017, 12:34:55 PM »

NYC is hosting "Elsie Fest" in Central Park.

It's a concert that stars a number of Broadway performers, singing show tunes from the plays they are in, as well as songs from other plays.

One of the main performers is Darren Criss, who earned fame from his role in Glee.


Here is one of the songs he'll be performing at Elsie Fest.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e78hgMokz2I

Offline Sara B

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Re: Theatre
« Reply #875 on: February 24, 2018, 02:09:44 AM »
(Also posted in Gay Cinema)

This week I watched in the cinema a performance from a London theatre of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, which I last saw as the Taylor/Newman film when I was a student (which very much played down the theme of homosexuality).
I was in the end a little disappointed, partly because it was so noisy. Every time a child appeared it was screaming, and thereís was so much shouting in shrill Southern accents - I donít know how genuine as most of the cast was British, though Sienna Miller was an excellent Maggie. Also I didnít like the set, which was not even trying to look like the home of an extremely wealthy man, with no chairs or even a table for Brick's bourbon bottles and ice. It got more and more messy and cluttered as the play went on, presumably mirroring the dysfunctional family. There was however a working shower, under which a totally naked and progressively drunk Brick (Jack O'Connell) stood or sat for long periods.
Is Brick gay/bi? It was left open. His love for Skipper, the one good thing in his life that he clings to, could have been platonic. But his intense disgust at hints that it wasnít, perhaps indicates that his feelings were more than that?
But I was finally left a little unsatisfied. I think I was expecting more revelations and at least some resolution, though admittedly that would realistically be hard to find. Anyway, glad I saw it. I must read the play again sometime.
There were only the two of them on the mountain flying in the euphoric, bitter air, looking down on the hawk's back and the crawling lights of vehicles on the plain below, suspended above ordinary affairs....

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: Theatre
« Reply #876 on: February 24, 2018, 08:47:29 AM »

I have a friend who saw this the other night and he was telling me about it.  He's seen the stage version a couple other times, too, one was with Kathleen Turner.

He was of two minds about this one. He's told me he doesn't really like the play, but that this was the first time he really understood it. I believe he said it was the direction he liked. He did not, though, like most of the cast, particularly Big Mama. He thought most of the accents weren't up to par.  Becasue of what he said I asked, "Well, then, how were the no-neck monsters?"  He laughed a bit and said, they were actually on stage this time, most of the time you just hear then from off stage."

I have only ever seen the movie a few times and I love the first half, but always dislike the second half. Sara, you say the question of whether he was gay or not was left open. That seems really odd to me. Only because it doesn't seem to me Tennessee WIlliams would have wanted it that way. Too bad we could never have seen T.W. write an explicitly gay role for someone because of the times he was living in.

Also, and this is probably just me, but Jack O'Connell has tattoo's and I don't feel that character would ever have a tattoo. Even Williams' sailor in The Rose Tattoo does not. (THough someone else does.)

By the way, I think The Rose "Tattoo" (LOL!) needs to be revived more than Glass Menagerie or Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. It's such a marvelous play, the issues of sex, are dealt with so much more realistically than other 1950's plays are. I love the movie, but always felt it should've been filmed in color. The setting is so important and well, with a color in the title...!

I was watching a retro channel recently which was showing a variety show from the 60's. They did a short sketch talking about Tennessee Williams having gone missing for several days and no one knew where he was. (Like Agatha Christie was missing that one time?) Does anyone know or remember what that was all about. The sketch concluded when they were going to interview the man who found him and the interviewer asked the man, "How did you find Mr. WIlliams?" and the man replies, "Absolutely delightful!"  Heh!

Shall I also write a little snippet about Tennessee Williams?  I have an acquaintance named Bobby, much younger than I, and when I knew him (he moved away from L.A. many moons ago) he was young and pretty and smart and could play the piano so beautifully...  He had a vacation once and went to the Florida Keys.  He was in a gay bar one afternoon and it wasn't that crowded. There was a piano in the place and he asked the bartender if he could play it for a little while and he did. After awhile what he described as "this old man" sat on the bench beside me and started babbling and hitting on me. After a bit Bobby excused himself and went back to the bar and ordered another of whatever he was having. The bartender said when he brought Bobby his drink, "Hey, do you know who that was you were talking to?" Bobby said "no".
The bartender winked and said, "Tennessee Williams."  (!)

Offline Sara B

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Re: Theatre
« Reply #877 on: February 25, 2018, 11:18:27 AM »
I have a friend who saw this the other night and he was telling me about it.  He's seen the stage version a couple other times, too, one was with Kathleen Turner.

He was of two minds about this one. He's told me he doesn't really like the play, but that this was the first time he really understood it. I believe he said it was the direction he liked. He did not, though, like most of the cast, particularly Big Mama. He thought most of the accents weren't up to par.  Becasue of what he said I asked, "Well, then, how were the no-neck monsters?"  He laughed a bit and said, they were actually on stage this time, most of the time you just hear then from off stage."

I have only ever seen the movie a few times and I love the first half, but always dislike the second half. Sara, you say the question of whether he was gay or not was left open. That seems really odd to me. Only because it doesn't seem to me Tennessee WIlliams would have wanted it that way. Too bad we could never have seen T.W. write an explicitly gay role for someone because of the times he was living in.

Also, and this is probably just me, but Jack O'Connell has tattoos and I don't feel that character would ever have a tattoo. Even Williams' sailor in The Rose Tattoo does not. (Though someone else does.)


I was interested to hear your friend's reactions, Lyle. I was going to go with a friend but she couldn’t make it, so I had no one to discuss it with...

The cast: Sienna Miller was very good, I thought, and Jack O'Connell did pretty well too (nice body, but I agree about the tattoos, which were quite extensive and presumably meaningful, but why a large cross?). It’s a difficult part really, so much of the time not reacting to Maggie, and grading the degree of drunkenness until the final "click". I’d like to see Paul Newman in it again - it’s so long since I saw it - and also to notice what had been omitted for the film version.

I actually thought Big Mama was good, but she looked much too young to be the mother of the two men. Mae's voice was excruciating, and quite hard to hear.

About Brick being gay - if you took his words at their face value then it would be possible to accept that he wasn’t, that, as he said, his relationship with Skipper never went beyond a handclasp between beds or a manly hug, and that his extreme disgust at the innuendos was because his pure affection for Skipper was being defiled. But of course the disgust is more likely to have been against his own forbidden feelings, and also at Maggie for trying to seduce Skipper.

Yes, I do wonder how good a play it is. Most of the characters are hard to feel empathy with and the whole situation seems hopeless. I think I was expecting more revelations which didn’t come, and in the end I was slightly inclined to think, so what? (I agree about the first act being more interesting.) But I did enjoy it on the whole.

I like your TW stories. :)
There were only the two of them on the mountain flying in the euphoric, bitter air, looking down on the hawk's back and the crawling lights of vehicles on the plain below, suspended above ordinary affairs....

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: Theatre
« Reply #878 on: February 25, 2018, 11:31:45 AM »

Thanks, Sara!

Jack O'Connell did pretty well too (nice body, but I agree about the tattoos, which were quite extensive and presumably meaningful, but why a large cross?).

You know, my friend (on the phone) was telling me who was in this production and he said Jack O'Donnell and I asked him if it was the actor in Angelina Jolie's film UNBROKEN, but he hadn't seen it. There was another Irish prison movie I saw the actor in, but couldn't remember the name of it, so I just said "Did he have tattoo's?" My friend said yes.  I said that because I believe Jack O. has tattoo's and perhaps they just hired him knowing that and those weren't really indicative of anything to do with the character of Brick. They just let it be that way.

I just wrote on the movie thread about a movie I saw last night, 5 Against the House. The character played by Brian Keith is named Brick. The youngest boy on the series THE MIDDLE is named Brick. I've never heard anyone in real life named Brick, have you?


Offline Sara B

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Re: Theatre
« Reply #879 on: February 25, 2018, 12:24:07 PM »
Just googled Jack O'D (hadnít come across him before) and the tattoos are his. Pity. Also he doesnít have very nice teeth!

Also saw that he was on the Graham Norton Show, where there was a large closeup of a (fake) tattoo on his bum.
There were only the two of them on the mountain flying in the euphoric, bitter air, looking down on the hawk's back and the crawling lights of vehicles on the plain below, suspended above ordinary affairs....

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: Theatre
« Reply #880 on: February 26, 2018, 10:49:13 AM »

Oh my...!

I "get" tattoos in a fringe sort of way, but how they ever got mainstream is beyond me. So many of the
handsomest guys I see walking down the street have these tattoo's that add absolutely nothing to their
personas. What are those tattoos that some get where it is writing or verse on their backs? A lot of them
look like birthmarks or some kind of scars. Tattoos aren't like jewelry that you could wear for effect and
then remove when you'd like. It's like telling someone, here, wear this shirt and you can never take it off.
I like "The Rock", Dwayne Johnson, but why tattoo half of your chest/pec? It looks absolutely ridiculous.

I also don't see why any actor would want to get a tattoo. It must eliminate roles for you in many instances.
Wouldn't you think? Remember them trying to hide Heath's tattoos in BBM? If I understood the psychology
of why people want them, maybe I'd have some different opinion, but I have never heard anyone explain it
in any meaningful way and so I don't get it.

It seems to me an upcoming generation will look at the previous generation or two that's gotten older with
all these sagging and ____ tattoo's and they will rebel and be clean as a whistle. All the places I've seen
where you can get a tattoo are near bars. There's a reason for that.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: Theatre
« Reply #881 on: February 26, 2018, 11:44:41 AM »
I also don't see why any actor would want to get a tattoo. It must eliminate roles for you in many instances.
Wouldn't you think? Remember them trying to hide Heath's tattoos in BBM? If I understood the psychology
of why people want them, maybe I'd have some different opinion, but I have never heard anyone explain it
in any meaningful way and so I don't get it.

When I saw The New World, with Colin Farrell as Capt. John Smith, you could see Farrell's tatoos. I kind of went, "N-o-o-o."

Of course, the idea of Colin Farrell as Capt. John Smith sort of boggles the mind to begin with.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2018, 01:55:48 PM by Jeff Wrangler »

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: Theatre
« Reply #882 on: February 27, 2018, 09:19:07 AM »

I'd forgotten all about The New World. I remember the first 5 minutes of that film had me thinking it was
going to be a brilliant, memorable, stunning film. Then it all went down hill from there.

That film was out at the end of 2005. It was one in a long line of movie openings that was touted as possible
Oscar potential and, one by one, all through that year, each and every one fell by the wayside leaving Brokeback
Mountain at the top of the Oscar heap. Until AMPAS went back to a mix-reviewed film from the previous May
that no one was talking about as Oscar potential and suddenly they proclaimed it a contender out of the blue.

Maybe Brokeback Mountain will be a Best Play winner!

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: Theatre
« Reply #883 on: February 27, 2018, 10:21:00 AM »
I'd forgotten all about The New World. I remember the first 5 minutes of that film had me thinking it was
going to be a brilliant, memorable, stunning film. Then it all went down hill from there.

Not to continue with something that probably doesn't belong in the Theatre thread, BUT. ...

I remember it was supposed to be a Big Deal because Terrence Malick wrote and directed.

At the time I thought that having both Colin Farrell and Christian Bale in one film was more hotness than I could bear. ...  :D  But, tattoos or no tattoos, I always found the idea of Colin Farrell as Capt. John Smith kind of weird.

Until I looked it up, I forgot that Christopher Plummer and Wes Studi were in it. Ever since I first became aware of him in The Last of the Mohicans, I have always found Wes Studi eminently watchable.

My field in graduate school was Early American History, and I thought the production values (I mean costumes, sets, and so forth) were quite good.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2018, 11:13:28 AM by Jeff Wrangler »

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: Theatre
« Reply #884 on: March 01, 2018, 11:30:57 AM »
Wow!

I don't make a habit of looking at the theater listings in The New Yorker, but I did over lunch today (March 5 issue).

I was surprised by what--or, really who--is going on right now:

Andrew Garfield, Nathan Lane, and Lee Pace in  Angels in America.

Renee Fleming (opera star) in Carousel (as Nettie Fowler).

Ed Harris, Rhea Perlman, and F. Murray Abraham in Good for Otto (by David Rabe).

Michael Cera and Chris Evans in Lobby Hero, by Kenneth Lonergan.

Glenda Jackson and Laurie Metcalfe as two of the three in Three Tall Women (won Edward Albee the Pulitzer in 1994).

Bernadette Peters and Victor Garber taking over for Bette Midler and David Hyde Pierce in Hello, Dolly!

That is a lot of high-powered talent.

(At least Dolly! they've replaced one gay as Horace Vandergelder with another gay.  :D )

(Victor Garber has a really hot husband, Rainer Andreesen, artist and international model. In the U.S. he models for either L.L. Bean or Lands' End. I always get those two confused. I should check the catalogs when I get home this evening.  :D )

ETA: It's Lands' End.  :D
« Last Edit: March 01, 2018, 06:55:16 PM by Jeff Wrangler »