The Ultimate Brokeback Forum

Author Topic: Annie Proulx  (Read 181460 times)

Offline mary

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Re: Annie Proulx's other books
« Reply #15 on: January 02, 2006, 08:43:09 PM »
She has also posted the following (including the retraction) on her website:
 
Quote
about Brokeback Mountain
 
Note on interviews:

I very much regret that the demand for interviews has overwhelmed me. I am sorry to disappoint anyone, but I can no longer neglect my regular writing work. From today, December 9, 2005, I can no longer do any interviews connected with Brokeback Mountain.

Suggested background information sources are: my biography, curriculum vitae, and Interview with Annie Proulx (The Missouri Review, vol XXII, No. 2, 1999). There is one lie in this interview where I said I had never fallen in love with any of my characters. I think I did fall in love with both Jack and Ennis, or some other strong feeling of connection which has persisted for the 8 years since the story was written. Another commentary on the Brokeback story is in the essay "Getting Movied," included in the recently published Brokeback Mountain: Story to Screenplay (Scribner, 2005), which also contains essays by Diana Ossana and Larry McMurtry.

Thanks for your interest,

Annie Proulx
 
 
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Offline mary

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Re: Annie Proulx's other books
« Reply #16 on: January 02, 2006, 09:32:49 PM »
One other question - I know I have heard that AP was disappointed in the film version of The Shipping News, but I'm not sure where I heard that or what it is based on - anyone know?  I never saw the film.
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Offline peteinportland

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Re: Annie Proulx's other books
« Reply #17 on: January 03, 2006, 03:36:22 AM »
Oh my. Annie HATED the movie version of TSN and washed her hands of it. It is one of the main reasons I've never seen the movie.

Offline happycamper

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Re: Annie Proulx's other books
« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2006, 04:47:54 AM »
Oh my. Annie HATED the movie version of TSN and washed her hands of it. It is one of the main reasons I've never seen the movie.
It's an alright movie, but doesn't capture the book AT ALL, IMHO. I loved the book though...

Offline Jack Nasty

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Re: Annie Proulx's other books
« Reply #19 on: January 07, 2006, 01:57:41 PM »
Well I am 1/2 through Close Range. I like it just fine (actually I like it a lot) but I am in agreement with most here. Brokeback Mountain seems, so far, the stand out (I read it first in the Story to Screenplay book after viewing #1). I am excited because I am not really into fiction. I love nonfiction. I am hopeful this new found joy of reading fiction will last!
FUR IS DEAD! for more inFURmation: http://www.infurmation.com/

Offline Constans

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Re: All About Annie
« Reply #20 on: January 12, 2006, 04:23:31 PM »
A bit of information about the writing of Brokeback Mountain- A few years ago, shortly after I first read the story, I listened to a lengthy interview with Annie Proulx on a BBC radio programme called 'With Great Pleasure'.  The format of this was that over an hour the guest talks about their career and plays substantial pieces of music that were important to them.  Annie talked a lot about BBM and said that, while writing the story, she played one piece of music over and over again.  This was the track 'Spiritual' from the wonderful album 'Beyond the Missouri Sky' by Charlie Haden and Pat Metheny.  I do recommend that people pick this up as it does have a wonderful resonance, listening to it and remembering this anecdote.  I was hoping they might use it in the film score, but it would probably have been too overpowering.

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Re: All About Annie
« Reply #21 on: January 13, 2006, 06:53:06 AM »
Constans -- Thank you so much for that info about Annie.  When did this interview take place?  I'm going to do some research and see if I can get the recording of the interview or a transcript.   :)
« Last Edit: January 13, 2006, 04:37:47 PM by Bobbie »

Offline Constans

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Re: All About Annie
« Reply #22 on: January 13, 2006, 03:33:30 PM »
Bobbie - Oh dear! Probably around 2000 - not long after I read the story and way before i had any idea a film was in the offing.    The series was broadcast for a few seasons on BBC Radio 3, presented by composer and presenter Michael Berkeley.  I wish I could remember more what Annie said about the composition of BBM, but I was so transfixed by the music it's all I really remember.

Offline bbbmedia

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Re: All About Annie
« Reply #23 on: January 14, 2006, 09:55:20 PM »
OK, I used to be a librarian, so I have a thing about reading books.

But I really feel the story "Brokeback Mountain" has more depth if read in the context of all 22 of Annie Proulx's Wyoming stories collected in Close Range and Bad Dirt.

Why Jack and Ennis behave the way they do makes much more sense when we see how Proulx's other Wyoming characters react to the state's wide open spaces, rugged terrain, brutal weather, limping economy, and sense of isolation from "mainstream" America.

I consider "A Lonely Coast" (in Close Range) the straight equivalent of "Brokeback." Despite all their difficulties, Jack Twist and Ennis del Mar achieve a bond of intimacy and tenderness completely unimaginable to Josanna Skiles and her slezoid boyfriend Elk Nelson.

Read both stories, and see how much more important Wyoming is in Proulx's writing than either homosexuality or heterosexuality.
What Jack remembered and craved in a way he could neither help nor understand was the time that distant summer on Brokeback when Ennis had come up behind him and pulled him close, the silent embrace satisfying some shared and sexless hunger.

Offline wjp58

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Re: All About Annie
« Reply #24 on: January 15, 2006, 03:39:49 PM »
bbbmedia --

Thanks for the suggestions.  I had heard of Annie Proulx prior to Brokeback, but have never read any of her other stories. 

I'm just bowled over by the story.  I've read it several times.  Very slowly.  Rereading every line.  It is one of the best short stories I've ever read.  Which makes it all the more amazing that Hollywood, far from butchering it, created such a great film version.

What is your take on the prologue?  And how do you think putting it in or leaving it out (in the original version published in the New Yorker) effects the story?

I just noticed.  7 posts on Annie Proulx.  5 on the also great Larry McMurtry.  1000 on the actors.  I take nothing from their excellent performances, but SHE created this thing!  Guess that's jsut a cross writers have to bear.
"There was some open space between what he knew and what he tried to believe..."

Offline sapstar

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Re: All About Annie
« Reply #25 on: January 16, 2006, 09:40:57 AM »
bbbmedia --

Thanks for the suggestions.  I had heard of Annie Proulx prior to Brokeback, but have never read any of her other stories. 

I'm just bowled over by the story.  I've read it several times.  Very slowly.  Rereading every line.  It is one of the best short stories I've ever read.  Which makes it all the more amazing that Hollywood, far from butchering it, created such a great film version.

What is your take on the prologue?  And how do you think putting it in or leaving it out (in the original version published in the New Yorker) effects the story?

I just noticed.  7 posts on Annie Proulx.  5 on the also great Larry McMurtry.  1000 on the actors.  I take nothing from their excellent performances, but SHE created this thing!  Guess that's jsut a cross writers have to bear.

Couldn't agree more with you on this wjp

Re-reading is the key to discovering new things hidden in the story.   Especially if you read it, like you mentionned, line by line, phrase by phrase, and paragraph by paragraph.    It's been 8 times now and I am still discovering things.... and still thrown against the wall (and down on the floor).


Offline Lance

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Re: All About Annie
« Reply #26 on: January 16, 2006, 01:03:07 PM »
Annie's Brokeback Mountain story is the most sparse and compressed narrative i've ever read. it takes really deep thinking and work to produce such an efficient, effective narration. i never even heard of her until Christmas night and morning of the day after. being penniless and eager, i downloaded and read the story early in the morning, and have thought of little else since. i read the story twice, got supremely lucky and was given a ticket to a sold out performance of the movie, and a ride to the theater. saw the movie for no cost to me, but received a great gift of art and feeling. based on this one story, i have to think that she is one of the greatest writers. it's a miracle that the story was translated into a movie as effective as the original story. i've never seen that happen before. it must have been because of the sheer power of the writing to pass the spirit to others.

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Re: All About Annie
« Reply #27 on: January 16, 2006, 02:55:34 PM »
Lance - Anne did indeed write an incredible piece of art which may be a catalyst for some of the greatest 'cultural' changes in my life time.

Offline Castro

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Re: All About Annie
« Reply #28 on: January 16, 2006, 03:00:48 PM »
Here's a good Proulx interview from Bookslut:
http://www.bookslut.com/features/2005_12_007310.php

She also has an interesting website (I think it's just Annieproulx.com; if that doesn't work, google will give it to you); and there's a talk, pre-movie, that I'm trying to find again.



Offline mary

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Re: All About Annie
« Reply #29 on: January 16, 2006, 09:50:36 PM »
Here's a good Proulx interview from Bookslut:
http://www.bookslut.com/features/2005_12_007310.php

She also has an interesting website (I think it's just Annieproulx.com; if that doesn't work, google will give it to you); and there's a talk, pre-movie, that I'm trying to find again.

Thanks Castro;
 One quote from her that I found very interesting :

Did you ever feel like your work might be defined by Shipping News, and now it seems there's a lot of attention being given to Brokeback Mountain? I guess it's awfully early to say, but do you think your work might be defined by Brokeback Mountain?

It's starting to look that way, yeah. It's odd, but that's how it is. Actually, that story was to be one of three or four stories about offbeat and difficult love situations, but I never wrote any of the others. I just wrote that one.

I had to get away from it. It just got too intense, and too much on my mind. That's when I wrote the book [That Old Ace in the Hole], but I may have to write the other stories just to clear my mind, as it were. And also because I conceived of that particular story as one of a set of stories. As it is right now, it stands out rather like a sore thumb in comparison to the rest of the work, so I think I have to do those other stories.


« Last Edit: January 16, 2006, 09:59:15 PM by mary »
never enough time, never enough....

Some fictional characters are less fictional than others