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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT => TV & Music => Topic started by: bubba on March 02, 2013, 08:27:52 AM

Title: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 02, 2013, 08:27:52 AM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/I-Love-Lucy-Posters_zpsac09c98a.jpg)


We have had some discussions in the TV thread about some of the older television shows.  Trying to keep that thread more on the current TV programs, some of us thought it would be a nice idea to start another thread and dedicate to some of the older well loved programs.


There have been some great ones, from the 1950's and 1960's with such classics as I Love Lucy, The Honeymooners, The Dick Van Dyke show and Bewitched.  Leave it to Beaver, My Three Sons, too many to list!

Some of the 60's TV shows carried into the 70's and then the 70's had some ground breaking television...........as they say "and then came Maude"  :D

Mary Tyler Moore continued on with a show of her own, as did Rhoda, and we can't forget Mr. Bunker.



Anyway I thought it may be fun, there are lots of links to old TV programs and I am sure everyone has their fond memories to share.  And let's not forget the cowboys and the westerns.


So I thought just to make this thread a little specific, we could discuss shows from 1950 to late 70's?


And as per the mods lets keep any pics safe for work!   But we do want pics, there are some beautiful ones out there.



Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 02, 2013, 08:51:54 AM
Lyle found a picture for your files:


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/andy-griffith-show-3007_zps2adbb858.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 02, 2013, 09:40:10 AM
Love this new thread!!!   Thank you, bubba for the idea and thank you, Chuck for setting up the thread!!!

Can't think of a better bunch of people to be on the first post than the I LOVE LUCY quartet!  Especially since this is Desi Arnaz's birthday.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 02, 2013, 09:46:26 AM
I'm reminded of a foreign language phrase book in MAD magazine way back when (before Castro), in which one of the important phrases in the Cuba section was "No, I don't want to visit Desi Arnaz's birthplace". (Another one was, "Pilot, why are we landing in rebel territory?")

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 02, 2013, 09:51:02 AM
Any way of transferring some of the discussions on the other TV thread, say from the last two days, about classic TV shows to THIS thread to keep the discussions going?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 02, 2013, 09:57:44 AM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/120912094217-movie-couples-desi-arnaz-and-lucille-ball-horizontal-gallery_zpsdcdcbc70.jpg)

Is this safe for work?


 :D


March 2, 1917 Dezi was born, I just checked.  I had no idea, I think it's a sign!!


I have been in Cuba and I never thought to go see where he was born, darn!  :D


You know the thing about shows like Andy Griffith, is they seemed like "regular folk". You could close your eyes and picture a little town like Mayberry, where they still live today in a parallel universe.


I don't mind some of the shows we have now, but it's  just not the same.    I can't drift off to sleep with thoughts of Law and Order SUV.  :-\



And yea maybe we can move our discussions over, we were having some good ones.


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 02, 2013, 10:13:30 AM
Here is a neat site:


http://www.fiftiesweb.com/tv-shows.htm


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/actor-thumb_zpsc9885c64.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on March 02, 2013, 10:14:33 AM
Love this new thread!!!   Thank you, bubba for the idea and thank you, Chuck for setting up the thread!!!


I can't take credit for setting it up, that was Bubba.  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 02, 2013, 10:31:14 AM
Oh no Chuck you guided me in the right direction, I wouldn't have known where to start!  :D


And in "The Celebrity Next Door" episode of "The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour," when Lucy pays $10 to the Mertzes to serve as her maid and butler, that's equal to $81.95 in today's dollars!  No wonder that Fred tells Ethel, "For ten bucks [Lucy] can say anything she wants to about me!"


Ricky and Lucy had way more money then the Mertze's!    The one I watched a week or so ago, Lucy and Ricky bought all new furniture and gave the Mertz's their old stuff.   Fred was a penny pincher!  :D


I was just googling to see what he did for a living - I thought he was the landlord!


It says here he was in vaudeville, was a boxer ....and owned the apartment building!

Can that be right?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Mertz
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on March 02, 2013, 10:38:14 AM
I was just googling to see what he did for a living - I thought he was the landlord!


It says here he was in vaudeville, was a boxer ....and owned the apartment building!

Can that be right?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Mertz


I wasn't a regular watcher of I Love Lucy, but I do remember episodes where Fred talked about his boxing.  I was never sure if the Mertzs were the landlords or building owners.   There were also episodes where The Copacabana did "Vaudeville Nights" and Fred & Ethel came "out of retirement" and would perform at The Copacabana with Ricky.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 02, 2013, 10:56:09 AM
Owning a brownstone in New York, Fred would be worth knowing!  :D

(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/freddrag_zps81b7b8c2.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 02, 2013, 11:20:50 AM
The Mertzes were retired vaudevillians who bought the apartment building as an investment after leaving show business and managed the building as well as owned it.  Fred was part of an act called Mertz and Kurtz but I got the impression that Kurtz left and that's when Mrs. Mertz--Ethel--teamed up with Fred.  The Mertzes were the Ricardos' best friends, landlords, and (as of episode #61, "The Ricardos Change Apartments", May 18, 1953) down-the-hall neighbors.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 02, 2013, 11:32:03 AM
So when they all moved to Conneticut (the country) wonder if Fred was suppose to have sold the building?  Loved those episodes, remember the chickens?   :D



Last Sunday I stumbled on an episode of I Love Lucy that I don't recall ever having seen before. It was one of the "Connecticut" episodes. The Ricardos, the Mertzes, and the Ramseys (neighbors) all went to a dance at the country club. To the annoyance of their wives, the men were all gaga over a pretty young thing. The pretty young thing was played by Barbara Eden, in one of her earliest TV roles.


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/1620-6-25_zps9d36e92c.jpg)


Just found this pic!


http://trakt.tv/show/i-love-lucy/season/6/episode/25
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 02, 2013, 11:41:45 AM
No, Fred still owned the building.  Mrs. Trumbull's sister moved in to manage it.

I do remember the chicken episode.  Hilarious.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 02, 2013, 11:44:26 AM
oops we posted at the same time!!   So it sounds like Fred had some money, he was just a penny pincher!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 02, 2013, 04:30:47 PM
I wasn't a regular watcher of I Love Lucy, but I do remember episodes where Fred talked about his boxing.  I was never sure if the Mertzs were the landlords or building owners.   There were also episodes where The Copacabana did "Vaudeville Nights" and Fred & Ethel came "out of retirement" and would perform at The Copacabana with Ricky.

You're channeling Barry Manilow, Sweetheart.  :D  :-* Ricky performed at a club called the Tropicana (just like the orange juice brand  ::) ), and then later he opened his own place, Club Babaloo.

But that's all right. You're way too young to remember any of this. (Pats Chuckie on the head. ...)  :D  :-*
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 02, 2013, 04:38:31 PM
Tell you what, we've mentioned the death of Bonnie Franklin, but this week we lost another veteran of Classic TV, in this case, Westerns. Dale Robertson, of Tales of Wells, Fargo and Iron Horse, passed away on Wednesday at age 89.

Last year a dear friend recorded a whole bunch of episodes of Iron Horse for me. The second lead on the show was the late Gary Collins, and one of the episodes had as a guest Mary Ann Mobley (aka Mrs. Gary Collins, though I don't know if they were married yet when she appeared on the show). Later episodes included, as a regular, an actress who went on to a highly respected career, a certain Ellen McCrae, better known as Ellen Burstyn.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on March 02, 2013, 04:47:28 PM
I knew he had some sort of club.  LOL

As for The Copacabana.......that's not just a Barry Manilow song.  There was a very popular club in NYC named "The Copacabana"  (Copa for short) that was a place that many Latin, disco and freestyle acts performed.  I've been there a few times, pretty cool place.



(http://www.showtimeny.com/Copacabana/Copacabana%20Collage.jpg)


At least I was right about the Mertzs.  :D :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 02, 2013, 05:04:48 PM
I just told my Mother in law about Dale, now she is upset!  :D   We are losing all the older ones..    THAT club looks amazing, we have nothing like that around here.  Heck we have nothing like the Club Babaloo.    

Ricky could play those bongo's couldn't he?  


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rAV3bOJaQuY


Now I feel like listening to some Cuban Pete!



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5nMrIjBBov8
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 02, 2013, 05:13:28 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/gunsmoke-cast_zps16d35271.jpg)


Was anyone a fan of Gunsmoke, that show ran for 20 years!  :o


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/ARNESS-WEAVER-Gunsmoke_zps055b7ee4.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 02, 2013, 05:21:05 PM
Oh yeah! The radio version too.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 02, 2013, 06:25:38 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/gunsmoke-cast_zps16d35271.jpg)


Was anyone a fan of Gunsmoke, that show ran for 20 years!  :o


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/ARNESS-WEAVER-Gunsmoke_zps055b7ee4.jpg)

I don't remember the Dennis Weaver years of Gunsmoke (though I remember him as McCloud), but in my adolescence, when the show aired on Mondays, we never missed it. I don't remember Burt Reynolds in the show, either, though I know he played a half-breed blacksmith named Quint Aspers.

And I remember being shocked and saddened when Amanda Blake died of AIDs.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: suelyblu on March 02, 2013, 08:07:55 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/gunsmoke-cast_zps16d35271.jpg)


Was anyone a fan of Gunsmoke, that show ran for 20 years!  :o


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/ARNESS-WEAVER-Gunsmoke_zps055b7ee4.jpg)

It's still being shown here in the UK !! Monday afternoons 12.30pm on TCM. two episodes at a time !!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 08:30:29 AM
Well it spanned so many years I am not sure if any of us could have even seen them all.  Maybe some saw it when it was first on, some the middle and me probably more the end.   I have no idea it was on radio Fritz, I just checked and it looks like it ran for 10 years on the radio.

Starring    James Arness
Milburn Stone
Amanda Blake (Seasons 1-19)
Dennis Weaver (Seasons 1-9)
Ken Curtis (Seasons 9-20)
Burt Reynolds (Seasons 8-10)
Buck Taylor (Seasons 13-20)
Glenn Strange (Seasons 7-18)
Roger Ewing (Seasons 11-12)


And I had no idea Amanda died of AIDS, I always thought she died of cancer??

I love Westerns I always have, Ponderosa was another favourite - The Cartwright boys,


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/bonanza_zpsc353b19a.jpg)


Fine looking bunch of fellas.






Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 03, 2013, 10:06:22 AM
Oh, Adam...

What a crush I had on him...
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 10:16:18 AM
He really was a nice looking guy, but my heart belonged to Little Joe!  ;)   I actually did go on to enjoy Pernell in Trapper John though.


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/adam2122_zps6001a51a.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 10:17:19 AM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/gallery_3_263_12247_zpse69cc3f6.jpg)

One more for you Lyle.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 03, 2013, 10:28:31 AM
Yes, Gunsmoke was on radio! I still listen to it with people in the Diner on a show called the Big Broadcast on Sunday nights at 8 pm Eastern. It's still good!

Yes, my crush was on Little Joe too!

But my all time crush was on Kirby Grant in Sky King when I was little, and later on on Don Grady in My Three Sons.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 11:12:57 AM
I had never heard of Sky King Fritz.   I definitely had a crush on Don Grady (Robby) I was sorry to hear of his passing.

And I followed Michael Landon from Little Joe to Pa Ingalls, Highway to Heaven - I feel like he never left my TV.  Another one taken from us too soon.  :'(



(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/Vintage-TV-collage_zps8b353ddd.jpg)


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 11:15:21 AM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/bewitched_zps26fafaa5.jpg)


Tabitha was just too cute!  :D


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/Bewitched2_zpsf737246e.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 03, 2013, 11:54:46 AM
My first post, finally, on this thread is going to be about ADAM-12, which
premiered in 1968. It is currently showing on the Antenna-TV network,
usually alongside Dragnet. A friend and I have been watching it, mostly
on the weekend airings, and talking about it a bit.

So, when I was young and this show came on Saturday nights, I had a crush
on one of those officers, Kent McCord.

                               (http://tvseriesfinale.com/assets/adam1210m.jpg)

Lately he's been active in the SAG, he might've even been President of it for awhile.
When I worked at Virgin Megastore he came in once when it was quite empty and
I talked to him for a bit.  And the guy looks just about the same as he did in 1968,
whereas I now look older than he does!  ($%&#!)  At the time, I had just recently
seen an episode of Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In where he and Martin Milner were doing
some jokes as their Adam-12 personas and I mentioned to him that I had just seen that.
He was very nice. And I felt my crush coming back! I almost, really--a l m o s t told him
that I had had a crush on him way back when. I wish I had now.

Sigh.

And having watched many of these lately I'm finding Martin Milner was quite appaling, too.

He was also a regular on Route 66 with George Chakiris, but I have never seen much of that show.
By the way, I also used to see George Chakiris at my other job I had. George Chakiris is gay, if you
believe renting gay porn -- a lot -- is a good indication.

Some other gay tv stars of yesteryear that I met will probably get mentioned if we bring up their
shows here. We should keep a running tally!  Heh!

We could start with Bewitched for several right off the bat, lol!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 03, 2013, 12:11:41 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/Vintage-TV-collage_zps8b353ddd.jpg)

This collage is great, except maybe for Alf being in it, lol.  I love the little touch
of putting the Have Gun, Will Travel business card in it!

I love the Christmas photos you posted, too, of Bonanza and Bewitched, where did you find those?
I haven't seen those before!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 03, 2013, 12:20:39 PM

As for westerns, I can't say I'm a huge fan of them, but anyone watching
TV in the 60's watched them becasue there were so many on. I always had
my eye on Doug McCLure in The Virginian, though.

(http://imgc.allpostersimages.com/images/P-473-488-90/54/5487/MVQKG00Z/posters/doug-mcclure-the-virginian.jpg)

I always liked him better as a sailor in WWII movies, however!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 03, 2013, 12:23:18 PM
(http://www.davidmacklin.com/images/Virg%20DE%20me%20dug%20looking%20out.JPG)

The actor on the right is someone named David Macklin. He has a website and
is still promoting himself all over the place!  Good for him!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 12:24:27 PM
I just googled "classic tv" and so many Christmas ones come up - I will post some more.

I do love the collage, but yea what is with ALF?  :D


As for Kent McCord, get in line honey.   I thought he was adorable and yea he is still is.   How cool that you met him!  I think I would have told him about your crush.  :-*

http://kentmccord.com/gallery/index.html


And I think we should talk about the classic TV stars of old who "came out".


And yea Daren #2 for sure!  Funny I felt like there was zero chemistry between Samantha and second Daren, compared to first Daren.   And then when I found out he was gay, I thought ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh I see.


Of course that didn't hold true for McMillan and Wife, I thought they had incredible chemistry.   Are we "sure" Rock was gay?  :D



I am beginning to see all my crushes came from old TV shows, I think it stared with Dr. Kildaire, Richard Chamberlin.  
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 12:26:48 PM
As for westerns, I can't say I'm a huge fan of them, but anyone watching
TV in the 60's watched them becasue there were so many on. I always had
my eye on Doug McCLure in The Virginian, though.

(http://imgc.allpostersimages.com/images/P-473-488-90/54/5487/MVQKG00Z/posters/doug-mcclure-the-virginian.jpg)

I always liked him better as a sailor in WWII movies, however!


How adorable was he??  And married five times, wonder what he was looking for?  ::)  And he died so young, just terrible.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 03, 2013, 12:29:34 PM

I was friends for a time with a guy named Dean Jones. (Not that
Dean Jones.) And he resembled Doug McClure quite a bit only he
was even more good looking!  I told him once I had a thing for
Doug McClure and imagine my surprise when he told me that
he was friends with Doug McClure's daughter!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 03, 2013, 12:33:24 PM
Having watched many of these lately I'm finding Martin Milner was quite appaling, too.

Sorry, Martin. I meant "appealing" of course!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 12:35:09 PM
 :D :D  What are the chances of that?


I just thought of another one Robert Reed, Mr. and Mrs. Brady, didn't they seem perfect together?


Here is some great pics:

http://www.listal.com/list/hotties-from-1960s-television


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 03, 2013, 12:37:51 PM


He was also a regular on Route 66 with George Chakiris, but I have never seen much of that show.
By the way, I also used to see George Chakiris at my other job I had. George Chakiris is gay, if you
believe renting gay porn -- a lot -- is a good indication.

Some other gay tv stars of yesteryear that I met will probably get mentioned if we bring up their
shows here. We should keep a running tally!  Heh!

We could start with Bewitched for several right off the bat, lol!



Oh Lyle...

It was George MAHARIS who co-starred with Martin Milner, not West Side Story's George CHAKIRIS!

Are you sure YOU'RE gay?

I thought Maharis and Milner's other TV partner, Kent McCord, were just dreamy!

Not Milner, though.  Blah.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 03, 2013, 12:51:00 PM
Sorry, Martin. I meant "appealing" of course!

Kinda figured that's what you meant!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 03, 2013, 12:55:38 PM

Oh Lyle...

It was George MAHARIS who co-starred with Martin Milner, not West Side Story's George CHAKIRIS!

Yes, I meant Maharis, not Chakiris, although I did meet George Chakiris there, too, when
he was doing The King and I in a theatre in Long Beach. (I was supposed to see that, too,
but a friend couldn't make it and we had to reschedule and it was sold out and we didn't.

Quote
when he was doing The King and I in a theatre in Long Beach.

I wish!

Are you sure YOU'RE gay?

   Duh.

I thought Maharis and Milner's other TV partner, Kent McCord, were just dreamy!
Not Milner, though.  Blah.

Take another look!
(http://farm8.static.flickr.com/7162/6638446229_e197e45b9a.jpg)
I mean, look away, or?
Though he is 82 now!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 01:00:22 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/skyking1280x1024_zps3d501f69.jpg)


for Fritz!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 03, 2013, 01:01:02 PM
Yep! Kirby Grant was gorgeous!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 01:03:15 PM



Not bad and the show looks like a great premise!



And since the loin cloth was started! :D


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/tarzan1280x1024_zps0cfe3fba.jpg)


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 01:05:57 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/flipper1280x1024_zpsf06ce6a0.jpg)

This show started my life long obsession with Dolphins!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 01:08:05 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/lassie1280x1024_zpsc54defb6.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 03, 2013, 01:41:02 PM

Isn't that Tarzan one all from movies?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 03, 2013, 01:52:13 PM
I know I'm way behind, here, so I'll just comment.

Great selection of Bonanza photos! Thanks! I just ... barely ... remember Pernell Roberts as Adam, but we regularly watched Trapper John, M.D., on Sunday nights--though by then Gregory Harrison was the resident hunk. ...  ::)

Kent McCord? OMG! Thud!  ;D

Every once in a while I'll stumble on an Adam 12 episode on one of the nostalgia stations, and also an episode of Dragnet, and every once in a great while Officer Reed or Officer Malloy will make a brief appearance on Dragnet! (At least, I'm sure I saw Reed, once, so I'm assuming Malloy did, too.)

Which reminds me that I could never quite get used to Officer Bill Gannon as Col. Sherman Potter. ...  ;)  :D

Anyone who wants to see Martin Milner as a teenager, watch Life With Father (which is a wonderful, gently amusing old movie; I highly recommend it!)

Doug McClure was another real hunk.

The more old episodes of Wagon Train that I see, the more convinced I am that Robert Horton epitomized manliness. ...

George Chakiris, George Maharis. ... Both gorgeous. (I'm confused, though. Which one rented the gay porn? Either one, I would have gladly taken matters in hand for him, or whatever. ...  ::) )

And those "Georges" remind me of another "George" I always liked who left us too soon: Christopher George.  :(
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 03, 2013, 02:12:09 PM
This show [Flipper] started my life long obsession with Dolphins!

At the time I think I was more interested in Luke Halpin:

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d2/Luke_Halpin_publicity_photo.jpg)
(http://blogasnoruscom.ipage.com/mycomputer/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/1176691057_3.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 02:15:29 PM
Isn't that Tarzan one all from movies?


I don't know, it said it was TV.  But honestly I barely remember Tarzan on TV - although I know I watched it.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 02:21:58 PM


And those "Georges" remind me of another "George" I always liked who left us too soon: Christopher George.  :(


I remember Christoper George (Rat Patrol right?) married to Linda Day George.  He died of a heart attack, so sad!


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/3722257532_e170d4d15c_zps46ca0747.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 03, 2013, 02:22:17 PM
You know, I just got this horrible feeling. There are way too many pictures online of Luke Halpin than one
would think, seeing as how he didn't do anything of the sort of Flipper fame afterwards, and most of them
are shirtless and kinda sorta suggestive and the like and I get the feeling there are a lot of pedophiles who've
posted them. Maybe I shouldn't say that, but I don't see how it wouldn't at least cross one's mind if you
saw them all. Or maybe I've been watching too many Dr. Phil's lately.

This is an example of some of them:
(http://content7.flixster.com/photo/12/97/54/12975417_ori.jpg)(http://www.cpps90.com/Luke/images/16/166510ba.jpg)(http://content7.flixster.com/photo/14/10/52/14105217_ori.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 03, 2013, 02:26:42 PM
My favorite Tarzan was Mike Henry, the hairiest and hunkiest!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQVWvGSKHCI

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 03, 2013, 02:27:27 PM
George Chakiris, George Maharis. ... Both gorgeous. (I'm confused, though. Which one rented the gay porn? Either one, I would have gladly taken matters in hand for him, or whatever. ...  ::) )

George Maharis, I don't remember what George Chakiris was doing, probably the same thing!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 02:30:07 PM



Oh that kid would be a pedophiles dream!  :-\


My favourite Tarzan:


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/JohnnyWeismuller_zps2217111b.jpg)



I still have nightmares about the Twilight Zone!


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/twilight_zone1280x1024_zps6d4538a4.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 02:36:27 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/a829618b-3864-4888-9317-28f2f75fbc1c_zpsd717adeb.gif)

 ::)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 02:41:27 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/04cb44c4-310e-4014-9045-8de7f0c834c3_zpse0268cc1.jpg)


Was he ever on TV, let's just say yes!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 03, 2013, 02:43:29 PM
I like the later FLIPPER episodes, when Luke had matured into a teenager.  He and Brian Kelly were full of eye appeal.

Bud, played by Tommy Norden, used to irritate me because he was a simp and to boot, sounded like he was from Brooklyn and always pronounced Flipper as "Flippa!"
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 02:53:58 PM



FLIPPA!!  :D


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/2603dc01-ecb0-4f93-b511-8067c31eea45_zps1c3c5182.jpg)


Nice pic of Roddy, he was in Twilight Zone and Night Gallery (another good show).

Those two shows had great guest stars, people who would go on to be quite famous.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 03, 2013, 03:00:04 PM
My brother is a big TZ fan.  For his birthday I gave him a "best of" the show DVD and it does have many of the best ones!  Some of my favorites on that DVD set are "The Invaders" with Agnes Moorehead and "Two" with Elizabeth Montgomery and Charles Bronson.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 03:08:14 PM
http://www.ranker.com/list/guest-stars-on-the-twilight-zone/general_crack?page=1

Check out this list!   WOW
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 03, 2013, 03:30:05 PM
I like the later FLIPPER episodes, when Luke had matured into a teenager.  He and Brian Kelly were full of eye appeal.

Brian Kelly used to appear on a game show quite frequently that I watched
when I'd get home from school. (You Don't Say.) I remember he had very
hairy and big arms. (He never wore a suit, just his same kind of Flipper shirt he
wore on the show.)

I looked it up and Luke Halpin is now 66!  Yikes!

So on Flipper he would've been 17 when it started in 1964, right?
Wonder what he looks like now?

***

Okay, I found a pic, but I don't know when it was actually taken. Growing, growing, grown.
(http://www.nndb.com/people/226/000067025/halp15-sized.jpg)(http://www.genesiscreations.biz/i/luke_halpin_picture02.jpg)(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_BjA9HB5RzRc/TMUjeZPKA_I/AAAAAAAAFVo/rpEy5ugTz4A/s1600/Luke+Halpin1+(Medium).jpg)

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 03, 2013, 03:35:24 PM
Bud, played by Tommy Norden, used to irritate me because he was a simp and to boot, sounded like he was from Brooklyn and always pronounced Flipper as "Flippa!"

I don't knnow where Tommy was born, but Luke was born in Queens!

Wasn't their last name Ricks?  Bud and Sandy Ricks.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 03:49:30 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/ricky-schroder-sliver-spoons-22515224-1110-1628_zps45a3d9d4.jpg)

He looks like Rick Schroder (Silver Spoons) in that first picture.  He has actually aged really well!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 03, 2013, 05:09:48 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/2603dc01-ecb0-4f93-b511-8067c31eea45_zps1c3c5182.jpg)


Nice pic of Roddy, he was in Twilight Zone and Night Gallery (another good show).

Those two shows had great guest stars, people who would go on to be quite famous.

Now, if that doesn't look like a gay couple in domestic mode! Oi!  :o
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 03, 2013, 05:13:26 PM
I don't know, it said it was TV.  But honestly I barely remember Tarzan on TV - although I know I watched it.

So did we. Ron Ely was Tarzan. And I remember the great Julie Harris doing a couple of guest spots, as a missionary.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 03, 2013, 05:21:16 PM
I looked it up and Luke Halpin is now 66!  Yikes!

So on Flipper he would've been 17 when it started in 1964, right?
Wonder what he looks like now?

***

Okay, I found a pic, but I don't know when it was actually taken. Growing, growing, grown.
(http://www.nndb.com/people/226/000067025/halp15-sized.jpg)(http://www.genesiscreations.biz/i/luke_halpin_picture02.jpg)(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_BjA9HB5RzRc/TMUjeZPKA_I/AAAAAAAAFVo/rpEy5ugTz4A/s1600/Luke+Halpin1+(Medium).jpg)

That upper right black and white photo looks like maybe around 1980? Looks sort of Magnum P.I.-ish. That period anyway.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 06:41:26 PM
Now, if that doesn't look like a gay couple in domestic mode! Oi!  :o


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/Bob_Keeshan_Hugh_Brannum_Captain_Kangaroo_1960_zps04eba80b.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 06:42:20 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/3thebeverlyhillbillies_zpsfbfcf51f.jpg)

(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/45dda021dcabf1867d51540d9ddf51a0_zpscf6aaa0f.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 06:43:22 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/batman60s_zpsa7e178e5.jpg)


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/movies_batman_through_years_adam_west_1_zps2541a023.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 06:44:26 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/12wesubu_lg_zps92e575c5.jpg)

(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/3108328-1_zps5fa21a69.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 06:45:22 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/C31_zpsd6f2953b.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on March 03, 2013, 06:57:27 PM
"December Bride" with Spring Byington and Harry Morgan and "Our Miss Brooks" with Eve Arden remain two of my favorite TV classics.
Don't know who was gay in either one but someone  >:D here will know.
Both were well written(here and there) and beautifully acted.

Also, "My Little Margie", "The Life of Riley", were excellent and original to the form. (tv sitcom)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on March 03, 2013, 07:05:42 PM
"I Married Joan" was also pretty good and a great example of TV copying a hit formula (in this case "I Love Lucy").
Nothing new, of course.  The formula copy idea came from radio and, before that, vaudeville. And before that....well,the Greeks.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 03, 2013, 07:06:00 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/ricky-schroder-sliver-spoons-22515224-1110-1628_zps45a3d9d4.jpg)

Rick Schroder (Silver Spoons)

Well, here's another picture that might be considered a pedophile's dream.  :-\
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 07:16:12 PM

I guess for anyone that way inclined, they will see something bad, where as a normal person just sees a sweet little boy! :">


http://www.briansdriveintheater.com/edfury.html


Here would be a reason to have tuned into My Little Margie (I looked that up it looked like a cute show).   This Ed Fury guy was on that and several others.  I got a kick out of those muscle bound guys that popped up in movies and TV shows in the 50's.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on March 03, 2013, 07:31:52 PM
(http://i327.photobucket.com/albums/k463/dcfmod/1-4-1.jpg)

My favorite cartoon as a kid, in two different incarnations.

Top pic is "All New Super Friends".....Superman,  Wonder Woman, Batman & Robin, Aquaman, and in the center, their trainee heros, the Wonder Twins, who were shape-shifters.  (1976-1977)

The middle pic was the next season (1977-1978) "Challenge Of The Super Friends".   Heroes were added to make the cartoon similar to Justice League, and three "ethnic" heros were added to break up the "whiteness" of the show.  However, the ethnic heros were given names that matched their ethnicity, and not their powers.  The line up was (l to r) Superman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Flash (super speed) Green Lantern (power ring) Hawkman (flight and bird-like senses), Samurai (turns into wind, and becomes invisible), Black Vulcan (electricity), Apache Chief (grow to 50 feet tall) Robin & Batman.

The last pic is from the same series, the villains, The Legion of Doom.  (l to r) Lex Luthor, Brianiac (super android), Mr. Freeze (freeze ray gun), Giganta (grows up to 50 feet tall), Bizzaro (reverse Superman), Grodd (super intelligent gorilla), Cheetah (cat like reflexes), Sinestro (yellow power ring) Riddler, Black Manta (undersea villain), Toyman (uses toys/gadgets for crimes), Scarecrow (master of fear) and Solomon Grundy (zombie super villain)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 03, 2013, 07:33:06 PM
I never liked superhero cartoons.  They aggravated my inferiority complex.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: suelyblu on March 03, 2013, 07:36:49 PM
http://www.thehighchaparral.com/chara1d.htm


I always had the hots for this guy ?   ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 07:41:08 PM
I was just thinking we haven't talked about cartoons!  I was going to mention The Flintstones and the Jetsons!


But OMG all these superhero's, we can't forget them - but now reading the names it makes me think of The Big Bang.   My husband loved the old Hercules cartoon. I was more of an Under Dog type of gal!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 03, 2013, 07:45:52 PM
http://www.thehighchaparral.com/chara1d.htm


I always had the hots for this guy ?   ;D


I just had to go look him up, he looked so familiar!



Look at all the shows he was in (scan down):


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Darrow
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on March 03, 2013, 08:47:16 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/1620-6-25_zps9d36e92c.jpg)

http://trakt.tv/show/i-love-lucy/season/6/episode/25
boy, does that remind me of marilyn monroe's dress in all about eve
(http://annyas.com/screenshots/images/1950/all-about-eve-marilyn-monroe-02.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on March 03, 2013, 08:51:09 PM
Was anyone a fan of Gunsmoke, that show ran for 20 years!  :o

my father was, which irritated the hell out of me because it was on opposite star trek!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on March 03, 2013, 08:58:30 PM
This collage is great, except maybe for Alf being in it, lol.  I love the little touch
of putting the Have Gun, Will Travel business card in it!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tgvxu8QY01s
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: suelyblu on March 04, 2013, 05:18:34 AM
::) ;D
I just had to go look him up, he looked so familiar!



Look at all the shows he was in (scan down):


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Darrow

I only ever knew him from "The High Chaparral" ! At the time he seemed "dark and exotic" to me !! Plus ...I always wanted that suede jacket he always wore ! ::) ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 04, 2013, 05:57:54 AM
He was in so many, you probably saw him in something!  His jacket!!! :D :D


 :-* Oh Jack you said Star Trek, I was a big fan of the original show - and kind of a life long obsession with William Shatner!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 04, 2013, 07:20:30 AM
I guess for anyone that way inclined, they will see something bad, where as a normal person just sees a sweet little boy! :">

Too true. Sad, isn't it?  :(

Quote
Here would be a reason to have tuned into My Little Margie (I looked that up it looked like a cute show).   This Ed Fury guy was on that and several others.  I got a kick out of those muscle bound guys that popped up in movies and TV shows in the 50's.

I believe I read somewhere that Ed Fury got his start modeling for the physique magazines that were soft-core gay porn "back in the day."

I remember watching My Little Margie in reruns. Also Pete and Gladys.  ;D

And, oh, yes, we watched The High Chaparral. It aired on Friday nights.  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 04, 2013, 07:25:46 AM
I was just thinking we haven't talked about cartoons!  I was going to mention The Flintstones and the Jetsons!

The Flintstones had some great "guest stars." Remember "Stoney Curtis" and "Ann-Margrock"?  ;D

Quote
But OMG all these superhero's, we can't forget them - but now reading the names it makes me think of The Big Bang.   My husband loved the old Hercules cartoon. I was more of an Under Dog type of gal!  :D

Two words: Mighty Mouse.  ;D

I remember once Mighty Mouse got mentioned in an episode of NCIS: LA. Kensi and Sam had to enter a suspect's home. He was gone, but there was a Mighty Mouse cartoon playing on the TV. Kensi said something about not understanding Mighty Mouse, and Sam--big, uber-muscled LL Cool J--replied, "It's the Mouse."  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 04, 2013, 07:28:29 AM
"I Married Joan" was also pretty good and a great example of TV copying a hit formula (in this case "I Love Lucy").
Nothing new, of course.  The formula copy idea came from radio and, before that, vaudeville. And before that....well,the Greeks.

I've seen a few episodes of Burns and Allen. I wish I had been around "back then." Gracie Allen was really funny.  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 04, 2013, 11:23:34 AM
gay porn, LL Cool J and mighty mouse, where do I start?  :D


The Flintstone's and all their guest stars, what a hoot!  I have to post some pictures, and remember The Way Outs?  They were like The Beatles!  :D


I never saw Burns and Allen either, all I can think about when I read about them is that he outlived her by about half a life time.  Crazy!


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 04, 2013, 12:22:39 PM
The Flintstone's and all their guest stars, what a hoot!  I have to post some pictures, and remember The Way Outs?  They were like The Beatles!  :D

And of course we all know The Flintstones was based on The Honeymooners, with Fred and Wilma Flintstone as a "modern stone-age" suburban Ralph and Alice Kramden.

I'd forgotten about the Way Outs.  ;D  Somewhere I read an opinion that The Flintstones "jumped the shark" when they brought in the Great Gazoo (voiced by Harvey Korman!). I don't necessarily agree. I was a kid. I liked it all.  ;D

Barney Rubble even sounded sort of like Ed Norton.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 04, 2013, 12:28:48 PM
Oh yea they were definitely like the Honeymooners, very much so.

I liked Kazoo as well!   They did change the voices of the characters at one point though didn't they, I seem to remember that bugging me!   :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 04, 2013, 12:34:08 PM
Did we mention Hazel yet?


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/booth-as-hazel_zps0333a348.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 04, 2013, 12:37:51 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/star_trek_the_original_series_zpseeb4bbd4.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 04, 2013, 12:39:23 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/page0_blog_entry12931-crockett-album_zpsfdaa1c9a.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 04, 2013, 03:20:59 PM
Oh yeah, I thought that Fess Parker was pretty hot, too!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 04, 2013, 04:22:34 PM
Should we sing the theme song together?   :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on March 04, 2013, 04:27:53 PM
I've seen a few episodes of Burns and Allen. I wish I had been around "back then." Gracie Allen was really funny.  :)

LOL, well in a feeble attempt to defend my dotage, let it be known that I did not see any of these during the original runs either.  :)
A local independent TV station used to run them early afternoons and on Saturday when I was a kid. 
It was, I admit, a "while ago" but I am pretty sure we had already discovered fire.

Burns and Allen was excellent and Gracie Allen was a genius.  The best part of the show was the prologue and epilogue which featured George and Gracie basically performing their old vaudeville act. 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 04, 2013, 04:34:51 PM
 :D  I know it is like saying you have seen the Wizard of Oz (which I did last night)  but I don't mean I saw it when it first came out in theatres!


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/Gracie-Allen-with-husband-George-Burns-1957_zpsefe170d2.jpg)


And I guess they were on radio as well, before the TV show!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: suelyblu on March 04, 2013, 04:49:16 PM
http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=early+pictures+from+lassie+tv+series&hl=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=WTI1UemdLdGA0AWL1oCoDA&ved=0CDgQsAQ&biw=1366&bih=667


The early TV series of "Lassie" ! I drove my Mom crazy for a dog like this !!! :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 04, 2013, 04:57:23 PM
Oh yea they were definitely like the Honeymooners, very much so.

I liked Kazoo as well!   They did change the voices of the characters at one point though didn't they, I seem to remember that bugging me!   :D

Without doing any research to check. ... I'm sure I remember that Betty Rubble got a new voice. I think she was first voiced by the incomparable Bea Benaderet (who played neighbor Blanche on Burns and Allen and then went to play Cousin Pearl Bodine [Jethro's mother] on The Beverly Hillbillies and to star as Kate Bradely on Petticoat Junction); she probably just got too busy to stay with the cartoon!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 04, 2013, 05:02:34 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/page0_blog_entry12931-crockett-album_zpsfdaa1c9a.jpg)

I wasn't here yet ::) for the real Davy Crockett craze, though I saw all the movies in rerun on the Disney program. But Fess in his other frontiersman persona, Daniel Boone, was my hero as a kid in the Sixties. I was thrilled to death when Daniel Boone was finally released on video before Fess passed. One of our local nostalgia channels is running Daniel Boone now, but it's on at 9:00 on weekday mornings, and I gotta work. ...  :(

I can sing the Daniel Boone theme song, too!  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: suelyblu on March 04, 2013, 05:05:43 PM
http://www.ioffer.com/i/circus-boy-mickey-the-monkees-dolenz-noah-beery-189602160



"Circus Boy " . Every episode wrung the tears out of you !!! :D



Sorry....but when I do find pictures of these programs.....I have to post the whole kit and caboodle !!!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 04, 2013, 05:12:22 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Flintstones


Okay here is some info on the voices on The Flintstones, now I am really confused.


As much as I loved Lassie (and wanted a collie) I loved Littlest Hobo more.  I still watch that one in re-runs.  He is a shepard and his real name was London (well there was probably more than one) anyway I loved that dog!  There was another one about a St. Bernard called George as well, really loved him as well.  The animal shows really tug at the heart strings.


 :D  And I am dying laughing here at Mickey Dolenz, I was a big Monkees fan for sure.


Do you have a PVR Jeff, they are great and only a few dollars a month, I tape everything!






Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on March 04, 2013, 05:15:24 PM
I wasn't here yet ::) for the real Davy Crockett craze,

:D
Must admit I was around for the original Davy Crockett tv show.
I have a pic of me, somewhere, in my "coon skin cap" along with the official Davy Crockett mug and dinner plate.
If I can find it, I definitely will NOT post.  ;)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 04, 2013, 05:17:29 PM
 :D  My son lives in Northern Ontario, I think he has been up there too long.  He often wears a animal fur hat!   He wears moccasins and the whole bit - it is a good look if you can pull it off. 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 04, 2013, 05:45:53 PM
Did we mention Hazel yet?


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/booth-as-hazel_zps0333a348.jpg)


I LOVE "Hazel" and Shirley Booth!  She won Emmys for the first two seasons!

I was re-watching this DVD (season 1) last weekend, in fact!  Seasons 1-4 are available on DVD and hopefully season 5 (the last one) will become available soon!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 04, 2013, 05:47:39 PM
And speaking of Hazel, those of you who love the show and the superb Ms. Booth, watch this clip--it's hysterical!

Hazel reviews Les Miserables - YouTube

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z7jeDbucjFo
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: suelyblu on March 04, 2013, 06:21:44 PM
http://www.google.co.uk/webhp?source=search_app#hl=en&sclient=psy-ab&q=pictures+of+the+lone+ranger+and+tonto&oq=stills+from+the+lone+ranger+and+&gs_l=hp.1.0.0i22.3710.15258.1.17434.16.16.0.0.0.0.266.1945.2j13j1.16.0.les%3B..0.0...1c.1.5.psy-ab.3helUM3xi1k&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&bvm=bv.43148975,d.d2k&fp=207c2cbbd37f5283&biw=1366&bih=667

Never missed an episode of this when I was a kid ! Later on when I learned that the guy who played Tonto was a real Native   American and his name was Jay Silverheels.....I was agog !!!


What was the intro ?? "With a fiery horse , the speed of light ..... something.....something and a hearty hi yo silver !" My memory fails me !!!!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 04, 2013, 06:30:19 PM
And speaking of Hazel, those of you who love the show and the superb Ms. Booth, watch this clip--it's hysterical!

Hazel reviews Les Miserables - YouTube

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z7jeDbucjFo

Oh MY GOD!  :D  Okay Les Mis is a my favourite musical of all time and I have never heard it described like that.   I haven't seen Hazel since I was a kid, it is so strange that it has always stuck in my head.  Now I know why, she is a riot.......and his face!!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 04, 2013, 06:35:35 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxIuIxqo2So


Is this the one (Lone Ranger)?


 ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 04, 2013, 06:43:59 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/8371edfc57a45042f6953f4ee4206af1_zps84642639.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: suelyblu on March 04, 2013, 06:49:59 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxIuIxqo2So


Is this the one (Lone Ranger)?


 ;D

Yup ! That's the very one ! Thanks.

Did Clayton Moore who plays the Lone Ranger.......ever do anything else.....or Jay Silverheels if it comes to that?. I could check it out on the net ....but it will give somebody else something to do !!!!! ;) ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: suelyblu on March 04, 2013, 06:51:08 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/8371edfc57a45042f6953f4ee4206af1_zps84642639.jpg)


Oh !  :-\ Yummy.....I think  :-\


 :D :D :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 04, 2013, 06:52:04 PM
http://pinterest.com/rarntgo/those-were-the-days/


Here is a neat site, it has shows and other things......and that is where I got that tasty TV dinner!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 04, 2013, 08:17:26 PM
Did Clayton Moore who plays the Lone Ranger.......ever do anything else.....or Jay Silverheels if it comes to that?. I could check it out on the net ....but it will give somebody else something to do !!!!! ;) ;D

Well, afterward, Clayton Moore made a career of appearing as the Long Ranger. Things got very nasty when the producers of the 1980 flop movie The Legend of the Lone Ranger got an injunction to stop him making appearances as TLR because, they said, they were afraid he would somehow damage their movie.  ::)

I know of at least one episode from the first season of Daniel Boone where Jay Silverheels appeared as (what else?) an Indian chief.

Easy enough to look them both up at IMDb.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 04, 2013, 08:21:01 PM
Do you have a PVR Jeff, they are great and only a few dollars a month, I tape everything!

A what?  ;D

By now it must be well more than twenty years since I last recorded anything. Last time I recorded something, people still used videotape.  ;D

No, I stopped recording stuff when I realized I was accumulating piles and piles of recordings and I never found the time to watch any of them.  :-\ 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 04, 2013, 08:28:22 PM
I have a pic of me, somewhere, in my "coon skin cap" along with the official Davy Crockett mug and dinner plate.

I wonder if it was the same outfit that brought out a similar "official" Daniel Boone set? I've seen the Daniel Boone dinner set on eBay. It included a plate, a mug, and a bowl. The plate has a picture of Daniel and Mingo; I managed to buy one of those a few years ago. The bowl had a picture of Daniel in the center, and I'm not really sure about the mug. I've only seen one picture of the full set, and it appears that maybe Yadkin was on the mug.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 04, 2013, 08:31:28 PM
A what?  ;D

By now it must be well more than twenty years since I last recorded anything. Last time I recorded something, people still used videotape.  ;D

No, I stopped recording stuff when I realized I was accumulating piles and piles of recordings and I never found the time to watch any of them.  :-\ 

Well I did too and then you were stuck with all those stupid VHS tapes.  This is great because they are stored on the TV, you record shows that are on at a time when you can't see them.  Or shows that are on when maybe you are watching something else, or you just don't have time to watch.

And if you get a bunch on there and you don't feel you will ever get to them.......you just hit delete!   ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 04, 2013, 08:43:18 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/MyFavoriteMartianBillBixbyandRayWalston_zpsfa9ce8ce.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 04, 2013, 08:45:43 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/Thunderbirds2013241056705_zps12c05000.jpg)


Any guesses on these two?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 04, 2013, 08:48:19 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/buffy-jody_zpsec78bc73.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: kathy on March 04, 2013, 08:59:12 PM
Not bad and the show looks like a great premise!

And since the loin cloth was started! :D

(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/tarzan1280x1024_zps0cfe3fba.jpg)


I always thought Johnny Weissmuller was the best Tarzan in the movies, especially the early (pre-code and other) ones.  When I was young I saw them all on TV and I loved them; he was my favorite, and so handsome.  IMO he seemed to capture the character so well, even though MGM did not stress the Lord Greystoke identity. 
Lex Barker and Gordon Scott were very good too; they had handsome men in those days to fit the parts.
 
One of my older brothers was absolutely crazy about Tarzan; one of my uncles had first editions of the Edgar Rice Burroughs' novels.  I remember being small and looking at beautiful illustrations in those books.   

kathy    :)
p.s.  the other pic of Johnny W. is with George O'Brien.  He started in the silents ("Sunrise") is such a classic and many other famous ones.  Went on to talkies in popular horse westerns; in the late '40's was in two of John Ford's films (Mr. Ford directed one of George's classic silents - "The Iron Horse" I think).  Even in the late '40's films he still was handsome and such a good actor. 

When you think of the greats in "Fort Apache" and "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon" (e.g. Duke, Hank Fonda, V. MacLaglen, etc.) George fit in with them like a glove.  What good films!  My mom loved -  and I mean love(s) - Duke Wayne forever.  Wow, all those times going to the drive-in to see him.  My daddy of course always liked him a lot, but he sure knew it was Duke for my mother.   
What happy memories - going to the drive-in to see re-releases (and others, like The Searchers) ;), and sometimes ending up in the back row; it was so packed.  I was a child when King Kong was re-released and before it went on TV (if I remember correctly).  The drive in was so packed they had to turn cars away.  Boy, was it scary... 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: kathy on March 04, 2013, 09:09:47 PM
Oh!  I can't go w/o mentioning my ever-favorite TV show Gunsmoke.  What a series - 20 years on TV.  It started off as a half-hour show and then went to an hour, first on Sat. nights (I was so young) then on Mon.nights.  I just loved it. :-*

On the Encore Western channel, they show the classic 1/2 hr. shows (called "Marshal Dillon") followed by an hour episode.  Oh, I loved that Matt Dillon; James Arness was so handsome.  And Dennis Weaver as Chester!  IMO those with Chester were the best.   
I never really took to Ken Curtis as Festus.  But I still watched Gunsmoke 'til its 20th year.

kathy     
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on March 04, 2013, 09:40:26 PM
I've seen a few episodes of Burns and Allen. I wish I had been around "back then." Gracie Allen was really funny.  :)
i loved I MARRIED JOAN.  it looks pretty simple minded now, but they worked very well together, and gracie allen had the best comedic timing i have ever seen even to this day...
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on March 04, 2013, 09:44:23 PM
Oh yeah, I thought that Fess Parker was pretty hot, too!
me too, and i had me a real coonskin cap too.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on March 04, 2013, 09:56:10 PM
i think johnny weismuller and johhny sheffield may have printed themselves on my juvenile libido.  i had to wait until the late 60's to have hair long enough to trail behinf me under water and flip back when i surfaced, and sheffield may have been young, but he was a budding hottie, as indeed he grew up to be.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 05, 2013, 05:40:46 AM
Kathy and Jack you are making me nostalgic for Tarzan!  :D  I use to say my Dad could swim like Johnny, in one end of the pool and wouldn't come up until he got to the other end (like a fish) me I sink like a rock.

And Gunsmoke, I know a few people with the DVD's maybe I should try and pick up some seasons. I know they had an anniversary edition that kind of focused on the episodes with the guest stars who went on to further fame, those would be neat to watch.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 05, 2013, 07:38:22 AM
And Gunsmoke, I know a few people with the DVD's maybe I should try and pick up some seasons. I know they had an anniversary edition that kind of focused on the episodes with the guest stars who went on to further fame, those would be neat to watch.

The whole series is available on DVD, but it ain't cheap if you want to collect it.

Anybody else watch Laredo? Lord 'a' mercy, I thought Peter Browne was handsome!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 05, 2013, 07:41:24 AM
I just thought of another one Robert Reed.

Another one lost to AIDS.  :(
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 05, 2013, 01:00:36 PM
(http://www.scifistore.com/ebay/p/K6631.jpg)

"We had dinners then."

(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/8371edfc57a45042f6953f4ee4206af1_zps84642639.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 05, 2013, 01:26:34 PM

I LOVE "Hazel" and Shirley Booth!  She won Emmys for the first two seasons!

I was re-watching this DVD (season 1) last weekend, in fact!  Seasons 1-4 are available on DVD and hopefully season 5 (the last one) will become available soon!

I, too, love Hazel.  I hadn't seen any Hazel's since they went off the air in 1966. So it was a real treat
when the first season came out on dvd a few years ago. I'd love to get the rest, but...

They have aired it on the Antenna-tv station, but when they were doing it every day I didn't watch
because I wanted to see them on dvd which is optimal.  I finally gave in and watched the last season
when they switched networks--and families! But, except for a few episodes, it's not a great season.

I believe I was the same age as the actor who played "Sport." Bobby Buntrock. Although I did not
really recognize it as such at the time, when I think back on it, I had a sizable crush on that boy!

(http://www.sitcomsonline.com/photopost/data/766/Hazel18.jpg)

Thinking about it, all my crushes I've mentioned when I was around ten were blond boys!
Bobby Buntrock, Luke Halpin, Jay North, Doug McClure!  Lol!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 05, 2013, 01:36:46 PM


Wow, Hazel was hugly popular when it premiered!

The TOP TEN Shows of 1961-1962 season.

1.  Wagon Train
2.  Bonanza
3.  Gunsmoke
4.  Hazel
5.  Perry Mason
6.  The Red Skelton Show
7.  The Andy Griffith Show
8.  Make Room for Daddy
9.  Dr. Kildare
10. Candid Camera

Even though it was on for 20 years, I never liked Gunsmoke.
I've never analyzed why, but I never liked that show. (?)
I read Dr. Kildare's first season is coming out on dvd. That
was on too late for me to stay up and see, but was so
popular that I had an official "Dr. Kildare" shirt I remember
wearing to school. (It was doctor design influence.)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 05, 2013, 01:45:01 PM
Kathy and Jack you are making me nostalgic for Tarzan!

You should never have brought up Tarzan because it's only classic TV if you're talking
about the Ron Ely tv series in the 60's! And nobody has yet! Lol!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 05, 2013, 01:53:42 PM

This thread is obviously interesting, but does anyone else find it also a bit overwhelming?
Veering from one thing to an opposite thing on a whim and then wanting to write a dozen
posts all at once? That might get old or repetitive.

Maybe we should have one genre a week, like westerns, sitcoms, sci-fi, game shows or the like.
Or one theme, like movie stars making guest appearances on series, or shows we love who had
gay actors on them (!) or favorite holiday episodes or the like.  Something like the topic of the
week used to be.

Just some ideas thrown out there. The thread is new and enjoyable, but I fear it will become
too overwhelming. So many posts have gone by all ready that I wanted to answer or talk
about and if that happens you don't really feel like going back.

ALSO:  Can the thread be moved to the TV & MUSIC section now where it's right in the line of sight!
(Hey another theme: Shows with great/favorite theme songs.)

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 05, 2013, 03:38:33 PM
I agree with you 100 percent, lets do that!


Actually I am in back in school right now and I have just been hit with a shit load of assignments, so Lyle baby, take the wheel........please!!!!   :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 05, 2013, 05:11:19 PM
If we do this then can we include shows from the 1980s, too?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 05, 2013, 05:30:12 PM
You should never have brought up Tarzan because it's only classic TV if you're talking
about the Ron Ely tv series in the 60's! And nobody has yet! Lol!

I mentioned it three days ago.  ::)

 ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 05, 2013, 05:33:19 PM
Yes you did, Jeff.  I'll vouch for you. 

Oh, Ron Ely!  Of course Tarzan is my fantasy dream figure anyway.

Fridays were so stressful as I had Ron on NBC and at the same time Robert Conrad and Ross Martin on CBS!

OK someone who can post, post a picture of that divine Wild Wild West credit sequence with the boot, etc.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 05, 2013, 05:36:58 PM
(http://www.scifistore.com/ebay/p/K6631.jpg)
I remember when Gloria Swanson guest starred on The Beverly Hillbillies. The Clampetts wanted to make a silent movie. When the head of the studio they owned protested, Mr. Drysdale said he didn't care if the Clampetts wanted to make a movie without film.  ;D The film had its world premiere at the Bijoux Theater in Bugtussel.  ;D

And I loved Swanson TV Dinners when I was a kid, loved them because they were different and therefore a treat, as was a trip to McDonald's back in those days. When I was a small boy my mother didn't have a job outside the home, so ordinarily we had a home-cooked dinner every night. So on the rare occasions when we got to eat out of little aluminum trays, I loved it! (I liked the chopped steak and gravy best.)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 05, 2013, 05:38:49 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/buffy-jody_zpsec78bc73.jpg)

Buffy and Jodie!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 05, 2013, 05:43:27 PM
Yes you did, Jeff.  I'll vouch for you.

Thank you!  :) 

Quote
Oh, Ron Ely!  Of course Tarzan is my fantasy dream figure anyway.

Fridays were so stressful as I had Ron on NBC and at the same time Robert Conrad and Ross Martin on CBS!

I guess that explains why we didn't watch Wild, Wild West at my house when I was a kid; we were watching Tarzan.  :-\

It might also be that the local TV station was an NBC affilate, and so the reception of NBC was better than the reception of CBS.  :D

Seeing as how all this was before cable, everyone we knew had an antenna on the roof, and ours was hooked up to a device we called a 'tenna-rotor, to turn the antenna for better reception!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 05, 2013, 05:45:28 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/MyFavoriteMartianBillBixbyandRayWalston_zpsfa9ce8ce.jpg)

How odd. I recognized "Uncle Martin" right away, but I didn't think that looked like Bill Bixby. Must be the camera angle.  :-\
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 05, 2013, 05:49:21 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/2603dc01-ecb0-4f93-b511-8067c31eea45_zps1c3c5182.jpg)

OK, I give up. I live in a cave. Who's that with Roddy McDowell? I'm sure I should know who he is, but I just don't recognize him.  :-\
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 05, 2013, 05:53:46 PM
I think it's Tab Hunter.

Roddy (and Bill in the picture before that) sure got better looking as they got older (and had longer hair)!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 05, 2013, 05:57:46 PM
I remember when Gloria Swanson guest starred on The Beverly Hillbillies. The Clampetts wanted to make a silent movie. When the head of the studio they owned protested, Mr. Drysdale said he didn't care if the Clampetts wanted to make a movie without film.  ;D The film had its world premiere at the Bijoux Theater in Bugtussel.  ;D

And I loved Swanson TV Dinners when I was a kid, loved them because they were different and therefore a treat, as was a trip to McDonald's back in those days. When I was a small boy my mother didn't have a job outside the home, so ordinarily we had a home-cooked dinner every night. So on the rare occasions when we got to eat out of little aluminum trays, I loved it! (I liked the chopped steak and gravy best.)


Oh, yeah!  I loved getting to have a TV dinner whenever Mama and Daddy were going out to a party or something!  It was a special treat! 

I love that episode of HILLBILLIES.  I remember how Granny was always bragging how everyone used to say that she looked like Gloria Swanson!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 05, 2013, 06:00:48 PM

Seeing as how all this was before cable, everyone we knew had an antenna on the roof, and ours was hooked up to a device we called a 'tenna-rotor, to turn the antenna for better reception!  :D


We got cable TV in our town in 1965, when I was six!  I think it was maybe ten channels but boy, did we think it was neat!

We got our first color TV complete with remote control in 1969.  A big ol' Zenith.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on March 05, 2013, 06:35:12 PM
I think it's Tab Hunter.

Roddy (and Bill in the picture before that) sure got better looking as they got older (and had longer hair)!

Speaking of Tab Hunter, yes it is him in the pic, want to see something fun?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJzsryffz5s (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJzsryffz5s)
Watch all the way through and you will get links to others.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 05, 2013, 08:55:30 PM
Speaking of Tab Hunter, yes it is him in the pic.

Thanks!  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 05, 2013, 09:01:24 PM
We got our first color TV complete with remote control in 1969.  A big ol' Zenith.

I don't remember what year we got our first color TV, but I'm sure it was some time in the late Sixties. But that's what we got, a big ol' Zenith console set. It had a real wood cabinet, too. :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on March 05, 2013, 09:04:23 PM
Real wood is always preferable. 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 06, 2013, 07:19:34 AM
Real wood is always preferable. 

Wood. Not woodie. ...  ;)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on March 06, 2013, 10:05:31 AM
Wood. Not woodie. ...  ;)
Oh.
Well, either way, the preference still applies.  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 06, 2013, 10:28:57 AM
Oh.
Well, either way, the preference still applies.  ;D

 ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 06, 2013, 12:09:33 PM
Seeing as how all this was before cable, everyone we knew had an antenna on the roof, and ours was hooked up to a device we called a 'tenna-rotor, to turn the antenna for better reception!  :D

(http://www.mediamotions.com/page6/files/page6_blog_entry4_1.jpg)

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 06, 2013, 12:22:38 PM

As for my query about narrowing the focus each week, let's hear what some
other posters think about it first.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 06, 2013, 12:30:02 PM

I'm curious about what shows people might have liked, but were only
on one season or less. The one that gets me that was cancelled after
one season is The Time Tunnel. If only--at least one more season!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 06, 2013, 12:40:31 PM
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-yEO5FqKudi0/T_iMAT9_cvI/AAAAAAAAnx0/893maUfi_Gk/s1600/timetunnel-1000-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 06, 2013, 12:49:04 PM


Oh wow strangely enough I remember that one!


I don't know about one season or less, but the original Star Trek didn't run long and look at the impact that little show had.  I mean it is unreal when you think of it.


The series was produced from 1966-67 by Desilu Productions, and by Paramount Television from 1968-69. Star Trek aired on NBC from September 8, 1966 to June 3, 1969.[2] Although this television series had the title of Star Trek, it later acquired the retronym of Star Trek: The Original Series (Star Trek: TOS or TOS) to distinguish the show within the media franchise that it began. Star Trek's Nielsen ratings while on NBC were low, and the network canceled it after three seasons and 79 episodes. Nevertheless, the show had a major influence on popular culture and it became a cult classic in broadcast syndication during the 1970s. The show eventually spawned a franchise, consisting of five additional television series, 12 theatrical films, and numerous books, games, and other products.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Trek:_The_Original_Series
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on March 06, 2013, 12:52:38 PM
here's some unpleasant news that i think belongs here...
many of you may have heard already that valerie harper, rhoda morgenstern on the MTM show and later on her spinoff, RHODA, has been diagnosed with a fatal brain cancer, and has very little time left with us.  she has had a long life, but cancer is the way most of us would prefer not to die.

farewell rhoda, bon voyage valerie...
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 06, 2013, 12:56:09 PM
WHAT I hadn't heard a thing!!   I am going to look it up right now!   :'( :'(
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 06, 2013, 01:03:55 PM
WHAT I hadn't heard a thing!!   I am going to look it up right now!   :'( :'(

Me neither. I'm very sorry to hear that.  :'(
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 06, 2013, 01:06:33 PM
I'm curious about what shows people might have liked, but were only
on one season or less. The one that gets me that was cancelled after
one season is The Time Tunnel. If only--at least one more season!

While we didn't watch it, I remember The Time Tunnel. I didn't realize it lasted only one season.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 06, 2013, 01:14:48 PM
As for my query about narrowing the focus each week, let's hear what some
other posters think about it first.

I should study on this one a little more. My initial impulse is No, but I come from a place where discussion is aloud to be a little more free-wheeling, to follow its own path, than it is here.  ::)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 06, 2013, 01:16:05 PM
http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20679526,00.html


Just went to the People site, poor Valerie Harper!


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/mary-tyler-moore-show-1_zps3abfd850.jpeg)


MTM show was a real favourite of mine (and of course Rhoda).  I hadn't gotten around to mentioning the show yet, just because it started in 1970.   I tell you at this rate Cloris Leachman will out live Mary and Valerie and she was the oldest.




It is beyond sad and even reading that article, she is still thinking of others, what an amazing woman!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 06, 2013, 04:55:30 PM

That's pretty sad news concerning Valerie Harper. A few of us get together each week
and watch several things. We went through different tv series from end to end. We
finished MTM a year ago and someone suggested we do Rhoda. I had not seen any
Rhoda's when it aired, so I didn't mind the choice. Last gathering we saw an episode
with Vivian Vance and David White (Bewitched) and it was great. I keep forgetting the
actors and actresses I still see on their old shows are a lot older than I think they are.
She is 73, as unbelievable as that might seem.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 06, 2013, 05:01:15 PM

Gary,

Did you see her playing Tallulah Bankhead on Broadway last year?
I don't recall the name of that show.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 06, 2013, 05:31:47 PM
LOOPED, Lyle.

I just missed this in tryouts at the Pasadena Playhouse in 2008.  Had the BBM showing been a week earlier I would have been in L.A. and tried to go see it.  I bet Valerie was marvelous.  I was hoping she'd tour with it but that is out of the question now.

So damn sad.  I just finished her autobiography last week.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 06, 2013, 07:42:26 PM
My daughter in law read her autobiography, she was going to lend it to me.   Remember she did that other show (after Rhoda) Valerie, then they let her go for some reason and had Sandy Duncan come in and renamed it the Hogan Family.  I see she has had a tony nomination, has been nominated and won emmy's and some golden globe nominations and a win.  Very talented lady and by all accounts a really nice person.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on March 06, 2013, 08:13:43 PM
Gary,

Did you see her playing Tallulah Bankhead on Broadway last year?
I don't recall the name of that show.

yes, as Mark posted,"Looped" and yes we saw it.  Pretty bad play but very nice performance from Ms. Harper.  She really did not capture Bankhead but, as always, her comic timing and delivery was excellent.
A better example was her performance in "Tale of the Allergist's Wife".  She replaced Linda Lavin on Broadway and took it on tour.  She was, quite simply, magnificent. 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: kathy on March 06, 2013, 10:03:45 PM
Kathy and Jack you are making me nostalgic for Tarzan!  :D  I use to say my Dad could swim like Johnny, in one end of the pool and wouldn't come up until he got to the other end (like a fish) me I sink like a rock.

And Gunsmoke, I know a few people with the DVD's maybe I should try and pick up some seasons. I know they had an anniversary edition that kind of focused on the episodes with the guest stars who went on to further fame, those would be neat to watch.


bubba, I'm so glad we made you remember both with nostalgia. Always thought Johnny was so handsome and wow what a swimmer's body he had when he was young!   I realized after I posted about Tarzan that I discussed the films and the thread is Classic TV!   Anyway, I loved Tarzan.

As for Gunsmoke, I just loved it.  Yes, there are DVDs of the series.  The first one is hard to get 'cuz Duke Wayne introduces it; my brother has it and will never part with it.  There are DVDs of the other seasons too (with at least four episodes on it) and I believe there are collections of DVDs together.  The stories are just great (both the 1/2 hour ones and hour ones).
The 50th Anniversary edition is out and is pricey but I'd love to get it.  I've tried to collect each season but haven't gotten there yet.  I really want all the ones with Chester; Dennis Weaver left the show in 1964 (darn!).  

It is such a wonderful treat to see those classic episodes; I'd love to have all of them.  I think Jim Arness' Matt Dillon is the best TV marshal I've ever seen.   Can you imagine any TV show lasting 20 years now - no way.

kathy    :)  
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 07, 2013, 05:45:28 AM
I was going to do a post about that, here is a list unreal:


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_longest-running_United_States_television_series


WOW !
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 07, 2013, 12:06:52 PM
If Hee-Haw could run for twenty-four years,
The Time Tunnel could have lasted two!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 07, 2013, 12:14:07 PM
I'm curious about what shows people might have liked, but were only
on one season or less. The one that gets me that was cancelled after
one season is The Time Tunnel. If only--at least one more season!



Here are ones that immediately come to mind:

HE & SHE, THE PRUITTS OF SOUTHAMPTON/THE PHYLLIS DILLER SHOW, and MY WORLD AND WELCOME TO IT.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 07, 2013, 12:46:50 PM

Here are ones that immediately come to mind:

HE & SHE, THE PRUITTS OF SOUTHAMPTON/THE PHYLLIS DILLER SHOW, and MY WORLD AND WELCOME TO IT.

Got canceled and then won an Emmy. Go figure.

I was just an adolescent, but I loved that show. It was my introduction to the wonderful world of James Thurber.

If Hee-Haw could run for twenty-four years, The Time Tunnel could have lasted two!

Don't overestimate the average American TV viewer--or network executive. See above re: My World and Welcome to It.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bentgyro on March 07, 2013, 12:47:30 PM
The Travels of Jaime McPheeters?
Sugarfoot?

My mother always thought that Johnny was the best Tarzan.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 07, 2013, 01:06:13 PM
Coronation Street - 50 plus years and I am still watching it.  Don't know when I started, but I have watched people actually grow up on the show.   I like that,  not like some North American shows, where one day the kid is a toddler and then the next minute he is graduating High School (played by another actor obviously).
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 07, 2013, 06:48:55 PM
Don't know when I started, but I have watched people actually grow up on the show.
I like that,  not like some North American shows, where one day the kid is a toddler and
then the next minute he is graduating High School (played by another actor obviously).

Not in the case of Doogie Howser!   :D

That's after the eighties, but I have to mention...I kept an old tv guide because it had a Lucy
Christmas themed thing in it I wantd to save and so I put it in with the Christmas decorations.
I was looking at it this year and there's a cover story about Doogie Howser (Neil Patrick Harris)
with the completely interesting title that tells us we'll find out about what kind of girls he likes
and if he's dating yet.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 07, 2013, 06:58:42 PM

Here's the cover..."but, ooh, those hollywood girls!" LOL!

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51UA-esgwAL._SL500_SS500_.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 07, 2013, 07:28:00 PM
OMG I thought I was the only one who saved old TV Guide's, I actually subscribed for years  (I kind of miss it).   I watched Doogie faithfully, I am still a big fan of NPH, he's great.


I am not sure if you saw the Oprah interview with David and Neil, but it was very interesting.   Neil dated women for years, and to quote him it was "good times".   He had sex with them and was attracted to them (to quote him) but it never quite clicked the way it should have.


And of course now he has David (and the kids) and seems very happy.   David also admitted to dating women, lots and lots of them. Sounded like he was quite a womanizer at some point.   I think he actually has 2 other children other than the 2 he has with Neil.

So technically Niel was not lying back then, he did see girls!  He was just adorable, he still is!  ;D



http://www.imdb.com/list/ClwkBTwU5ZQ/


Kind of neat, might have to move the link someplace else though!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: kathy on March 07, 2013, 08:27:37 PM
I was going to do a post about that, here is a list unreal:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_longest-running_United_States_television_series

WOW !

What a list; thanks bubba!  I'm so glad that when the list comes to Gunsmoke for 20 yrs., there is a little reference number [89] next to it.  When you go to it, an explanation comes up which tells all about its place as the longest-running prime time drama.   So interesting. 

kathy
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 08, 2013, 10:39:43 AM

 Is Law & Order considered a primetime drama?
That was on for twenty years.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 08, 2013, 10:50:15 AM
So technically Niel was not lying back then, he did see girls!

Posters have gone over this topic many times in the Gay etc. Experience section.

So, for example, was he lying to himself?  Was he pleasing society or the dozens of
interviewers who always ask little child actors: do you have a girlfriend? Would either
of them have done what they did if societal pressures were at play? Would you expect an
actor to diss their fanbase if they really did not like it--oh, I hated dating women--I doubt
it. It's often complicated and not so straight forward. Pun intended. Obviously, they didn't
like it all that much in the final analysis or they wouldn't be together today. Etc. etc. etc.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 08, 2013, 11:01:16 AM
OMG I thought I was the only one who saved old TV Guide's

There are a great deal of serious collector's out there. Some have made it a goal not only to
collect every tv guide ever issued, but every regional edition of every one! Now that's serious.
I do miss the old format--who ever thought that icon would go away?

I've seen some online sites where they sell old TV Guides. Some people give them as gifts to
those who have everything---like finding the edition for the week you were born or an anniversary
or the like.

At one time I collected over two years of them, but in my small apartment where I lived at the
time it was just too much--so I just kept the covers!  Ooops.  I have kept only a few over the years,
has anyone else?  I have one of The Monkees, Laugh-In, the one I posted above, an X-Files one that
I have no idea why I kept that one, but I liked the design of it, and several of the Fall Preview Issues.
If Time TUnnel had been on the cover I'd have kept that one, too, heh!

Trivia question: Who has appeared on the cover of TV Guide more than anyone else?
(According to my TV Guide: Fifty Years of Television book.)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 08, 2013, 11:24:31 AM
Merchandising for TV shows is not at all what it is today, but there was some.
Does anyone have any old tv-themed memorabilia from these classic tv shows?
I always loved board games, but there wasn't many people to play them with
when I was growing up.

The earliest TV related thing I can remember having is this game:
(http://s.ecrater.com/stores/80689/4b75a2bdebc4b_80689n.jpg)

I wish I still had it. I still have The Monkees board game.
(http://media.reporternews.com/media/img/photos/2011/12/13/620111213121147003_t607.JPG)

Frankly, though, most of the board games from tv series are terrible and
uninteresting games to actually play. The Monkees game is ridiculous and
one of the worst I've ever seen. Although the Car 54 game is a little bit
complicated to play, it's one of the best I ever saw.




Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 08, 2013, 11:36:15 AM

I think if you google almost any popular classic tv show plus "board game"
you'll find one!  Let me try a couple that have been mentioned recently:

(http://crystal-cdn3.crystalcommerce.com/photos/273209/large/picThe_Time_Tunnel_Game.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 08, 2013, 11:38:37 AM

For Kathy:
(http://img3.etsystatic.com/000/0/6218930/il_fullxfull.313767503.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 08, 2013, 11:43:37 AM
(http://worthopedia.s3.amazonaws.com/images/thumbnails2/1/0709/20/1_3c1ea165cd18c78d8c641522a9e09357.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 08, 2013, 11:45:15 AM
I am actually still in shock about the TV guide thing, why did I think I was the only one?  :D  And yes I loved the format, like a little book......crosswords, a little entertainment news and the guide.  Like I said I subscribed for years and years, got in every week in the mail.  And if someone died, I saved that issue.

Anyway NPH, is it possible he was just unsure about his sexuality, how sure are we when we are young?   Not everyone is the same don't forget, he talks about "the scale" on the interview with Oprah.  Some men (like Ricky Martin) admitted that he loved making love to women, but identifies as a gay male, that confuses the hell out of people.  Especially straight people.

I will be back later to discuss the classic games, love them.  I have a few!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 08, 2013, 11:50:24 AM
is it possible he was just unsure about his sexuality

Anything is possible. He's not unsure now. He says he's gay.

Quote
Some men (like Ricky Martin) admitted that he loved making love to women, but identifies as a gay male, that confuses the hell out of people.  Especially straight people.

Also, I take what these guys say with a grain of salt, because as I said, you aren't going to
want to p.o. your fan base. NPH plays a womanizer on his show after all and women adore
Ricky. You aren't going to jeopardize that.  But any other comments on this should go in
one of the Gay, Bi, Whatever section threads IMO.

Now, back to board games:

(http://cf.geekdo-images.com/images/pic413851_t.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on March 08, 2013, 11:54:36 AM
I am actually still in shock about the TV guide thing, why did I think I was the only one?  :D
In 1956 I was a Cub Scout and to earn some sort of badge one had to have a hobby or a collection or something.  I had nothing so I decided to keep,(collect), our
TV Guides which came each week in the mail.  I did so for two years.  My parents thought I was nuts in that there was nothing valuable or even interesting in keeping old TV guides. 
I still have them.  A bit over 120 dating 1956-through part of 1958. 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 08, 2013, 11:57:02 AM

I just looked up a couple, what I thought might be odd choices, but there they are!

(http://cf.geekdo-images.com/images/pic122911_t.jpg)   (http://cdn102.iofferphoto.com/img3/item/469/547/898/eHjg.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 08, 2013, 12:02:28 PM

I looked up Laugh-In. There's not specifically a Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In Game,
but there is, and I would expect nothing less, this:

(http://crystal-cdn4.crystalcommerce.com/photos/341434/large/picSqueeze_Your_Bippy.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 08, 2013, 12:12:26 PM
"My favorite" tv related toy growing up had to be this
My Favorite Martian - Martian Magic Tricks.
(http://www.myfavoritemartian.ca/mfmtrck.jpg)

Over the years, thr tricks all got lost or broken. I do wish I still
had the little plastic replica of Martin's spaceship, though.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on March 08, 2013, 12:24:20 PM

Trivia question: Who has appeared on the cover of TV Guide more than anyone else?
(According to my TV Guide: Fifty Years of Television book.)

Well, without "googling" it, I am going to say Lucille Ball.  It seems to me that I heard or read that somewhere.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 08, 2013, 12:29:23 PM
My parents thought I was nuts in that there was nothing valuable or even interesting
in keeping old TV guides.  I still have them.  A bit over 120 dating 1956-through part of 1958.

That is great! Do you ever look at them or are they in storage?

THat means you have most of these:

1/7/1956 Arthur Godfrey  
1/14/1956 Loretta Young  
1/21/1956 Lawrence Welk  
1/28/1956 Janis Paige  
2/4/1956 Judy Tyler  
2/11/1956 Perry Como  
2/18/1956 Jimmy Durante  
2/25/1956 Gisele MacKenzie  
3/3/1956 Lynn Dollar & Hal March  
3/10/1956 Frances Rafferty & Spring Byington  
3/17/1956 Maurice Evans & Lilli Palmer  
3/24/1956 Dave Garroway  
3/31/1956 Arlene Francis & John Daly  
4/7/1956 Jayne Meadows, Garry Moore & Faye Emerson  
4/14/1956 Grace Kelly  
4/21/1956 Nanette Fabray  
4/28/1956 Red Skelton  
5/5/1956 George Gobel & Mitzi Gaynor  
5/12/1956 Bernadette O'Farrell & Richard Greene  
5/19/1956 Phil Silvers & Elisabeth Fraser  
5/26/1956 Alice Lon & Lawrence Welk  
6/2/1956 Sid Caesar & Janet Blair  
6/9/1956 Patti Page  
6/16/1956 Elinor Donahue, Robert Young, Lauren Chapin & Billy Gray  
6/23/1956 Steve Allen  
6/30/1956 Bob Cummings  
7/7/1956 Lassie Photograph Garrett-Howard
7/14/1956 Gordon MacRae & Sheila MacRae  
7/21/1956 Bill Lundigan & Mary Costa  
7/28/1956 Gail Davis of Annie Oakley
8/4/1956 Jackie Cooper & Cleo (dog)  
8/11/1956 Democratic Convention Illustration
8/18/1956 GOP Convention Illustration Kramer
8/25/1956 Esther Williams  
9/1/1956 Alice Lon  
9/8/1956 Elvis Presley  
9/15/1956 Fall Preview 1956-1957 Shows  
9/22/1956 Hal March illustration Al Hirschfeld
9/29/1956 Jackie Gleason  
10/6/1956 Gale Storm  
10/13/1956 The Nelson Family  
10/20/1956 Phyllis Goodkind & Perry Como  
10/27/1956 Alfred Hitchcock  
11/3/1956 Edward R. Murrow illustration Al Hirschfeld
11/10/1956 Loretta Young Photograph Elmer Holloway
11/17/1956 Buddy Hackett  
11/24/1956 Nanette Fabray  
12/1/1956 Gracie Allen & George Burns illustration Al Hirschfeld
12/8/1956 Victor Borge  
12/15/1956 Dinah Shore  
12/22/1956 Merry Christmas  
12/29/1956 Jeannie Carson  
1/5/1957 Arthur Godfrey illustration Al Hirschfeld
1/12/1957 Lucille Ball  
1/19/1957 Jerry Lewis  
1/26/1957 Bob Hope illustration Al Hirschfeld
2/2/1957 Jane Wyman  
2/9/1957 Hugh O'Brian  
2/16/1957 Jane Wyatt & Robert Young  
2/23/1957 Charles Van Doren  
3/2/1957 Dorothy Collins & Gisele MacKenzie  
3/9/1957 Arthur Godfrey & Pat Boone  
3/16/1957 The Emmy Awards  
3/23/1957 Tennessee Ernie Ford Illustration Ernest Chiriaka
3/30/1957 Julie Andrews  
4/6/1957 Lawrence Welk Illustration Al Hirschfeld
4/13/1957 Nanette Fabray of The Kaiser Aluminum Hour in a baseball uniform (a baseball preview feature was included in this issue) Photograph Herb Ball
4/20/1957 Loretta Young  
4/27/1957 Groucho Marx Illustration Al Parker
5/4/1957 Hal March & Robert Strom  
5/11/1957 James Arness of Gunsmoke Photograph Garrett-Howard
5/18/1957 Esther Williams  
5/25/1957 Sid Caesar illustration Al Hirschfeld
6/1/1957 Ida Lupino & Howard Duff  
6/8/1957 Lassie  
6/15/1957 Red Skelton  
6/22/1957 Jack Bailey  
6/29/1957 Gale Storm  
7/6/1957 What's My Line? Illustration Al Hirschfeld
7/13/1957 Gail Davis  
7/20/1957 Julius La Rosa  
7/27/1957 Garry Moore  
8/3/1957 Cleo  
8/10/1957 Ann B. Davis & Bob Cummings  
8/17/1957 Phil Silvers Illustration Al Hirschfeld
8/24/1957 Marjorie Lord & Danny Thomas  
8/31/1957 Clint Walker of Cheyenne Photograph Warner Bros.
9/7/1957 Janette Davis & Arthur Godfrey  
9/14/1957 "Fall Preview 1957-1958 Shows, Photograph Arthur Williams
9/21/1957 Pat Boone  
9/28/1957 Gracie Allen & George Burns  
10/5/1957 Joan Caulfield  
10/12/1957 This Is The Week To Watch photo montage  
10/19/1957 Loretta Young  
10/26/1957 Peter Lawford & Phyllis Kirk  
11/2/1957 Lucille Ball Illustration Al Hirschfeld
11/9/1957 James Garner  
11/16/1957 Patti Page  
11/23/1957 Mary Martin  
11/30/1957 Alfred Hitchcock illustration Al Hirschfeld
12/7/1957 Dinah Shore Illustration Al Parker
12/14/1957 Walt Disney  
12/21/1957 Season's Greetings  
12/28/1957 Ricky Nelson of The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet Photograph John Engstead
1/4/1958 Lawrence Welk  
1/11/1958 Gisele MacKenzie  
1/18/1958 John Payne  
1/25/1958 Sid Caesar & Imogene Coca Photograph Philippe Halsman
2/1/1958 Walter Winchell  
2/8/1958 Perry King & Tab Hunter  
2/15/1958 A Great Week  
2/22/1958 Rosemary Clooney  
3/1/1958 Lassie illustration Al Hirschfeld
3/8/1958 Arthur Godfrey  
3/15/1958 Amanda Blake & James Arness  
3/22/1958 Perry Como Illustration Al Hirschfeld
3/29/1958 Tennessee Ernie Ford  
4/5/1958 Gale Storm  
4/12/1958 Hugh O'Brian illustration Al Hirschfeld
4/19/1958 Polly Bergen  
4/26/1958 Guy Williams of Zorro Photograph Dave Preston
5/3/1958 Shirley Temple  
5/10/1958 Richard Boone of Have Gun Will Travel Photograph Philippe Halsman
5/17/1958 Danny Thomas  
5/24/1958 Dick Clark  
5/31/1958 Phyllis Kirk

That's pretty impressive! The Elvis one alone would be worth a lot to a collector.
The 9/14/1957 "Fall Preview 1957-1958 Shows, Photograph Arthur Williams, is considered a standout, as well.
I just recalled it's the week my best friend was born, too!

Not that I expect you to go searching, but I have to ask, why was this the week to watch TV?
10/12/1957 This Is The Week To Watch photo montage

I'm impressed you have all these, would be great to see them!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 08, 2013, 12:41:55 PM
Well, without "googling" it, I am going to say Lucille Ball.
It seems to me that I heard or read that somewhere.

You heard or read correctly!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 08, 2013, 01:00:54 PM
Some men (like Ricky Martin) admitted that he loved making love to women, but identifies as a gay male, that confuses the hell out of people.  Especially straight people.

It confuses the hell out of me, too.  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on March 08, 2013, 01:01:36 PM

Not that I expect you to go searching, but I have to ask, why was this the week to watch TV?
10/12/1957 This Is The Week To Watch photo montage

I'm impressed you have all these, would be great to see them!

Hmm, is that the one with the black and white sort of "checkerboard" cover design?  If so, not sure why it would have been" the week" except that it might have been episode premiere week that year.  That was usually in September back then, however.  It was also a week after Sputnik threw all of us for a loop. 

My collection is currently, most of it anyway, on exhibit in the lobby of the Paley Center in NYC. Until the end of this month, I think.  It then is being packed up and sent to SFO for an 8 or 12 week exhibit in the American Airlines terminal.  Then, i don't know, back into a "hermetically sealed" mason jar I guess.  I gave it to my youngest son several years ago and he manages it.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 08, 2013, 01:04:19 PM
I think if you google almost any popular classic tv show plus "board game"
you'll find one!

I regularly see a board-game tie-in to Fess Parker's Daniel Boone on eBay. When I was a kid I had a Petticoat Junction game--something about using the Hooterville Cannonball to help Kate Bradley do her shopping--the first person back to the Shady Rest won.  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 08, 2013, 02:44:21 PM


(http://cf.geekdo-images.com/images/pic413851_t.jpg)

Lyle did you know dolphins are just gay sharks?? :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 08, 2013, 02:48:34 PM
My daughter in law is a board game fanatic (that is all her family must have done growing up) and she is a classic TV nut, and "loves" all the old game shows.  So I try to get her old TV games at yard sales and antique places.  They are usually either junky, missing bits or mint and they want a fortune for them.

She got one at the Goodwill one day, I can't even remember now what show it was.  She was so excited, it was in perfect condition and it was 2 dollars!  I think it was Family Fued with Richard Dawson.


I can't believe we have someone else with a TV guide collection, can we petition to get the old TV guide back?   Maybe with satellite and all that it wouldn't be popular??

I am going to dig mine out tonight, see what years I have.


Imagine having the I love Lucy one, when Little Ricky was born?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 08, 2013, 03:04:52 PM
My collection is currently, most of it anyway, on exhibit in the lobby of the Paley Center in NYC. Until the end of this month, I think.  It then is being packed up and sent to SFO for an 8 or 12 week exhibit in the American Airlines terminal.  Then, i don't know, back into a "hermetically sealed" mason jar I guess.  I gave it to my youngest son several years ago and he manages it.

We now have a Paley Center in Los Angeles, well, it's in Beverly Hills.
How about exhibiting it there! Heh!

http://www.paleycenter.org/visit-visitla/

That is cool that it's being seen!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 08, 2013, 03:06:38 PM
Well, without "googling" it, I am going to say Lucille Ball.  It seems to me that I heard or read that somewhere.


http://video.msnbc.msn.com/msnbc/38077612#38077612


Check it out!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 08, 2013, 03:15:32 PM
She IS The First Lady of Television.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on March 08, 2013, 04:20:02 PM
We now have a Paley Center in Los Angeles, well, it's in Beverly Hills.
How about exhibiting it there! Heh!

http://www.paleycenter.org/visit-visitla/

That is cool that it's being seen!


Yes, they were at the LA,(Beverly Hills), center in the Fall of 2010...I think.  yeah, 2010.
The collection is of the entire magazine, not the just the covers, so, in total, it is surprisingly bulky and heavy and difficult to move around. But, the museum personnel know what they are doing and take care of all of that.  The covers are fun, of course, but what i have always found interesting are the reviews, the mini-synopsis of the various shows, and most importantly, the advertising.  The ads, especially, give a rich and diverse history of the culture of the time. 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 08, 2013, 04:42:50 PM
Hope y'all enjoy having the topic here in the board where it belongs!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 08, 2013, 05:01:26 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/C31_zpsd6f2953b.jpg)

One of my absolute favorites. Always watched it every week. Dr. Zachary Smith/Jonathan Harris always irritated me.

I did not know that John Williams was one of the composers on the show.
Must of been before he got famous.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 08, 2013, 05:08:16 PM
Hadn't realized that!

And I remembered some of the stars from other series, Angela Cartwright from Make Room For Daddy (and The Sound of Music), June Lockhart from Lassie, and Guy Williams from Zorro.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 08, 2013, 05:18:14 PM
I haven't gone through the whole thread yet, but I do remember Inner Sanctum. It looks like it was only on on season, from Jan through Oct.
The opening scene always stuck with me, the creaking door opening up into a black abyss.

It was originally a radio program, then there were a couple of movies, and then the one season in TV, 39 episodes in 1954.

(http://www.nostalgiamerchant.biz/Tv%20JPEGS%20Large/Inner_Sanctum.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 08, 2013, 05:24:05 PM
Two words: Mighty Mouse.  ;D

I remember once Mighty Mouse got mentioned in an episode of NCIS: LA. Kensi and Sam had to enter a suspect's home. He was gone, but there was a Mighty Mouse cartoon playing on the TV. Kensi said something about not understanding Mighty Mouse, and Sam--big, uber-muscled LL Cool J--replied, "It's the Mouse."  ;D

Mighty Mouse

"Here he comes to save the day!"
http://youtu.be/BdIev12fCPs  (I still have this tune in my head!)

(http://api.ning.com/files/EHaB5oXttiAVOakupf2xObJm-Hl4*QxNKjrlhk6JoKwo*r5UCDkRjBof49DyU7jI42YBRS6qXpZx0zJ6MZC6rdE*5VYmWGyU/mighty_mouse.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 08, 2013, 05:26:36 PM
Yeah, some of the Mighty Mouse cartoons were downright operatic!  :D

Never knew that Inner Sanctum was on TV. I've been listening to it on Sirius XM Classic Radio when on trips.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 08, 2013, 05:29:39 PM
Yeah, some of the Mighty Mouse cartoons were downright operatic!  :D

Never knew that Inner Sanctum was on TV. I've been listening to it on Sirius XM Classic Radio when on trips.



It was just the one season, 1954, 39 Episodes. (Obviously I would have had to have seen it a few years later in reruns, because I doubt I would have remembered it at 2 yo!)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 08, 2013, 05:31:31 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/page0_blog_entry12931-crockett-album_zpsfdaa1c9a.jpg)

We always watched this!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: gwyllion on March 08, 2013, 05:34:25 PM
Hope y'all enjoy having the topic here in the board where it belongs!

Thanks for rounding them up for me, Fritz   :-*

I don't watch TV now, nor have I ever watched TV.

Oh, wait.... Lost in Space.... I've seen that before...  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 08, 2013, 05:43:33 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxIuIxqo2So


Is this the one (Lone Ranger)?


 ;D

The classical song that this theme song was based on.

"Rossini: William Tell Overture: Final".

http://youtu.be/c7O91GDWGPU

Can anyone remember other theme songs of tv shows based on classical songs?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 08, 2013, 05:53:54 PM
One of my absolute favorites. Always watched it every week. Dr. Zachary Smith/Jonathan Harris always irritated me.



I always thought Dr. Smith was a hoot.  "Oh nooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!!!"


The one who irritated me was Don West, who was always mean to Dr. Smith and acted so macho.  He was tedious and not even cute.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 08, 2013, 05:54:39 PM
Thanks for moving the thread, Fritz!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 08, 2013, 05:57:11 PM
Does anyone remember Lariat Sam and his horse, Tippy Toes?

It was a cartoon on CAPTAIN KANGAROO.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 08, 2013, 05:57:57 PM
(http://cdn102.iofferphoto.com/img3/item/469/547/898/eHjg.jpg)


Oh I loved "77 Sunset Strip".
Cookie (Edward Burns) was cute, (never had a thing for blonds) but Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. and Roger Smith.
Oh let's face it, they were all good looking!! ::)

http://youtu.be/weAIhNDn034
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 08, 2013, 06:03:30 PM
Hadn't realized that!

And I remembered some of the stars from other series, Angela Cartwright from Make Room For Daddy (and The Sound of Music), June Lockhart from Lassie, and Guy Williams from Zorro.

Yes I remember them in all those riles.

Jonathan Harris was the timid accountant Bradford Webster in the TV version of The Third Man

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 08, 2013, 06:05:16 PM

I always thought Dr. Smith was a hoot.  "Oh nooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!!!"


The one who irritated me was Don West, who was always mean to Dr. Smith and acted so macho.  He was tedious and not even cute.

Yeah, Don West was my least favorite character as well.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: suelyblu on March 08, 2013, 06:28:28 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=COsWRn0BLCA



The intro for the TV series "The Untouchables" with Robert Stack........and the fabulous narrator Walter Winchell !.

My dad would never miss an episode of this. Consequently we all watched it.
Instead of being able to quote passages from the bible.....I could list nearly all the gangsters from this era  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 08, 2013, 06:34:51 PM
The Outer Limits 1963-1965

My dad loved this show. So much in fact that it was the ONLY show we ever moved the TV into the kitchen to watch the show!

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/27/TheOuterLimits-Screenshot-old.jpg)

http://youtu.be/DY6y0zRCiOY
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: suelyblu on March 08, 2013, 06:39:09 PM
                                                          ^^^

Oh yes! I remember this well. The intro always scared me a little bit...but I couldn't not watch !!! :D
Thanks for posting this Linda.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 08, 2013, 06:40:04 PM
Oh yeah, The Outer Limits was a good one. Even spookier than The Twilight Zone in many ways.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: kathy on March 08, 2013, 06:57:28 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=COsWRn0BLCA

The intro for the TV series "The Untouchables" with Robert Stack........and the fabulous narrator Walter Winchell !.

My dad would never miss an episode of this. Consequently we all watched it.
Instead of being able to quote passages from the bible.....I could list nearly all the gangsters from this era  :D

I loved the Untouchables too.  Robert Stack was the main reason.

kathy    :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: kathy on March 08, 2013, 07:06:12 PM
For Kathy:
(http://img3.etsystatic.com/000/0/6218930/il_fullxfull.313767503.jpg)

Thanks, lyle!  I love seeing this.  I'm seriously wondering why I don't remember the game.

kathy     :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 08, 2013, 08:07:43 PM
Oh yeah, The Outer Limits was a good one. Even spookier than The Twilight Zone in many ways.



Yes it really was. So much more 'out there'!! Although, "Twilight Zone", had some really strange ones too!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 08, 2013, 08:55:12 PM
Quote
Quote from Lyle:
I saw that house on a commercial this week!  I was like, there's Samantha's house!
It didn't have the awnings on the windows. It is still on the Columbia pictures backlot
there in Burbank, but I don't see how anyone could ever use it again really! I always loved
that house, too. By the way, it's right next door to the Hazel house which was also the same
house for I Dream of Jeannie AND Gidget. The house across the street is the Partridge Family
house. Dennis the Meance's house and neighbors are down the street somehwat further.


I copied this from the "Sucky" thread, where we discussed the Stevens' house from Bewitched before the threads were split. I saw the house this evening. Twice. It was really quite funny. I saw it once on an episode of Bewitched, and then immediately again on an episode of I Dream of Jeannie, where it was the home of Dr. and Mrs. Bellows.  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on March 09, 2013, 08:03:39 AM
as my eyes passed down the list of names someone posted for something, i saw the name giselle mckenzie and had such a head rush.  i faithfully watched YOUR HIT PARADE, with giselle, snooky lanson, dorothy collins, and russell arms.  it was always a riot when a song stayed at the top of the charts for months on end, because they did a little production number for each song, and had to come up with new ways to showcase the same song week after week after week.

the show ran on tv from 1950-59, so it was the time from when i was 7 to 13.  i remember perry como songs being a big hit back then.  i'm sure others will come to me as my brain revisits the memories.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on March 09, 2013, 08:07:22 AM
Hadn't realized that!

And I remembered some of the stars from other series, Angela Cartwright from Make Room For Daddy (and The Sound of Music), June Lockhart from Lassie, and Guy Williams from Zorro.
i had kind of a crush on billy mumy.  it lasted quite a while too, as he grew up quite well.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 09, 2013, 08:42:15 AM
Hey I had a crush on Billy Mummy, I gotta go look for some pics later today!


And I remember Hit Parade, we are tapping into our subconscious mind in this post I swear!!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on March 09, 2013, 08:54:30 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMOJ94RyBDY
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 09, 2013, 09:57:23 AM
Hope y'all enjoy having the topic here in the board where it belongs!

Yes, thank you Fritz!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 09, 2013, 09:58:58 AM

I did not know that John Williams was one of the composers on the show.
[Lost in Space.] Must of been before he got famous.

I've seen a few episodes of this the past year. ME-TV airs it on Saturday nights.
If you get that network they should be starting over with the first season again
soon. I was surprised to see his name for the theme, too. I like it, but they did
a re-recording of it when Season 3 started airing and I don't particularly like that
arrangement of it.

I haven't researched what else he's done, but I've seen his name for the music on
Gilligan's Island episodes and he also did the theme song of another Irwin Allen show,
The Time Tunnel. I believe hie was credited as Johnny Williams on these series.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: huntinbuddy on March 09, 2013, 10:16:18 AM
Oh yeah, The Outer Limits was a good one. Even spookier than The Twilight Zone in many ways.



I really liked both Outer Limits and Twilight Zone, however, Serling did another series before his death called Night Gallery.   Now that was some scary stuff!

Here is one of my favorites from the series, yet most disturbing.....Sins of the Fathers, which stars a very young Richard Thomas as the Sin Eater.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YqW8Tv4yfHk
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 09, 2013, 11:03:28 AM

Giselle McKenzie--I remember her a frequent guest on the original Match Game
series. I loved the theme of that series, "Swingin' Safari."

Billy Mumy was the go to child actor of that era.  He was everywhere. ME-TV has
an ad showing him in a Twiight Zone episode. I remember him from two episodes
of Bewitched. One was when Endora turned Darrin into his younger self. He played
the younger Darrin. The other was the first Christmas episode when they take him
home from an orphanage for the holidays. There's an amusing scene when he tells
Samantha that the adults think he's a problem child. She asks, "Well are you?" He
nods his head yes, in agreement. Lol!  What did he do after Lost in Space?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 09, 2013, 11:15:46 AM
I copied this from the "Sucky" thread, where we discussed the Stevens' house from Bewitched before the threads were split. I saw the house this evening. Twice. It was really quite funny. I saw it once on an episode of Bewitched, and then immediately again on an episode of I Dream of Jeannie, where it was the home of Dr. and Mrs. Bellows.  :D

I saw that I Dream of Jeannie last night, too. I stopped and watched specifically because of that.
Bizarre that they used the Bewitched house, both exterior and interior, for the Bellows place. It
was the same studio, but didn't they think people would notice? After all, Bewitched was a huge
ratings hit and had been on TV for at least two years by then. They were on different networks
and we couldn't replay them like we can now, so who knows, but it's odd to me. I always read,
though they never bad-mouthed it or talked about it publicly, that the Bewitched people were
slightly ticked off at the Jeannie show. They considered it a pretty big rip-off of their own series.
TV audiences found a place for them both, apparently. I liked Jeannie, but it seems more dated
because of all the 60's astronaut stuff. That is a show that could probaly be remade. Someone
else could find the bottle with Jeannie in it (she's apparently ageless) and with the different
mores now than then...who knows? They had been discussing a Broadway musical version of
it, though I haven't heard anything recently. I'd prefer it be a male genie, though.  Heh!


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 09, 2013, 11:17:39 AM
Yes, they were at the LA,(Beverly Hills), center in the Fall of 2010...I think.  yeah, 2010.

 I guess I missed them.  :(
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 09, 2013, 11:20:30 AM
Can anyone remember other theme songs of tv shows based on classical songs?

The only things I can come up with are the NBC Nightly News Theme, before they
had "John WIlliams" write the new one. The Bad News Bears TV series used music
from Carmen, does that count?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 09, 2013, 11:22:07 AM
Oh I loved "77 Sunset Strip".
Cookie (Edward Burns) was cute, (never had a thing for blonds) but Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. and Roger Smith.
Oh let's face it, they were all good looking!! ::)

This is one show I have heard about my entire life, but never seen an episode of it.
The classic theme song is great. I was hoping Warners would put it out on dvd or it
would show up on one of those retro channels, but it hasn't.

A couple times a month I walk down Sunset Blvd., right past the buildings where the
detective office was located on the show and the nightclub where Ed Burns parked
cars next door.  There is a large plaque embedded in the sidewalk that says something
like "This is the filming site of the classic television series 77 SUNSET STRIP."  It has become
a habit every time I walk by and step on the plaque to stop and snap my fingers two times!

This show was so popular that Warner Brothers plugged the same format (detective agency
in an interesting location) into several other shows and cities--Hawaiian Eye, Surfside 6 and
Bourbon Street Beat come to mind.  I haven't seen any of those shows!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 09, 2013, 11:24:10 AM
Yeah, Don West was my least favorite character as well.

Oh, Linda and Mark, I liked him and thought he was appealing!  I think I liked him
because, well, at first I liked the character of Dr. Smith and his shenanigans, but
his complete idiocy started wearing thin as the series went on and Don West was
the only character who wouldn't put up with that and put him in his place. Someone
on that show need to do that.  How many times could Smith blow up half the Jupiter
or get them in trouble or the like? He'd have been in the brig if it were a real situation!

Did you ever notice that Irwin Allen's shows started off with these great and real
premises, but quickly devolved into cartoonish alien plots and unbelievable situations?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 09, 2013, 11:25:29 AM
the TV series "The Untouchables" with Robert Stack........and the fabulous narrator Walter Winchell !.
My dad would never miss an episode of this. Consequently we all watched it. Instead of being able to quote
passages from the bible.....I could list nearly all the gangsters from this era  :D

LOL!  I love this series, too.  I found out about it when I was in college and the series was
first synidcated at midnight.  I remember once, and I don't know why he mentioned it, on
a Dr. Phil show he said something like "I remember when I was in college I almost missed
half my morning classes because I'd been up too late watching The Untouchables."  LOL!

During its day it was hugely popular and considered extremely violent. (Watching it now
you wonder what those audiences at the time would think of today's television!) One of
my favorite episodes guest stars Elizabeth Montgomery, who got her first Emmy nomination
for it) and there's a scene in it where David White (who played Larry Tate on Bewitched) grabs
her and plants a big one on her mouth. (Shocking!) Another one is called The Day They Shot
Santa Claus and guest stars an actress I was always fond of, Nita Talbot. (She played a recurring
Russian woman character on Hogan's Heroes.) That Untouchables episode also starred a very
cute and young Butch Patrick. I also liked the two-parter (which was re-edited as a film for
foreign distribution and subsequent airing on U.S. tv) which was about Al Capone being
transferred by train to another prison and his planning to escape. A lot of great guest stars,
either famous then or soon to be famous, were on that show. A few are, Cloris Leachman,
Dan Dailey, Barbara Stanwyck (twice), Dick York, Dyan Cannon, Jack Lord, Telly Savalas,
Ed Asner (in the Stanwyck episodes), Gavin MacLeod. Robert Redford, Peter Falk and
Jim Backus. Louise Fletcher was even in the episode where Claire Trevor played Ma Barker!

This entire series is on dvd in half-seasons sets including the original Desilu Playhouse two-parterr
which was so popular it bcame the series. I have the first thee seasons and hope to get the last
season at some point.

In some memorabilia places I've seen gum cards for this series and I always wondered why
they chose the color pink for the wrapper.

TRIVIA QUESTION: What Best Picture winner has a scene where a character doesn't want to
go out that evening because she'll miss seeing The Untouchables?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 09, 2013, 12:48:50 PM
Oh, Linda and Mark, I liked him and thought he was appealing!  I think I liked him
because, well, at first I liked the character of Dr. Smith and his shenanigans, but
his complete idiocy started wearing thin as the series went on and Don West was
the only character who wouldn't put up with that and put him in his place. Someone
on that show need to do that.  How many times could Smith blow up half the Jupiter
or get them in trouble or the like? He'd have been in the brig if it were a real situation!

Did you ever notice that Irwin Allen's shows started off with these great and real
premises, but quickly devolved into cartoonish alien plots and unbelievable situations?


I agree with all you say about his character and his actions against Dr. Smith, Lyle. I guess he just not appeal to me physically.
I always thought there was just too much of an attitude about him. But this may be what appealed to you.
I was only 10-13 at the time it was on originally, so it is hard to pinpoint exactly why my 10 yo mind disliked him.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 09, 2013, 04:24:40 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMOJ94RyBDY


 :'(  I love it!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 09, 2013, 05:25:16 PM

Quote from: Lyle (Mooska) on Today at 11:23:47 AM
Oh, Linda and Mark, I liked him and thought he was appealing!  I think I liked him
because, well, at first I liked the character of Dr. Smith and his shenanigans, but
his complete idiocy started wearing thin as the series went on and Don West was
the only character who wouldn't put up with that and put him in his place. Someone
on that show need to do that.  How many times could Smith blow up half the Jupiter
or get them in trouble or the like? He'd have been in the brig if it were a real situation!

Did you ever notice that Irwin Allen's shows started off with these great and real
premises, but quickly devolved into cartoonish alien plots and unbelievable situations?

[the following is from killersmom]

I agree with all you say about his character and his actions against Dr. Smith, Lyle. I guess he just not appeal to me physically.
I always thought there was just too much of an attitude about him. But this may be what appealed to you.
I was only 10-13 at the time it was on originally, so it is hard to pinpoint exactly why my 10 yo mind disliked him.

[the following is from me, ennis del mark]

Sorry Lyle, I'm sticking to my guns.  Even when I became exasperated with Dr. Smith he was always amusing.  I hated Don.

I too liked and still like Billy Mumy but even then sometimes felt that he got excess air time at the expense of Angela Cartwright.  I can only remember one episode that focused on her and he wasn't even in the episode.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 09, 2013, 06:18:46 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMOJ94RyBDY

Ah, surprised to find out how many of these singers I still recognize! I would have been 8.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: gwyllion on March 09, 2013, 06:46:46 PM
My 10 year-old self slashed everyone on Lost In Space.... without knowing what slash was.....

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on March 10, 2013, 05:42:48 AM
The only things I can come up with are the NBC Nightly News Theme, before they
had "John WIlliams" write the new one. The Bad News Bears TV series used music
from Carmen, does that count?

the lone ranger uses the william tell overture, and porky and bugs made liberal use of the barber of seville
the tv show victory at sea had a score composed for it by Richard Rodgers and Robert Russell Bennett which was later sold as multple disc sets of orchestral music.
alfred hitchcock used funeral march of marionette
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on March 10, 2013, 05:54:43 AM
huntley brinkley report (nbc news?) was the 2nd movement of bethoven's 9th symphony

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iwIvS4yIThU
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on March 10, 2013, 06:14:04 AM
is masterpiece theater in our target group?  that's mouret's rondeau..
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 10, 2013, 12:00:16 PM
And very classic, in use for well over 50 years, Charpentier's Te Deum, used to signal for a national network that the next transmission would be multinational, in Eurovision.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wK1N_vTgayw

I can remember the first time I heard this, back in 1966. Loved it immediately, and have ever since.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 10, 2013, 09:00:10 PM
http://www.turnipnet.com/whirligig/index.htm

I found a neat site!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 11, 2013, 07:43:14 AM
Last night I watched on DVD three episodes from the first season (1962-63) of The Beverly Hillbillies.

Considering what an enormous hit the show was, I was chagrinned to find that I didn't think those episodes were very funny.  :">  That probably says more about me at age almost-55 than it says about the show (though I'm kind of wondering what someone who was almost-55 in the fall of 1962 might have thought of it). We were regular viewers of the show, and I do remember as a kid being amused by the "pot-passers" in "the fancy eatin' room." And some friends and I still make fond references to the "cee-ment pond." ;D

I also noted that the plot of what I take to have been the pilot episode didn't quite match the lyrics to the theme song The Ballad of Jed Clampett. In the episode there is a swamp on Jed's land in which oil is naturallly seeping. This is discovered by a prospector for a Tulsa oil company. Jed wasn't "shootin' at some food, when up through the ground come a-bubblin' crude."

(Historical perspective: The fall of 1962 was the time of the Cuban Missile Crisis. Personal perspective: That November, your writer, aged 4 years, nearly died of a ruptured appendix.)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 11, 2013, 08:41:17 AM
 :D Some of the shows come off as cheesy!   And yea you wonder were they always cheesy or is it just us looking at them with our "mature eyes".  It ran for almost 10 years, so truthfully I remember the latter years more.  I loved Miss Hathaway and Mr. Drysdale and the way Miss Hathaway was always after Jethro.   And Dash Riprock, he had a crush on Ellie Mae! :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 11, 2013, 09:26:27 AM
In that first episode, the Clampetts were worth a mere $25 million, but I guess that bought more in 1962 than it does today.  :D

I remember Dash Riprock. And all Ellie Mae's "critters." And Jethro being unable to make a career choice between brain surgeon and "double-nought spy."  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 11, 2013, 11:56:04 AM
 :D :D :D :D  See how can you not laugh at that?


As for the 25 million, Ashton Kutcher made that last year on a season of Two and Half Men, yea I guess money doesn't go as far as it use to!  :P
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 11, 2013, 12:27:53 PM

Yes, those poor 1%-ers. Those job creators.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 11, 2013, 12:39:04 PM
While I was watching Wagon Train Saturday afternoon, I got to thinking, I wonder how much it would cost today to recreate an episode of that show--different actors, of course, but otherwise to completely recreate an episode? Would one of the "classic" Westerns be prohibitively expensive to do today?

In Saturday's episode, Agnes Moorhead was the guest star. I'm so accustomed to thinking of her as that mean old drag queen Endora that it seemed odd to see her in a sympathetic role.  :D

I do wish I could see again the episodes I saw years ago that had Charles Laughton and Bette Davis as the guest stars (not in the same episode, of course). I remember in the Davis episode there was a sort of sly reference/inside joke to Davis' movie Jezebel, when her character mentioned to Major Adams that she had been in a yellow fever epidemic in New Orleans.  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 11, 2013, 12:40:09 PM
Yes, those poor 1%-ers. Those job creators.

I'm sure the Clampetts must have kept all those people at the Commerce Bank of Beverly Hills employed.  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 11, 2013, 12:46:49 PM

I believe I read that the Beverly Hillbillies episode titled "The Giant Jack Rabbit,"
in which granny thinks a kangaroo is a very large bunny, is the highest rated
regular episode of a tv series ever recorded. (By regular they mean it wasn't
some special season finale episode or the like.)

I was watching some episodes of this show last summer when ME-TV was
airing it on Wed. nights and some of them were very amusing. The joke
can wear thin, though, some of them were just plain worn out. I remember
even getting aggravated with it as a youngster in its later years when you'd
read what the plot was about in the TV Guide and the shows always just
seemed to lead up to the plot point and then stop and you were left hanging.

I always thought the idea of Jethro as Jethrene was downright creepy. The idea of
a group of people like this from the back woods, in Beverly Hills, IS funny, but repeating
it for nine years? One of the early episodes when the Clampetts go out to their neighbors
to borrow something and the neighbors think they're in costume because it's Halloween,
is very believable and even hilarious.

It's a show I don't mind seeing selected episodes, but not every episode.

One line I remember from that show is probably from it's last season. Jed and Mr. Drysdale
are flying to Washington, D.C., and they look out the window of the plane. Mr. Drysdale
remarks. "That is Washington's Dulles Airport." Jed looks down at it from the plane window
and replies, "Really? It looks quite lively to me."
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 11, 2013, 01:02:01 PM

There is a television series called BURKE'S LAW that starred Gene Barry as
a millionaire Los Angeles police captain who investigated murders from a
Rolls-Royce and was a huge ladies man. Each episode sets up a murder in
the beginning and then a huge array of guest stars are introduced one by
one as suspects and eventually we find out who done it!

I got interested in it a few years ago when one season was put on dvd.
(The studio won't release the rights to the next seasons to put out the others.)
What's fascinating is seeing how many famous guest stars are in each episode.
You might come across Mickey Rooney, Joan Blondell, Ann Blyth, Zasu Pitts or
even Gloria Swanson!  Or then current stars like Annette Funicello and Frankie
Avalon with Dick Clark or Sammy Davis, Jr. thrown in.  Tab Hunter or John Gavin
anyone!

ME-TV, since last fall, has been airing this once a week at 4am on Sunday morning!
I've tried to tape it if I remember since they've gotten to the second season. The
episode that aired this week had Paul Lynde in it and the title was quite amusing,
"Who Killed Mr. Colby in Ladies Lingerie?" An upcoming episode has the Honey West
character in it that was spun off into the Honey West series a year later. I remember
one episode that had a bit part with Rue McClanahan (and Don West!) in it!

Anyone else heard of this show?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 11, 2013, 01:49:30 PM
Heard of Burke's Law? You bet!

What a shame that it's on at such a ridiculous time as 4 a.m.  :(

I remember Honey West, too. I suppose without Honey West there would have been no Police Woman.

The "Giant Jackrabbit" episode of The Beverly Hillbillies is included in the DVD collection I have. I vaguely remember it. I remember as a kid thinking the Jethro/Jethrene thing was funny. So was Granny and Cousin Pearl fighting in the kitchen.  :D

Some bits have stuck in my memory all these years; and most of them seem to involve Irene Ryan: Granny wanting a party-line telephone, and telling Ellie Mae that she needed to wear a veil when traveling by train to keep the cinders out of her hair. Also Granny thinking the Civil War was still on, and that Indians were attacking (John Wayne showed up in a cameo at the end).

Remember when the Clampetts went to England?

One bit in the later years that I thought was carried on way too long was the idea that the grunion (fish) were foreigners who were invading California.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 11, 2013, 01:50:24 PM
I have never heard of it, but I was just on youtube looking something up to send to someone (was surprised I found that) so I thought what the heck type this in too and found this episode:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hik_-Wqjrgk

I watched some, I will have to come back later and watch the rest!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 11, 2013, 01:56:39 PM
Okay I am on a youtube roll, the jack rabbit episode:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSGgrBeGKo0
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on March 11, 2013, 02:08:21 PM

Anyone else heard of this show?


Oh sure, I remember it quite well.  It was one of my parent' favorites, especially my mom.
She loved Gene Barry to the extent that I had to take her to see him in "La Cage..." many years later.
I don't remember seeing that many episodes myself as I was a teenager and I guess thought I had better things to do
on a Friday or Saturday night or whenever it was on. 
I am pretty sure it was produced by Dick Powell/David Niven's (also Ida Lapino?) production company giving the show access to quite a few of the actors you mention who, otherwise, might have been a bit hesitant to "do" TV at the time.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on March 11, 2013, 02:57:19 PM
Oh I loved "77 Sunset Strip".
Cookie (Edward Burns) was cute, (never had a thing for blonds) but Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. and Roger Smith.
Oh let's face it, they were all good looking!! ::)

http://youtu.be/weAIhNDn034

Yup, "Cookie, Cookie, lend me your comb".
And of course,   "Surfside Six".  Troy Donahue.
"If Merle Johnson,Jr., can be a movie star then I can be a movie star".  ;)
Troy never did much for me,  Diane McBain on the other hand.  ;D  
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 12, 2013, 04:12:14 PM
Heard of Burke's Law? You bet!
What a shame that it's on at such a ridiculous time as 4 a.m.  :(

No kidding! During the week two other shows I wouldn't mind seeing off and on at a reasonable
hour air at 3am and 4am -- Combat! and Twelve O'Clock High.

I remember Honey West, too. I suppose without Honey West there would have been no Police Woman.

The channel also airs Honey West (2 episodes) right before Burke's Law.

Some bits have stuck in my memory all these years; and most of them seem to involve Irene Ryan:
[...]
Also Granny thinking the Civil War was still on, and that Indians were attacking (John Wayne showed up in a cameo at the end).

I'm all for exaggeration in comedy but things like that, even as a kid, just strained incredulity.
Really, the Civil War still on? The grunion?


Remember when the Clampetts went to England?

I remember that Paul Lynde was the passport clerk when they went to file for their passports!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bentgyro on March 12, 2013, 04:32:41 PM
I used to watch Burke's Law and enjoyed it.
Paul Lynde was sooo funny and I was a big fan.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 12, 2013, 04:36:30 PM
[Burke's Law] I don't remember seeing that many episodes myself as I was a teenager and
I guess thought I had better things to do on a Friday or Saturday night or whenever it was on.

It's first season it was on Friday nights from 8:30 - 9:30, right after 77 Sunset Strip and opposite
Route 66. The second season they moved it to Wednesday from 9:30 - 10:30. Because of the
James Bond influence in the movies they decided to shed him of the police connection to a particular
city and changed the title to Amos Burke, Secret Agent, airing Wed. from 10 - 11. It was opposite
the brand new hit I Spy and got trounced and cancelled after three seasons.

I am pretty sure it was produced by Dick Powell/David Niven's (also Ida Lapino?) production company
giving the show access to quite a few of the actors you mention who, otherwise, might have been a
bit hesitant to "do" TV at the time.

It was produced by Dick Powell/David Nivens Four Star Theatre production company. In fact, in the
original telefilm/pilot of Burke's Law that aired on Dick Powell's Four Star Theatre program, Dick Powell played
Amos Burke!  In the credits, the individual producer for this series (and Honey West) is Aaron Spelling (no wonder
Carolyn Jones played three characters on one episode!). His Dynasty costume designer, Nolan Miller, is also credited
for these two series. And this was about 20 years before they were household names for Dynasty!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on March 12, 2013, 04:53:18 PM
Oh yeah, Nolan Miller. 
The should pad guy who made us all look like full-backs.  ;)
Actually I guess the style was kind of flattering.

Good ol' Linda Evans.  I had the hots for her from her "Big Valley " days. 
Loved it when she and what's her name would start fighting and fall into that big fountain on "Dynasty". 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 12, 2013, 05:19:25 PM
I remember that Paul Lynde was the passport clerk when [the Clampetts] went to file for their passports!

That I did not remember!

I think I mentioned somewhere that I thought the grunion bit was dragged out way too long.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: huntinbuddy on March 12, 2013, 06:53:36 PM
Okay I am on a youtube roll, the jack rabbit episode:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSGgrBeGKo0

Fun stuff!    And a bit a trivia....the other woman in the scene with Max Baer and Nancy Kulp in the bank office is none other than Sharon Tate sporting a dark wig!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 13, 2013, 08:58:39 AM
Love me some Miss Hathaway.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 13, 2013, 09:04:50 AM
Awww poor Sharon Tate!  :'(

Now was Miss Hathaway (not Anne  :D)  Nancy Culp gay, I thought I read that she was??

And Jethro (Max Baer Jr.) his Dad was the famous boxer right?



Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 13, 2013, 11:36:04 AM
Awww poor Sharon Tate!  :'(

Now was Miss Hathaway (not Anne  :D)  Nancy Culp gay, I thought I read that she was??

And Jethro (Max Baer Jr.) his Dad was the famous boxer right?

Yes, she was a lesbian.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nancy_Kulp (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nancy_Kulp)

(Coincidentally, the article has a still of Max Baer, Nancy Kulp, and Sharon Tate.)

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 14, 2013, 10:25:57 AM
I just went and checked that picture of the three of them, it doesn't even look like her (the hair I guess).



https://pinterest.com/swimmom2mg/childhood-tv-memories-late-60-s-all-70-s/


Late 70's had a lot of TV shows!


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/gentle_ben1_zpsb85d4e8e.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 14, 2013, 10:34:55 AM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/HereComeTheBrides_S1_zpsed90f5b8.jpg)


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/thumbnail_zps40212f42.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 14, 2013, 10:43:29 AM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/5477120e18bf832783013cb115bb4163_zps1df191b9.jpg?t=1363279283)

The Hardy Boys
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 14, 2013, 10:47:33 AM
Who affected and inspired millions of male teens in the mid to late 1970s to become The Hard-on Boys.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 14, 2013, 10:48:10 AM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/60dae8ef1c458a2b41063ec24f04cafc_zps912cef55.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 14, 2013, 10:52:10 AM
Who affected and inspired millions of male teens in the mid to late 1970s to become The Hard-on Boys.

They were nice looking I will say that!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 14, 2013, 11:12:49 AM
Late 70's had a lot of TV shows!

You are silly, you know that? Lol!  You wrote that and then posted shows that
weren't on then!

Gentle Ben (1967-69)
That Girl (1966-71)
Here Come the Brides (1968-70)

I always wanted to like Here Come the Brides, but it never gelled. The plots
all were a bit off. The issues seemed more of the 60's than it's setting. The
villain was too silly. Antenna Tv was showing the series on the weekend a
year ago and I tried watching a couple again. I didn't see it in color when
it first aired, but the colors are so pastelly-sweet that it also was a turn off.

I liked Bobby Sherman and David Soul, but Robert Bolt's costume always looked
like he stepped off the starship Enterprise or something. Joan Blondell was a plus.
Also, the idea of the series, based on a true story, was that the guys sent for a
boatload of girls from New Bedford to become their wives and in the series none
of them ever seemed in much of a hurry to actually get married. The theme song
was a standout, though.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 14, 2013, 11:21:33 AM
Lyle, Hardy Boys was late 70's, Mission Impossible was early 70's, and 70 and 71 are still the 70's.  I will give you the Gentle Ben one though!  I actually took them off that site, which was TV of the 60's and 70's.   Maybe we need to look at LATE 70's, how about that?

I think Bobby Sherman was the ultimate teen heart throb!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 14, 2013, 11:32:51 AM
Lyle, Hardy Boys was late 70's, Mission Impossible was early 70's, and 70 and 71 are still the 70's.

Not to be nit-picky, but I did not mention those two shows and your post did say "late 70's".
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 14, 2013, 03:44:39 PM
I stand corrected (are you writing that down  :D).   I don't know why I even said late 70's, I had to go back and look, I just meant 70's.   I will gather my thoughts and post some of those next week!


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: huntinbuddy on March 14, 2013, 07:56:32 PM
One that I remember well from the late 70's and the middle years of my college days was James at 15.   I remember it touched on some rather controversial issues at the time, which today wouldn't even get a second glance.   Probably some of the better episodes are available on You Tube.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_at_15
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on March 15, 2013, 03:37:01 AM
i'm lucky.  while i have an interesting mind for remembering odd bits, i am not blessed or cursed with sequential memory, i have little if any sense of what came when, so they are all just shows or events from various periods of my life.  if something occurred on or about the time of something specific to me, say high school graduation, i may be able to roughly date it but outside of that tabula rasa 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 15, 2013, 10:34:18 AM
Good point Jack!  :D


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/FgeV_zps9b178fed.jpg)


I remember James at 15 very well, soon to go on to become James at 16!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: gwyllion on March 15, 2013, 10:58:59 AM
In high school, my friend Christopher had a mad crush on Lance Kerwin.

Where is he now?

Lance Kerwin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lance_Kerwin)

"Since the mid-1990s, Kerwin has not acted. He was a minister with UTurn4Christ in Kaua'i, Hawaii."

Christopher would be devastated!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 15, 2013, 12:05:14 PM

Jack, you could go visit him.

***

I didn't have a tv when most of this series aired, but I remember hearing about it
and seeing a couple episodes. It's TV movie pilot got huge ratings and the critics
liked both it and the series, but the creator or writer got immediately peeved with
network interference doing the series and left. It only laster 20 episodes! It burned
bright for a few months and then burned out fast. I always liked Linden Chiles, who
played the father, ever since I saw him in an episode of the Time Tunnel. Too bad
the series didn't work out for him.

Kevin Williamson credits this series for his idea for Dawson's Creek. He wanted to do
a James at 15 for the 90's, he says!

I always thought the actor Brian Kerwin was related to Lance Kerwin. Apparently a lot
of people assume that, but it's not true.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 15, 2013, 12:18:01 PM
Tabula Rasa

Isn't that your drag name?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 15, 2013, 12:19:25 PM

Are they, perhaps, friends with Keyser Söze or Rollo Tomassi?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 15, 2013, 02:13:27 PM
Isn't that your drag name?


 :D  :D  :D

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 15, 2013, 04:03:08 PM
Lance was a favorite of mine, a young actor who wasn't a pin-up stud type, but a youth who was also a good actor.  A study should be made of these "way above the average child actor" performers, who had above-average intelligence and talent.  When they were cast in a show you knew it would be a cut above usual.  Performers such as Lance, Lisa Gerritsen, Lisa Lucas, George Spell, and Ramades Pera, to name a few.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 15, 2013, 04:10:43 PM
Ramades Pera

I had to look this one up, I did not watch Kung Fu.
They have it spelled Radames, however.  There is
nothing like Ra-dames.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 15, 2013, 04:12:40 PM
I love you, Lyle.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 15, 2013, 05:29:32 PM
Catching up after being away to help my dad celebrate his 83rd birthday.

We watched That Girl and Here Come the Brides (I think I can still sing the theme song by heart).  :D I liked Jason and Jeremy, Joshua (David Soul) not so much. I guess, oddly enough, he had the bigger TV career, moving on to Starsky and Hutch (Paul Michael Glaser was more my type).
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 15, 2013, 10:44:42 PM
Catching up after being away to help my dad celebrate his 83rd birthday.

Congrats to your 'classic' dad, Jeff!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 15, 2013, 10:52:53 PM
Congrats to your 'classic' dad, Jeff!

Aw, thanks, Linda.  :)

I always thought the actor Brian Kerwin was related to Lance Kerwin. Apparently a lot
of people assume that, but it's not true.

Incidentally, Brian Kerwin was in tonight's episode of Blue Bloods (he was also in an episode of Elementary recently) (maybe he's becoming the go-to guy for overweight older men). I noticed something that struck me as unusual; even though he was playing a character on the upper limits of middle age (as he himself must be), in several shots you could clearly see that he was wearing a hearing aid behind each ear.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 15, 2013, 11:42:45 PM
Aw, thanks, Linda.  :)

Incidentally, Brian Kerwin was in tonight's episode of Blue Bloods (he was also in an episode of Elementary recently) (maybe he's becoming the go-to guy for overweight older men). I noticed something that struck me as unusual; even though he was playing a character on the upper limits of middle age (as he himself must be), in several shots you could clearly see that he was wearing a hearing aid behind each ear.

I am watching this now, and was thinking we had just been talking about him.
I was wondering about the hearing aids as well.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 16, 2013, 09:22:33 AM
I am watching this now, and was thinking we had just been talking about him.
I was wondering about the hearing aids as well.

On rereading my post I feel I phrased my comment kind of stupidly. It isn't a surprise to me that a man Brian Kerwin's age might need to wear hearing aids. What surprised me is that he wore them in his role in Blue Bloods.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 16, 2013, 12:49:38 PM

Recently on Antenna-TV I've been catching an occasional episode of Alfred Hitchock Presents.
People know that Hitchcock himself introduced the episodes, made light of the commercials
and the like.

I've noticed that if a story ends with some character seemingly getting away with an awful
deed, that in the tag he always says something like, "Don't worry. So and so was arrested
and jailed for their crime." I guess that was part of telelvision's unwritten rules back then that
if people committed an awful act, whether it be robbery, murder, being unfaithful to your
spouse, sex before marriage or the like that the character had to pay or suffer for it. It doesn't
sound like something Hitchcock would want to do, but it was also a way for these kinds of
stories to be told without altering them.

Last night's episode concerned a cheating husband. The faithful wife pretends to be
collecting old clothes for charity and she goes to the "other woman's" place and puts
poison into her sugar bowl. When she finds out her husband unexpectedly has gone
to the other woman's place that night she rushes over hoping to avoid him being killed
by the poison. The other woman finds out she's the wife and what she's done. She tells
her she was too late and he's been driven off to the hospital. If he doesn't make it, the
wife will be accused of murder if she tells them what she's done. The wife wants to save
her husband so she rushes off.

The husband was hiding in the other room and didn't hear any of this. He has come, though,
to tell the other woman that their relationship is over. He's going back to his wife. The other
woman is not happy and tries to get him to change his mind. She serves him a cup of coffee
and offers him the sugar, with the poison in it. He takes two big heaping teaspoons of it. His
wife will be accused of doing it.

In the tag, Hitchcock says that the other woman was immediately arrested for her crimes.
He says these things in such a way that you don't believe it, that he's being forced to say
it. And IMO that's true!

Some interesting episodes.  Ethical dilemmas are the best ones. Occasionally some stars
of the past appear that are interesting to watch. Like Hurd Hatfield in a recent one!
 

 

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on March 16, 2013, 01:44:45 PM
Isn't that your drag name?

No, but by god you've planted a seed, lol.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 16, 2013, 09:10:35 PM
Occasionally some stars
of the past appear that are interesting to watch. Like Hurd Hatfield in a recent one!

It's amazing who pops up on some of these old programs. I'm really hoping to see the Wagon Train episodes with Bette Davis and Charles Laughton. While I'm waiting, I'll just moon over Robert Horton.  ;D

Meanwhile, Bruce Dern showed up on today's episode of The Big Valley. I didn't recognize him behind a long beard, but he was doing the usual sleazy bad-guy routine that I associate with him.

Earlier, on today's episode of Bonanza--one so old that Pernell Roberts was still around as Adam--I recognized a face I couldn't put a name to. Fortunately I was able to catch the credits. They didn't list character name with actor name, but I knew the name as soon as I saw it, Ron Hayes (1929-2004), someone I probably hadn't thought of since the Sixties. I remember that at our house, in 1966-67, we watched him on a contemporary comedy-western called The Rounders (based on/inspired by a movie, I believe?), where he co-starred with Chill Wills  ;D and hunky-hunky Patrick Wayne--the Duke's boy.

I'd love to see some Alfred Hitchcock Presents. Ditto The Twilight Zone. Rod Serling was a genius.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 17, 2013, 06:08:40 AM
Recently on Antenna-TV I've been catching an occasional episode of Alfred Hitchock Presents.
People know that Hitchcock himself introduced the episodes, made light of the commercials
and the like.

I've noticed that if a story ends with some character seemingly getting away with an awful
deed, that in the tag he always says something like, "Don't worry. So and so was arrested
and jailed for their crime." I guess that was part of telelvision's unwritten rules back then that
if people committed an awful act, whether it be robbery, murder, being unfaithful to your
spouse, sex before marriage or the like that the character had to pay or suffer for it. It doesn't
sound like something Hitchcock would want to do, but it was also a way for these kinds of
stories to be told without altering them.

Last night's episode concerned a cheating husband. The faithful wife pretends to be
collecting old clothes for charity and she goes to the "other woman's" place and puts
poison into her sugar bowl. When she finds out her husband unexpectedly has gone
to the other woman's place that night she rushes over hoping to avoid him being killed
by the poison. The other woman finds out she's the wife and what she's done. She tells
her she was too late and he's been driven off to the hospital. If he doesn't make it, the
wife will be accused of murder if she tells them what she's done. The wife wants to save
her husband so she rushes off.

The husband was hiding in the other room and didn't hear any of this. He has come, though,
to tell the other woman that their relationship is over. He's going back to his wife. The other
woman is not happy and tries to get him to change his mind. She serves him a cup of coffee
and offers him the sugar, with the poison in it. He takes two big heaping teaspoons of it. His
wife will be accused of doing it.

In the tag, Hitchcock says that the other woman was immediately arrested for her crimes.
He says these things in such a way that you don't believe it, that he's being forced to say
it. And IMO that's true!

Some interesting episodes.  Ethical dilemmas are the best ones. Occasionally some stars
of the past appear that are interesting to watch. Like Hurd Hatfield in a recent one!
 

 





Lyle,

This episode was called "One for the Road" and was originally broadcast on March 3, 1957.

I love the Hitchcock show and have seasons 1-5 on DVD.  I wish to hell they'd get the other two seasons out on disc. Some of my favorite episodes come from season 6, especially "Coming, Mama" (April 11, 1961) where Eileen Heckart is wanting to accept a marriage proposal (from Don DeFore) and leave her domineering invalid mother.  Don't miss this one!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: moreta on March 17, 2013, 07:28:48 AM
http://www.thehighchaparral.com/chara1d.htm


I always had the hots for this guy ?   ;D


I just loved this show, one of the better quality westerns of the era, created by David Dortort, who also created Bonanza.  (did any one see Tin Men, with the "one hump and out theory?)  So true of most series of this era.  Why did moms always seem to die?

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 17, 2013, 01:12:25 PM
I just loved this show, one of the better quality westerns of the era, created by David Dortort, who also created Bonanza.  (did any one see Tin Men, with the "one hump and out theory?)  So true of most series of this era.  Why did moms always seem to die?

LOL! It wasn't just moms. I remember joking that any girl who fell in love with a Cartwright was a goner!  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 18, 2013, 11:32:08 AM

It was interesting that the premise of Bonanza is that Ben lived on the ranch with
his three sons from three diffferent wives he'd had. Ladies beware! Was the original
title My Three Sons? ME-TV showed the leprechaun episode of Bonanza yesterday.


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 18, 2013, 01:43:36 PM
It was interesting that the premise of Bonanza is that Ben lived on the ranch with
his three sons from three diffferent wives he'd had. Ladies beware! Was the original
title My Three Sons? ME-TV showed the leprechaun episode of Bonanza yesterday.

I saw that yesterday.  :) I remember feeling really sad when Dan Blocker died.

Lyle, would you happen to know, was Bonanza filmed in color right from the start (1959)? I did some reading up on the show today, but that was one thing I wasn't able to find out for sure.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 18, 2013, 02:32:32 PM
I've heard that too, and I'm pretty sure it was. NBC broadcast all their primetime shows in color by the late 50's, I think.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: moreta on March 18, 2013, 04:55:38 PM
I've heard that too, and I'm pretty sure it was. NBC broadcast all their primetime shows in color by the late 50's, I think.



Its pretty well documented that it aired in color from the start. 

What I loved is it had lyrics to the theme song which for some reason was never used. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpUd9KecPa4 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpUd9KecPa4)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: moreta on March 18, 2013, 04:56:59 PM
Any one else love the Wild Wild West?

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on March 18, 2013, 05:27:50 PM
Its pretty well documented that it aired in color from the start. 

LOL, lord yes.  "In Living Color" no less.  RCA owned NBC at the time.
My grandmother bought a color tv in 1959 meaning that we had to watch anything that was broadcast in color including:
"Bonanza", "Sing Along with Mitch",(god help us), and "Disney's Wonderful World of Color". 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on March 18, 2013, 05:30:30 PM
Any one else love the Wild Wild West?


Yes, I liked it a lot.  "Steampunk" long before the term was coined.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bentgyro on March 18, 2013, 06:24:23 PM
It was interesting that the premise of Bonanza is that Ben lived on the ranch with
his three sons from three diffferent wives he'd had. Ladies beware! Was the original
title My Three Sons? ME-TV showed the leprechaun episode of Bonanza yesterday.



I remember that episode and Laughing a lot!!!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 18, 2013, 07:24:06 PM
LOL, lord yes.  "In Living Color" no less.  RCA owned NBC at the time.
My grandmother bought a color tv in 1959 meaning that we had to watch anything that was broadcast in color including:
"Bonanza", "Sing Along with Mitch",(god help us), and "Disney's Wonderful World of Color". 

Really? Seriously, I had no idea color TV was available that early. Partly that's because nobody I knew, including my own parents and grandparents, had a color set before the middle Sixties at the earliest--in the case of my family I'm sure it was more like 1967 or so.

There is also the fact that some of the shows I remember most fondly had their first season in black and white as late as the middle of the Sixties (e.g., Daniel Boone, first season 1964-65).

Bewitched, The Beverly Hillbillies, and Petticoat Junction also began in black and white.

I remember Sing Along with Mitch (introduced the world to Leslie Uggams),  :D and we never missed Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color.  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 18, 2013, 07:32:37 PM
Any one else love the Wild Wild West?

The Wild, Wild West is one of the shows where people react with shocked disbelief when I tell them I didn't watch it as a kid. I've assumed it aired opposite something else we watched in my family, but now I've begun to wonder whether it was on after my bedtime.  ;) I can remember having to go to bed on Thursday nights after Daniel Boone was over, and lying in bed listening to Bewitched, which my parents had on the TV downstairs in the living room.  :D

I've enjoyed the few episodes I've seen of The Wild, Wild West on ME-TV, and I hope to see more of them. Robert Conrad is awfully hot in those black leather chaps, and I love watching Ross Martin do all those different characters.  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 18, 2013, 07:33:58 PM
I remember my grandparents had a remote control for their TV. It was tethered to the set by a long cord, and you had to watch not to trip over it.  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: suelyblu on March 18, 2013, 07:37:03 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ig3GcDBjQN4

Remember this ??  I had the thrill of going on two different trains in the US which reminded me of this program.!!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 18, 2013, 08:00:46 PM
Really? Seriously, I had no idea color TV was available that early. Partly that's because nobody I knew, including my own parents and grandparents, had a color set before the middle Sixties at the earliest--in the case of my family I'm sure it was more like 1967 or so.

There is also the fact that some of the shows I remember most fondly had their first season in black and white as late as the middle of the Sixties (e.g., Daniel Boone, first season 1964-65).

Bewitched, The Beverly Hillbillies, and Petticoat Junction also began in black and white.

I remember Sing Along with Mitch (introduced the world to Leslie Uggams),  :D and we never missed Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color.  :D

Actually color broadcasting and TV sales (basically RCA Victor only, and NBC) started in 1954, but it was a couple of years before they even had a single hour of color programming per night. CBS had an earlier color system, but it was incompatible with regular black and white TV's. Ed Sullivan was broadcast in this format for a while, but because non-color receivers couldn't show it, this system died without a trace.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_television

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 18, 2013, 08:05:58 PM
Back in high school we had a fund drive for the Holy Cross Missions, and one of the prizes was the opportunity to go to one of our classmates house, his family had a color TV (very early 60's). The show we watched was Sing Along with Mitch.

And when I was travelling with my parents to New York, we stopped at a motel in Petersburg, VA (The Roses of Picardy Motel), and they had a single color TV in the common room, which the guests were able to watch. It was The Price Is Right, that's the one I remembered seeing. This was in 1958. They had the color turned up so it was quite garish. I loved it!



Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 18, 2013, 08:07:30 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ig3GcDBjQN4

Remember this ??  I had the thrill of going on two different trains in the US which reminded me of this program.!!


Oh yes, remember this very well!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on March 18, 2013, 08:16:57 PM
Really? Seriously, I had no idea color TV was available that early.

Yup, and here it is.  This is exactly the one she bought (and then got rid of few years later because she did not like the "modern" cabinet".

(http://i302.photobucket.com/albums/nn86/gary8194/CTC-9_Kenbridge595_zps56eefede.gif)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: kathy on March 18, 2013, 08:37:06 PM
I remember when the color TVs were first promoted; what a big thing that was!  We never missed Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color.

And in the ad above, in the bottom right hand corner: remember when the RCA dog and  the "Victrola"? were always in the ads?  I thought it was so cute and always looked for the ad and the cute dog.  A few yrs. ago there was an RCA ad with this dog, the Victrola, and a smaller version of the older dog.  I loved it. 

The ads always read "...his master's voice".  I always looked for this but it has been gone for some time.  Sigh.

kathy   
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 18, 2013, 10:00:41 PM
LOL, lord yes.  "In Living Color" no less.  RCA owned NBC at the time.
My grandmother bought a color tv in 1959 meaning that we had to watch anything that was broadcast in color including:
"Bonanza", "Sing Along with Mitch",(god help us), and "Disney's Wonderful World of Color". 

Oh I liked "Sing Along With Mitch"! :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 19, 2013, 07:44:38 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ig3GcDBjQN4

Remember this ??  I had the thrill of going on two different trains in the US which reminded me of this program.!!


I've only heard of that show, never seen it. I'd like to see some episodes some day. That locomotive is the familiar Sierra Railroad #3.

It seems odd to see "the Skipper" without his "little buddy," Gilligan.  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 19, 2013, 07:52:05 AM
The Wild, Wild West is one of the shows where people react with shocked disbelief when I tell them I didn't watch it as a kid. I've assumed it aired opposite something else we watched in my family, but now I've begun to wonder whether it was on after my bedtime.  ;) I can remember having to go to bed on Thursday nights after Daniel Boone was over, and lying in bed listening to Bewitched, which my parents had on the TV downstairs in the living room.  :D

I've enjoyed the few episodes I've seen of The Wild, Wild West on ME-TV, and I hope to see more of them. Robert Conrad is awfully hot in those black leather chaps, and I love watching Ross Martin do all those different characters.  :)

You never saw The Wild Wild West, Jeff?!? The only reason you're not being drummed out of the club is that you were probably watching Tarzan on Friday nights instead.   ;)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 19, 2013, 07:53:11 AM
Any one else love the Wild Wild West?




OMG, YES!!!


Love it, love it, love it.

Robert Conrad AND Ross Martin?  Be still my heart.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 19, 2013, 09:16:42 AM
You never saw The Wild Wild West, Jeff?!? The only reason you're not being drummed out of the club is that you were probably watching Tarzan on Friday nights instead.   ;)

That's it! Thank you! That solves the mystery! At our house we did, indeed, watch Tarzan, with big Ron Ely in a teeny-weeny loin cloth!

I couldn't say why we--more'n'likely my parents--chose Tarzan. Maybe they considered it more suitable for a kid--me--to watch.  ???

Actually, some of the reading I've done about The Wild, Wild West does indicate that the show became controversial because of its level of violence. I couldn't say that I was aware of it at the time, but apparently there was something of an outcry over TV violence in the late Sixties. TWWW was considered a particular offender. The few episodes I've seen on "nostalgia TV" don't strike me as particularly violent. It's an action show, "James Bond in the Old West." Of course there will be fights. What did people expect?  ???
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 19, 2013, 10:21:11 AM
would you happen to know, was Bonanza filmed in color right from the start (1959)? I did some reading up on the show today, but that was one thing I wasn't able to find out for sure.

I see people have answered you. I didn't know that, but I could swear that I saw
some episodes of this in the not too distant past that were in b&w. Either there
was a reason for that or I am incorrect.

Did you know that some tv shows were filmed in color, but aired in b&w? This was
done because the producer's realized the value of their product would be higher
in syndication as the color tv market grew. But just because they were filmed in
color doesn't mean that people who had a color tv could see them that way
unless the network actually broadcast it that way.  They had to deem it worth it.
I guess local markets had to have different equipment to do it.

For example, I know that the second season of The Lucy Show was filmed in color,
but aired in b&w. They talk about it on the dvd set.

It seems color was standardized on tv in 1967. No show since then has aired as a
b&w series. Has it?  Has one aired that way on cable?  I know that MASH did a
singular "very special episode" that way once.

I wonder what was the last series filmed in b&w?

You were talking about series that first had seasons in b&w and then switched to color.
We should compile a list of those!  I wonder how many that would be? Sometimes you
can find out almost anything like this someone else (like Sheldon Cooper) has already
made such a list on the internet!

I'll start with one:  F Troop.  Season one in b&w and Season 2 in color!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 19, 2013, 10:23:20 AM
If you recall when people were talking about Route 66 that I said:

[Martin Milner] was also a regular on Route 66 with George Maharis, but I have never seen
much of that show. By the way, I also used to see George Maharis at my other job I had.
George Maharis is gay, if you believe renting gay porn -- a lot -- is a good indication.

Well, I was just reading an article about Route 66 and I noticed this:

While researching a (sadly still unpublished) book on the show in the ’80s, author Karen Funk Blocher interviewed both Maharis and producer Herbert B. Leonard and learned that Maharis’ claims (reasons why he left) were more than plausible, but she also learned from Leonard that he feared Maharis’ homosexuality would come up in the press and cause a scandal, contributing to bad blood all around. It would be unfortunate if one of the contributing factors to the demise of such a progressive show was such an unprogressive stance, but such a stance wasn’t uncommon in the pre-Stonewall era.

Entire article is here:

http://www.avclub.com/articles/why-the-mostly-forgotten-route-66-was-one-of-tvs-m,93796/
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 19, 2013, 10:48:50 AM

Did you guys like the Quinn Martin shows from the 60's and 70's that were all
done in the distinctive format whereby they set up the series episode and then
it was done in Acts.  Act I through Act IV and then an epilogue?  I was watching
a CSI recently and thinking if that was done now that CSI would have to have
seven or eight acts with all the commercial breaks they now seem to insist on.

Some Quinn Martin shows ("A Quinn Martin production...") that I can recall are:

*I updated it from a complete list I got on wikipedia:

Very successful:
Cannon
The Streets of San Francisco
Twelve O'Clock High
The F.B.I.
The Fugitive
The Invaders
Dan August
Barnaby Jones
Most Wanted
The Untouchables

Don't know these so well:
The New Breed
Premiere
Banyon
The Manhunter
Caribe
Bert D'Angelo/Superstar
Quinn Martin's Tales of the Unexpected
The Runaways
A Man Called Sloane

In order of production the first three were:
The Untouchables
The New Breed
Twelve O'Clock High

I kow that The Untouchables didn't use the Act break format, although it
did have a bumper at the beginning and end of each break. I know that
Twelve O'Clock High had the Act breaks. I don't know what the middle
one is.  Not sure if EVERY show after that did the act break thing, but
it sure made his series unique. I've never heard anyone complain about it.

The Invaders lasted two seasons. It's sense of creepiness and foreboding was
great. It was a premise that was bound not to last very long because you
couldn't very well imagine that, say, after awhile that people wouldn't either
think the main character was crazy or that other people wouldn't have found
out besides him.

Some of the optical effects seem a little cheesy now, but it had some wonderful
episodes. I remember Suzanne Pleshette, Roddy McDowall and Gene Hackman
being in some of the episodes. I don't think any of the retro channels are airing
this now, but both seasons are on dvd. Fox did a two-part miniseries remake of
this show, but it was, alas, not very good.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 19, 2013, 11:55:32 AM
I see people have answered you. I didn't know that, but I could swear that I saw
some episodes of this in the not too distant past that were in b&w. Either there
was a reason for that or I am incorrect.

Maybe there was a technical problem in the broadcasting? But you say your memory is of more than one episode?  ???

Quote
Did you know that some tv shows were filmed in color, but aired in b&w? This was
done because the producer's realized the value of their product would be higher
in syndication as the color tv market grew. But just because they were filmed in
color doesn't mean that people who had a color tv could see them that way
unless the network actually broadcast it that way.  They had to deem it worth it.
I guess local markets had to have different equipment to do it.

I did not know that. That's interesting.

Quote
It seems color was standardized on tv in 1967.

Well, that certainly squares with my memory of approximately when my mom and dad bought our first color console set. I'd ask my dad, but I doubt he'd remember exactly when it was.

Quote
You were talking about series that first had seasons in b&w and then switched to color.
We should compile a list of those!  I wonder how many that would be? Sometimes you
can find out almost anything like this someone else (like Sheldon Cooper) has already
made such a list on the internet!

I'll start with one:  F Troop.  Season one in b&w and Season 2 in color!

I forgot about F Troop! And that's even on my list of series "first seasons" that I'd like to add to my library some day. My memory is that when F Troop went to color, they did away with the theme with the lyrics that explained the set-up of the show:

The end of the Civil War was near
When quite accidentally,
A hero who sneezed
Abruptly seized
Retreat and reversed it to victory.

His medal of honor pleased and thrilled
His proud little family group.
While pinning it on some blood was spilled,
And so it was planned
He'd command
F Troop!


(From memory--honest!--so please pardon any misquotes.)

 ;D

I mentioned Bewitched! and The Beverly Hillbillies, but in strictest honesty I know only that their first seasons were in black and white. I don't know if they went to color as early as the second season, or if it was even later in the run.

I know the first season of Daniel Boone was in black and white and the second season in color because I own both seasons on DVD.

Edit to add: Better add I Dream of Jeannie to that last, too. I recently saw some episodes of that show in black and white, which surprised me because I only remember the color episodes. (Kind of sad to see Larry Hagman so young and handsome, and now he's gone.  :( )
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 19, 2013, 12:11:57 PM
"A Quinn Martin production..."

Now, there's a phrase that takes me back.

Quote
Did you guys like the Quinn Martin shows from the 60's and 70's that were all
done in the distinctive format whereby they set up the series episode and then
it was done in Acts.  Act I through Act IV and then an epilogue?  I was watching
a CSI recently and thinking if that was done now that CSI would have to have
seven or eight acts with all the commercial breaks they now seem to insist on.

Seems to me that a lot of the scripted dramas I watch now still seem to follow that pattern, though some shows (e.g., Law & Order: SVU) dispense with the epilogue:

Prologue
Main Title
(Commercials)
Act I
(Commercials)
Act II
(Commercials)
Act III
(Commercials)
Act IV
(Commercials)
(Sometimes Epilogue)

Some of those shows on the list we watched, others I remember the titles or something about them (e.g., didn't watch The Invaders but remember Roy Thinnes was in it), and others I draw a complete blank.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 19, 2013, 08:33:11 PM
Love THE FUGITIVE!

I'd like to get the whole series for my brother, who REALLY loves it.  (And I could borrow it.)

Quinn Martin certainly was a prolific producer.  He worked his way up at Desilu during the 1950s.  In fact he was married to I LOVE LUCY writer Madelyn Pugh for a while (in the Connecticut shows you'll notice her listed as Madelyn Martin) but he screwed around on her and the marriage collapsed.

Stupid man.  She was attractive.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 20, 2013, 09:24:01 AM
I gotta go google Desilu productions and see all what they were involved with at the time?  I am thinking tons of old shows!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 20, 2013, 09:54:35 AM
I gotta go google Desilu productions and see all what they were involved with at the time?  I am thinking tons of old shows!

Yeah. I seem to remember Desilu was a real big deal in Hollywood at one time.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 20, 2013, 10:42:21 AM

Desilu was responsible for bringing Star Trek, The Untouchables and Mission: Impossible
to TV!  I know some shows that were filmed AT Desilu, like My Favorite Martian and
The Dick Van Dyke Show, but I don't know if Desilu was actually responsible for them.
I've always found it interesting that some network shows are shot at other network's
facilities. Three's Company (ABC), Dancing with the Stars (ABC) and American Idol (FOX)
are all filmed at CBS Television City, for example. (Three's Company actually filmed in three
separate studios all over Los Angeles during it's run. Another studio was Metromedia.
All in the Family did as well (two locations).
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 20, 2013, 06:16:17 PM
Television shows produced or filmed by Desilu

    I Love Lucy
    The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour
    The Lucy Show
    December Bride
    Private Secretary
    The Ann Sothern Show
    Our Miss Brooks
    The Jack Benny Program
    Make Room for Daddy
    The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp
    The Real McCoys
    The Andy Griffith Show
    The Dick Van Dyke Show
    My Three Sons
    The Untouchables
    I Spy
    Whirlybirds
    Harrigan and Son
    Mannix
    Family Affair
    Mission Impossible
    Star Trek
    Gomer Pyle, USMC
    That Girl
    Meet McGraw
    Hogan's Heroes

Some of these programs were created and owned outright by Desilu; others were other production companies' programs that Desilu filmed or to which Desilu rented production space.


WOW!


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desilu_Productions
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 20, 2013, 08:35:40 PM
I have a very vague memory of Whirlybirds, little more than the title, actually.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 21, 2013, 06:25:01 AM
Any fan of MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE and/or STAR TREK and all their various offshoots should thank Lucy.  As president of Desilu, she was the one who made the final decisions to film the pilots.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 21, 2013, 12:15:38 PM
We owe Lucille Ball a lot!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 22, 2013, 08:23:09 AM
Well, I don't know whether Magnum, P.I., qualifies as "classic," but I had a good laugh from an episode I caught last night on Cozi-TV. The episode was from December 1982 (I looked it up), and the plot involved a woman wanting to deposit her father's ashes on the U.S.S. Arizona. The name they gave the father was "Miles Archer," and the name of the daughter was "Bridget."

Of course, "Miles Archer" was the name of Humphrey Bogart's partner who gets knocked off early on in The Maltese Falcon, and "Bridget" (actually "Brigid") was the name of Mary Astor's character in the same movie.   ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bentgyro on March 22, 2013, 11:25:37 AM
It is a "classic".....That episode was 31yrs old :o
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 22, 2013, 11:45:13 AM
It is a "classic".....That episode was 31yrs old :o

And Tom Selleck sure looked good in a pair of form-fitting pale-blue jeans, with that luxuriant mass of dark chest hair peeking out of his Hawaiian shirt.  ;D

He looked even better in the final scene, where he was playing volleyball in just a little pair of shorts.  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 22, 2013, 01:54:59 PM
I worked with a girl that was in love with Tom Selleck, in his Magnum years.  She had poster up all over her office (back when you could put up pictures/posters in your office).  I personally didn't get it.   But then I had pictures of Don Johnson up in mine!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 22, 2013, 02:25:16 PM
I worked with a girl that was in love with Tom Selleck, in his Magnum years.  She had poster up all over her office (back when you could put up pictures/posters in your office).  I personally didn't get it.   But then I had pictures of Don Johnson up in mine!  :D

It's all about the mustache. Either you get it, or you don't.  ;D

(Don Johnson never did anything for me.  ;) )
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: kathy on March 22, 2013, 07:42:50 PM
We owe Lucille Ball a lot!

Oh, yes, but we just can't forget Desi.  He had so much to do with production from the very beginning.

kathy
p.s.  I'm certain The Untouchables (one of my favorites) was a Desilu production.  I heard Robert Stack mention it more than once.   
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 23, 2013, 02:45:32 AM
No, I'd never forget about Desi.

But he was long gone from Desilu by 1966, when Lucy gave the go-ahead to making the Star Trek and Mission:  Impossible pilots.  So the credit for them is all hers.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 23, 2013, 02:47:29 AM
I worked with a girl that was in love with Tom Selleck, in his Magnum years.  She had poster up all over her office (back when you could put up pictures/posters in your office).  I personally didn't get it.   But then I had pictures of Don Johnson up in mine!  :D

I loved Tom AND Don, both of whom were dorky-looking in their 20s but by their mid-thirties were extremely sexy.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 23, 2013, 10:35:46 AM
No, I'd never forget about Desi.

But he was long gone from Desilu by 1966, when Lucy gave the go-ahead to making the Star Trek and Mission:  Impossible pilots.  So the credit for them is all hers.

Lucy was a shrewd business woman. Star Trek may not have lasted many season in its initial run, but when you consider the life the franchise continues to have, I'd say her decision was justified.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 23, 2013, 10:39:24 AM
Here's a good one. I just saw Corporal Klinger of the 4077th M*A*S*H on an episode of The Rebel!  :D  He was not wearing a dress, and he was even riding a horse!  :D

Meanwhile, I'm watching handsome-handsome Guy Madison as the guest star on Wagon Train.  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 23, 2013, 11:34:07 AM
p.s.  I'm certain The Untouchables (one of my favorites) was a Desilu production.  I heard Robert Stack mention it more than once.  

You are entirely correct. The Untouchables initially aired in April of '59, as a two-part episode of the
Desilu Playhouse series. (This is where episodes of the Lucy/Desi Comedy Hour aired which featured
the hour long shows of Lucy, Ricky, Fred & Ethel.) The Untouchables was such a huge ratings hit that
a series was immediately brought into production. The original two-part episode was re-cut as a movie
and was shown in movie theaters in the U.S. and abroad to gain publicity for the upcoming series that
fall. It was also syndicated to stations across the country after that for years. The first season dvd of
The Untouchables includes the two parter in the "film version," but adds the introductions and original
credits of the Desilu Playhouse version as an added extra.

In 1966, I believe it was, three years after it was off the air, The Lucy Show did an episode
reuniting three of The Untouchables characters, including Robert Stack. Although they didn't
use their character names, they were playing their Untouchables characters, including Robert
Stack, and it was quite amusing. That episode is on one of the dvd's as a bonus extra, too.
SNL in it's second season did a parody of The Untouchables with Dan Aykroyd playing Ness.

I had always heard how violent this show was and at the time it was considered extreme.
Watching them now you may harken back to a "simpler" time and wonder what audiences
would think of today's television programs.

I've always been a fan. I also enjoyed the film. I could never get into the syndicated series
done in the early 90's, though. Did anyone know that a musical was done called "Eliot Ness
in Cleveland?" True!

I attended a Paley Festival event celebrating this series back in the early 90's. Robert Stack
was there as well as some other cast members. They showed an episode and had a panel
discussion.  Was great!
 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 23, 2013, 11:47:45 AM
I loved Tom AND Don, both of whom were dorky-looking in their 20s but by their mid-thirties were extremely sexy.

The first R- Rated film I ever saw when I went off to college starred Don Johnson.
I'm going to look up the title now.

***

It was The Harrad Experiment. Don Johnson was probably the first naked person I'd seen
in a film!  Heh! I'll bet the film doesn't hold up. Peyton Place was considered scandalous
when it came out. I thought it was a hoot. Generations now would probably think the
same of Harrad Experiment, which even had a sequel! Me and my friends were particularly
interested in Don Johnson then because one of our classmates looked amazingly like him.
(The guy's name is Paul Murray, if I recall.)

You could see more on the internet now than we ever thought of seeing
back when this film came out. I can't imagine growing up now and seeing
nearly anything you want and many things a young person shouldn't,
whenever you want to online! Back to TV!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on March 23, 2013, 12:02:58 PM
Did anyone know that a musical was done called "Eliot Ness
in Chicago?" True!

LOL, well, "semi" true.  It was "Eliot Ness..In Cleveland". 
zzzzzzz
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 23, 2013, 12:03:57 PM
Meanwhile, I'm watching handsome-handsome Guy Madison as the guest star on Wagon Train.  :)

I wish I'd seen that! That guy in photos alone makes me swoon, I can't imagine
what he'd have been like in person. Wonder who coined the phrase "bedroom eyes."

(http://i2.listal.com/image/162696/600full-guy-madison.jpg)

I just wrote this in the above post:
I can't imagine growing up now and seeing nearly anything you want
and many things a young person shouldn't, whenever you want to online!


Well, I googled Guy Madison to find a pic to post here and look what I immediately found:

Click the Not Safe for Work link here:  NSFW (http://andrejkoymasky.com/liv/fam/biom1/madiso02/madi2a.jpg) 

I've not seen many of his movies or his TV series.  What was the Wagon Train episode about?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 23, 2013, 12:18:22 PM
Every time someone mentions Guy Madison I spend an hour looking at
his photograph online. Dang you, Jeff.  I mean, thank you Jeff!  LOL!

(http://davelandweb.com/celebs/images/GuyMadison.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on March 23, 2013, 12:35:03 PM
guy madison caught my eye as well, to say the least.  he never got any really plum roles, but was a durable b-list actor who happened to look good in union blues or on a horse.  i think he may have been in a few military uniforms as well...
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 23, 2013, 01:49:11 PM

Guy was discovered by his agent Henry Willson at a radio show taping
in Hollywood. Guy was on leave from the navy and in uniform.
(http://farm8.static.flickr.com/7029/6750156205_fd1a35ac0c.jpg)
Willson took him to Selnick who was looking for someone for the small part of a sailor
in the film Since You Went Away. Selznick thought a real life sailor playing the part
would be worth the publicity. Especially a sailor who looked like Guy Madison. So he
filmed the part while still on leave and was back aboard ship. When he got back to
Hollywood after the film had been released, he had received thousands of letters
sent to him while he was in the Pacific aboard ship in the navy and a star was born!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 23, 2013, 01:50:06 PM
Guy's brother was also in the navy:

(http://blogs.villagevoice.com/dailymusto/Guy%20Madison%20and%20brother.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 23, 2013, 01:52:30 PM
Okay, I have to share more photos (which I never saw before until today!)
of that TV actor from the classic TV series Wild Bill Hickok (keeping it on topic)!

(http://www.guymadison.com/images/396_RobertGuyon_Bike_Teen.01.jpg)

Guy as a teenager! (His name was Bill Mosely. His agent gave him the
name "Guy" as in "The guy  every girl would want." Madison came
from a Dolly Madison cake truck that his agent happened to see.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 23, 2013, 01:58:26 PM

(http://www.guymadison.com/images/396_RoryandGuyFishing-07.jpg)
Guy's daughter says that Rory Calhoun and her father were best friends.
Others say that they were lovers and there's a lot of things to back that
notion up. Here they are on one of their frequent "fishin' trips!"
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 23, 2013, 02:01:35 PM

Was this his daughter's license plate or Rory Calhoun's, lol!
(http://www.guymadison.com/images/396_GUYMAD02.jpg)

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 23, 2013, 02:08:12 PM
Holy cow, what did I start by bringing up Guy Madison?  :D

I didn't save the link, but one day, when I was bored not busy at work, I found a very nice tribute website maintained by his daughter (who, incidentally, lost a son in either Iraq or Afghanistan, unfortunately I don't remember which). I can't imagine the site would be too difficult to locate, not if I could find it.  :D

He must have been awfully young when some of those photos were taken. Henry Willson certainly had an eye for prime young beef.  8)  ;D

In the Wagon Train episode he played some who had been at Shiloh with Major Adams and turned out to be a thief and con-man. This being a show from before 1960, he is redeemed in the end by love for a pretty girl.  ::)

As Jack said, he did look good in Union blues. I remember seeing him (on TV, of course) in a B-grade horse opera called The Command, where he played the regimental surgeon who ended up being the ranking surviving officer and had to lead the troops safely through hostile Indian country. Must have been some time in the early Eighties that I saw the movie, but I still remember how good Madison looked in that cavalry uniform.  :)

What a shame he didn't become a bigger star.  :(  What a handsome, handsome man he was.  :)

ETA: Looks like Lyle found the web site.  :D


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 23, 2013, 02:08:40 PM

Wild Bill Hickok

(http://www.guymadison.com/images/396_CowboyGuy-01.jpg)
(http://www.guymadison.com/images/274_Picture_005.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 23, 2013, 02:11:10 PM

(http://www.guymadison.com/images/831_GuyinAZ.jpg)

Look at this photo of Guy in his 60's. Man oh man! Still the looker!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 23, 2013, 02:11:28 PM
Well, I googled Guy Madison to find a pic to post here and look what I immediately found:

Click the Not Safe for Work link here:  NSFW (http://andrejkoymasky.com/liv/fam/biom1/madiso02/madi2a.jpg) 

 :o  Mother of God!

LOL!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 23, 2013, 02:12:08 PM

One more:

(http://www.guymadison.com/images/396_GuywithJalopy-03.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 23, 2013, 02:17:43 PM
(http://www.guymadison.com/images/396_RoryandGuyFishing-07.jpg)
Guy's daughter says that Rory Calhoun and her father were best friends.
Others say that they were lovers and there's a lot of things to back that
notion up. Here they are on one of their frequent "fishin' trips!"

Now, shall we get started on Rory Calhoun, too?  ;D

Anybody know anything about a Western TV series Calhoun starred in called The Texan? I never heard of it until I came across it in the Critic"s Choice Video catalog. (Apparently it only lasted a season or two and debuted the year I was born.  ::) )

Lucky Betty Grable ends up with Calhoun in the movie How to Marry a Millionaire.  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 23, 2013, 02:20:17 PM
(http://www.guymadison.com/images/831_GuyinAZ.jpg)

Look at this photo of Guy in his 60's. Man oh man! Still the looker!



Still strikingly handsome even in his 60s.  :)

(I love the shirt and the boots!  ;D )
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 23, 2013, 02:21:45 PM
Holy cow, what did I start by bringing up Guy Madison?  :D

Yes, please don't do it again, I have things to do!   ;D

found the web site.

Yes, one of many!

Henry Willson certainly had an eye for prime young beef.  8)  ;D

And speaking of that NSFW pic I linked to, in Willson's biography, it is stated that Willson had
dozens of naked photos of Guy Madison, mostly taken at his home and on the lawn, that he
kept in an album in his house that many people viewed. Willson would tell people the story of
keeping tabs on some of his stable of stars and talks about one night following Guy Madison to
Rory Calhoun's place (during a thunderstorm, no less) and finding them going at it in the back
seat of the car parked in the driveway.

And I wonder what happened to that photo album?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 23, 2013, 02:25:14 PM
(http://www.guymadison.com/images/831_GuyinAZ.jpg)

Look at this photo of Guy in his 60's. Man oh man! Still the looker!



Wow! That's for sure!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 23, 2013, 02:25:34 PM
And speaking of that NSFW pic I linked to, in Willson's biography, it is stated that Willson had
dozens of naked photos of Guy Madison, mostly taken at his home and on the lawn, that he
kept in an album in his house that many people viewed. Willson would tell people the story of
keeping tabs on some of his stable of stars and talks about one night following Guy Madison to
Rory Calhoun's place (during a thunderstorm, no less) and finding them going at it in the back
seat of the car parked in the driveway.

And I wonder what happened to that photo album?

Imagine what that album would be worth today!

Hmm. Guy Madison and Rory Calhoun going at it. ...

I think I need some air!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 23, 2013, 02:29:09 PM
Now, shall we get started on Rory Calhoun, too?  ;D

I never heard of that TV series The Texan. The only thing I knew about Rory Calhoun for
many many years was that he was a guest star on the most disturbing ever episode of
Gilliigan's Island.

(http://www.sitcomsonline.com/photopost/data/762/rc3.JPG)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 23, 2013, 02:53:43 PM

Speaking of changing names, is that your real name Jeff Wrangler?  It sounds
like a name that Henry Willson would have come up with back in the day!

He tried Troy Donahue on a few other boys before it finally stuck with--Troy Donahue. The
iffiest name he came up with was for a gas station attendant he had his eye on who worked
near MGM studios whom he named Race Gentry. He looks a little reminiscent of Ricky Nelson.
(http://therockhudsonproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Race-Gentry.jpg)
He got the boy a few good jobs, but "Race" (born John Papiro) was wary of big bad Hollywood,
according to the book, and decided it was not the life for him!  Hmmm.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 23, 2013, 02:55:32 PM

John Papiro aka Race Gentry aka John Gentry did do a film with
Rock Hudson. (I wonder if he did anything else?)
(http://therockhudsonproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Rock-Hudson-and-Race-Gentry-candid-one.jpg)

He came back in a few years and did some TV work under the name John Gentry.
Willson tried the name Gentry out again in the 60's on an actor (Chance Gentry),
but to llittle avail.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 23, 2013, 03:10:36 PM
Speaking of changing names, is that your real name Jeff Wrangler?  It sounds
like a name that Henry Willson would have come up with back in the day!

Perhaps you knew my big brother, Jack Wrangler?  ;D

We were both named for a pair of pants. ...  8)

Quote
The iffiest name he came up with was for a gas station attendant he had his eye on who worked near MGM studios whom he named Race Gentry. He looks a little reminiscent of Ricky Nelson. (http://therockhudsonproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Race-Gentry.jpg) He got the boy a few good jobs, but "Race" (born John Papiro) was wary of big bad Hollywood, according to the book, and decided it was not the life for him!  Hmmm.

Kid was smarter than he looks. ...  8)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 23, 2013, 03:24:25 PM
The first R- Rated film I ever saw when I went off to college starred Don Johnson.
I'm going to look up the title now.

***

It was The Harrad Experiment. Don Johnson was probably the first naked person I'd seen
in a film!  Heh! I'll bet the film doesn't hold up. Peyton Place was considered scandalous
when it came out. I thought it was a hoot. Generations now would probably think the
same of Harrad Experiment, which even had a sequel! Me and my friends were particularly
interested in Don Johnson then because one of our classmates looked amazingly like him.
(The guy's name is Paul Murray, if I recall.)

You could see more on the internet now than we ever thought of seeing
back when this film came out. I can't imagine growing up now and seeing
nearly anything you want and many things a young person shouldn't,
whenever you want to online! Back to TV!



Of course being obsessed with Don, I did look up the move (many times  :-\) and would love to own the movie.


I think he was cute when he was young (but as has been mentioned) he got better with age!


We can't sneak Miami Vice into the classic TV, it was early 80's, too bad - I could do a whole category on that show alone!   It really was life changing for me, and looking back I am not sure why - just the right show at the right time I guess.


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/Don-Johnson_zpsf9253150.jpg)

I still just hear his voice and swoon, and swoon is the only word to describe it!  :P


But it wasn't just Don (although I did go on to watch Nash Bridges) it was Sonny Crockett that really did it for me!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: kathy on March 23, 2013, 08:35:21 PM
LOL, well, "semi" true.  It was "Eliot Ness..In Cleveland". 
zzzzzzz

I do remember a 2-hr. TV movie about Eliot Ness in Cleveland.  There was a series of murders and the killer was not found.  Bob Stack portrayed Ness again. 
He had a very good idea who the killer was but because he came from a prominent family and lots of $$$$, Eliot was never able to get this out to the public.  Yeah - what else is new?

kathy
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: kathy on March 23, 2013, 08:46:27 PM
You are entirely correct. The Untouchables initially aired in April of '59, as a two-part episode of the
Desilu Playhouse series. (This is where episodes of the Lucy/Desi Comedy Hour aired which featured
the hour long shows of Lucy, Ricky, Fred & Ethel.) The Untouchables was such a huge ratings hit that
a series was immediately brought into production. The original two-part episode was re-cut as a movie
and was shown in movie theaters in the U.S. and abroad to gain publicity for the upcoming series that
fall. It was also syndicated to stations across the country after that for years. The first season dvd of
The Untouchables includes the two parter in the "film version," but adds the introductions and original
credits of the Desilu Playhouse version as an added extra.

In 1966, I believe it was, three years after it was off the air, The Lucy Show did an episode
reuniting three of The Untouchables characters, including Robert Stack. Although they didn't
use their character names, they were playing their Untouchables characters, including Robert
Stack, and it was quite amusing. That episode is on one of the dvd's as a bonus extra, too.
SNL in it's second season did a parody of The Untouchables with Dan Aykroyd playing Ness.

I had always heard how violent this show was and at the time it was considered extreme.
Watching them now you may harken back to a "simpler" time and wonder what audiences
would think of today's television programs.

I've always been a fan. I also enjoyed the film. I could never get into the syndicated series
done in the early 90's, though. Did anyone know that a musical was done called "Eliot Ness
in Cleveland?" True!

I attended a Paley Festival event celebrating this series back in the early 90's. Robert Stack
was there as well as some other cast members. They showed an episode and had a panel
discussion.  Was great!
 
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Lyle, thx for confirming my statement re The Untouchables as a Desilu production.  I remember so many of the things you mention in your post (practically all; but not the "musical".
I think Bob Stack was my very first crush.  I always watched him.  

kathy
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 24, 2013, 12:45:43 AM
I came across this on YouTube.

10 RARE "LOST" CLASSIC '60s TV THEMES
http://youtu.be/cqx-D0440pA

The only one I vaguely remember is "Suspense Theater".
The rest of them, I don't have a clue!!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 24, 2013, 12:47:14 AM
The first R- Rated film I ever saw when I went off to college starred Don Johnson.
I'm going to look up the title now.

***

It was The Harrad Experiment. Don Johnson was probably the first naked person I'd seen
in a film!  Heh! I'll bet the film doesn't hold up. Peyton Place was considered scandalous
when it came out. I thought it was a hoot. Generations now would probably think the
same of Harrad Experiment, which even had a sequel! Me and my friends were particularly
interested in Don Johnson then because one of our classmates looked amazingly like him.
(The guy's name is Paul Murray, if I recall.)

You could see more on the internet now than we ever thought of seeing
back when this film came out. I can't imagine growing up now and seeing
nearly anything you want and many things a young person shouldn't,
whenever you want to online! Back to TV!


I actually remember this movie, Lyle!
And watched it! :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 24, 2013, 12:47:51 AM
Every time someone mentions Guy Madison I spend an hour looking at
his photograph online. Dang you, Jeff.  I mean, thank you Jeff!  LOL!

(http://davelandweb.com/celebs/images/GuyMadison.jpg)

Yeah........ ditto, Jeff! ::)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 24, 2013, 12:56:39 AM
I love 's commercials too!!

http://youtu.be/_yWTsFVkrFc
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: moreta on March 24, 2013, 02:25:27 PM

Well, I googled Guy Madison to find a pic to post here and look what I immediately found:


Sadly, this pic just reminds me of the episode of Seinfeld where George got caught after a swim.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 24, 2013, 02:57:03 PM
 
LOL!  Good reference/comparison!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 24, 2013, 04:39:36 PM
I came across this on YouTube.

10 RARE "LOST" CLASSIC '60s TV THEMES
http://youtu.be/cqx-D0440pA

The only one I vaguely remember is "Suspense Theater".
The rest of them, I don't have a clue!!


I don't remember any of the themes, though I remembered some of the titles (e.g., Hawk, T.H.E. Cat) and certainly some of the actors. Some of those themes were nice, jazzy pieces.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on March 24, 2013, 04:50:54 PM
I don't remember any of the themes, though I remembered some of the titles (e.g., Hawk, T.H.E. Cat) and certainly some of the actors. Some of those themes were nice, jazzy pieces.

I caught the jazzy sounds as well, Jeff. I guess it was the times, as that was a decade where jazz really came into it's own.
Well at least for me!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 26, 2013, 09:13:15 AM
I came across this on YouTube.

10 RARE "LOST" CLASSIC '60s TV THEMES
http://youtu.be/cqx-D0440pA

The only one I vaguely remember is "Suspense Theater".
The rest of them, I don't have a clue!!



We could almost have a TV song category!   There have been some great ones, there must be a CD or two out.


http://ca.ign.com/articles/2006/05/05/top-50-tv-theme-songs-of-all-time?page=1

I couldn't even pick a favourite, maybe a tie between the Brady Bunch and the Partridge Family.

My sons would pick Fresh Prince of Bel air for sure.


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 26, 2013, 12:42:21 PM

We could almost have a TV song category!

It could be split into "themes with lyrics" and "themes without lyrics."

Quote
I couldn't even pick a favourite, maybe a tie between the Brady Bunch and the Partridge Family.

My sons would pick Fresh Prince of Bel air for sure.

I don't think I could settle on a single one favorite. Personal favorites of themes with lyrics are The Beverly Hillbillies, Petticoat Junction, and Green Acres (all Paul Henning comedies, and I'd bet the themes are all by the same person or persons). Favorite themes without lyrics are Bonanza, Hawaill 5-0, and Magnum, P.I.

And of course favorite doesn't mean that I don't know by heart the words to a number of other themes with lyrics.  ::)

In another context, I once had a discussion with a friend where I surmised that The Lone Ranger had probably ruined the William Tell Overture for opera-goers. She confirmed that she had been in the audience for a performance of the Rossini opera, and when the overture got to the part used for The Lone Ranger (I think technically it's called the March of the Swiss Soldiers, or something like that), she noticed a lot of otherwise sophisticated opera buffs start to smile and squirm in their seats.  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: moreta on March 26, 2013, 09:43:31 PM

We could almost have a TV song category!   There have been some great ones, there must be a CD or two out.


Hands down best tv theme song, Maverick is the name
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 27, 2013, 08:48:46 AM
Check out this list, this one is a keeper (I just bookmarked it).  Funny I think even some of the ones that were instrumental, did actually have lyrics, sometimes we just never heard the lyrics!



http://www.boyculture.com/boy_culture/2013/01/historys-50-best-tv-theme-songs-my-list.html
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 27, 2013, 11:49:45 AM

Despite what that link reads, the list is 150 themes!

One can quibble about personal favorites and what is on the list (of 150!), but
"77 Sunset Strip" should've been on there!

Many of the pics chosen for the list are a hoot as well!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 27, 2013, 11:59:54 AM
sometimes we just never heard the lyrics!

I have a recording, by Peggy Lee of all people, singing the lyrics to Bewitched!

Bewitched, bewitched, you've got me in your spell.
Bewitched, bewitched, you know your craft so well.

Before I knew what you were doing I looked in your eyes.
That brand of woo that you've been brew-in' took me by surprise.

You witch, you witch, one thing that's for sure,
That stuff you pitch - just hasn't got a cure.

My heart was under lock and key, but somehow it got unhitched.
I never thought my heart could be had.
But now I'm caught and I'm kind of glad to be Bewitched.
Bewitched-witched.


Several years ago I went to a concert of TV Theme music at the Hollywood Bowl.
Mary Tyler Moore and Dick Van Dyke performed, for the first time they said they
had done it, the lyrics to The Dick Van Dyke Show theme!

So you think that you've got troubles?
Well, trouble's a bubble,
So tell old Mr. Trouble to "Get lost!".

Why not hold your head up high and,
Stop cryin', start tryin',
And don't forget to keep your fingers crossed.

When you find the joy of livin'
Is lovin' and givin'
You'll be there when the winning dice are tossed.

A smile is just a frown that's turned upside down,
So smile, and that frown will defrost.
And don't forget to keep your fingers crossed!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 27, 2013, 12:13:07 PM
Going through all 150 of those, I probably should change my vote to the theme song from Miami Vice.    And "Thank you for being a Friend" (from Golden Girls) is a keeper, my son and his wife played that at their wedding reception!  :D


I can't believe the lyrics you posted Lyle, I had no clue and they are brilliant!  :D  I am going to have them stuck in my head all day now.

I was thinking more along the lines of the Andy Griffith show, wasn't it just whistling?   But I have read the lyrics!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 27, 2013, 04:42:43 PM
What Classic Sitcoms Taught Us About Gay Rights
by Kevin Fallon Mar 27, 2013 11:40 AM EDT

Forget Hillary Clinton and Rob Portman. The Golden Girls’ Sophia, All in the Family’s Archie, and a slew of classic sitcom stars were the real gay-rights crusaders.


http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/03/27/what-classic-sitcoms-taught-us-about-gay-rights.html
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on March 27, 2013, 09:19:31 PM
Loved this, Bubba.  I have seen every one of these clips, except the Gimme a Break! one.

Love your avatar, too. They were never lovelier than here.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on March 28, 2013, 05:50:03 PM
if we are going for classic, and i have not yet checked the list, the one that immediately popped into mind was RAWHIDE, frankie lane's contribution.. but that's for us old people...
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 28, 2013, 07:22:32 PM
if we are going for classic, and i have not yet checked the list, the one that immediately popped into mind was RAWHIDE, frankie lane's contribution.. but that's for us old people...

That was a great theme.  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: moreta on March 30, 2013, 01:22:25 PM
Check out this list, this one is a keeper (I just bookmarked it).  Funny I think even some of the ones that were instrumental, did actually have lyrics, sometimes we just never heard the lyrics!



http://www.boyculture.com/boy_culture/2013/01/historys-50-best-tv-theme-songs-my-list.html

Terrific List, but this one http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9Q3orQhEcA&feature=youtu.be will always remind me of Jackie
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on March 30, 2013, 02:31:45 PM
Terrific List, but this one http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9Q3orQhEcA&feature=youtu.be will always remind me of Jackie

Didn't watch TV much at that time, I was unaware that this was even a TV theme!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bentgyro on March 30, 2013, 03:12:04 PM
if we are going for classic, and i have not yet checked the list, the one that immediately popped into mind was RAWHIDE, frankie lane's contribution.. but that's for us old people...

The Blues Brothers had to sing it over and over again!
And Clint Eastwood was such a pretty boy! :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 31, 2013, 11:48:04 AM

On Friday, a friend and I were talking about the lack of Easter themed tv show episodes.
We could only come up with 2-3. Can anyone think of TV shows that had Easter episodes?

We wondered why. It's possibly because the tv seasons are usually over by then, or used
to be. I mean, is there any 4th of July themed episodes, either? Maybe it's too religious?
Christmas can be thought of in so many different ways for example, most of them nothing
to do with religion. And Santa is a person. Depicting a rabbit seems too unlikely and it is
unbelievable in many ways.

Seems like Bewitched might have given that a go, but they never did. They did Leprechauins
(twice), tooth fairies and even the Loch Ness monster after all!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on March 31, 2013, 11:53:46 AM

Coincidentally:
A friend and I were exchanging emails just now and I discovered I missed the last two
episodes of Raising Hope, which we both like, because Fox decided to air the season
finales on Thursday last week and I didn't know that, so I'll have to catch the reruns.
But, he said one of them was an Easter episode and the other one a Mother's Day
episode! That seems to be a theme this year because not only did they do the standard
Halloween and Christmas episodes, they also did Thanksgiving, Valentine's Day and the
funniest episode of the season--an Arbor Day episode!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: moreta on March 31, 2013, 09:04:20 PM
Coincidentally:
A friend and I were exchanging emails just now and I discovered I missed the last two
episodes of Raising Hope, which we both like, because Fox decided to air the season
finales on Thursday last week and I didn't know that, so I'll have to catch the reruns.


I love this show! Half Malcolm in the Middle, Half Roseanne, and MawMaw is awsome!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 01, 2013, 02:01:29 PM
On Friday, a friend and I were talking about the lack of Easter themed tv show episodes.
We could only come up with 2-3. Can anyone think of TV shows that had Easter episodes?

We wondered why. It's possibly because the tv seasons are usually over by then, or used
to be. I mean, is there any 4th of July themed episodes, either? Maybe it's too religious?
Christmas can be thought of in so many different ways for example, most of them nothing
to do with religion. And Santa is a person. Depicting a rabbit seems too unlikely and it is
unbelievable in many ways.

Seems like Bewitched might have given that a go, but they never did. They did Leprechauins
(twice), tooth fairies and even the Loch Ness monster after all!

Easter is probably too religious, though it does seem odd that Bewitched! never conjured up the Easter Bunny. They conjured up just about everyone and everything else.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 01, 2013, 03:30:23 PM
I don't know about any of the classic TV shows, but I am thinking a show like Seventh Heaven, where the Father was a Minister, you would think they would have done it!


Actually if you google that, it is surprising what comes up, the first one was Bonaza!  :D

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0529520/
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 01, 2013, 03:38:08 PM
http://www.insp.com/shows/the-waltons-the-easter-story/


And the Waltons, should have known!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: kathy on April 01, 2013, 06:41:42 PM
if we are going for classic, and i have not yet checked the list, the one that immediately popped into mind was RAWHIDE, frankie lane's contribution.. but that's for us old people...


I don't think anyone ever sang a western theme song like Frankie.  Both for films and TV, he was just great.

kathy :) 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 01, 2013, 07:22:11 PM
This afternoon I caught an episode of The Wild Wild West that was an absolute hoot! A baby elephant, and Ruta Lee in a black wig playing a Gypsy!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 03, 2013, 08:16:45 AM
Even in my own mind, my topic here doesn't qualify as "Classic TV," only, perhaps, as "oh-my-God-that's-almost-20-years-ago TV," but it doesn't really seem to fit any other thread, so I'm putting this here.

I've begun to watch on DVD a series that apparently lasted only one season, 1994-95, and I have no memory of even hearing about it back then, much less watching it. It's called Hawkeye, and it's kind of like fan fiction for fans of The Last of the Mohicans. In fact, I'm sure it must have been somebody's idea/attempt to capitalize on the Daniel Day-Lewis movie (which I like a lot), which came out a couple of years before this series. Moreover, I've watched the DD-L film often enough that I've recognized footage from it (misty mountains, soldiers marching) in Hawkeye. Plus, the series score features the same kind of Celtic-inflected music that was used in TLotM. The series might even be considered a sort-of prequel to TLotM, since each episode opens with the date 1755, and TLotM takes place in 1757. Col. Munro has appeared as a recurring character in the series, and in the last episode I watched he mentioned having two daughters. ...

Hawkeye stars manly Lee Horsley as the title character. His leading lady is none other than Wonder Woman herself, Lynda Carter. Chingachgook is played by Rodney A. Grant; there is no Uncas. The set-up is this. Lynda Carter plays a woman named Elizabeth Shields. She accompanies her husband William to the fictional Fort Bennington, where William Shields is to run the trading post. The fort is commanded by William Shields' younger brother, whose commission in the British Army William purchased for him (you could do that sort of thing back then). There is bad blood over family inheritance between the brothers, and shortly after his arrival at Fort Bennington, William Shields is captured by Indians and apparently handed over to the French as a POW. Elizabeth Shields sticks around to run the trading post and attempt to secure her husband's release, with the assistance of Hawkeye. So far as the episodes I've seen, Hawkeye doesn't seem to live anywhere, though mention has been made of his living with the Delawares; he just seems to hang around Fort Bennington. I might be wrong but based on what I've seen so far, in this version Chingachgook seems to be a Delaware rather than a Mohican.

I've enjoyed the four episodes I've watched so far (there are 22 in all). I stop short, however, of recommending the series because personally I'll watch just about anything set on the 18th-century frontier  ;D, and especially during the so-called French and Indian War, when the "frontier" was hardly more than 100 miles west and north of where I'm sitting as I write this, so I don't consider myself an impartial judge. Serious fans of TLotM might object to this series; I don't. So far I've noticed only a couple of bone-headed anachronisms in dialogue, and I've been impressed that the production values seem to have been pretty high, with props, costumes, sets, and so forth pretty accurate.

Just passing this on for anyone else who might be interested.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 03, 2013, 10:07:17 AM
http://www.wonderland-site.com/html/hawk.htm


You know I was about to say I didn't remember it, but looking at the pictures in that link above, I do remember it.


And Lee Horsely, he was also Matt Houston!


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 03, 2013, 11:40:13 AM
http://www.wonderland-site.com/html/hawk.htm

You know I was about to say I didn't remember it, but looking at the pictures in that link above, I do remember it.

And Lee Horsely, he was also Matt Houston!

Yes, he was! People used to talk about the lingering crotch shot that was part of the opening sequence for Matt Houston.  ;D

It seems  he's had several series, none of which seem to last terribly long--Matt Houston was probably the longest--but he's still working.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on April 03, 2013, 11:51:36 AM
Yes, he was! People used to talk about the lingering crotch shot that was part of the opening sequence for Matt Houston.  ;D

It seems  he's had several series, none of which seem to last terribly long--Matt Houston was probably the longest--but he's still working.
He is in "Django Unchained" 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 03, 2013, 01:51:20 PM
He is in "Django Unchained"  

I was surprised when I saw that, when I looked Lee Horsley up at IMDb. That's one reason why I mentioned that he's still working.

I know I shouldn't say this. I'm embarrassed for myself by my own feelings, but I've always rather thought of Lee Horsley as sort of "Tom Selleck Lite." But, OTOH, based on the episodes I've seen so far, I'd say he's quite right for the role of Hawkeye in this series. He's quiet and reserved, a man of few words. Tom Selleck would have overwhelmed the part. His personality is too big for it.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 05, 2013, 09:12:36 PM
This evening I saw the lovely early Bewitched! Christmas episode where Sam took Darrin and a very young Billy Mumy to the North Pole to meet Santa Claus. I wish I could have gone with them!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on April 06, 2013, 06:23:46 AM
What station was this rerun on, Jeff?  Just curious.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 06, 2013, 09:04:10 AM
This evening I saw the lovely early Bewitched! Christmas episode where Sam took Darrin and a very young Billy Mumy to the North Pole to meet Santa Claus. I wish I could have gone with them!  :D

Awww that is so sweet!!  I remember that one well and yes I wish I could have went as well!!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: moreta on April 07, 2013, 09:37:36 AM
Even in my own mind, my topic here doesn't qualify as "Classic TV," only, perhaps, as "oh-my-God-that's-almost-20-years-ago TV," but it doesn't really seem to fit any other thread, so I'm putting this here.

I've begun to watch on DVD a series that apparently lasted only one season, 1994-95, and I have no memory of even hearing about it back then, much less watching it. It's called Hawkeye, and it's kind of like fan fiction for fans of The Last of the Mohicans. In fact, I'm sure it must have been somebody's idea/attempt to capitalize on the Daniel Day-Lewis movie (which I like a lot), which came out a couple of years before this series. Moreover, I've watched the DD-L film often enough that I've recognized footage from it (misty mountains, soldiers marching) in Hawkeye. Plus, the series score features the same kind of Celtic-inflected music that was used in TLotM. The series might even be considered a sort-of prequel to TLotM, since each episode opens with the date 1755, and TLotM takes place in 1757. Col. Munro has appeared as a recurring character in the series, and in the last episode I watched he mentioned having two daughters. ...

Just passing this on for anyone else who might be interested.



I really liked this show when it was in first run syndication.  I get really frustrated that shows like this are not given the chance to find an audience.  Then there are other shows which spend 2 to 3 years in the bottom 50 being nursed along and are now "classics" cough:seinfeld:cough, 

Did anyone ever see a show called "the Young Rebels"?  It was set during the Revolutionary war.  It also only lasted a season.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 07, 2013, 01:59:00 PM
Did anyone ever see a show called "the Young Rebels"?  It was set during the Revolutionary war.  It also only lasted a season.

I remember The Young Rebels! I was, er, very young when it aired.  ::) I think I remember them doing an episode (inspired by fact) about how they got the Liberty Bell out of Philadelphia and hid it from the British?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 07, 2013, 02:04:05 PM
One thing that really interests me in revisiting these "classic" shows, now that I have the perspective of years,  ::) is seeing actors from one show in other roles, often in earlier shows. Just this afternoon I saw "Dr. Bellows" from I Dream of Jeannie in an episode of I Love Lucy. And in another episode--the one where a teenage girl has a crush on Ricky, and Lucy tries to teach one of the girl's classmates to dance--the teenage classmate looked familiar. I made a point to pay close attention to the credits. I didn't catch the name of the girl, whose voice sounded familiar (like, from cartoons, maybe?), but the reason the boy looked familiar was because he was a very young Richard Crenna! (They called him Dick in the credits.)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 08, 2013, 06:59:34 AM
What station was this rerun on, Jeff?  Just curious.

I'm sorry! Somehow I missed this post and never answered your question. My bad!  :(

I'm getting Bewitched! and I Dream of Jeannie and a whole bunch of other classic shows, including The Rebel and Wagon Train and Gunsmoke and Bonanza and The Rifleman and The Big Valley and The Wild, Wild West on something called ME-TV. Locally the station bills itself as Philadelphia-Allentown, and lots of its commercials are for businesses in the Allentown-Lehigh Valley-Reading, PA, region.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 08, 2013, 07:04:10 AM
That's it! Thank you! That solves the mystery! At our house we did, indeed, watch Tarzan, with big Ron Ely in a teeny-weeny loin cloth!

Quoting this because one of the episodes of Hawkeye that I watched last night on DVD featured none other than Ron Ely. By 1994 he was considerably heavier in face and body than he was in his Tarzan years.

Somebody once said, Gravity gets us all in the end.  :-\
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on April 08, 2013, 07:54:23 AM
The girl in "The Young Fans" episode of I LOVE LUCY (originally broadcast February 25, 1952, the 20th episode of the series) was Janet Waldo, who indeed was the voice of Judy Jetson.

Interesting fact:  when she filmed the I LOVE LUCY episode, she was pregnant.

Crenna was billed as Dick until he showed a more manly side (and how!) in THE REAL McCOYS.   Henceforth he was billed as Richard.

I love MeTV!  Just wish I had cable.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 08, 2013, 08:13:14 AM
The girl in "The Young Fans" episode of I LOVE LUCY (originally broadcast February 25, 1952, the 20th episode of the series) was Janet Waldo, who indeed was the voice of Judy Jetson.

Tell you what, I would have guessed Judy Jetson.  :D

Quote
Crenna was billed as Dick until he showed a more manly side (and how!) in THE REAL McCOYS.   Henceforth he was billed as Richard.

I remember The Real McCoys, too, especially Grandpa (Walter Brennan). I didn't look him up, but Richard Crenna must have been awfully young when he filmed that Lucy episode. Yikes! 1952! He matured into a very good-looking, manly guy.  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 08, 2013, 10:50:01 AM
I love MeTV!  Just wish I had cable.

Most of ME-TV's networks don't air on cable, it's over the air.  In your area check out
one of these and see if you get either of them:

Gainesville                  WYME-CA     9.2          New Age Media
Tampa/St. Petersburg WFLA-TV      8.2          Media General
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 08, 2013, 11:38:49 AM
Did anyone ever see a show called "the Young Rebels"? It was
set during the Revolutionary war.  It also only lasted a season.

Yes, I do remember watching this series.  I remember that Brandon De Wilde played
Nathan Hale in one episode.  My recollection is that it was on in the late 60's and was
supposed to be thought of as a corollory to the "young rebels" of the late 60's and the
like who were active trying to "change America' at the time. Something different, that's
for sure. The only other series I can think of that even got close to portraying anything in
this time period was Danile Boone on occasion.

I have often wondered why Americans are not interested in this time period. There's very
few movies about it and the ones there are are mostly not very good. I mean, there's not
even a movie about Paul Revere. Really? The most recent thing I can think of to detail this
period at all was the John Adams mini-series. And TV series?  Curious.

Now I am going to look up a few things about The Young Rebels.

--Ok, it was on a bit later than I thought -- 1970-71. A synopsis I read says that "The series was
supposed to allow the youthful and social rebels of the late 1960's and early 1970's, or those who
fantasized along with them, to relate to the American revolution.

--They must have really wanted to appeal to a very young audience as it had an odd time slot, in
my opinion, Sundays at 7pm.

--It only aired 15 episodes! (And yet three of us remember it!)

--The lead character was played by Rick Ely. I wonder if he was realted to Ron Ely?

--On the Sunday night schedule this show aired opposite Wild Kingdom and the Wonderful
World of Disney on NBC and Lassie and Hogan's Heroes on CBS.

--Another item reads:  "Rick Ely and Philippe Forquet became teenage idols and were widely featured
in movie and fan magazines. Despite extensive promotion and a large (by television standards of the era)
production budget, The Young Rebels failed to garner enough of an audience and was canceled at midseason."

I do wonder what these episodes would be like to view today.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 08, 2013, 12:06:20 PM

I found a few photos from it:

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-BKlAHiz5MLU/TkGiMt2JZjI/AAAAAAABHX0/9wbDEZucLt0/s320/Rebels.jpg)

Alex Henteloff (his character idoloized Ben Franklin and he resembles him)!
Lou Gossett was in it!
Rick Ely on the right.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 08, 2013, 12:07:16 PM

(http://cdn101.iofferphoto.com/img3/item/512/194/652/the-young-rebels-afa7.jpg)

The girl was Hilarie Thompson.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 08, 2013, 12:11:01 PM

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_S9hWVfjAHuY/S15-Pw5nXGI/AAAAAAAABeo/iPKaaAVI80E/s320/10946438_tml.jpg)

Philippe Forquet

Apparently places like IOFFER and such have people selling bootleg copies (dvd) of
this series episodes. Buyer beware, but you can find some things you'd never get
ahold of otherwise.  I also noticed a brief youtube clip and an entire episode on
David Soul's website, so I'm assuming he was in one of the episodes.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 08, 2013, 12:47:26 PM

Does anyone remember that ABC, in an effort to grab some ratings opposite the
powerhouse ratings draws of Gunsmoke, Lucy and Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, tried
programming two 45 minute programs from 7:30 to 9pm on Mondays during the
1969-70 season.

The first was a Hullabaloo or Shindig type show called The Music Scene. It was followed
by a drama in the Lord of the Flies mold called The New People. A society formed on a
South Pacific atoll when the plane crashes and the people have to form a new society
together. It was an abandoned military station or something so they had buildings and
various supplies.  I can see how a music show could be fit into a 45 minute block, but
I wondered how satisfying a 45 minute drama would be or how difficult it might have
been to write it, since it was out of the box. Both shows only lasted a half-season.

Interestingly, at that time Lily Tomlin chose to be on "The Music Scene" rather than
Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, which was #1 in the ratings. (?) When The Music Scene
was cancelled she then agreed to be on Laugh-In which rocketed her to stardom almost
immediately. Her first episode was the last week of Dec. 1969.

Interestingly, I see that this very short-lived series has had a dvd release. Two volumes
entitled MUSIC SCENE: Best of 1969-70 Vol. 1 and Vol. 2 that included some complete
episodes and a raft of individual performance clips was released. Trippy!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 08, 2013, 02:10:22 PM
Most of ME-TV's networks don't air on cable, it's over the air.  In your area check out
one of these and see if you get either of them:

Gainesville                  WYME-CA     9.2          New Age Media
Tampa/St. Petersburg WFLA-TV      8.2          Media General


The cable we've got has an annoying habit of losing the signal (at least I guess that's what happens) from the ME-TV outlet. It happened again this past Saturday afternoon, right in the middle of Wagon Train.  >:(  At least I got to see hunky Robert Horton before they lost the signal.  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 08, 2013, 02:27:54 PM
I have often wondered why Americans are not interested in this time period. There's very
few movies about it and the ones there are are mostly not very good. I mean, there's not
even a movie about Paul Revere. Really? The most recent thing I can think of to detail this
period at all was the John Adams mini-series. And TV series?  Curious.

I understand that it used to be said that the only successful movie made about the American Revolution was Drums Along the Mohawk, which takes place on the frontier during the Revolution. Was The Patriot a success?

Quote
--The lead character was played by Rick Ely. I wonder if he was realted to Ron Ely?

IMDb has almost nothing about him, but one point included suggested to me that his actual surname might be Weber.

Quote
--Another item reads:  "Rick Ely and Philippe Forquet became teenage idols and were widely featured
in movie and fan magazines. Despite extensive promotion and a large (by television standards of the era)
production budget, The Young Rebels failed to garner enough of an audience and was canceled at midseason."

I have no memory at all of Philippe Forquet. I wonder what ever became of him?

What does it say about me that I remember that Will Geer played Rick Ely's father?  :D

Quote
I do wonder what these episodes would be like to view today.

Probably very dated. ... Clearly it wasn't Aaron Spelling's finest hour.  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 08, 2013, 02:30:51 PM
Does anyone remember that ABC, in an effort to grab some ratings opposite the
powerhouse ratings draws of Gunsmoke, Lucy and Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, tried
programming two 45 minute programs from 7:30 to 9pm on Mondays during the
1969-70 season.

The first was a Hullabaloo or Shindig type show called The Music Scene.

I remember Hullabaloo. Also That Was the Week That Was.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 08, 2013, 05:04:15 PM
I suppose if we are going to talk about "Classic TV," we should remember The Mickey Mouse Club--at least those of us old enough to remember it--and note the passing today, at age 70, of Annette Funicello, from complications of multiple sclerosis.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 08, 2013, 06:37:32 PM
I was just going to say the same thing.  I don't really remember the Mickey Mouse Club, but I certainly have fond memories of Annette and her movies.   May she rest in peace, MS is just a terrible disease.


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/annette-funicello_zps6b2151a5.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 08, 2013, 06:39:37 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/513px-Mickey_Mouse_Club_Mouseketeers_1957_zps571128ae.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: kathy on April 08, 2013, 07:45:55 PM
    Quote (partial) from Lyle:

Does anyone remember that ABC, in an effort to grab some ratings opposite the
powerhouse ratings draws of Gunsmoke, Lucy and Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, tried
programming two 45 minute programs from 7:30 to 9pm on Mondays during the
1969-70 season.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I do, lyle.  CBS' Gunsmoke (my favorite, as you know) always had the highest ratings, and I do remember that those ABC shows lasted a short time.  I thought it was just stupid of ABC to do those things. 

Just a note:  Last week in one of the hour episodes of Gunsmoke (I get it here on the Encore Western Channel; they show two Marshal Dillon episodes - these are the older ones of 1/2 hr. each; Dennis Weaver as Chester), then an hour one.  Rory Calhoun was the special guest star.  (They didn't always put "special" in front of a guest star's name). 
It was one of the real good episodes.  He played an old friend of Jim Arness' Matt, ended up in some kind of trouble, but was really a good guy in the end and confessed to Matt what he had done. 

It was a pleasure to see him again in western clothes.  And he did look handsome too.  Well, both of them do.   ;)

kathy     :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: kathy on April 08, 2013, 07:51:03 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/513px-Mickey_Mouse_Club_Mouseketeers_1957_zps571128ae.jpg)

I remember when I was little, some of the older kids always went inside their homes for The Mickey Mouse Club.  So I started to do it too.  I enjoyed the old cartoons (when they were shown) the best.  Sometimes they even showed one of Walt's Silly Symphonies shorts from the '30's; sooo good.

It's sad about Annette; that MS is bad.

kathy
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 08, 2013, 08:57:20 PM
Just a note:  Last week in one of the hour episodes of Gunsmoke (I get it here on the Encore Western Channel; they show two Marshal Dillon episodes - these are the older ones of 1/2 hr. each; Dennis Weaver as Chester), then an hour one.  Rory Calhoun was the special guest star.  (They didn't always put "special" in front of a guest star's name). 
It was one of the real good episodes.  He played an old friend of Jim Arness' Matt, ended up in some kind of trouble, but was really a good guy in the end and confessed to Matt what he had done. 

It was a pleasure to see him again in western clothes.  And he did look handsome too.  Well, both of them do.   ;)

kathy     :)

Oooh, I wish I got that! I bet they show a lot of good stuff!  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 09, 2013, 12:51:43 PM

For those of you who grew up watching westerns (and still do!)...
I could have, but I was never really into watching them regularly,
but they were so prevalent that I couldn't help but see them once
in awhile--did any plots or characters ever hint at a gay relationship
or character or the like?  I know that's remote, but you never know.
I was wondering if those shows were on today if any gay characters
or storylines would appear?  I'd have to guess, yes.  I have never seen
the episode, but I know that DR. QUINN, MEDECINE WOMAN did an
episode where Walt Whitman comes to town and rumors of his lifestyle
cause some commotion. If I had known about it beforehand I probably
would have watched it!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 09, 2013, 01:06:33 PM

There was a tv episode I saw when I was quite young that somehow affected me
very strongly, because I think of it every once in awhile, but the problem is that I
have no idea what it was and very few clues to find out what it was.

The only thing I know for a fact is the general outline of what the plot was.
At some point in the story one man that "the law" is searching for is in an upper
window of a building and a man who is after him is on the street below and draws
his gun (rifle?) on him. There is a stand-off through most of the episode where the
guy on the street has to hold his gun on the man in the window and will shoot him
if he moves. Neither of the men move, I guess, throughout much of the episode with
the guy holding the gun on him getting increasingly tired and intense etc. The suspense
builds with every second. What will happen?

That's basically what I know. Was it a western? My recollection of it is that it had a bit of
that vibe, but I seem to recall there were cars on the street. Who knows if it was color or
black and white. Half-hour or hour. Was it Route 66 or Naked City or Twilight Zone or The
Virginian or The Fugitive? With TV series being re-aired and available online and/or dvd I was
hoping a fan of whatever series this was might instantly recognize this plot. Once in awhile I
bring it up hoping it will spark the answer from somewhere.

You can't trust your memory on these things always which is why I can't be specific. But I'd
love to find out what it was and even see it again!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 09, 2013, 01:29:32 PM
For those of you who grew up watching westerns (and still do!)...
I could have, but I was never really into watching them regularly,
but they were so prevalent that I couldn't help but see them once
in awhile--did any plots or characters ever hint at a gay relationship
or character or the like?  I know that's remote, but you never know.
I was wondering if those shows were on today if any gay characters
or storylines would appear?  I'd have to guess, yes.  I have never seen
the episode, but I know that DR. QUINN, MEDECINE WOMAN did an
episode where Walt Whitman comes to town and rumors of his lifestyle
cause some commotion.
If I had known about it beforehand I probably
would have watched it!

I did see that episode. I confess: I used to watch Dr. Quinn: Medicine Woman (though I missed the first season) because I'm a Jane Seymour fan. I remember Dr. Quinn being on the homophobic side, but of course she ends up with a more tolerant attitude toward Whitman by the end.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: kathy on April 09, 2013, 07:03:16 PM
Oooh, I wish I got that! I bet they show a lot of good stuff!  :)

They certainly do and I bet you'd love it!  It's a pleasure to get it (it comes under the heading of Starz/Encore and contains different genres).  It's not offered on HD though, one of the channels that don't. 
I heard on the thread that ME TV has some classic TV, but the ME channel here isn't that good and offers only a certain number of shows.

kathy     :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on April 10, 2013, 04:39:54 AM
Nice to see the pics of Annette here.

Please make sure you check the news box in the upper right corner of the forum, for a message about forum down time.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 10, 2013, 09:55:31 AM
Nice to see the pics of Annette here.

Please make sure you check the news box in the upper right corner of the forum, for a message about forum down time.


oops thanks for the heads up Chuck!


Annette was such a little cutie, Beach Blanket Bingo was my favourite.  I should get a discussion going in the movie thread, see if anyone else enjoyed those type of movies.

(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/foliasnapraia-beachblanketbingo_zpsa2468714.jpg)


Oh and speaking of Dr. Quinn, another favourite of mine.  I started watching because of "Sully" but just fell in love with the show.


(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/26911Dr_Quinn_zps850ca7d0.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 11, 2013, 08:01:50 AM
Gilligan himself, Bob Denver, was the guest star on the episode of I Dream of Jeannie that I saw last night. He played an inept genie named Harold.  :D

I caught only a part of the Bewitched episode. It appeared to be one where Samantha met Darrin's parents (played by Mabel Albertson and Robert F. Simon) for the first time, and Aunt Clara (bless her heart  :-* ) tried to "help."

Which brings to me mention that I've wondered how come nobody thought it strange that neither the bride's nor the groom's parents/family were present at Darrin and Samantha's wedding?  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 11, 2013, 11:45:49 AM
It seems like it often like that in TV shows, when they start out they are not even thinking of casting extended families.   So then down the road when these people become a big part of the cast, you think "hey where were they when"?   They do the same thing with TV shows that are on now.

http://www.squidoo.com/TvMemories


Here is a list of some 70's TV shows, a lot on there I don't remember!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 11, 2013, 11:48:16 AM
Gilligan himself, Bob Denver, was the guest star on the episode of I Dream of Jeannie that I saw last night. He played an inept genie named Harold.  :D

I caught only a part of the Bewitched episode. It appeared to be one where Samantha met Darrin's parents (played by Mabel Albertson and Robert F. Simon) for the first time, and Aunt Clara (bless her heart  :-* ) tried to "help."

I don't remember that episode with Bob Denver, I wished I'd tuned in!
The shows were always some of my favorites growing up, but now I feel
Jeannie doesn't date as well as Bewitched. I think that's partly to do with
the very 60's "astronaut" themed stories they did which date it and I also
find Bill Daily's character highly annoying because it stretches credibility just
one step too far. It's the same reason I have trouble watching reruns of
The Bob Newhart Show. Still, there's some very amusing episodes.

The 60's sure had a lot of unique sitcom ideas in this realm. Wasn't My Favorite Martian
the first? I watched most of that series recently and there are two episodes where
Ray Walston (Uncle Martin) reference Bewitched.  In one episode they are trying to
get out of being tied up and Martin doesn't know what to do so he says he's going to
try something he's seen on one of your television programs--he twitches his nose.

In another episode he does practically the same thing and when they get out of trouble
eventually the last line is delivered by Uncle Martin saying into the camera:  "Remind me
to send a dozen roses to 'my favorite witch'."
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 11, 2013, 12:38:18 PM

I don't know what I'd have thought of GILLIGAN'S ISLAND if I were an adult when
it aired, but I was the perfect age for it's combination of slapstick humor and often
pun related jokes. I also loved the lagoon set and the whole idea of the show. I know
that critics hated it -- intensely -- and CBS was embarrassed by it. They only gave it a
chance because Sherwood Schwartz wouldn't let it go and kept brining it back to them
and they finally agreed to test it in one of those audience monitoring theaters in L.A.
(I did one a couple times) and it got the highest rating for a test pilot ever at the time,
so they reluctantly agreed to air it, but tried burying it on Saturday night, which was
great because their younger audience was watching tv on Saturday nights and it was
very successful there. It was unheard of to move a successful show back then, but
CBS did the next year and the year after that and it still won it's time slot every season
(even against The Monkees). They even renewed it for a 4th season, but at the last
minute cancelled it when they needed to placate William Paley's wife who wanted "her"
favorite series to remain on the air.  Who knows, maybe a 4th season would've killed it
off and been just too much and it wouldn't still be as popular in the culture as it is.

I've watched all the things that have been made about the series, the three TV specials
and the two documentaries. The 2001 (was it?) TV movie about the making of the series.
The tv episodes that spoofed or paid homage to the show on Roseanne, Alf, The New Gidget,
Baywatch and such. I watched Turner's two season reality series The Real Gilligan's Island. I saw
the stage musical version. I read two books about the series and also Sherwood Schwartz's own
book about how the series happened and it's aftermath. I even read a script for a movie version
of the series that didn't get made. (They keep bringing it up every so often. While Schwartz
was still around a couple years ago he announced a possible version and he thought Michael Cera
would be a good choice for Gilligan and he wanted Beyonce (ugh) to be Ginger.) I even met
Natalie Schafer in Century City once and asked if I could shake her hand and told her I was a fan.
(This was in 1991 I believe.) The show keeps appearing in various forms all the time so I am sure
it'll turn up some more! Remember the IKEA commercial? The only thing I haven't seen are the
two animated versions done in the 70's, Gilligan's Planet and The New Adventures of Gilligan. Heh!

What opinion(s) do you guys have of this show?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 11, 2013, 12:42:51 PM
I don't remember that episode with Bob Denver, I wished I'd tuned in!
The shows were always some of my favorites growing up, but now I feel
Jeannie doesn't date as well as Bewitched. I think that's partly to do with
the very 60's "astronaut" themed stories they did which date it and I also
find Bill Daily's character highly annoying because it stretches credibility just
one step too far. It's the same reason I have trouble watching reruns of
The Bob Newhart Show. Still, there's some very amusing episodes.

Yes, I see what you mean. The astronaut theme clearly pegs Jeannie to the Sixties (which really makes it for me like a visit to my childhood!). Bewitched has a certain "timelessness" to it in the way that I Love Lucy is "timeless," in my opinion.

Quote
The 60's sure had a lot of unique sitcom ideas in this realm. Wasn't My Favorite Martian
the first? I watched most of that series recently and there are two episodes where
Ray Walston (Uncle Martin) reference Bewitched.  In one episode they are trying to
get out of being tied up and Martin doesn't know what to do so he says he's going to
try something he's seen on one of your television programs--he twitches his nose.

In another episode he does practically the same thing and when they get out of trouble
eventually the last line is delivered by Uncle Martin saying into the camera:  "Remind me
to send a dozen roses to 'my favorite witch'."

For whatever reason I don't have many memories of My Favorite Martian--as though I only saw a few episodes in reruns even "back then." I'll admit I never checked dates, but I didn't associate it in my memory with being contemporary with at least the early season(s) of Bewitched. I always thought of it as earlier than Bewitched.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 11, 2013, 12:50:05 PM
What opinion(s) do you guys have of this show?

Sometimes you just want mindless goofiness, and Gilligan's Island was perfect for that. The characters were likeable (though I never cared much for Mr. Howell; however, Mrs. Howell was OK). I thought the Professor was handsome, and who doesn't still have a crush on Mary Ann?  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 11, 2013, 01:12:22 PM
It was Ginger my husband liked!  :-*  I hardly remember watching Gilligan's Island, although I know for sure I did.  As you say mindless TV.  BUT Bewitched was different.  I remember when my Dad was in his nursing home, he would watch Bewitched ever day and I would watch with him and it never grew old!  :D 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 13, 2013, 04:36:23 PM
I'm finding it really interesting to read the credits at the end of these old shows that I'm watching now. For example, the episode of Wagon Train that I saw today was written by ... Aaron Spelling!  :o

(And main character at the center of the episode was hunky-hunky Flint McCullough.  :D )
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on April 14, 2013, 12:53:08 PM
I remember watching Gilligan's Island, Professor and Mary Ann were my favorite characters.  I had a crush on the professor.

;D

I remember seeing one or two of the TV specials.


I remember this as well.



(http://www.gilligansisle.com/images/advcrew.gif)



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRAaIt0T3aU
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on April 15, 2013, 04:18:45 AM
Chuck,

That post could have been written by ME. Word for word, but Mrs. Howell was also a favorite character of mine.  I wondered if anyone else had a crush on the Professor.  Now I know!  And I always loved dear "Morry Ahn" (Mr. Howell voice).

Like Lyle, I was the right age for the show at the time.  Today it is silly but I still like it.  Some favorite eps are the one where Mary Ann's "boyfriend" Horace Higginbotham, is getting married, the one with the radioactive vegetables,  and the one with the plastic explosives, to name a few.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 15, 2013, 06:48:01 AM
Was it for the second season that they added the Professor and Mary Ann to the theme song?  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on April 15, 2013, 08:21:35 AM
Yes, and changed the group singing it.  For the better.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 15, 2013, 08:52:53 AM
Yes, and changed the group singing it.  For the better.

Either I never noticed that, or I've just plain forgotten it.  :-\
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 15, 2013, 01:53:00 PM
I wondered if anyone else had a crush on the Professor.  Now I know!

I was going to mention it in my first (or second?) post about Gilligan's Island, but I guess I will do it
now. I actually was attracted to Gilligan! Who knows why, but I always kind of liked "him"!

Like Lyle, I was the right age for the show at the time.  Today it is silly but I still like it.  Some favorite eps are the one where Mary Ann's "boyfriend" Horace Higginbotham, is getting married, the one with the radioactive vegetables,  and the one with the plastic explosives, to name a few.

I always liked the episodes best that were the most realistic and you could sort of imagine happening.
Like the first few when they were trying to repair the Minnow or build huts or looking for water. I enjoyed
when something they'd find made a humorous plot, like the radioactive seeds you mentioned! I liked the one
where a telephone cable washied up on the island after a hurricane and they tapped into it. I wasn't always
thrilled with the myriad of people that kept visiting, but I liked the one with the rock group (The Mosquitos)
and the Broadway producer when they put on a musical of Hamlet. I liked the one with the jet pack and the
one where they are going stir crazy so the Professor gets Ginger to foretell coming events to get their minds
off their troubles and she foretells that a ship will pass by when the moon is full, to rescue them. She lets on
in the show that she can't really foretell the future and they all individually agree to keep it to themselves, but
the episode ends when they show a full moon in the night and a huge ocean liner sailing right past them in the
dark! Lol!

By the way, I found out just awhile ago that Jim Backus was offered the role of Abner Kravitz on Bewitched
but had already committed to Gilligan's Island. I think it worked out all right!

From what I've read about Gilligan's Island, Jim Backus, who was a friend of Sherwood Schwartz, was
allowed to improvise at no end and often his stuff ended up in the show to the detriment of better
stuff. I read a script from the series once that had some decent bits in it without Backus, but the actual
televised episode had a couple scenes in it with Backus, that were not as good as the scenes left out.
I guess Sherwood was trying to keep him happy.

I recall a college professor who taught writing for telelvision once in an article writing that everyone he taught
knew Gilligan's Island and were aware that critics and others thought it was really bad so he had his classes write
either actual scripts or storylines for the series to see how good and/or imaginative they could be. I gave it a shot
once!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 15, 2013, 01:57:34 PM
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_E74OcuMgFfE/TJK_DuPkabI/AAAAAAAABqs/rUheDRR0F8Y/s1600/gilligans-island-castjpg-36f949a7535dd51e.jpg)

Sherwood Schwartz pointed out once that in the background of this cast photo,
in a show that was set in the Pacific Ocean, south of Hawaii, there are pine trees!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 15, 2013, 08:08:05 PM
BEAVER star Frank Bank aka LUMPY Rutherford who reportedly broke hearts as an off-screen lothario dead one day after turning 71.

Beaver himself Jerry Mathers, now 64, broke the sad news via Facebook: "I was so sad to hear today of the passing of my dear friend and business associate Frank Bank, who played Lumpy on Leave it to Beaver. He was a character and always kept us laughing. My deepest condolences to Frank's family."

After Beaver was cancelled, Bank made rare  TV appearances, including The Hollywood Squares, Family Feud and the 1983 TV movie Still The Beaver but made most of his income by working as a stockbroker.

According to his 1997 autobiography Call Me Lumpy, Bank claimed that, during the Beaver years, he lived a life of wine, women and song, claiming to have bedded a thousand women.

But Eddie Haskell's alter ego, actor and former LA cop Ken Osmond, was aghast.

"I never pictured Frank as being Don Juan," said Osmond. "But I never went on a date with him."


http://www.nationalenquirer.com/celebrity/leave-it-beaver-star-dead
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on April 15, 2013, 09:44:44 PM


By the way, I found out just awhile ago that Jim Backus was offered the role of Abner Kravitz on Bewitched
but had already committed to Gilligan's Island. I think it worked out all right!




Really?!?  I can't imagine anyone other than George Tobias as Abner.  His deadpan sarcasm was wonderful.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on April 17, 2013, 09:14:25 PM
The entire series of THE MANY LOVES OF DOBIE GILLIS is about to be released on DVD.

Anybody out there fans of this show?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 18, 2013, 07:07:31 AM
Really?!?  I can't imagine anyone other than George Tobias as Abner.  His deadpan sarcasm was wonderful.

He had quite a career. He played a producer who wouldn't produce Jimmy Cagney's musical in Yankee Doodle Dandy.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 18, 2013, 11:07:38 AM
The entire series of THE MANY LOVES OF DOBIE GILLIS is about to be released on DVD.

Anybody out there fans of this show?


I tried watching a few episodes of this on ME-TV, but I just can't get into it for whatever reason. It seems too forced maybe,
or over the top or something, I can't explain it. I like all the people involved, but it doesn't gel for me. I would like to see some
of the episodes with Warren Beatty or Tuesday Weld, I haven't seen any of those. The actress who plays Zelda, Sheila Kuehl, is
an out lesbian and has run (and won) several political posts in California.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 18, 2013, 11:54:41 AM
I tried watching a few episodes of this on ME-TV, but I just can't get into it for whatever reason. It seems too forced maybe,
or over the top or something, I can't explain it. I like all the people involved, but it doesn't gel for me. I would like to see some
of the episodes with Warren Beatty or Tuesday Weld, I haven't seen any of those. The actress who plays Zelda, Sheila Kuehl, is
an out lesbian and has run (and won) several political posts in California.

Who can forget the pre-Gilligan Bob Denver as Maynard G. Krebs? Wasn't he on Dobie Gillis? Back then they had beatniks.  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on April 18, 2013, 07:17:37 PM
Yes Bob Denver WAS Maynard G. Krebs on Dobie Gillis and he was the beatnik who played the bongo drums.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 20, 2013, 03:55:42 PM
I was watching the credits of ... something ... on ME-TV a couple of days ago, and I noticed something you used to see a lot:

"A Mark Goodson--Bill Todman Production"
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on April 20, 2013, 04:21:05 PM
I even remember the jingle they played behind it!!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 20, 2013, 05:36:31 PM
I was watching the credits of ... something ... on ME-TV a couple of days ago, and I noticed something you used to see a lot:

"A Mark Goodson--Bill Todman Production"


WOW those names are a blast from the past aren't they? 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: moreta on April 20, 2013, 11:30:45 PM
I'm finding it really interesting to read the credits at the end of these old shows that I'm watching now. For example, the episode of Wagon Train that I saw today was written by ... Aaron Spelling!  :o


There is an episode of I love Lucy that had Spelling playing Cousin Zeke, in one of the road to hollywood episodes.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: moreta on April 21, 2013, 12:09:59 AM

I have often wondered why Americans are not interested in this time period. There's very
few movies about it and the ones there are are mostly not very good. I mean, there's not
even a movie about Paul Revere. Really? The most recent thing I can think of to detail this
period at all was the John Adams mini-series. And TV series?  Curious.


I think most of the reason that we do not portray revolutionary war stories is becuase of the manner of fighting at the time.  Its hard to make a story of two armies lining up and shooting at each other very exciting.  But there have been some successes.  George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson.  Maybe its because its so far removed and such a different time.  Its difficult to relate.

The civil war seems to overshadow it greatly. My dads grandfather was a justice of the peace, a teacher who made it his lifes mission to make sure that Civil war veterans got the pensions they were promised.  Most didnt, but even that would not be a very interesting movie.

As for the Patriot, Mel Gibson was a big draw back then, but even so they had to play fast and loose with the story line to create an interesting narrative.  A South Carolina plantation owner that did not own slaves? Please! The person he was based on did own slaves, and they cleaned up the story for contemporary audiences. 

I think there are many stories of the revolution/war of 1812 that could be told in an exciting and compelling manner.  Unfortunately, Hollywood thinks the masses are dumb.  Just look at what they did with Master and Commander.  They changed the enemy ship, which in the book was American, to French.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on April 21, 2013, 03:08:19 AM
I have always been very interested in the Revolutionary War, much much so than the War Between the States.  (There's no such thing as a "civil" war. Besides, I'm from the south.)  I too wonder why this period has never been able to be well-represented on movies or TV. 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 21, 2013, 10:07:12 AM

I grew up in the middle of New York State and we had to study New York State history for one year in school.
I learned all about the Indians of New York State and, of course, the Revolutionary War. (Burgoyne's Invasion,
anyone?) We visited sites that had to do with the conflict, like General Herkimer's home, and the gay Revolutionary
War Hero, Baron Von Steuben. (Although no one ever said he was gay back then!  Wonder if they would now?)

I was surprised that back in 1975-76 for the Bicentennial there were no films or movies or TV specials or series
that came out, at least not that I remember, that had anything to do with the period. (?) The thing I most remember
is that between programs CBS had short Bicentennial minutes where they'd announce what happened 200 years ago
that day. It said those Bicentennial minutes were responsible for the later "news breaks" the networks began.

As for TV series, Daniel Boone touched on this time period the most. Does anyone remember a very short-lived
sitcom that was tried out, starring Ryan O'Neal, called 1775? I sure give it credit for trying something new!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 21, 2013, 01:17:37 PM
I grew up in the middle of New York State and we had to study New York State history for one year in school.
I learned all about the Indians of New York State and, of course, the Revolutionary War. (Burgoyne's Invasion,
anyone?) We visited sites that had to do with the conflict, like General Herkimer's home, and the gay Revolutionary
War Hero, Baron Von Steuben. (Although no one ever said he was gay back then!  Wonder if they would now?)

Drums Along the Mohawk, Lyle?

Ooops, wrong thread. ...  ;D  ;)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 21, 2013, 01:21:00 PM
"Hello friends! Are you tired, run-down, listless? Do you poop out at parties? Are you unpopular?"

Yes, friends, this afternon ME-TV ran the Vitameatavegamin episode of I Love Lucy.  :D

"It's so tasty, too! Just like candy!"  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on April 21, 2013, 02:23:59 PM
"It's so tasty, too! Just like candy!"  ;D

As she does one of the best full body shiver scowls I have ever seen on TV. :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: moreta on April 21, 2013, 03:29:08 PM
I grew up in the middle of New York State and we had to study New York State history for one year in school.
I learned all about the Indians of New York State and, of course, the Revolutionary War. (Burgoyne's Invasion,
anyone?)

Its ironic that you brought this up because I was googling this battle this morning looking for a story about the origins of a quilt pattern that was named after this battle called Burgoyne Surrounded. The name comes from the Revolutionary War battle of Saratoga, in which 5,800 British troops under the command of General John Burgoyne were surrounded by the American army and forced to surrender on October 17, 1777. This American victory was the turning point in the war, and during one of the periods of colonial revival in the 1800’s, a quilt pattern showing a large square surrounded by smaller squares was created and named for the unfortunate General Burgoyne.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: moreta on April 21, 2013, 03:44:52 PM

I was surprised that back in 1975-76 for the Bicentennial there were no films or movies or TV specials or series
that came out, at least not that I remember, that had anything to do with the period. (?)

I immediately thought of John Jakes "the Bastard" the book came out in 74 and was part of the Kent Family Chronicles that followed the family from pre revolution immigration to modern day.

here is a wiki list of revolutionary war movies and tv shows from 1970 and later which takes it out of classic tv so I will stop commenting here. Tho I will say Im rather fond of Liberty's Kids.

The Young Rebels (1970–1971), Television Series
1776 (1972) film starring William Daniels, Howard Da Silva, Ken Howard
The Bastard (1978), TV miniseries starring Andrew Stevens
The Rebels (1979), TV miniseries starring Andrew Stevens
George Washington (1983), TV miniseries starring Barry Bostwick
Revolution (1985) film starring: Al Pacino, Director: Hugh Hudson
George Washington (1986), TV miniseries starring Barry Bostwick
April Morning (1987) starring Chad Lowe, Tommy Lee Jones, and Robert Urich.
The Devil's Disciple (1987) TV film starring: Patrick Stewart, Director: David Hugh Jones
The American Revolution (1994), TV miniseries starring: Kelsey Grammer and Charles Durning, Director: Lisa Bourgoujian (A&E)
The Crossing (film) (2000) film starring: Jeff Daniels, Roger Rees, Director: Robert Harmon; screenwriter Howard Fast based on his novel; produced for broadcast by the Arts and Entertainment cable television network
The Patriot (2000) film starring: Mel Gibson, Heath Ledger, Director: Roland Emmerich
Liberty's Kids (since 2002) a 40-part animated television series produced by DiC Entertainment and broadcast on PBS Kids from September 2, 2002 to August 13, 2004 and Kids' WB since August 2004.
John Adams, a seven-part HBO biopic miniseries of John Adams, based on David McCullough's biography also entitled John Adams. The first three episodes deal with the Revolution itself, the fourth with its immediate aftermath leading up to the institution of the federal government under the Constitution of the United States in 1789.
Benedict Arnold: A Question of Honor. (2003) film starring: Aidan Quinn as Benedict Arnold and Kelsey Grammer as George Washington. The life of Benedict Arnold and how he switched sides in the American Revolution.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 21, 2013, 06:15:45 PM
As she does one of the best full body shiver scowls I have ever seen on TV. :D

I love the part where she's mangling her lines and says, "Do you pop out at parties? Are you un-poop-ular?"
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 21, 2013, 06:32:27 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/lucy1_zps0e5b023a.png)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 21, 2013, 06:35:25 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/unnamed_zps3a4d853f.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on April 21, 2013, 06:58:31 PM
I've loved her all my life. She will always be my favorite.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 22, 2013, 09:03:33 AM
As she [Lucy] does one of the best full body shiver scowls I have ever seen on TV. :D

I had read in the I Love Lucy Show book that they were looking for a substance for the Vitameatavegemin
and someone from the show said they were in a store in West Hollywood and saw apple pectin, which is a
substance used for baking. I told my friend Mark that and one day he saw some on the shelf and bought it.
He had the idea to recreate the scene and we'd taste that stuff the same time Lucy does in the episode. So,
as the moment approached, we got our apple pectin bottles ready and poured it on the spoon and at the right
moment, we put it into our mouths.  I am not taking anything away from Lucy and her talents, but that stuff
provoked the same look on Mark's face as Lucy had in this instance. I guess it's because the stuff tastes sweet
and sour at the same time and is quite unexpected in its taste and the perfect substance for that routine! A
moment to remember, something like Lucy & Ethel would've done!

(http://cdn.mondofood.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/66e91fc26c238bc82b2282f8640edf87/P/8/P8180703.JPG)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 22, 2013, 11:13:54 AM
(http://cdn.mondofood.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/66e91fc26c238bc82b2282f8640edf87/P/8/P8180703.JPG)

So, the answer to all our problems is in that "bittle lottle"?  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 22, 2013, 11:22:30 AM
The Rebels (1979), TV miniseries starring Andrew Stevens


Be still my heart, I remember that one well!   :-* :-*



Apple Pectin eh??   :o
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 23, 2013, 08:43:41 AM
https://www.facebook.com/classictvshows60s70s80s


Someone is one step ahead with a facebook page!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 25, 2013, 10:31:45 AM

There was an episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents on last night with Bette Davis.
It was much ado about nothing, but it was fun to see Bette. She did several TV
series episodes that I can think of. Who knew? Besides this one I know she did
a Gunsmoke and a Perry Mason, neither of which I've seen.
 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 25, 2013, 11:24:28 AM
There was an episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents on last night with Bette Davis.
It was much ado about nothing, but it was fun to see Bette. She did several TV
series episodes that I can think of. Who knew? Besides this one I know she did
a Gunsmoke and a Perry Mason, neither of which I've seen.

I'm sure I've mentioned that she did a Wagon Train, during the Ward Bond years. I saw it years ago, in the same period where I saw the Charles Laughton episode of Wagon Train. In Bette's episode, there was mention of her character having been in a yellow fever epidemic in New Orleans.  ;)  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: kathy on April 25, 2013, 09:14:35 PM
I remember each episode you stated.  I saw the Wagon Train one a few wks. back (with the mention of yellow fever - shades of Jezebel?) ;)  This was in b&w.

In the Gunsmoke episode, the story was Bette as a mother whose husband had been taken in to Hays City by Matt to be hanged; or the husband was killed by Matt in the line of duty.  She took Miss Kitty as a hostage and the sons (one of whom was Bruce Dern, who was in many an episode of Gunsmoke, like so many other to be rather famous actors and also was in Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte as Bette's lover when they were young and he was murdered) and started building a hanging tree to hang Matt.  I don't remember if Matt was taken prisoner before Kitty or not.  This was in color.

The Perry Mason episode was one she did as a fill in for Raymond Burr when he was ill for a time.  Other actors filled in too.  This was in b&w.

kathy    :)
p.s.  The Gunsmoke episode was the best (I know, I'm prejudiced).  Bette slapped Kitty in the face and there was much ado about that.  And do you remember how TPTB really came down on Gunsmoke - saying there was way too much violence in it?  There was so much about that.  I never thought it had "more violence" than any other western, but I'm prejudiced.  
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: moreta on April 26, 2013, 04:16:12 AM
I remember each episode you stated.  I saw the Wagon Train one a few wks. back (with the mention of yellow fever - shades of Jezebel?) ;)  This was in b&w.


One of my favorite episodes of It Takes a Thief  where she played Bessie Grindle, a down and out pick pocket that Al includes in caper to renew her will to live.  I also loved the episodes of Fred Astaire playing his father. 

Anyone remember Longstreet?  It had james Franciscus as a blind insurance investigator and his seeing eye dog.  It also had bruce lee for a few episodes
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 26, 2013, 07:19:13 AM
I remember each episode you stated.  I saw the Wagon Train one a few wks. back (with the mention of yellow fever - shades of Jezebel?) ;)  This was in b&w.

Darn! If ME-TV broadcast it sytem-wide, then I missed it!  :'(  I would really like to see that episode again. I wonder whether it's included in any of the collections that have been released on DVD?

You betcha that was a reference to Jezebel!  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: kathy on April 26, 2013, 07:32:43 PM
Jeff, the channel that runs the two Marshal Dillon 1/2 hr. episodes (with Chester), and next the 1-hr. episodes are shown here on Encore Western Channel.  Starz & Encore are kind of "together" but Encore is the one that shows the classic TV westerns and lately the classic film High Noon.
There are a few other Encore channels like Encore Suspense and Encore something or other, but I usually watch the Westerns one.   They are now still showing the 1/2 hr. ones w/Chester from 1960 - I think.  The hour ones are still in b&w and the one on today was from 1965 (Festus was in it).

ME-TV here: I have no idea what channel it's on.  I caught a Gunsmoke episode on it once by chance; it was in color.  But now I can't even find the channel.  Comcast has made many changes over the past year and sometimes the channels are just jumbled in my head; e.g. I have an HD TV.  The HD channels have a different numbered system from the others!  Talk about confusing.   ::) 

kathy     :)     
p.s.  Bette was also in another episode of Wagon Train w/Ward Bond.  She played a mother of several children and thought she was pregnant again.  But she learned it was a tumor and she would die in a matter of time.  (I'd like to catch the one w/Chas. Laughton). 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 28, 2013, 04:09:19 PM
kathy     :)     
p.s.  Bette was also in another episode of Wagon Train w/Ward Bond.  She played a mother of several children and thought she was pregnant again.  But she learned it was a tumor and she would die in a matter of time.  (I'd like to catch the one w/Chas. Laughton). 

Wow! I didn't know that! I've only seen the "Jezebel episode," and that only once.  :(
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 29, 2013, 10:59:23 AM

I saw the Bette Davis PERRY MASON episode last night. While it was grand to see Bette doing
her thing in a classic tv series, the episode and plot were not all that compelling.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 30, 2013, 07:10:42 AM
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000012/

I can't believe how much TV she did, I had no idea!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 30, 2013, 11:02:46 AM

According to that she did THREE episodes of WAGON TRAIN:

Wagon Train (TV series)
– The Bettina May Story (1961) … Bettina May
– The Elizabeth McQueeny Story (1959) … Madame Elizabeth McQueeny
– The Ella Lindstrom Story (1959) … Ella Lindstrom

I know one thing they don't have on that list because I saw the segment.
She was on an episode of ABC's Variety Series THE HOLLYWOOD PALACE.
Amazing what you can find all at your fingertips, too--I just googled Bette
and Hollywood Palace and you can find these clips on there!

THE HOLLYWOOD PALACE is a show that never really garnered much public attention
nor has it stayed in the minds of hardly any people. I think it was in a rough timeslot or
something, but if you look at the people who were on it you'd be quite amazed. It was
on for 192 episodes, too, from 1964-1970.

This wikipedia link has a list of the people who appeared on it each season!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hollywood_Palace

If I were here then I surely would've gotten a ticket or two to a taping.
It's got nearly all the whole list of Hollywood greats and people of the moment. It had different
hosts every week (like SNL) and it was structured like an old vaudeville show and actually done
in a theatre near Hollywood and Vine.
(http://www.shorpy.com/files/images/Misc_183.preview.jpg)

The place is still there and it's a nightclub called The Avalon.
(http://avalonhollywood.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/avalon-history-2002.jpg)


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 30, 2013, 11:19:46 AM

Look at some of the famous people on this show that would've been glorious to see,
and this is only a selection from the FIRST season, mostly:

    Bing Crosby
    Bobby Van
    Ginger Rogers
    Johnny Mathis
    Eleanor Powell
    Yma Sumac
    Gene Kelly
    Kate Smith
    Dean Martin
    Groucho Marx
    Nat "King" Cole
    Diahann Carroll
    Ken Murray
    Paul Winchell
    The Lennon Sisters
    Patti Page
    Cyd Charisse
    Tony Martin
    Ferrante and Teicher
    Rich Little
    Jimmy Durante
    Rowan and Martin
    Eddie Albert
    Anna Maria Alberghetti
    Henny Youngman
    Betty Hutton
    Carole Cook
    Paul Lynde
    Trini Lopez
    George Gobel
    Victor Borge
    Dennis Day
    Caterina Valente
    Phil Harris
    Louis Armstrong
    Gene Barry
    Buster Keaton
    Gloria Swanson
    The Rolling Stones
    Ed Wynn
    Eydie Gormé
    Joan Crawford
    Maurice Chevalier
    Dan Dailey
    Willie Mays
    Bette Davis
    Olivia de Havilland
    Arthur Godfrey
    Alice Faye
    Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy
    Betty Grable
    Van Johnson
    Liberace
    Edward G. Robinson
    Shani Wallis
    Gene Barry
    Elizabeth Montgomery
    The Supremes

And some people I don't think I've heard of before:
   
    Johnny Puleo
    Miriam Makeba
    Francis Brunn
    Michael Bentine
    Zizi Jeanmaire
    Gilbert Bécaud
    John W. Bubbles
    John Gary
    Philly Joe Jones
    Shelly Manne
    Gene Baylos
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 30, 2013, 11:44:43 AM
According to that she did THREE episodes of WAGON TRAIN:

Wagon Train (TV series)
– The Bettina May Story (1961) … Bettina May
– The Elizabeth McQueeny Story (1959) … Madame Elizabeth McQueeny
– The Ella Lindstrom Story (1959) … Ella Lindstrom

That's the episode I've seen--and hope to see again.

Quote
I know one thing they don't have on that list because I saw the segment.
She was on an episode of ABC's Variety Series THE HOLLYWOOD PALACE.
Amazing what you can find all at your fingertips, too--I just googled Bette
and Hollywood Palace and you can find these clips on there!

THE HOLLYWOOD PALACE is a show that never really garnered much public attention
nor has it stayed in the minds of hardly any people. I think it was in a rough timeslot or
something, but if you look at the people who were on it you'd be quite amazed. It was
on for 192 episodes, too, from 1964-1970.

This wikipedia link has a list of the people who appeared on it each season!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hollywood_Palace

If I were here then I surely would've gotten a ticket or two to a taping.
It's got nearly all the whole list of Hollywood greats and people of the moment. It had different
hosts every week (like SNL) and it was structured like an old vaudeville show and actually done
in a theatre near Hollywood and Vine.
(http://www.shorpy.com/files/images/Misc_183.preview.jpg)

We watched The Hollywood Palace at our house.  :) Was it on Saturday nights? Sunday nights--later than Disney? I could never have believed it lasted till 1970--it's a part of my "Sixties Childhood" memories.  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 01, 2013, 10:47:44 AM
The place is still there and it's a nightclub called The Avalon.
(http://www.privatelosangelestours.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Avalon.jpg)

The other photo doesn't seem to be loading properly.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 01, 2013, 11:39:11 AM
And some people I don't think I've heard of before:
   
    Johnny Puleo
    Miriam Makeba
    Francis Brunn
    Michael Bentine
    Zizi Jeanmaire
    Gilbert Bécaud
    John W. Bubbles
    John Gary
    Philly Joe Jones
    Shelly Manne
    Gene Baylos


I ought to do some research (read: Google). I know Miriam Makeba and John Gary are/were singers. I'm pretty sure John W. Bubbles was a tap dancer. I think Zizi Jeanmaire was in a movie with Danny Kaye (just as "Jeanmaire"). And--I think this is kind of funny--I don't know a thing about Philly Joe Jones, but I've seen his plaque in Philadelphia's "Music Walk of Fame" on South Broad Street.

I think at our house, when I was a kid, we must have watched all the variety shows--and for myself I'm including in this category--but not limiting it to--Red Skelton, Ed Sullivan, Dean Martin, Jackie Gleason, Andy Williams, Flip Wilson, the Osmonds, and the King Sisters. There must be more.

Of course, Carol Burnett is sui generis.  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 04, 2013, 12:56:57 PM
I ought to do some research (read: Google). I know Miriam Makeba and John Gary are/were singers. I'm pretty sure John W. Bubbles was a tap dancer. I think Zizi Jeanmaire was in a movie with Danny Kaye (just as "Jeanmaire"). And--I think this is kind of funny--I don't know a thing about Philly Joe Jones, but I've seen his plaque in Philadelphia's "Music Walk of Fame" on South Broad Street.

That's cool that many are recognizable to you!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 04, 2013, 01:33:56 PM
I think at our house, when I was a kid, we must have watched all the variety shows--and for myself I'm including in this category--but not limiting it to--Red Skelton, Ed Sullivan, Dean Martin, Jackie Gleason, Andy Williams, Flip Wilson, the Osmonds, and the King Sisters. There must be more.

Of course, Carol Burnett is sui generis.  :D

I used to love the variety show format, too.  I was more fond of the ones that accented
comedy over the music, though.  Now, I appreciate the ones with the music in them a lot
more than I did as a kid.

My favorite variety show of all time was:

(http://images.sodahead.com/polls/003634727/336261480_laugh_in_title_card_thumb_xlarge.jpeg)

Other huge favorties were and are:

The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour
The Red SKelton Hour
The Sonny & Cher Show
The Carol Burnett Show
   (I always loved that her shows' initials were also CBS!)
The Dean Martin Show

The Dean Martin Show wasn't one I could always stay up to see when I was a kid.
It was on at 10pm. And it wasn't rerun during the summer when I could have seen
it.  So, I don't know a lot about it, but I really liked it, even though it was more
attuned to music, but there were so many stars!  I know recently many have
been released on dvd at Time Lilfe, but I haven't seen them, though I will someday.

I don't really know much about the black and white variety shows before 1965,
like Danny Kaye, Perry Como, Judy Garland (I have seen some of these on video)
and Dinah Shore, Pat Boone, Nat King Cole and the like.

I remember some shorter lived series like Julie Andrews, Pat Paulsen, Leslie Uggams,
Tom Jones, Jim Nabors and Jerry Lewis. Milton Berle tried a series revival in 1968, or
thereabouts. Kraft Music Hall was always a hit or miss proposition because it had no
regular host each week. I did not really gravitate toward all the country star shows
because I was not really fond of all their music--Glen Campbell (the one I saw mostly),
Mack Davis, Johnny Cash (ugh) and the syndicated ones from Nashville. I did like
Flip Wilson (he appeared on Laugh-In a lot) but I did not like the format of his show,
with the studio audience practically in his lap or in every shot. It really annoyed me.
I know Ed Sullivan's show was variety, but I didn't really watch it, we watched Disney's
Wonderful World of Color more often than not.

I remember The Beautiful Phylllis Diller Show. Shields & Yarnell and Hee-Haw.  When I went off to
college I only brielfy saw some of those variety series that were the last of their kind like Donny & Marie
and The Captain & Tenille and what probably killed the genre-Pink Lady & Jeff!

In 1977 I was fortunate to see one of the Laugh-In '77 specials taped.  I alwasy looked forward to
Bob Hope's specials, at least his monologues. and the Jack Benny Variety Specials.

I always wanted Paul Lynde to have a variety series or be a regular on Laugh-In!

Of the six variety series I listed as my favorites, there are episodes one can find of all of those
on dvd, which is remarkable considering music rights hamper most all variety show releases.
I still enjoy watching many of them.

Of course, SNL starts out in the Classic TV Series era we've outlined!  I still watch that!
It's about 38 seasons now!  Incredible...Wow!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 04, 2013, 01:43:05 PM

In the variety show arena, one of the most amazing clips I have seen is on youtube
and it was labeled as from The Sammy Davis, Jr. Show. (I didn't know he had one.)
It had The Supremes on one side of the stage and The Andrews Sisters on the other
(Sammy was in the middle) and each "group" was singing the hits of the other. Amazing
piece of video. If you google Supremes + Andrews Sisters + youtube you'll probably find it.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on May 04, 2013, 03:05:48 PM
Here it is, Lyle.

http://youtu.be/HgTsBsSngrc
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on May 04, 2013, 03:48:15 PM
I ought to do some research (read: Google). I know Miriam Makeba and John Gary are/were singers. I'm pretty sure John W. Bubbles was a tap dancer. I think Zizi Jeanmaire was in a movie with Danny Kaye (just as "Jeanmaire"). And--I think this is kind of funny--I don't know a thing about Philly Joe Jones, but I've seen his plaque in Philadelphia's "Music Walk of Fame" on South Broad Street.

I think at our house, when I was a kid, we must have watched all the variety shows--and for myself I'm including in this category--but not limiting it to--Red Skelton, Ed Sullivan, Dean Martin, Jackie Gleason, Andy Williams, Flip Wilson, the Osmonds, and the King Sisters. There must be more.

Of course, Carol Burnett is sui generis.  :D

John Gary lived in New Orleans for a while, and he was a fixture on local TV in the early 60's. He was an avid skin diver, and once broke the record for remaining underwater using scuba equipment while living down there.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 04, 2013, 06:30:47 PM
I wish someone would bring back the variety show, I really do!


On television, variety reached its peak during the period of the 1960s and 1970s. With a turn of the television dial, viewers around the globe could variously have seen shows and occasional specials featuring Dinah Shore, Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, Perry Como, Andy Williams, Julie Andrews, The Carpenters, Olivia Newton-John, John Denver, John Davidson, Mac Davis, Bobby Goldsboro, Lynda Carter, Johnny Cash, Sonny and Cher, Bob Monkhouse, Carol Burnett, Rod Hull and Emu, Flip Wilson, Lawrence Welk, Glen Campbell, Donny & Marie Osmond, Barbara Mandrell, Judy Garland, The Captain & Tennille, The Jacksons, The Keane Brothers, Bobby Darin, Sammy Davis, Jr., Mary Tyler Moore, Dean Martin, Tony Orlando and Dawn, The Smothers Brothers, Danny Kaye, Des O'Connor, Buck and Roy, Roy Hudd, Billy Dainty, Max Wall or The Muppet Show. Even "The Brady Bunch" had a variety show. Variety shows were once as common on television as Westerns, courtroom dramas, suspense thrillers, sitcoms, or (in more modern times) reality shows.

During the 1960s and 1970s, there were also numerous one-time variety specials featuring stars such as Shirley MacLaine, Frank Sinatra, Diana Ross and Mitzi Gaynor, none of whom ever had a regular television series.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variety_show
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 04, 2013, 08:38:48 PM
Boyoboy, all these posts on the old variety shows sure do bring back memories.  :)

Laugh-in was sui generis. It always amazes me to think where Goldie Hawn went from there!  :D

How on earth can I remember Dean Martin's show if it was on that late?  :D

On television, variety reached its peak during the period of the 1960s and 1970s. With a turn of the television dial, viewers around the globe could variously have seen shows and occasional specials featuring Dinah Shore, Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, Perry Como, Andy Williams, Julie Andrews, The Carpenters, Olivia Newton-John, John Denver, John Davidson, Mac Davis, Bobby Goldsboro, Lynda Carter, Johnny Cash, Sonny and Cher, Bob Monkhouse, Carol Burnett, Rod Hull and Emu, Flip Wilson, Lawrence Welk, Glen Campbell, Donny & Marie Osmond, Barbara Mandrell, Judy Garland, The Captain & Tennille, The Jacksons, The Keane Brothers, Bobby Darin, Sammy Davis, Jr., Mary Tyler Moore, Dean Martin, Tony Orlando and Dawn, The Smothers Brothers, Danny Kaye, Des O'Connor, Buck and Roy, Roy Hudd, Billy Dainty, Max Wall or The Muppet Show. Even "The Brady Bunch" had a variety show. Variety shows were once as common on television as Westerns, courtroom dramas, suspense thrillers, sitcoms, or (in more modern times) reality shows.

Oi! There are some folks in this list that I've never heard of (Rod Hull and Emu? Billy Dainty? ??? ), but it's shocking how many others I'd clean forgotten had shows. How on earth did the networks accommodate them all, back in the days when there were only three networks?  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on May 04, 2013, 11:32:04 PM
Ohmigod.  Rod Hull and his Emu.  That used to crack me up.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 05, 2013, 10:46:15 AM

I think variety shows disappeared because of the remote control. When people started having
dozens of channels they started flipping from one to another and that, in a sense, is your own
type of variety show. Youtube is a world wide vatiety show. I guess you could say that a show
like America's Got Talent or Dancing with the Stars, even though they're a competition, are a
bit like variety shows. Saturday Night Live is a variety show, we tend to forget that there is still
one on and it's been on for a long time. MAD-TV was also on for quite a few seasons.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 05, 2013, 03:23:47 PM
I don't know, I guess I don't really agree.........I don't see IDOL or X Factor or America's Got Talent as the same thing.  And yea we do have more stations (I probably have a hundred) but I would still like to see a good variety show.


I say bring back the Captain and Tennille!!


 :D



(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/30627_zps35414c4e.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 06, 2013, 07:38:05 AM
The granddaddy of America's Got Talent: Ted Mack's Original Amateur Hour.  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 06, 2013, 08:55:02 AM
I am betting no one remembers this one:


Tiny Talent Time was a long-running and hugely successful television program on CHCH television, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. For almost four decades (1957 to 1992) the talent and variety program showcased the talents of local children in an entertaining family genre. The show was marked by a characteristically home-spun style and had great appeal to many different age groups. Indeed, many participants in the original show have enjoyed illustrious careers as performers around the world.

The original Tiny Talent Time was aired in a half-hour format and was hosted by notable Canadian performer Bill Lawrence. During the program, Mr. Lawrence engaged in casual, light-hearted banter with the performers before and after each act. The questions usually revolved around a child's school, home life, family and likes and dislikes.


http://www.tvarchive.ca/database/18809/tiny_talent_time/details/


I can still sing the theme song!  :D  I always wanted to go on it, but I couldn't sing OR dance!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on May 06, 2013, 02:39:41 PM
The granddaddy of America's Got Talent: Ted Mack's Original Amateur Hour.  ;D

And before that was Major Bowes!  :D

(Of course, that was TV without pictures)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_Bowes_Amateur_Hour

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on May 06, 2013, 02:52:29 PM
And before that was Major Bowes!  :D



I got through Abie's, Irish Rose, Five Dionne babies, Major Bowes

Had heebie-jeebies for Beebe's, Bathysphere

I got through Brenda Fraszier, and I'm here
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 07, 2013, 11:02:18 AM

I was watching some episodes of CAR 54, WHERE ARE YOU? this weekend.
The show has both a great appeal and also an annoyance about it at the same
time. It was filmed in New York City and the outdoor scenes, usuaully without dialogue,
are on the streets of the city from the early sixties and that's interesting.  The end
credits proclaim "Filmed at the Biograph Studios in the Bronx."  I guess a lot of Broadway
actors at the time did cameo roles in the series.

What I don't like about it and find terribly annoying is that to get the laugh track they
showed the episodes in a rented theatre in New York somewhere and used that for
the laugh track and it sounds disconnected from the show somehow.  It sounds hollow
and too over the top at points and way too loud many times.

There's a holdup in the Bronx
Brooklyn's broken out in fights
There's a traffic jam in Harlem
That's backed up to Jackson Heights.
There's a scout troop short a child
Kruschev's due at Idyllwild...
Car 54, Where Are You?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 07, 2013, 11:58:09 AM
There's a holdup in the Bronx
Brooklyn's broken out in fights
There's a traffic jam in Harlem
That's backed up to Jackson Heights.
There's a scout troop short a child
Kruschev's due at Idyllwild...
Car 54, Where Are You?


Oooh! Oooh!

 :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 07, 2013, 12:50:56 PM
Oooh! Oooh!
 :D

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-lPrE2GZypKk/TnAj1LiefbI/AAAAAAAATJM/TqkuaaTMBwQ/s1600/Car54Bottom.jpg)

Oooh! Oooh!
 Who knew!

(http://thedomandjaneshow.itmblog.com/files/2012/06/gunther-toody-s-diner.jpg)

Apparently there are six of these locaions in Colorado, the first one opened about twenty years ago,
but I can find no reference it was named after this character, but how could it not be?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 07, 2013, 01:25:12 PM
(http://thedomandjaneshow.itmblog.com/files/2012/06/gunther-toody-s-diner.jpg)

Apparently there are six of these locaions in Colorado, the first one opened about twenty years ago,
but I can find no reference it was named after this character, but how could it not be?[/center]

Indeed, how could it not? I've seen one of them--I think it's in Westminster, outside Denver--but I've never eaten there.

There is also a Rosie's Diner in the Denver area, which I'm positive I was told has some TV connection to its name, but I can't seem to remember what that connection is.  ???  I have eaten at Rosie's, and the food is good diner food--or it was when I ate there, anyway.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on May 07, 2013, 02:06:56 PM
In
There is also a Rosie's Diner in the Denver area, which I'm positive I was told has some TV connection to its name,

"Rosie the Waitress", (Nancy Walker), Bounty paper towel commercials.  (Though not the one in the Denver area).  I think the original commercials were filmed in a diner in New Jersey which was then renamed "Rosie's Diner" due to popularity of the commercials. 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on May 07, 2013, 04:08:08 PM

I tried watching a few episodes of this on ME-TV, but I just can't get into it for whatever reason. It seems too forced maybe,
or over the top or something, I can't explain it. I like all the people involved, but it doesn't gel for me. I would like to see some
of the episodes with Warren Beatty or Tuesday Weld, I haven't seen any of those. The actress who plays Zelda, Sheila Kuehl, is
an out lesbian and has run (and won) several political posts in California.
i believe she was ranking state senator and then was termed out.  she is currently running for LA county supervisor.

dobie gillis was a product of his times, and a spin off from a book of stories by max shulman.  in that period between the beats and the hippies, the angsty first world problems of what would today be deemed as slackers was pretty funny.  it did not, obviously age well, but did not achieve a camp following such as beverly hillbillies did.  i remember it fondly, but doubt i would find it amusing now.
 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on May 07, 2013, 04:11:08 PM
I grew up in the middle of New York State and we had to study New York State history for one year in school.
I learned all about the Indians of New York State and, of course, the Revolutionary War. (Burgoyne's Invasion,
anyone?) We visited sites that had to do with the conflict, like General Herkimer's home, and the gay Revolutionary
War Hero, Baron Von Steuben. (Although no one ever said he was gay back then!  Wonder if they would now?)
as was i, it was 7th grade, jr high back then, before the middle school concept tragically became the norm.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on May 07, 2013, 04:31:39 PM
lyle.. great summation of miriam makeba's life and impact on the world.  she was a great talent and a great lady.

i had several of her records and she fit right in with the protest movement concerts of the 60's.

you might recognize several of her songs if you heard them. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FP6CdNVzjC8
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on May 07, 2013, 04:35:07 PM
Here it is, Lyle.

http://youtu.be/HgTsBsSngrc

excellent clip.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 07, 2013, 05:00:20 PM

The Carol Burnett Show is back!

Carol Burnett has hand-selected her favorite ten episodes for you to enjoy. Laugh along to the show’s most memorable sketches including Went with the Wind, The Oldest Man, Mr. Tudball and Mrs. Wiggins, As the Stomach Turns, The Hollow Hero, The Family, Nora Desmond and many more! You’ll also enjoy over 50 musical performances and 6 hours of bonus material.


http://timelife.com/products/carol-s-top-ten-episodes?utm_source=google&utm_medium=ppc-display&utm_campaign=Y11GGRNGRM&utm_term=


 ;D  adds to my Christmas list!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 07, 2013, 05:22:18 PM
"Rosie the Waitress", (Nancy Walker), Bounty paper towel commercials.  (Though not the one in the Denver area).  I think the original commercials were filmed in a diner in New Jersey which was then renamed "Rosie's Diner" due to popularity of the commercials. 

Is that it? Thanks! (I meant the name, not necessarily the location.)

In a similar vein, I've always assumed somebody in a restaurant company had a Bonanza fixation, since we've had, in succession, the Bonanza Sirloin Pit, the Ponderosa Steak House, and Hoss's.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 07, 2013, 05:35:50 PM
*Show #722, Original Air Date: March 16, 1974

Guest Starring: Roddy McDowall, The Jackson 5

    Q&A
    Talk and Duet Medley: Exactly Like You/She’s Funny That Way/They Didn’t Believe Me/Tea for Two/Speak Low/So in Love—Carol and Roddy McDowall
    Short Film: Roddy McDowall in the Makeup Chair for Planet of the Apes
    The Family: The Reunion—Cast and Roddy McDowall
    The Carpenters—Carol, Harvey, Lyle
    Dancing Machine—The Jackson 5
    Bus Stop—Carol, Harvey, Vicki, Lyle
    Brief Encounter—Carol and Roddy McDowall
    Finale: Music School Medley: This Old Man/ABC—Carol, The Jackson 5, Dancers and Singers
    Goodnights


I could entertain myself with that link, I want these DVD'S!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: moreta on May 07, 2013, 08:44:18 PM

In a similar vein, I've always assumed somebody in a restaurant company had a Bonanza fixation, since we've had, in succession, the Bonanza Sirloin Pit, the Ponderosa Steak House, and Hoss's.

Bonanza Steak house was founded by Dan Blocker, Ponderosa was started a few years later probably as a competitor.  They merged ownership in the 90s.  Most of them are gone where I lived.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 08, 2013, 07:41:17 AM
Bonanza Steak house was founded by Dan Blocker, Ponderosa was started a few years later probably as a competitor.  They merged ownership in the 90s.  Most of them are gone where I lived.

Interesting to know. Thanks!  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 08, 2013, 10:05:03 AM
Another favorite TV theme song:

The end of the Civil War was near
When quite accidentally,
A hero who sneezed, abruptly seized
Retreat and reversed it to victory!
His Medal of Honor pleased and thrilled
His proud little family group;
While pinning it on, some blood was spilled
And so it was planned he'd command... F TROOP!
Where Indian fights are colorful sights
And nobody takes a lickin',
Where paleface and redskin
Both turn chicken!
When drilling and fighting get them down
They know their morale can't droop
As long as they all relax in town
Before they resume with a bang and a boom... F TROOP!


 ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 08, 2013, 11:16:07 AM

I have both seasons of F TROOP on dvd. (The first season is in black and white
and the second season is in color.) I really didn't think the show would hold up
and I'd find it just too silly, but I was pleasantly surprised that it is still pretty
amusing. One does have to like that kind of silly humor, including slapstick, but
it works in a kind of Blazing Saddles sort of way. The Indian tribe is played as
Catskill, borscht belt comedians. (And smarter than the soldiers, of course.)

And it is something different.  Were there any other western comedies that
lasted at all?  I remember them trying some like Rango, with Tim Conway,
and one called Pistols and Petticoats, but I'm not remembering any others.

There's one episode where the Captain and Wrangler Jane do a hilarious
take-off on the dinner scene in the film Tom Jones. Another has a very
amusing Paul Lynde playing a singing Mountie.

The Indians in tthe show were from the Heckawi tribe.  Now, whether or not
those who came up with this name had this joke in mind at first or not, who knows,
but if they did, the fact that they waited almost a year to do this joke made it even
more hilarious."

In an episode almost a year after it came on the air, Corporal Agarn (Larry Storch)
asks the Indian Chief, Chief Wild Eagle, what their name means; how their tribe got
their name. His reply:

Chief Wild Eagle: "Many moons ago tribe move west because Pilgrims ruin neighborhood.
Tribe travel west, over country and mountains and wild streams, then come big day...
...tribe fall over cliff, that when Hekawi get name. Medicine man say to my ancestor,
'I think we lost. Where the heck are we?'"


LOL!

Did anyone see the 2009 Coen Brothers film A Serious Man?  The film takes place in 1967 and the
main character is a father and his family, which include two teenage sons.  A recurring point in the
film is that the two boys are hooked on the show F TROOP.  There are scenes where they have
to be in front of the tv when the show airs and a crisis at one point when the reception from the
antenna isn't working properly. A nice touch in an otherwise, IMO, problematic film.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 08, 2013, 11:37:51 AM
as was i, it was 7th grade, jr high back then, before the middle school concept tragically became the norm.

Yes, exactly right, it was 7th Grade.  Although one doesn't usually appreciate such things
at the time, I had an exceptional teacher for this class.  We learned so much in that one
year and all in the guise of having a good time at it.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 08, 2013, 11:42:12 AM
I have both seasons of F TROOP on dvd. (The first season is in black and white
and the second season is in color.)

I've been meaning for years to get that first season but I keep procrastinating.  :-\

Quote
Were there any other western comedies that
lasted at all?

Well, there was this one-season wonder, which essentially reworked Gilligan's Island, complete with Gilligan!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dusty's_Trail (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dusty's_Trail)

Quote
Pistols and Petticoats

I remember that show very fondly, too.  :)

My memories of it are a bit confused, however. How was it that everyone in the family was surnamed Hanks? Was Henrietta (Ann Sheridan) born a Hanks or did she marry into the family (yet I swear I have a memory of her addressing Grandma [Ruth McDevitt] as "Mama")? I'm sure I'm correct in remembering that Henrietta was a widow. But if she was born a Hanks and married, why were she and her daughter Lucy both using Hanks as a last name?  ??? Questions you're not supposed to worry about, I guess.  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on May 08, 2013, 01:57:08 PM
I remember watching F-Troop in reruns.....was I the only one who thought Ken Berry was cute in his outfit?

:D :D :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 08, 2013, 02:54:11 PM
I remember watching F-Troop in reruns.....was I the only one who thought Ken Berry was cute in his outfit?

:D :D :D

Nope. I watched it in the original broadcast and I thought he was cute in that uniform.  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 09, 2013, 12:18:13 PM

What I always laughed at was the recurring joke where someone would say to
Agarn (Larry Storch) "And they say you're so dumb."  And then it could be
right away or it could be twenty minutes later and he'd look at the person and
go, "Who says I'm dumb?"  Worked every time!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on May 09, 2013, 12:28:26 PM
(http://knoji.com/images/user/williamfelchner/ftroopkenberryautograph-2f839490.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on May 10, 2013, 10:50:40 PM
(http://www.supermanhomepage.com/images/superfriends/z130506-worldsgreatestDVDA.jpg)

Season 4 of the Super Friends (titled "World's Greatest Super Friends") was released on DVD the end of last month.   Fans of the series were surprised because word was that this season would not see the light of day.

The season consisted of only 8 episodes, but some of the episodes were based on pieces of literature, so it was long assumed that permissions weren't given, and therefore a DVD release was not going to happen, as seasons 3 & 5 were released, with 4 being skipped.

"Rub Three Times for Disaster" - (based on The Arabian Knights) - Kareem Azaar is a ruthless thief on the Planet Zaghdad who has stolen the Magic Lamp of Olam, which contains the power of an evil genie. Kareem uses the Genie's power to take over the planet and banish the Sultan into the world of the Genie's lamp. When the Super Friends arrive to do battle, Superman and the Wonder Twins wind up in the lamp leaving the other heroes to take on Kareem's forces. 

"Lex Luthor Strikes Back" - (original) Lex Luthor uses a projector ray (reverse camera) to disguise himself and his assistant Orville Gump as Super Friends in an elaborate plot to destroy them. Luthor aligns himself with evil fire demons who originate from the sun. They aid Luthor in capturing the Super Friends and placing them in death traps. The demons then change the color of the sun from yellow to red which cause Superman's powers to vanish. However, the sun demons double-cross Luthor and he is trapped in a fire, so he has no choice but to free the Super Friends in an effort to save himself and Earth (so he can continue to take it over, of course!). The Super friends perform rescues and put out fires. Superman uses the Super-Mobile to chase the fire demons back into the sun...which causes the sun to return to its natural color...which restores Superman's powers. Luthor and his assistant are sent back to prison.
 
"Space Knights of Camelon" - (based on King Arthur) - While protecting a prehistoric planet from a meteor, Superman ends up hit by the meteor's nuclear core, crash lands on the medieval planet of Camelon, and loses his memory. A bunch of rebels led by Logan take him in as their black knight in a plan to overthrow King Arthur 7. It's up to the Super Friends to help Superman remember and defeat the rebels. 

"The Lord of Middle Earth" - (based on  J. R. R. Tolkien's writings) - What starts off as a camping trip for the Wonder Twins turns into a nightmarish adventure in Middle Earth when the Super Friends must battle a black magic sorcerer named Mal Havok who has taken over the troll kingdom. Mal Havoc uses his magic to turn the Super Friends into trolls. With their powers reduced, Batman and Wonder Woman accompany the troll king on a mission to free Middle Earth of the evil sorcerer. 

"Universe of Evil" - (original) - In a parallel universe, the Super Friends are super villains, the Super Enemies. When Mount Vesuvius erupts in both worlds, Superman and his evil counterpart are blown into opposite worlds, as they were alternatively trying to make and stop an eruption. While Superman has to fight his evil comrades and find a way back to his own world, his evil counterpart battles the real heroes and begins his plan to conquer the Earth.

"Terror at 20,000 Fathoms" (based on 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea) - The evil Capatin Nimoy plots to use nuclear warhead missiles to sink continents below the sea where he plans to rule. Nimoy is aided by an android duplicate of Batman to help him out, but with Superman and Wonder Woman away on a space mission, the Super Friends are aided by Superman's tiny Kandorian friends from the bottle city of Kandor. 

"The Super Friends Meet Frankenstein" - (based on Frankenstein) When a descendant of the original Dr. Frankenstein kidnaps and steals the powers of Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman and transfers them into his latest creation, it's up to Robin to stop the Super-Monster. He transfers the remaining powers into himself, then manages to restore the Super Friends powers. 

"The Planet of Oz" (based on The Wizard Of Oz) - A tornado transports the Hall of Justice to the Land of Oz where Mister Mxyzptlk, who has once again escaped from the 5th Dimension, informs the Super Friends that they must find The Wizard to get home. Along the way they encounter the Wicked Witch of the Worst Kind in a gingerbread house who turns Superman into the Tin Man, Wonder Woman into the Cowardly Lion and Aquaman into the Scarecrow. 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 13, 2013, 05:29:01 PM
I was just flicking around and came across The Odd Couple, with Marilyn Horne (the Opera singer) guest starring.  It was good and boy can that woman sing!!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 13, 2013, 05:45:55 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/cheese_zps64d5e11c.jpg)


http://free-classic-tv-shows.com/
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 14, 2013, 01:25:09 PM
"Terror at 20,000 Fathoms" (based on 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea) - The evil Captain Nimoy plots to use nuclear warhead missiles to sink continents below the sea where he plans to rule. Nimoy is aided by an android duplicate of Batman to help him out, but with Superman and Wonder Woman away on a space mission, the Super Friends are aided by Superman's tiny Kandorian friends from the bottle city of Kandor. 

You  mean like in "Leonard"?  :o
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 18, 2013, 01:02:19 PM
Well! What an episode of Wagon Train this afternoon! The principal guest star was the movie star Linda Darnell (who never seemed right to me in "period" pieces, but let be, let be), but also appearing in supporting roles were the always reliable John Caradine, a pre-Mannix Mike Connors (always liked his darkly handsome good looks) and a pre-Bonanza Dan Blocker.

We also got to see Flint McCullough with his shirt off, though most of his upper chest was obscured by bandage, as he had been shot in the shoulder. Still it looked as if Robert Horton had a nice spread of chest hair (can be difficult to tell some times in old black-and-white). Linda Darnell got to kiss Horton twice. Lucky woman. ...  ;D

This was one of those series episodes where I'm watching and suddenly go, "OMG that's Dan Blocker!"  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on May 18, 2013, 07:09:40 PM
I was just flicking around and came across The Odd Couple, with Marilyn Horne (the Opera singer) guest starring.  It was good and boy can that woman sing!!

I remember that one!  Her name in the show was Jackie.  She won a Grammy as most promising new opera singer early in her career.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on May 18, 2013, 07:13:49 PM

This was one of those series episodes where I'm watching and suddenly go, "OMG that's Dan Blocker!"  :D


I do that all the time!


But it really pisses people off when he's not in the show we're watching.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 19, 2013, 11:32:49 AM

Lol!

I have an episode of Laugh-In guest starring Dan Blocker.
In one sketch he's in drag! In a brown and white polka dot
ensemble, with a white leather purse.  (Really...brown?)


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 19, 2013, 11:37:00 AM

Saw a rather good episode of Alfred Hitchock this week starring
Peter Lorre and Steve McQueen!

ME-TV is showing 4 hours of ADAM-12 this afternoon.

Saw a Get Smart episode this week and discovered the guest actress
was Gale Sondergaard! She won the very first supporting actress oscar!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 19, 2013, 11:39:24 AM

Wonder if Alfred Hitchcock was ever in drag?


(...or Peter Lorre or Steve McQueen for that matter!)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 19, 2013, 02:26:36 PM
Over supper last night I watched an episode of The Lawrence Welk Show on our local PBS affiliate. My mom and dad and my grandma and grandpa never missed an episode of Welk's show. I'm afraid he was their idea of "high culture"  ::)  but, on the other hand, the episode last night was devoted entirely to Cole Porter's music, so that wasn't so bad.

Of course Mr. Welk pointed out that Wunderbar (title of a song from Porter's musical Kiss Me, Kate) is German for one of his own favorite words, "Wunnerful, wunnerful!"  ;D

Saw a rather good episode of Alfred Hitchock this week starring
Peter Lorre and Steve McQueen!

Dagnabbit, I wish the stations around here would run the Hitchcock show when I can actually watch it.   >:(

I once saw Lorre on an episode of The Jack Benny Program. Except for not having a mustache, in later life, as he appeared on Benny's show, he looked an awful lot like Charles Addams' cartoon Gomez.

Quote
ME-TV is showing 4 hours of ADAM-12 this afternoon.

Four hours of Kent McCord! Dreamy!

Quote
Saw a Get Smart episode this week and discovered the guest actress
was Gale Sondergaard! She won the very first supporting actress oscar!

Would you believe she even lived long enough to appear on Get Smart?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on May 19, 2013, 03:38:18 PM
She lived to be 85, dying in August 1985 (Ironically, just when the movie KISS OF THE SPIDER WOMAN came out!  And NO obit of her mentioned this!).

I'm swooning at the thought of four hours of Kent McCord.  Why couldn't he and George Maharis have co-starred together with NO Martin Milner?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 20, 2013, 12:37:26 PM
I once saw Lorre on an episode of The Jack Benny Program. Except for not having a mustache, in later life, as he appeared on Benny's show, he looked an awful lot like Charles Addams' cartoon Gomez.

You are right!  I saw this episode on ANTENNA-TV recently and you are correct about the
way he looked!

Four hours of Kent McCord! Dreamy!

An acquaintace of mine, born in the mid-70's, when I had mentioned Adam-12/McCord at some
time recently, said that people of my age group that he knows all seem to mention him, he seems
to have been a "thing" for a lot of you.  HEH!

Would you believe she even lived long enough to appear on Get Smart?

Lol! "Wunnerful, wunnerful!"  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 20, 2013, 03:48:44 PM
Over supper last night I watched an episode of The Lawrence Welk Show on our local PBS affiliate. My mom and dad and my grandma and grandpa never missed an episode of Welk's show. I'm afraid he was their idea of "high culture"  ::)  but, on the other hand, the episode last night was devoted entirely to Cole Porter's music, so that wasn't so bad.

Of course Mr. Welk pointed out that Wunderbar (title of a song from Porter's musical Kiss Me, Kate) is German for one of his own favorite words, "Wunnerful, wunnerful!"  ;D



I always watched it, especially the Christmas ones.  I didn't know it wasn't cool to watch! :D  Looking back they all looked like Stepford wives!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 20, 2013, 03:53:54 PM
I remember that one!  Her name in the show was Jackie.  She won a Grammy as most promising new opera singer early in her career.


I thought it was pretty good for a half hour sitcom comedy!   They threw a little culture in there!  ;)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 20, 2013, 05:23:13 PM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2327895/Twilight-Zone-actress-Christine-White-dies-86.html


Anyone remember this lady?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 24, 2013, 11:36:25 AM
Last evening I watched three episodes of Magnum, P.I.

Today, being in a philosophical mood, I find myself wondering what it says about me that being thirty years on and well into middle age, I still find Tom Selleck, circa the early 1980s, the epitome of sexiness in a man.  ???

This isn't the place for a discussion about that, so let be, let be.  :-\
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on May 24, 2013, 12:02:02 PM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2327895/Twilight-Zone-actress-Christine-White-dies-86.html


Anyone remember this lady?

Oh yeah, from this area around DC. The wife in the William Shatner episode.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 28, 2013, 01:14:52 PM

If they haven't already, ME-TV is going to begin airing the TV series IRONSIDE.
(And there's a remake in the works.)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 28, 2013, 02:15:55 PM
If they haven't already, ME-TV is going to begin airing the TV series IRONSIDE.
(And there's a remake in the works.)

Yep. Saw a commercial for it last evening during either Bewitched! or I Dream of Jeannie.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 30, 2013, 07:28:36 AM
Because of the service outage, I didn't get to report yesterday that on Tuesday evening's episode of Bewitched!, no less a light than Richard Dreyfuss--a very young Richard Dreyfuss--appeared as Rodney, a young warlock with a crush on Samantha, who used to babysit him.  :)

I just love it when you're watching one of these old shows, and you see somebody before he or she became a big star.

This must have been a second-season episode, as Darrin and Samantha already had Tabitha, although it was still in glorious black and white.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 31, 2013, 07:01:28 AM
Kind o' odd bit of broadcasting of Magnum, P.I. episodes on Cozi-TV last night. In the 9 p.m. hour they showed a pretty amusing Rashomon-kind of episode about a robbery of the King Kamehameha Club, the club Rick manages, told from three points of view, Rick's, T.C.'s, and Higgins'. Then in the 10 p.m. hour they showed Part II of a two-parter (with Sharon Stone as the guest star). Hunh?  ??? Where was Part I?  ???

I figured out where they were going in the Sharon Stone episode. And it wasn't that I remembered it. The show is now so old that I don't remember any of the episodes--or, at least, so far I haven't seen any that I remember.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 31, 2013, 11:41:48 AM

Jeff, I don't know which episode it was, but I happened by one last night
and watched a few minutes. Tom Selleck was wearing the shortest denim
shorts I've ever seen I think, or was that the style in the early 80's?  He
also reminded me of the stereotypical porno star of that era! And, yes,
he was a very attractive guy.

I don't know why that series never had much of an appeal to me, maybe
it was it's timeslot back in the day when you sort of had to watch it when
it aired or not see it. I do remember one episode that intrigued me when it
was done, maybe dreamlike I don't recall, as though Magnum was a 1930's
style Hawaiian private eye. I like John Hillerman, though, especially in the three
(that I recall) Peter Bogdonovich movies he was in. Paper Moon being the biggest
role where he played himself and a cousin.

About 15 years (?) ago there was a lot of talk about having Tom Selleck himself
doing a film version of Magnum, P.I., but I don't know why it never happened.
Lots of talk about things like that, though. Every two years they keep talking
about doing a movie version of Gilligan's Island. There was also talk of Hawaii-Five-O
(but we know that turned into a series remake) and a live action Jetsons and
Bette Midler had the rights for years for a Green Acres movie.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 31, 2013, 12:15:34 PM

I found info about that episode.
It was Season 3 Episode 7 titled "Flashback."

Plot:  Magnum dreams he's in 1936 - populated with versions of his friends - where
he's working for a young woman whose father, a union leader, has been accused of
the murder of a construction magnate.

(http://magnum-mania.com/images/3_7_full.jpg)

This is the first episode in the series to feature lengthy "fantasy" or "dream" sequences
set in the past. Season Seven's "A.A.P.I." and "Murder by Night" are also of the same mold.

It was directed by Ivan Dixon, of Hogan's Heroes.

On this website, this episode is rated #18 in the Top 40 best episodes of the series.
(8 Seasons/162 episodes)

Interestingly, Magnum, P.I.'s first season began after an actors (SAG) strike.
It's first episodes aired December 11th of 1980, so they didn't quite do a full
regular season of episodes, they managed 18 that year. And it's last season
was cut short by the WGA strike in 1988 and they only did 13 episodes in the
final season.

http://magnum-mania.com/Episodes/Season3/Flashback.html

And all this because jeff mentioned watching Magnum, P.I. last night, lol!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 31, 2013, 12:18:55 PM

Egads, I just thought, Magnum, P.I. stopped airing 25 years ago!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 31, 2013, 12:43:03 PM
Because of the service outage, I didn't get to report yesterday that on Tuesday evening's episode of Bewitched!, no less a light than Richard Dreyfuss--a very young Richard Dreyfuss--appeared as Rodney, a young warlock with a crush on Samantha, who used to babysit him.  :)

This must have been a second-season episode, as Darrin and Samantha already had Tabitha, although it was still in glorious black and white.

I was watching a Gidget episode from about the same time 1965-66 and Sally Field and Richard Dreyfuss
had an episode together.  Richard Dreyfuss, who had won his oscar a year before, gave Sally Field her oscar
a year later!  Amazing.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 31, 2013, 01:01:34 PM
I just love it when you're watching one of these old shows, and you see somebody before he or she became a big star.

I enjoy that, too, it's a nice shot of spice while watching something.

It was announced that Naked City - which ME-TV airs in the middle of the nights on Sunday;
the entire series (29 disks) is going to be released on DVD. In the press release they name
some of the guest stars.
  
Includes an incredible cast of guest stars: Dustin Hoffman, Robert Redford, William Shatner, Martin Sheen, Robert Duvall, Rip Torn, Alan Alda, George C. Scott, Telly Savalas, Leslie Nielsen, Dennis Hopper, Peter Fonda, James Caan, Jack Klugman, Dick York, Walter Matthau, Jon Voight, Gene Hackman, Christopher Walken, Carroll O'Connor, Jean Stapleton, Peter Falk, George Segal, Jack Warden, Ed Asner, Doris Roberts, Suzanne Pleshette, Diane Ladd, Vic Morrow, James Coburn, Mickey Rooney, Burgess Meredith and More!

"Most" of these names were relatively unknown at the time, even though they may have appeared in some
other series episodes or had small parts in films. I don't think most of us think of Christopher Walken as going back that far. He'd been in the business for at least 15 years by 1978 when most of us came to know him for The Deer Hunter and winning the oscar for it. In fact, he appeared in small roles on TV when he was a child, even things like The Colgate Comedy Hour with Martin & Lewis! Around 1962 he appeared in the musical revival of Best Foot Foward with Liza Minnelli in her first Broadway show. He's been married nearly 45 years!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 31, 2013, 01:12:23 PM
Jeff, I don't know which episode it was, but I happened by one last night
and watched a few minutes. Tom Selleck was wearing the shortest denim
shorts I've ever seen I think, or was that the style in the early 80's?  He
also reminded me of the stereotypical porno star of that era! And, yes,
he was a very attractive guy.

They certainly did put Selleck in some shorts that would have made Daisy Duke blush--and jeans so tight in the crotch that I don't know how he was able to move.  :D

Egads, I just thought, Magnum, P.I. stopped airing 25 years ago!

Yeah, kinda scary to think that, isn't it?  :-\

(http://magnum-mania.com/images/3_7_full.jpg)

Tom Selleck was too big for that car!  ;D

Quote
It was directed by Ivan Dixon, of Hogan's Heroes.

Always kind of interesting when you recognize the name of a former actor as a director.

The name Eric Laneuville comes to my mind, right off the top of my head. I believe he acted on Room 222--along with Denise Nicholas, who was a guest on what I called the Rashomon-like Magnum episode last night.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on May 31, 2013, 04:35:33 PM
I enjoy that, too, it's a nice shot of spice while watching something.

It was announced that Naked City - which ME-TV airs in the middle of the nights on Sunday;
the entire series (29 disks) is going to be released on DVD. In the press release they name
some of the guest stars.
 
Includes an incredible cast of guest stars: Dustin Hoffman, Robert Redford, William Shatner, Martin Sheen, Robert Duvall, Rip Torn, Alan Alda, George C. Scott, Telly Savalas, Leslie Nielsen, Dennis Hopper, Peter Fonda, James Caan, Jack Klugman, Dick York, Walter Matthau, Jon Voight, Gene Hackman, Christopher Walken, Carroll O'Connor, Jean Stapleton, Peter Falk, George Segal, Jack Warden, Ed Asner, Doris Roberts, Suzanne Pleshette, Diane Ladd, Vic Morrow, James Coburn, Mickey Rooney, Burgess Meredith and More!

"Most" of these names were relatively unknown at the time, even though they may have appeared in some
other series episodes or had small parts in films. I don't think most of us think of Christopher Walken as going back that far. He'd been in the business for at least 15 years by 1978 when most of us came to know him for The Deer Hunter and winning the oscar for it. In fact, he appeared in small roles on TV when he was a child, even things like The Colgate Comedy Hour with Martin & Lewis! Around 1962 he appeared in the musical revival of Best Foot Foward with Liza Minnelli in her first Broadway show. He's been married nearly 45 years!



I vaguely remember this show. I was 6 yo to 11 yo when it was on TV. When I saw the YouTube blurb about it, it brought back some memories.

http://youtu.be/-DIA_PtIZfc

We pretty much watched what my Dad watched.

I have Dish Network and don't have an old TV series station, much to my regret.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on May 31, 2013, 10:19:11 PM
Last evening I watched three episodes of Magnum, P.I.

Today, being in a philosophical mood, I find myself wondering what it says about me that being thirty years on and well into middle age, I still find Tom Selleck, circa the early 1980s, the epitome of sexiness in a man.  ???

This isn't the place for a discussion about that, so let be, let be.  :-\

Well Jeff, when you find the place let me know so I can contribute to the discussion.  Or you and I can just discuss it.  Because I so agree with you!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on May 31, 2013, 10:23:47 PM
Because of the service outage, I didn't get to report yesterday that on Tuesday evening's episode of Bewitched!, no less a light than Richard Dreyfuss--a very young Richard Dreyfuss--appeared as Rodney, a young warlock with a crush on Samantha, who used to babysit him.  :)

I just love it when you're watching one of these old shows, and you see somebody before he or she became a big star.

This must have been a second-season episode, as Darrin and Samantha already had Tabitha, although it was still in glorious black and white.

It came late in the second season (May 12, 1966), because it features Mary Grace Canfield in one of her three appearances as Harriet Kravitz, Abner's sister.  (Alice Pearce had recently died and they hadn't recast Gladys yet.)  I love Canfield's face when Rodney, in a smoking jacket, calls her "Honey" and then says that he and Sam are having a little snort.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 01, 2013, 08:32:12 AM
It came late in the second season (May 12, 1966), because it features Mary Grace Canfield in one of her three appearances as Harriet Kravitz, Abner's sister.  (Alice Pearce had recently died and they hadn't recast Gladys yet.)  I love Canfield's face when Rodney, in a smoking jacket, calls her "Honey" and then says that he and Sam are having a little snort.

That's right! She was there! Gee! You really know Bewitched!  :)

And which "brother" was she on Green Acres, Ralph or Alf?  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 01, 2013, 08:34:37 AM
(Re: Tom Selleck circa 1980 as the epitome of male sexiness)

Well Jeff, when you find the place let me know so I can contribute to the discussion.  Or you and I can just discuss it.  Because I so agree with you!

Thanks for that! It's good to know I'm not alone. Maybe I'm not just stuck in my own past after all!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on June 01, 2013, 09:50:07 AM
I found Tom Selleck very sexy too! Earl used to make fun of me whenever I'd comment about him!  :D

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on June 01, 2013, 11:09:38 AM


And which "brother" was she on Green Acres, Ralph or Alf?  ;D


Uh, that would be Ralph.

She is still alive at 88 and lives in Maine.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on June 01, 2013, 11:11:27 AM

(http://magnum-mania.com/images/magnum_pi_tv_guide_4.jpg) (http://magnum-mania.com/images/magnum_pi_tv_guide_2.jpg) (http://magnum-mania.com/images/magnum_pi_tv_guide_3.jpg) (http://magnum-mania.com/images/magnum_pi_tv_guide_6.jpg) (http://magnum-mania.com/images/magnum_pi_tv_guide_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 01, 2013, 12:39:35 PM

Uh, that would be Ralph.

She is still alive at 88 and lives in Maine.

Thanks! God bless her! It's been a long time since I've seen an episode of Green Acres.  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 01, 2013, 12:48:07 PM
Tell you what, I remember when I saw The Big Chill that I got the biggest kick out of the fact that Tom Berenger's character was the star of a TV show that was clearly a Magnum, P.I. parody. Berenger even had the Magnum hair and pornstache.  :D

(I really like that cover with Selleck and John Hillerman.)

(http://magnum-mania.com/images/magnum_pi_tv_guide_4.jpg) (http://magnum-mania.com/images/magnum_pi_tv_guide_2.jpg) (http://magnum-mania.com/images/magnum_pi_tv_guide_3.jpg) (http://magnum-mania.com/images/magnum_pi_tv_guide_6.jpg) (http://magnum-mania.com/images/magnum_pi_tv_guide_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on June 01, 2013, 01:02:19 PM
(Re: Tom Selleck circa 1980 as the epitome of male sexiness)

Thanks for that! It's good to know I'm not alone. Maybe I'm not just stuck in my own past after all!  :D

I had a HUGE crush on Tom Selleck, still do. I heard no end of it from Rick and when the boys got old enough, them as well.
I actually have a bigger crush on him now from "Blue Bloods". He is one of a few actors whom I think are better looking now than he was when he was young.
Sean Connery comes to mind with this thought.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on June 01, 2013, 01:46:20 PM
And me, of course.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on June 01, 2013, 02:46:23 PM
And me, of course.

And YOU of course, Mark!! ::) ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on June 01, 2013, 03:13:21 PM
Jean Stapleton dies at 90.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-jean-stapleton-dies-at-90-20130601,0,2810680.story

R.I.P.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 01, 2013, 04:19:50 PM
Jean Stapleton dies at 90.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-jean-stapleton-dies-at-90-20130601,0,2810680.story

R.I.P.

Just heard that on NBC. RIP, indeed.

"Aw-w-w-chie!"  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 01, 2013, 04:21:35 PM
I had a HUGE crush on Tom Selleck, still do. I heard no end of it from Rick and when the boys got old enough, them as well.
I actually have a bigger crush on him now from "Blue Bloods". He is one of a few actors whom I think are better looking now than he was when he was young.
Sean Connery comes to mind with this thought.

Sean Connery (may he live forever!) is gonna look better when he's dead than some people look alive. ...   :-\
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on June 01, 2013, 05:28:46 PM
Just heard that on NBC. RIP, indeed.

"Aw-w-w-chie!"  :)

:)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on June 01, 2013, 05:32:35 PM
Sean Connery (may he live forever!) is gonna look better when he's dead than some people look alive. ...   :-\

Absolutely!!
And he has done it without cosmetic surgery and hair pieces.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 08, 2013, 03:08:07 PM
Interesting guest stars on today's Westerns:

Agnes Moorhead on The Rebel (sorry I missed all but the final few minutes of the episode), and the very handsome Tom Tryon on Wagon Train (an episode from the first season).
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on June 09, 2013, 05:38:45 AM
Tom Tryon was quite easy on the eyes. Very handsome indeed.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on June 09, 2013, 07:09:01 AM
I would try him on!


(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-LIFzvgNXSW0/UPWxHP6QgNI/AAAAAAAAIwY/2H9KtN8styg/s1600/tom-tryon-1956.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 09, 2013, 12:30:17 PM
I would try him on!

You bet!

Tell you what, though. Watching him in that Wagon Train episode got me thinking about how "some things" have changed since the end of the 1950s. Tryon played a character whose father was white and mother was Cheyenne. He decided to join his mother's people, and there was a scene of some sort of adoption ceremony that involved Tryon being tied up wearing just a loincloth (yee haw!  :D ). What struck me was that there was absolutely nothing at all remarkable about his body. He wasn't overweight, there was no flab, and his stomach was flat, but there was also no muscular development, no bulging biceps, no "pecs," no "six-pack" (certainly no "eight-pack"). Seems to me that nowadays we would expect a young male star doing a scene like that to have the body of young Greek god. I guess "back then," as long as the actor wasn't overweight, flabby, saggy, etc., it was "all about the face," and Tryon certainly did have "matinee idol" good looks.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on June 09, 2013, 02:27:22 PM
And he was gay, to boot!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 09, 2013, 02:49:11 PM
Multitalented, too. He was also an author.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 10, 2013, 08:17:59 AM
And he was gay, to boot!

And according to Wikipedia, one of his lovers was porn star Casey Donovan.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on June 10, 2013, 11:00:35 AM
Tell you what, though. Watching him in that Wagon Train episode got me thinking about how "some things" have changed since the end of the 1950s. Tryon played a character whose father was white and mother was Cheyenne. He decided to join his mother's people, and there was a scene of some sort of adoption ceremony that involved Tryon being tied up wearing just a loincloth (yee haw!  :D ). What struck me was that there was absolutely nothing at all remarkable about his body. He wasn't overweight, there was no flab, and his stomach was flat, but there was also no muscular development, no bulging biceps, no "pecs," no "six-pack" (certainly no "eight-back"). Seems to me that nowadays we would expect a young male star doing a scene like that to have the body of young Greek god. I guess "back then," as long as the actor wasn't overweight, flabby, saggy, etc., it was "all about the face," and Tryon certainly did have "matinee idol" good looks.

Since I happened to read something recently that is in align with what you wrote, I will mention it.
I believe what you are talking about actually took shape in the 80's. If you look at all the shirtless boys in the
Woodstock documentary (1969) or documentaries detailing protests and the like in the early 70's, you'll see the
same type of body on most young males as you are describing above.

There was a recent article about assessing current male body images that was talking about what you mention.
The article was talking about how over the past thirty years men have become more dissatified with their bodies
and experienced the type of thing that women were known to experience (not living up to the media images of
how women were portrayed) and in the 80's, with the prolifieration of more media avenues, males were portrayed
in ways that men found comparing themselves to and since they didn't look like that they began feeling more negative
about themselves. The quote, the best I can recall it that I remember is:

Although a muscular body has been idealized for a number of years, the importance of attaining this ideal has become stronger. This is reflected in part through an increase in the degree of muscularity of male bodies displayed in the media.

I tried to find the article just now, but can't find the exact one I was reading.  But here's a few other
quotes from a study I found now that were paralleling the article I did read:

--The exact nature of male body image concerns appears to have been neglected by the paradigm of research emphasizing thinness because males are more concerned with a muscular appearance.

--Male body image issues have become more prevalent due to the increase in valuation of the muscular male body in the visual media of Western cultures. Arguably, this media influence has caused a rise in the number of males experiencing dissatisfaction and, in turn, an increased incidence of clinically significant body image disturbance.

--Given these concerns, it is imperative to determine which methods are appropriate in assessing how males perceive, think, and behave with respect to their bodies. The arguments here hinge on the assumption that the concept of muscularity is an essential feature of how males think about their bodies. This is reflected in part through an increase in the degree of muscularity of male bodies displayed in the media. A 1999 study assessed the physiques of male action toys and found that the figures have grown significantly more muscular over the last 20 to 35 years. Another study assessed the body compositions of Playgirl centerfold models over the last 25 years and found that the average model gained 27 pounds of muscle and lost 12 pounds of fat.


I guess the conclusion was that in the days before the 80's (1975 seems to be a kind of turning point) that a body most males thought of to be an ideal is much the same as now, but the contant visual/media pressure to conform to that was not present, but has become increasingly so and now males are more inclined to be unhappy they don't conform to the media images that did not use to be so prevalent.

It's the old "societal pressure" to conform in ways that might not matter or be healthy for all concerned.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 10, 2013, 01:18:00 PM
I don't mean to continue to lead the discussion OT, but I've also read, somewhere, a long time ago, a claim that along about the 1970s--just about the time Lyle mentions--gay men discovered that they got more sex--or got more opportunities for sex--if they had more muscular, athletic bodies--and since gay men are fashion leaders for the rest of society. ...  ;)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on June 12, 2013, 08:57:53 PM
Jean Stapleton dies at 90.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-jean-stapleton-dies-at-90-20130601,0,2810680.story

R.I.P.

I was just so sorry to hear this!!  :'( :'(


I have been busy lately, moved house..........but have been thinking about this thread, watched an I love Lucy the other day, Lucy and Ethel wallpapering, too funny!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on June 14, 2013, 01:02:05 PM

There was no additional information about this, just a blurb in the current issue
of Entertainment Weekly that stated:

There are currently three new retro channels being developed that will carry
programming from the 1960's, 1970's and 1980's.

One channel for each decade I'm assuming.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on June 14, 2013, 03:44:51 PM
"We is Lucy and Ethel paperhanger."--LMAO!

Keep us posted on these channels, Lyle.

Not that I have cable, though.     :-\
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on June 14, 2013, 06:47:06 PM
She papered the window and Ethel! lol
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on June 21, 2013, 10:58:53 AM
I saw somebody post this on another board. It's an article about advertising to the LGBT community.

http://www.cbc.ca/undertheinfluence/season-1/2012/06/02/lgbt-advertising-chasing-the-pink-dollar/

This article was interesting. It talked about a sitcom that was the first to have a regular gay character
in it and I'd never heard of it before. The Corner Bar. It ran two summer seasons in 1972-73 on ABC.
(16 episodes total.)

I had thought Hot L Baltimore was on when I was in high school, before The Corner Bar, but it turns
out it wasn't on until 1975. Although the info I looked up said it was the first sitcom to have a gay couple
(an aging gay couple, it says) on as regulars. (George and Gordon.) Hot L Baltimore also had prostitutes
and drug addicts on it. It was a Norman Lear sitcom based on a play. (If you don't know, Hot L Baltimore
meant HOTEL BALTIMORE with the "E" in its lighted sign burned out, therefore HOT L BALTIMORE, and
it took place in a hotel.)

Vincent Shiavelli played the gay character Peter Panama in The Corner Bar.
He was a patron and played a Broadway set designer. You may remember
him as one of the patients in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.

Anyway, when I was looking up to see when Hot L Baltimore aired I came across this very
interesting site. It's a list compiled by a very resourceful Canadian of Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual
television characters and the shows they were on along with a lot of other pertinent information.

http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~wyatt/tv-characters.html
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Sara B on June 21, 2013, 11:28:52 AM
Very interesting - thanks, Lyle. Brought back a lot of series that I'd forgotten.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on June 21, 2013, 02:07:07 PM
Wow! Look at the huge increase in gay/lesbian/Bisexual characters documented from 1961 to present. 1 in 1961 to 803 to present (6/2013) !
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on June 21, 2013, 09:44:50 PM
I'm watching Golden Girls, it's the episode where Blanche's brother Clayton shows up with his partner Doug, and they announce they're getting married.



(http://images2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20120822231554/goldengirls/images/e/e6/Doug.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on June 21, 2013, 09:52:30 PM
One of my top ten GG episodes!  Too many great lines to count!

Love this one:  "You'll have to excuse my mother.  She survived a slight stroke which left her, if I can be frank, a complete burden."


P.S.  And Michael Ayr as Doug--hubba hubba!  I thought he was just dreamy!  I've tried to find a recent photo of him or get some bio info on him but to no avail in either case.  Darn.  He sure was cute and not a bad actor.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on June 21, 2013, 10:14:43 PM
Yeah, I can't find one of him now either.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on June 21, 2013, 10:26:35 PM
"doug will bend over backwards for me!"

:D :D :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on June 21, 2013, 10:32:25 PM
There must be homosexuals who date women!

Yeah, they're called lesbians!

 :D    :D    :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on June 21, 2013, 10:34:34 PM
And Sophia has that beautiful speech near the end:

"Everyone wants someone to grow old with.  And shouldn't everyone have that chance?"

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on June 23, 2013, 02:39:29 AM
i'm re entering somewhere near short shorts.... and short memories.

yes tom selleck wore shorts of the day, at least of the day for florida, california and hawaii, and the rest of the nation wasn't much further behind.  if you jog your memories, you probably can remember the geeky relative that always seemed to have one testicle or both hanging out at the most inappropriate times, not that there I
and appropriate time.  i have been bemoaning for years the change in basketball shorts.  what morons thought that SKORTS were the right attire for fit 7'athletes i don't know, may he burn in hell.
(http://i45.servimg.com/u/f45/17/05/80/69/notre_10.jpg)

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on June 23, 2013, 02:43:58 AM
and does anyone remember the running shorts not long after, especially around the time of " the front runner?  two little overlapping nylon pieces joined only at the taint and waistband.  the made their way into discos and skating rinks as well.

(http://www.acefitness.org/newsletters/archive/2009-11-top25fitnessappareltrends/shortshorts.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on June 23, 2013, 02:49:44 AM
now i know some of you are too young to remember, but some of you aren't, but xanadu on broadway made a star of cheyenne jackson
(http://tucsoncitizen.com/morgue/files/2007/07/l57784-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on June 23, 2013, 12:58:19 PM
i have been bemoaning for years the change in basketball shorts.
what morons thought that SKORTS were the right attire for fit
7'athletes i don't know

Agree, once in awhile I wonder about why and when that happened?
Was there a reason?

now i know some of you are too young to remember, but some of you aren't, but xanadu on broadway made a star of cheyenne jackson

He was already a star to me... :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 23, 2013, 02:28:00 PM
and does anyone remember the running shorts not long after, especially around the time of " the front runner?  two little overlapping nylon pieces joined only at the taint and waistband.  the made their way into discos and skating rinks as well.

(http://www.acefitness.org/newsletters/archive/2009-11-top25fitnessappareltrends/shortshorts.jpg)

"Ah, yes, I remember it well. ..."  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: canmark on June 23, 2013, 06:57:46 PM
now i know some of you are too young to remember, but some of you aren't, but xanadu on broadway made a star of cheyenne jackson
(http://tucsoncitizen.com/morgue/files/2007/07/l57784-1.jpg)

I had the good fortune of seeing Xanadu on Broadway.

Not endorsing bootlegs... but here's one of Xanadu (the whole show!) that someone posted on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_-mYomx1nw
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on June 26, 2013, 07:04:14 AM
He was already a star to me... :)
well, there was a run as the frank n furter monster in rocky horror on broadway in gold lame shorts and gladiator sandals too, i believe.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on June 26, 2013, 07:11:03 AM
"Ah, yes, I remember it well. ..."  :)
especially on pole vaulters and high jumpers...

and decathletes (bruce jenner when he was hot, and before someone convinced him he needed plastic surgery.)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on June 27, 2013, 07:21:04 PM
Amen, Jack.  I would love to have the physique--and hair, and nose--that Jenner had at the 1976 Olympics.  Why did he mess so much with his appearance?  How can some people not know they are good-looking?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 27, 2013, 07:41:20 PM
Amen, Jack.  I would love to have the physique--and hair, and nose--that Jenner had at the 1976 Olympics.  Why did he mess so much with his appearance?  How can some people not know they are good-looking?

Body dysmorphic disorder.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on June 29, 2013, 04:35:47 AM
or just low self esteem.  according to jenner, recalling from memory, someone convinced him that a tweak here and a tweak there would improve his marketability for movies and tv.  the job, of course, was horribly botched, and it has taken several surgeries, mostly within the last decade or so to tone things down to an almost normal appearance.  he rued the day...
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 29, 2013, 09:02:38 AM
How can some people not know they are good-looking?

Body dysmorphic disorder.

or just low self esteem.

I think they usually go hand-in-hand. But I'm straying OT here. ...
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on June 30, 2013, 07:01:19 PM
OK, BACK ON TOPIC, DAMMIT!   ;)


Here is a show that I'd love to see in reruns or on DVD:

THE DEFENDERS (1961-65).


WHY doesn't MeTV or some nostalgia station broadcast it?!?  132 episodes, 14 Emmy wins, by all accounts one of the best dramatic shows in TV history.  Where is it?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on July 01, 2013, 08:09:23 AM
Saw a couple of episodes of Thriller last night. Good show.  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on July 01, 2013, 10:28:58 AM

I had never seen that show until a few weeks ago when I was visiting a friend who has it on
dvd and we watched an episode.  A scene came on with a man and a woman and we
remarked that it was a very young Marion Ross.  And the very next thing that happened
is that the man lifted up his glass of champagne toward her and said, "Happy days!"
LOL!  That was so unbelievable that we couldn't help but laugh and had to rewatch that!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on July 04, 2013, 10:35:37 AM

I came across an episode of The Virginian on the COZI tv channel last night
and was able to watch a half hour of it. (They were 90 min. shows.) It
seemed like it was a two person, mostly, story and Doug McClure was one
of the two.  Sigh. He was even wearing the same outfit below:

As for westerns, I can't say I'm a huge fan of them, but anyone watching
TV in the 60's watched them becasue there were so many on. I always had
my eye on Doug McClure in The Virginian, though.

(http://imgc.allpostersimages.com/images/P-473-488-90/54/5487/MVQKG00Z/posters/doug-mcclure-the-virginian.jpg)

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on July 10, 2013, 08:07:16 AM
Oh, Lyle, you little TRAMP(AS)!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on July 10, 2013, 02:12:18 PM
Doug McClure was always pleasant to the eye.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on July 13, 2013, 06:26:47 PM
Doug was a cutie that's for sure!  He was in so many things!


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doug_McClure
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on July 13, 2013, 07:02:36 PM
I used to watch this show, and remember when the father was killed, and the mother left the series.   I never knew there were conflicts behind-the-scenes.


(http://cdn.tss.uproxx.com/TSS/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/good-times.jpg)


Good Times is an American sitcom that originally aired from February 8, 1974, until August 1, 1979, on the CBS television network. It was created by Eric Monte and Mike Evans, and developed by Norman Lear, the series' primary executive producer. Good Times is a spin-off of Maude, which is itself a spin-off of All in the Family along with The Jeffersons.  The series is set in Chicago. The first two seasons were taped at CBS Television City in Hollywood. In the fall of 1975, the show moved to Metromedia Square, where Norman Lear's own production company was housed.

The series stars Esther Rolle as Florida Evans and John Amos as her husband, James Evans, Sr. The characters originated on the sitcom Maude as Florida and Henry Evans, with Florida employed as Maude Findlay's housekeeper in Tuckahoe, New York and Henry employed as a firefighter. When producers decided to feature the Florida character in her own show, they applied retroactive changes to the characters' history. Henry's name became James, there is no mention of Maude, and the couple now live in Chicago.

Florida and James Evans and their three children live in a rented project apartment, in a housing project in a poor, black neighborhood in inner-city Chicago. Florida's and James's children are James, Jr., also known as "J.J." (Jimmie Walker), Thelma (Bern Nadette Stanis), and Michael (Ralph Carter). When the series begins, J.J. and Thelma are seventeen and sixteen years old, respectively, and Michael, called "the militant midget" by his father due to his passionate activism, is eleven years old. Their exuberant neighbor, and Florida's best friend, is Willona Woods (played by Ja'net Dubois), a recent divorcée who works at a boutique. Their building superintendent is Nathan Bookman (Johnny Brown), to whom James, Willona and later J.J. refer as "Buffalo Butt", or, even more derisively, "Booger".

Good Times was intended to be a vehicle for Esther Rolle and John Amos. Both expected the show to deal with serious topics (in a comedic way) while also providing positive characters for viewers. However, the character of J.J. was an immediate hit with audiences and became the breakout character of the series. J.J.'s frequent use of the word "Dy-no-mite!" (he also referred to himself as "Kid Dy-no-mite!") became a popular catchphrase. As a result of the character's popularity, writers focused more on J.J.'s comedic antics instead of serious issues. As the series progressed through seasons two and three, Rolle and Amos grew increasingly disillusioned with the direction the show was taking, especially with J.J.'s antics and stereotypically buffoonish behavior in the storylines. Although she had no ill-will against Jimmie Walker himself, Rolle was rather vocal about her dislike of Walker's character. In a 1975 interview with Ebony magazine she stated:


"He's 18 and he doesn't work. He can't read or write. He doesn't think. The show didn't start out to be that...Little by little—with the help of the artist, I suppose, because they couldn't do that to me—they have made J.J. more stupid and enlarged the role. Negative images have been slipped in on us through the character of the oldest child."

Although doing so less publicly, Amos also was outspoken about his dissatisfaction with the J.J. character. Amos stated:

"The writers would prefer to put a chicken hat on J.J. and have him prance around saying "DY-NO-MITE", and that way they could waste a few minutes and not have to write meaningful dialogue."

While John Amos was less public with his dissatisfaction, he was ultimately fired after season three because of his behind the scenes fights with Norman Lear. Amos' departure was initially attributed to his desire to focus on a film career, but Amos admitted in a 1976 interview that Norman Lear called him and told him that his contract option with the show was not being picked up. Amos stated, "That's the same thing as being fired." The producers decided not to recast the character of James Evans, instead opting to kill off the character in the two-part season four episode "The Big Move".

By the end of season four, Esther Rolle had also become dissatisfied with the show's direction and decided to leave the series. In the final two episodes of the season, Rolle's character gets engaged to Carl Dixon (Moses Gunn), a man she began dating towards the middle of season four. In the season five premiere episode, it is revealed that Florida and Carl married off screen and moved to Arizona for the sake of Carl's health.

Before taping of season six began, CBS and the show's producers decided that they had to do "something drastic" to increase viewership. According to then-vice president of CBS programming Steve Mills, "We had lost the essence of the show. Without parental guidance the show slipped. Everything told us that: our mail, our phone calls, our research. We felt we had to go back to basics."  Producers approached Esther Rolle with an offer to appear in a guest spot on the series. Rolle was initially hesitant but when producers agreed to a number of her demands (including an increased salary and higher quality scripts), she agreed to return to the series on a full-time basis. Rolle also wanted producers make the character of J. J. more responsible as she felt the character was a poor role model for African American youths. She also requested that producers write out the character of Carl Dixon. Rolle reportedly disliked the storyline surrounding the Carl Dixon character, as she believed Florida would not have moved on so quickly after James' death or leave her children. Rolle also thought the writers had disregarded Florida's devout Christian beliefs by having her fall for and marry Carl, who was an atheist
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on July 13, 2013, 07:17:21 PM
Wow! I hadn't heard about any of that either.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on July 13, 2013, 07:56:31 PM
I know, it took me by surprise!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on July 27, 2013, 02:26:16 PM
I came across an episode of The Virginian on the COZI tv channel last night
and was able to watch a half hour of it. (They were 90 min. shows.) It
seemed like it was a two person, mostly, story and Doug McClure was one
of the two.

McClure was the guest star on one of the episodes of Magnum, P.I. that I saw Thursday night. He was still playing a cowboy: The episode was mostly set on a ranch on the Big Island and the plot concerned native Hawaiian cowboys and cattle rustling.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on July 27, 2013, 02:31:44 PM
Weird experience this morning. One of the episodes of The Rebel had a supporting character (who didn't even have a name, he was just a stage coach stop attendant) whom I would have sworn was Lee Majors before he became Lee Majors, but apparently he wasn't. I guess the show may have been a little bit too early, but this guy had eyes and a voice--and biceps--that sure reminded me of Lee Majors.  :-\ (He had a full beard, which could have been fake, so the face was pretty much obscured.)

The main featured guest star was actress Patricia Medina. This was also now the second episode of The Rebel that I've seen that featured a pre-Virginian James Drury.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on July 27, 2013, 06:36:09 PM
(http://www.tampabay.com/resources/images/blogs/80s/50945.6a00d83451b05569e20120a5bb168e970b-450wi.jpg)


I remember staying up late to watch The Love Boat.   Loved that show!  LOL  The guest stars were sooooo funny!  Charo always seemed to be on.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on July 27, 2013, 06:36:35 PM
and I remember thinking that Fred Grandy wad cute.


(http://dailyman40.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/fred-grandy-as-Your-Yeoman-Purser-65-660x330.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on July 28, 2013, 05:20:51 PM
My best friend's Mom (when I was growing up) was in love with Doc.  We didn't dare speak when Love Boat came on.  It was a great show, I would like to see it in reruns, see if it holds up.


I also liked:


Love, American Style is a comedic television anthology, which was produced by Paramount Television and originally aired between 1969 and 1974. For the 1971 and 1972 seasons it was a part of an ABC Friday prime-time lineup that also included The Brady Bunch, The Partridge Family, Room 222, and The Odd Couple.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Love,_American_Style
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on July 28, 2013, 06:15:11 PM
ah, the rebel...

another actor i had a lust for.  something about nick adams was seriously sexy.  he had a smidgen of whatever that fatalistic charm that james dean had, but i suppose he, like several more successful actors, could really only play versions of himself.  the johnny reb cap suited him well, though.
 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on July 28, 2013, 07:06:05 PM
Oh yeah. Serious crush too.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on July 29, 2013, 09:13:31 AM
My best friend's Mom (when I was growing up) was in love with Doc.  We didn't dare speak when Love Boat came on.  It was a great show, I would like to see it in reruns, see if it holds up.

Doc? Doc? Seriously?


Quote
I also liked:


Love, American Style is a comedic television anthology, which was produced by Paramount Television and originally aired between 1969 and 1974. For the 1971 and 1972 seasons it was a part of an ABC Friday prime-time lineup that also included The Brady Bunch, The Partridge Family, Room 222, and The Odd Couple.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Love,_American_Style

Oh, boy, do I remember that lineup well!

Speaking of Room 222, from time to time I used to see Eric Laneuville listed as a director on different shows, so I guess he ended up going behind the camera.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on July 29, 2013, 09:14:34 AM
ah, the rebel...

another actor i had a lust for.  something about nick adams was seriously sexy.  he had a smidgen of whatever that fatalistic charm that james dean had, but i suppose he, like several more successful actors, could really only play versions of himself.  the johnny reb cap suited him well, though.

You bet!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on July 29, 2013, 06:06:17 PM
Doc? Doc? Seriously?


Oh, boy, do I remember that lineup well!

Speaking of Room 222, from time to time I used to see Eric Laneuville listed as a director on different shows, so I guess he ended up going behind the camera.


 :D

Check this out:

http://kopell.tripod.com/pages/loveboat.html
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on August 06, 2013, 05:59:59 PM
Loved Room 222 and thought even at age 10 how handsome and suave Lloyd Haynes was.  So sad that he died so young, at 45 (I believe) in 1986.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: B.W. on August 06, 2013, 06:50:26 PM
I used to watch this show, and remember when the father was killed, and the mother left the series.   I never knew there were conflicts behind-the-scenes.


(http://cdn.tss.uproxx.com/TSS/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/good-times.jpg)


Good Times is an American sitcom that originally aired from February 8, 1974, until August 1, 1979, on the CBS television network. It was created by Eric Monte and Mike Evans, and developed by Norman Lear, the series' primary executive producer. Good Times is a spin-off of Maude, which is itself a spin-off of All in the Family along with The Jeffersons.  The series is set in Chicago. The first two seasons were taped at CBS Television City in Hollywood. In the fall of 1975, the show moved to Metromedia Square, where Norman Lear's own production company was housed.

The series stars Esther Rolle as Florida Evans and John Amos as her husband, James Evans, Sr. The characters originated on the sitcom Maude as Florida and Henry Evans, with Florida employed as Maude Findlay's housekeeper in Tuckahoe, New York and Henry employed as a firefighter. When producers decided to feature the Florida character in her own show, they applied retroactive changes to the characters' history. Henry's name became James, there is no mention of Maude, and the couple now live in Chicago.

Florida and James Evans and their three children live in a rented project apartment, in a housing project in a poor, black neighborhood in inner-city Chicago. Florida's and James's children are James, Jr., also known as "J.J." (Jimmie Walker), Thelma (Bern Nadette Stanis), and Michael (Ralph Carter). When the series begins, J.J. and Thelma are seventeen and sixteen years old, respectively, and Michael, called "the militant midget" by his father due to his passionate activism, is eleven years old. Their exuberant neighbor, and Florida's best friend, is Willona Woods (played by Ja'net Dubois), a recent divorcée who works at a boutique. Their building superintendent is Nathan Bookman (Johnny Brown), to whom James, Willona and later J.J. refer as "Buffalo Butt", or, even more derisively, "Booger".

Good Times was intended to be a vehicle for Esther Rolle and John Amos. Both expected the show to deal with serious topics (in a comedic way) while also providing positive characters for viewers. However, the character of J.J. was an immediate hit with audiences and became the breakout character of the series. J.J.'s frequent use of the word "Dy-no-mite!" (he also referred to himself as "Kid Dy-no-mite!") became a popular catchphrase. As a result of the character's popularity, writers focused more on J.J.'s comedic antics instead of serious issues. As the series progressed through seasons two and three, Rolle and Amos grew increasingly disillusioned with the direction the show was taking, especially with J.J.'s antics and stereotypically buffoonish behavior in the storylines. Although she had no ill-will against Jimmie Walker himself, Rolle was rather vocal about her dislike of Walker's character. In a 1975 interview with Ebony magazine she stated:


"He's 18 and he doesn't work. He can't read or write. He doesn't think. The show didn't start out to be that...Little by little—with the help of the artist, I suppose, because they couldn't do that to me—they have made J.J. more stupid and enlarged the role. Negative images have been slipped in on us through the character of the oldest child."

Although doing so less publicly, Amos also was outspoken about his dissatisfaction with the J.J. character. Amos stated:

"The writers would prefer to put a chicken hat on J.J. and have him prance around saying "DY-NO-MITE", and that way they could waste a few minutes and not have to write meaningful dialogue."

While John Amos was less public with his dissatisfaction, he was ultimately fired after season three because of his behind the scenes fights with Norman Lear. Amos' departure was initially attributed to his desire to focus on a film career, but Amos admitted in a 1976 interview that Norman Lear called him and told him that his contract option with the show was not being picked up. Amos stated, "That's the same thing as being fired." The producers decided not to recast the character of James Evans, instead opting to kill off the character in the two-part season four episode "The Big Move".

By the end of season four, Esther Rolle had also become dissatisfied with the show's direction and decided to leave the series. In the final two episodes of the season, Rolle's character gets engaged to Carl Dixon (Moses Gunn), a man she began dating towards the middle of season four. In the season five premiere episode, it is revealed that Florida and Carl married off screen and moved to Arizona for the sake of Carl's health.

Before taping of season six began, CBS and the show's producers decided that they had to do "something drastic" to increase viewership. According to then-vice president of CBS programming Steve Mills, "We had lost the essence of the show. Without parental guidance the show slipped. Everything told us that: our mail, our phone calls, our research. We felt we had to go back to basics."  Producers approached Esther Rolle with an offer to appear in a guest spot on the series. Rolle was initially hesitant but when producers agreed to a number of her demands (including an increased salary and higher quality scripts), she agreed to return to the series on a full-time basis. Rolle also wanted producers make the character of J. J. more responsible as she felt the character was a poor role model for African American youths. She also requested that producers write out the character of Carl Dixon. Rolle reportedly disliked the storyline surrounding the Carl Dixon character, as she believed Florida would not have moved on so quickly after James' death or leave her children. Rolle also thought the writers had disregarded Florida's devout Christian beliefs by having her fall for and marry Carl, who was an atheist

Rolle didn't want her character to fall in love with an atheist but I disagree with her as that would not have disregarded her character's religious beliefs.  I think Rolle's opinion reflects prejudice towards atheists and I am an atheist but I don't care for her opinion.  Well, many religious blacks are probably married to atheists. There's nothing wrong with that.  I am formerly religious and I would not have acted like that even when I was religious despite my differences in beliefs with an atheist.  My husband is spiritual-but-not-religious and he has kindly put up with my atheism even if he is not entirely comfortable with it and he also dealt with my 30 years of religious exploration after leaving the Jehovah's Witnesses at 22 years old having been brought up in that particular fundamentalist Christian denomination by my control-freak of a mother whom I no longer speak to.  My dad is a Seventh-day Adventist and we talk occasionally.  He tries to be as understanding as he can be.  He's liberal but I know it's hard for him because of my strained relationship with my mom.  I liked " Good Times".  Janet Jackson starred in it as a child and coincidentally, she is an ex- JW like me.  She was born and raised into it by her mother who was a convert and Janet's mom is quite the homophobe as is her husband.  I read something in Ebony magazine once that the Jackson's mother said the bible condemns homosexuality and that Michael couldn't have been gay as he was a 'Christian'.  Well, Mrs. Jackson , your bible is wrong for condemning homosexuality and Michael could have been gay even if he was  a Christian.  I don't think Michael was homophobic at all , at least I hope not.  There are no famous African-American LGBT or black atheists at all in the media or LGBT atheists of color for that matter is there? Well there should be.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: B.W. on August 06, 2013, 06:57:04 PM
I liked " Survivor" back when it first came out.  Survival shows are popular and it reminds me of the film " Cast Away" with Tom Hanks and it also is reminiscent  of the independent horror mockumentary blockbuster film from 1999 entitled " The Blair Witch Project" and it's poorly received but fun to watch sequel released in 2000 entitled " Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2 ".



" I love Lucy", " Leave it to Beaver", " The Andy Griffith Show" and " Roseanne" are some of my personal likes.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on August 07, 2013, 05:36:11 PM
Roseanne will be classic TV one day for sure, it was perfect for it's time.  I still get such a kick out of the reruns!


I use to love JJ Walker, DYNOMITE!!

http://www.dynomitejj.com/front.html
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on August 07, 2013, 07:27:08 PM
Talk about loving Lucy! Polka dot dress worn by Lucille Ball on Fifties show fetches a whopping $168,000 at auction

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2386443/Lucille-Balls-Polka-dot-dress-worn-Fifties-fetches-168K-auction.html#ixzz2bKw6AloO
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Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: B.W. on August 08, 2013, 02:20:53 AM
Roseanne will be classic TV one day for sure, it was perfect for it's time.  I still get such a kick out of the reruns!


I use to love JJ Walker, DYNOMITE!!

http://www.dynomitejj.com/front.html

" Roseanne" is a classic to me.  Sara Gilbert who played Darlene Connor/ Darlene Healy,  she always makes me laugh.  She is a lesbian and is in a relationship with some female singer whom I think she is engaged to and has two children from a previous relationship with another woman. She's of Jewish descent and is the younger sister of Melissa Gilbert who played the role of Laura Elizabeth Ingalls Wilder in the beloved television series " Little House on the Prairie" which is another favorite show of mine.  Does anyone else like LHOTP?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: B.W. on August 08, 2013, 02:41:16 PM
" The X Files" and " Twin Peaks" were really good. Did anyone else like them?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: B.W. on August 08, 2013, 03:28:57 PM
" The Sopranos". Now that was a great show.  James Gandolfini recently passed away.  So sad.   :'(
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on August 08, 2013, 06:14:19 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/I-Love-Lucy-Posters_zpsac09c98a.jpg)


We have had some discussions in the TV thread about some of the older television shows.  Trying to keep that thread more on the current TV programs, some of us thought it would be a nice idea to start another thread and dedicate to some of the older well loved programs.


There have been some great ones, from the 1950's and 1960's with such classics as I Love Lucy, The Honeymooners, The Dick Van Dyke show and Bewitched.  Leave it to Beaver, My Three Sons, too many to list!

Some of the 60's TV shows carried into the 70's and then the 70's had some ground breaking television...........as they say "and then came Maude"  :D

Mary Tyler Moore continued on with a show of her own, as did Rhoda, and we can't forget Mr. Bunker.



Anyway I thought it may be fun, there are lots of links to old TV programs and I am sure everyone has their fond memories to share.  And let's not forget the cowboys and the westerns.


So I thought just to make this thread a little specific, we could discuss shows from 1950 to late 70's?


And as per the mods lets keep any pics safe for work!   But we do want pics, there are some beautiful ones out there.






I am bumping up the first page, when I said classic, this is what we meant!


But there are a lot of TV shows that are destined to be classics one day and yea Soprano's will be one for sure!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on August 11, 2013, 06:59:26 PM
I ought to do some research. I've been wondering lately whether My World, And Welcome To It was ever released on any form of video. It had only one season when I was in junior high (but it won an Emmy), it was based on the works of James Thurber, and I absolutely loved it!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on August 11, 2013, 07:09:18 PM
Jeff, according to TV Obscurities:

My World and Welcome To It was seen on superstation WGN's national feed (but not locally in Chicago, Illinois) in 1990 and perhaps a handful of other local stations over the years but otherwise has never been syndicated. It has never been commercially released on VHS or DVD.


http://www.tvobscurities.com/articles/my_world/
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 13, 2013, 11:13:08 AM
I used to watch that show because it was on before Laugh-In.
My memory is that critics appeared to like it.  I, myself, remember
that I didn't care for it.  I don't know what I'd think now if I saw it.

I remember it often had some animated sequences in it.  I, perhaps, didn't
like it because the daughter was played by Lisa Gerritson (sp.?).  She played
Phyllis' daughter on Mary Tyler Moore and for whatever reason I have a complete
aversion to this actress. I was glad she got this role so she'd be off the MTM show!

The only episode I can remember anything about was one where he put out the
American flag at Christmas time and that caused some sort of kerfuffle with the neighbors
or townspeople.  (It may be titled "Rally 'Round the Flag" as I saw that as one of the titles.)

In the 90's I got a Christmas card one year that had a painted city winter/snowy street scene
on it and the American flag was hanging on the buiilding at the center quite prominently and it
instantly reminded me of that episode and I kept that card.

A walk down memory lane for you, Jeff:

(http://ctva.biz/US/Comedy/MyWorld_SheldonLeonard.JPG)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 13, 2013, 11:16:46 AM

(http://www.tvparty.com/bigs10/myworld-04.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 13, 2013, 11:17:33 AM

TV Guide preview page: (If you click on the image you'll get a larger size you can read.)

(http://www.sitcomsonline.com/photopost/data/1525/007_-_My_World_And_Welcome_To_It.jpg) (http://www.sitcomsonline.com/photopost/data/1525/007_-_My_World_And_Welcome_To_It.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 13, 2013, 11:18:34 AM

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bTNO1T3icqQ/UDDzKj9-cKI/AAAAAAAAstI/PI_2KtkZ-uY/s640/dy2nnb1jsjwdsjwn.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 13, 2013, 11:19:34 AM

TV Guide "Close-Up" spotlighting an episode: (lol, "spot" lighting)

(http://ctva.biz/US/Comedy/MyWorld_Cristabel.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 13, 2013, 11:20:40 AM

(http://myworldandwelcometoit.flyingdreams.org/myworld2.jpg)

If you're interested in some more about it I found this nice website
that has a good overview of the show, it's place on tv, and some
facts, trivia and photos.

http://myworldandwelcometoit.flyingdreams.org/
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 13, 2013, 11:21:58 AM

And, buyer beware, there are places online that you can frequently buy things that aren't
available in any other way, that someone has access to somehow,  and they'll sell you copies
of things you might want.  I am not endorsing this (as it's probably illegal under copyright
laws) and it is definitely buyer beware in terns of quality and there are occasions people
just get ripped off, but I stumbled across this site that is offering the entire series or a few
episodes for sale.

http://www.sell.com/22GW9C

(http://i2.sell.com/7/181/507376/60/108/3918948-l.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 13, 2013, 11:29:22 AM

And in related news:

The Secret Life of Walter Mitty is an upcoming comedy-drama adventure film directed by
and starring Ben Stiller. The film will be the second adaptation of James Thurber's 1939 short
story of the same name, following the 1947 film starring Danny Kaye. It is scheduled to be
released in December. Also starring in the new version are Kristen WIig, Sean Penn and Josh
Charles.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on August 13, 2013, 11:35:31 AM
Thanks, guys.

I'm surprised and sorry you didn't like it, Lyle, though I understand how dislike of an actor can put one off a whole series. (You couldn't pay me to watch How I Met Your Mother because I have such an aversion to Neil Patrick Harris.)

As a kid, I was lucky I didn't piss myself from laughing at the show's dramatization of Thurber's "The Night the Bed Fell."  :D

Those recordings are probably pirated.

When I was in high school, William Windom brought his one-man Thurber show to a local theater. One of my English teachers arranged a field trip for her American Literature class to see the show. It was the semester after I had her class, but she remembered I was a great Thurber fan, and so she arranged for me to go along on the field trip anyway. I have always been grateful to her for that--it's one of my few good memories of high school.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 13, 2013, 11:37:37 AM

Okay, I actually came to this thread to write about something else!

Sunday ME-TV was airing in their Sunday afternoon block the series from
Jan. 1955-1960 called The Millionaire. I remember my mother telling me
about this show once.  It's about a super billionaire who at the beginning
of every episode instructs his valet or whoever he is to give a certified check
tax free of a million dollars to various people. You never see the millionaire, just
his hands or whatever and so each week it's basically a different story to see how
people deal with being given a million dollars.
 
It's a half hour show. I happened by it yesterday and stopped on it because
Dick Sargent was in the one I came upon.  I watched three of them and it
was pretty good.  (Another episdoe had Dick York!) I wish I could have taped
the rest of them to watch.  I thought it might be one of the new shows that
was going to be on in the fall cause they did that with Ironside before it appeared,
but it's not.  If they did about 30 shows a season there'd be over 160 episodes.
Maybe it'll be on eventually.  Apparently they are getting rid of their Sunday afternoon
block of varied programs for a set group. Which is too bad cause I liked the theme idea.
 
The show apparently is also known occasionally when it was syndicated as If I Had a Million.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on August 13, 2013, 11:58:17 AM
One hundred and sixty episodes? Geez, thats $160 million!  :o  ;D

I just wish those nostalgia channels would show more of the old Westerns at a time I could watch them.  :(
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 13, 2013, 12:08:26 PM

True, the westerns all seem to be on in the afternoon.  Most of the shows I find myself
interested in watching on ME-TV all air from 1am - 6am.

Antenna-TV airs Alfred Hitchcock Presents at a reasonable time and I am enjoying catching
episodes of that. One recent one (did I post about it?) had the delicious title of FOG CLOSING IN.

This series was a half-hour format and aired for seven seasons. After that the show, for three seasons,
became an hour and was called The Alfred Hitchcock Hour.  The hour long series is going to begin on
ME-TV this fall.  (I hope not in the middle of the night.)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on August 13, 2013, 02:14:52 PM
WOW thanks, I totally remember that show now.   And yes that kid was Phyllis's daughter!


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisa_Gerritsen
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on August 13, 2013, 02:22:28 PM
True, the westerns all seem to be on in the afternoon.

I've been losing a two-hour chunk right in the middle of my Saturdays to The Rebel and Wagon Train. I'm giving thought to buying the first two seasons of Wagon Train on DVD, but they ain't cheap.  :-\
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on August 13, 2013, 02:46:25 PM
One hundred and sixty episodes? Geez, thats $160 million!  :o  ;D

I just wish those nostalgia channels would show more of the old Westerns at a time I could watch them.  :(

There were over 200 episodes and the benefactor paid the taxes so it was well over $200 million.  Taxes, many here will be thrilled to know, were up to 90% of income over $300,000 back then. 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on August 13, 2013, 03:42:24 PM
I remember The Millionaire very well. John Beresford Tipton was the philanthropic multi-billionaire. And Marvin Milner (real name, can't think of the role name) was the one who delivered the checks.

I remember asking a civics teacher when the show was popular how much one would actually have to pay to give someone a million dollars at that time, but the teacher was stumped.

There would have been state (Louisiana) and local (New Orleans) taxes too.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on August 13, 2013, 05:16:43 PM
I remember The Millionaire very well. John Beresford Tipton was the philanthropic multi-billionaire. And Marvin Milner (real name, can't think of the role name) was the one who delivered the checks.

I remember asking a civics teacher when the show was popular how much one would actually have to pay to give someone a million dollars at that time, but the teacher was stumped.

There would have been state (Louisiana) and local (New Orleans) taxes too.



And, of course, it would have been subject to gift tax instead of the marginal rate of 90%.  So, in 1957 a gift of $1million would have resulted in a federal gift tax to the donor of $244,275.00.  Perhaps a bit less since there was a $3000.00 exclusion and we also do not know if dear Mr. Tipton was married, and if he was, whether or not the gracious Mrs. Tipton participated in his little game.  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on August 17, 2013, 02:19:44 PM
The principal guest star on today's episode of Wagon Train was Drew Barrymore's father, John Drew Barrymore.

He was actually quite good, for someone who turned out to be such a nut case. I guess it was the Barrymore blood. According to IMDb, the episode was from 1958.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on August 20, 2013, 06:13:48 PM
Anyone fondly remember Grindl"?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 21, 2013, 01:15:02 PM
Wow, Mark, that's a jolt out of the past.  I do remember Grindl, whether fondly or not,
I don't know.

These are a couple things I remember about it.

I remember liking it as a kid and it was probably the first time I knew who Imogene Coca was.
She played a maid that was sent out, I believe, on temporary assignments from an agency. The
one episode I remember greatly disturbed me.  Apparently she's sent out to work for a guy who
raises prize winning Roses and names them after the maids who have worked for him, but Grindl
finds out the maids have all disappeared as the man has used them as fertilizer for the roses, or
something like that. The other thing I remember is that I wanted to watch Grindl the very same
night that The Beatles first appeared on Ed Sullivan and was very angry about my sister getting her
way to see Ed Sullivan.  Heh!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on August 21, 2013, 01:54:46 PM
Yeah! Always liked Imogene Coca a lot, so I was very predisposed to like the show. It didn't disappoint, though I wish it had lasted longer.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on August 21, 2013, 02:33:29 PM
Anyone fondly remember Grindl"?

Only vaguely.  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on August 21, 2013, 03:28:15 PM
I remember one episode, her then boss constantly called her Gertl/girdle and she had to correct him frequently.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on August 22, 2013, 06:12:12 PM



Grindl is an American situation comedy that began in the fall of 1963 on NBC, originally sponsored by Procter & Gamble. The show, starring Imogene Coca in the title role, lasted for one season.


Synopsis

Grindl (Coca) worked for Foster's Temporary Employment service and was employed doing domestic work. The show revolved around the different humorous situations she would get into with each new job she was assigned to each week.


The first show featured guest star Telly Savalas, who would later star as Kojak. Other guest stars included George Kennedy, Paul Lynde, Robert Q. Lewis, Jack Albertson, Robert Karnes, Darryl Richard, and Leif Erickson.

In the 1954-1955 television season, Coca had starred in The Imogene Coca Show, a comedy and variety show, also aired on NBC.

Grindl was scheduled on Sunday nights at 8:30 P.M. in September 1963, sandwiched between Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color and Bonanza, both major hits. The series was pitted against the second half of The Ed Sullivan Show on CBS which greatly contributed to its low ratings. It was canceled in the spring of 1964, after completing a full season of 32 episodes.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grindl


Never heard of it until just now.   But as for Imogene (and how great is that name?  :D):


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imogene_Coca


WOW that's a lot of classic TV!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on August 23, 2013, 12:49:39 PM
She was fantastic! Deadpan humor, a worthy rival to Buster Keaton.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on August 25, 2013, 05:21:00 AM
i remember her as half a comedy duo, sid caesar and imogene coca, and might well have liked her better singly, but i think i took a pass on the maid sitcom, and i never missed ed sullivan.

how come we have never mentioned "Your Show of Shows"?  it featured    Sid Caesar, Imogene Coca, Howard Morris. and Carl Reiner.  although it is credited for inspiring a bunch of other shows, i think most of us would see the carol burnett show to be its most direct comparison.

for that matter, how about the Ed Sullivan show?  or toast of the town as it was originally called, i think from a newspaper column sullivan wrote.  virtually everybody appeared on that show, and like johnny carson, a favorable nod from stoneface sullivan could launch a career.  and then there was topo gigio, or thee still amazing señor wences....
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJiYZ6QIAtY
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on August 25, 2013, 05:58:21 AM
All very good shows indeed. And don't forget Garry Moore, whose variety show launched Carol Burnett.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on August 25, 2013, 07:21:24 AM
Loved Carol Burnett!

Hi Paaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaatsy!  Hi Paaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaatsy!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gpNF-3CBRFk
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on August 25, 2013, 07:46:02 AM
LMAO, Chuck!

I didn't even have to click on the link to know what you were referring to.

A SWIPED LIFE!  One of my favorite of her movie parodies!!

Ohmigod, over the years since I saw it I would go "PAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAATSY!" and until now I thought I was the only person in the world who GOT it!

Will you marry me, Chuck?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 25, 2013, 11:44:59 AM

Over the years I've seen some video collections of Your Show of Shows sketches,
and while some were amusing I never found it that good, as people seem to remember
it.

One reason is that Sid Caesar is one of those comedians who did what is referred to as
ethnic type humor--doing jibberish accents and/or voices as the source of character humor
and that never really appealed to me.  I don't find it funny. Arte Johnson did that type of
thing on Laugh-In often and I wasn't fond of most of those type of things he did, either.

As for Ed Sullivan, my parents didn't like him or enjoy him so we never watched his program.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on August 25, 2013, 11:55:03 AM
Over the years I've seen some video collections of Your Show of Shows sketches,
and while some were amusing I never found it that good, as people seem to remember
it.

One reason is that Sid Caesar is one of those comedians who did what is referred to as
ethnic type humor--doing jibberish accents and/or voices as the source of character humor
and that never really appealed to me.  I don't find it funny. Arte Johnson did that type of
thing on Laugh-In often and I wasn't fond of most of those type of things he did, either.

As for Ed Sullivan, my parents didn't like him or enjoy him so we never watched his program.



Gee Lyle, once again we agree.  (If I didn't know better I'd swear you were an Aquarius.)

I too can appreciate the genius of Sid Caesar and YOUR SHOW OF SHOWS (and I certainly don't dislike either man or show) without really being huge fans of both.  I think you nailed it:  it's the preponderance (notice how closely--and appropriately--that word sounds like "ponderous" and "preposterous") of Caesar's doing ethnic humor, which I have rarely found funny.  I felt the same way about Arte Johnson.  I hated his "Rozmenko" character on LAUGH-IN.

I always thought Imogene Coca was much funnier than Caesar.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 25, 2013, 11:58:48 AM

Gee Lyle, once again we agree.  (If I didn't know better I'd swear you were an Aquarius.)

Are you?

I'm a Librarian.  Lol!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 25, 2013, 12:01:26 PM


I liked her, too, but she was in some dubious things, like It's About Time.

And although I love Bewitched, I wasn't fond of the two-parter she did
playing Mary the Good Fairy.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on August 25, 2013, 12:01:49 PM
No, I am a Gemini, but Aquarius is supposed to be Gemini's soulmate.  So to a degree is Libra (all three are air signs).  And Leo is actually very compatible with Gemini, too.  Just coincidentally my male best friend is a Leo and my best female friend is an Aquarius.  I have been besties with both for 35 years.


P.S.

You ARE five years older than me so maybe in 1966 your 12-year-old self was already too jaded for the low humor of IT'S ABOUT TIME.  This 7-year-old loved it.

Imogene Coca and Joe E. Ross?  C'mon!

OOO!  OOO!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on August 29, 2013, 07:37:59 AM
if one were to look at a list of guest that were on sullivan, it would include virtually every flash in the pan and perennial favorite, unless they pissed off ed, in which case they were one and done.  everyone that was any kind of a talent turned up, and a number of acts that flourished there that found no other home in the entertainment industry.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on August 29, 2013, 07:42:01 AM
and now a question for lyle or anyone that cares to take a shot at it.

would someone explain to me the difference in feeling between a single camera series and a multicamera, besides the obvious?

illustrating the difference with a list of well known examples of each would be of some help i think in getting the idea of what the audience gets out of each.

thanks.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on August 29, 2013, 09:39:19 AM
You ARE five years older than me so maybe in 1966 your 12-year-old self was already too jaded for the low humor of IT'S ABOUT TIME.  This 7-year-old loved it.

Imogene Coca and Joe E. Ross?  C'mon!

OOO!  OOO!

A big thing I remember of It's About Time are bits and pieces of the lyrics of its theme song. That was back in the day when a show's theme could set up its premise (think, esp., The Beverly Hillbillies, Petticoat Junction, and Green Acres).

Ooo! Ooo! And now that you bring up Joe E. Ross, we're back to Car 54, Where Are You?  :D

(Oh, yeah, I turned 8 in May of 1966.)

Anybody wanna take a stab at how the humor Sid Caesar did on Your Show of Shows--which was way before my time--compared to the type of humor that was done in Vaudeville?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on August 29, 2013, 11:05:16 AM
and now a question for lyle or anyone that cares to take a shot at it.

would someone explain to me the difference in feeling between a single camera series and a multicamera, besides the obvious?

illustrating the difference with a list of well known examples of each would be of some help i think in getting the idea of what the audience gets out of each.

thanks.

Jack:
I have some knowledge of the subject however I find that the wiki article at the below link is pretty decent and may answer most of your questions.  Take a look.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single-camera_setup (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single-camera_setup)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on August 30, 2013, 07:16:08 AM
I watched three hours of Magnum, P.I. last night,  ::)

Ordinarily I've just been watching two hours, 8-10 p.m., but for some reason last night I left it on for the third episode, 10-11 p.m. I'm rather glad I did because it was an episode where Angela Lansbury showed up as a guest star as Jessica Fletcher!  :D

The episode had another old Broadway veteran, too, Dorothy Loudon.

Meanwhile, this morning, this old jingle popped into my head. Anyone else remember:

See the U.S.A.
In your Chevrolet!
America is asking you to call!


 :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 30, 2013, 09:47:15 AM

Mmmwaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 30, 2013, 09:48:58 AM
if one were to look at a list of guest that were on sullivan, it would include virtually every flash in the pan and perennial favorite, unless they pissed off ed, in which case they were one and done.  everyone that was any kind of a talent turned up, and a number of acts that flourished there that found no other home in the entertainment industry.

I'd also say the same thing about The Hollywood Palace, wihch often included sports figures,which I don't recall
Sullivan doing, but I could be mistaken.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 30, 2013, 10:29:57 AM
P.S.

You ARE five years older than me

But who's keeping track!?

so maybe in 1966 your 12-year-old self was already too jaded for the low humor of IT'S ABOUT TIME.  This 7-year-old loved it. Imogene Coca and Joe E. Ross?  C'mon!

OOO!  OOO!

I said it was "dubious," which doesn't necessarily equate to saying I didn't watch it or like it, I did!

Thought it was quite a good idea at the time, but what I'd think of it now I have no idea!  I also liked
that when they saw the ratings weren't going to be good enough for a second season, that after
18 episodes they reversed the entire premise and brought all the stone age people back to the present!

There was some talk on a video site at one time about the series being on dvd (or going to be) in
Europe.  Don't know, but I'd take a gander at it again, wouldn't you?

By the way, it was a Sherwood Schwartz show and on the same year as Gilligan's Island's last season.
Alot of the jungle type sets from Gilligan were used in It's About Time.

I always thought that some one season shows should be shown on the retro channels on the weekend.
They could get thirty weeks out of it!  Although not all shows left in the warehouse are up to broadcasting
quality and money would need to be invested in restoring them.

The show that Julie Newmar was in, MY LIVING DOLL, was recently tried to be released.  They had a really hard
time even finding existing copies of all the episdoes intact.  They did release a dvd with about 14 of the episodes
and said they are working on doing the rest of them.  I'd see that, too!  Love Julie Newmar.  Although I don't know
for a fact, it's my opinion from what I've gleaned over the years that Julie was not more popular than she was because
she was hard to work with.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 30, 2013, 10:33:48 AM
A big thing I remember of It's About Time are bits and pieces of the lyrics of its theme song. That was back in the day when a show's theme could set up its premise (think, esp., The Beverly Hillbillies, Petticoat Junction, and Green Acres).

Yes, I too still remember that theme song and last year sometime saw it on youtube.

Here it is:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J1G-TsdNWGg

When they changed the premise and brought back the people to the present, they also changed the
theme song lyrics.  Here's the lyrics, opening and closing, to the first premise:

--Opening Theme Version One

It's about time, it's about space,
About two men in the strangest place.
It's about time, it's about flight.
Traveling faster than the speed of light.
Here is their tale, of the brave crew.
As through the barrier of time they flew.
Past the fighting Minute Men.
Past an armored knight.
Past a Roman warrior.
To this ancient site.

It's about caves, cavemen too.
About a time when the Earth was new.
Wait'll they see what is in sight.
Is it good luck or is it good night?
It's about two astronauts.
It's about their fate.
It's about a woman,
And her prehistoric mate.
And now, It's About Time!

--Closing Theme Version One

It's about time, it's about space,
About two men in the strangest place.
They will be here right on this spot,
No matter if they like it or not.
How will they live in this primitive state?
Will help ever come before it is too late?

Will they ever get away?
Watch each week and see.
Will they be returning to,
The 20th century?
It's about time for our goodbyes,
To all these prehistoric gals and guys.
It's About Time!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 30, 2013, 10:34:30 AM

Opening Theme Version Two

It's about time, it's about space.
About cave people in the strangest place.
It's about time, it's about flight.
Traveling faster than the speed of light.
About cave people and the brave crew,
As through the barrier of time they flew.
Past the Roman Senator.
Past an armored knight.
Past the fighting Minute Man.
To this modern site.

It's about time for you and me
To meet these people from a million B.C.
It's about two astronauts
And how they educate.
A prehistoric woman,
And her prehistoric mate.
And now, It's About Time!

Closing Theme Version Two

It's about time, it's about space.
About cave people in the strangest place.
They will be here with all of us.
Dodging a taxi, a car, a bus.
Where will they go, what will they do?
In this strange place where everything is new.

Will they manage to survive?
Watch each week and see.
Will they get accustomed,
To the 20th Century?
It's about time for our goodbyes,
To all our prehistoric gals and guys.
It's About Time!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 30, 2013, 10:43:35 AM
Jack:
I have some knowledge of the subject however I find that the wiki article at the below link is pretty decent and may answer most of your questions.  Take a look.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single-camera_setup (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single-camera_setup)

I was going to take a stab at the answer, but this article provides most of what I would say.
Jack's question about what an audience would get out of each format, though, is what it doesn't answer.
I don't think that either format is used for what an audience gets out of it.  Basically a three camera format
is used when there's a studio audience. It's so that whatever is being filmed or taped can proceed more like
a play and avoid retakes, interruptions or the like, so in that sense it's for the live audience's benefit. One
cameras can take more time, do individual shots, hence you don't need three cameras.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on August 30, 2013, 11:42:21 AM

I don't think that either format is used for what an audience gets out of it. 

Yeah, I agree.  To be honest, I really don't think the average viewer can/does notice any real difference though I know there are, at least, subtle differences in the quality of lighting.
Most directors, especially formally trained film directors, seem to prefer single camera simply because it is the way they were taught" it should be done". 
My son, the film freak, always notices and uses "The Big Bang Theory" (multi-camera") and "Modern Family" (single camera) as examples of the deficiencies of multi camera versus single.
Personally, I don't really see it but...
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on August 30, 2013, 01:24:43 PM
Mmmwaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah!


Yeah!

I remember one time our old 21" TV had to be taken into the shop (they did that back then), and left the outer casing with the glass in front. I remember singing the jingle and doing the kiss while inside the TV casing. Imitating Dinah Shore, I should have known I was gay back then, but didn't realize it for many more years.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 31, 2013, 10:26:26 AM

LOL, Fritz!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on August 31, 2013, 10:51:11 AM
Are you guys going to eat on the boat?

No, we're going to DINAH SHORE!

Mwah!!!

I love Dinah!

Yes, Fritz, me too...


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on August 31, 2013, 10:52:33 AM
Yeah, I agree.  To be honest, I really don't think the average viewer can/does notice any real difference though I know there are, at least, subtle differences in the quality of lighting.
Most directors, especially formally trained film directors, seem to prefer single camera simply because it is the way they were taught" it should be done". 
My son, the film freak, always notices and uses "The Big Bang Theory" (multi-camera") and "Modern Family" (single camera) as examples of the deficiencies of multi camera versus single.
Personally, I don't really see it but...

Jeff, tell that little hotshot that multi-camera series can be just as great as single-camera ones! 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 31, 2013, 10:58:20 AM
My son, the film freak, always notices and uses "The Big Bang Theory" (multi-camera") and "Modern Family" (single camera) as examples of the deficiencies of multi camera versus single. Personally, I don't really see it but...

Well, it's only a deficiency really if one wants more movement in outside areas, I guess.  The three camera technique
doesn't allow for more outside filming.  If you think of Modern Family they travel all over the city to film and most of
BB Theory takes place in interiors like their apartments or work environments.  Frasier occasionally did outside street
scenes on the Paramount lot and when there were audience tapings they'd just show those to the studio audience
in sequence when they were filming the rest.

One thing not mentioned in the article you linked, and probably because they don't use film anymore do they?, was
how a show like All in the Family was shot and how one like Mary Tyler Moore was.  The people who did the shows
like MTM, Bob Newhart, Rhoda and the like used the three camera technique, but they used film in the cameras.
Norman Lear used videotape.  So the Lear shows were shot twice.  Once at around 5:30 and the second one at 8:30.
The 8:30 one was usually the one they'd use for airing, but they'd use bits of the 5:30 taping if they wanted to tweak
it or if something happened they needed to change.  Or sometimes if a line got a l augh that didn't at 8:30.

And one of those tapings would usually be 60 minutes to an hour for the audience.

If you went to a taping of a show like MTM that was filmed, the audience would be there for three hours or so,
because film was more expensive and they'd do it all at the same time.  There was one filming essentially and they'd
go back and do a scene again if they felt they needed to.  Sometimes they'd do insert shots right then, or sometimes
they'd do it after the studio audience left, but they didn't do two complete shows like they did with videotaping.

Of course, there's also exceptions to anything I wrote above!  For example, I attended three or so tapings of Three's
Company and they'd whiz through those in 35-40 minutes.  No fooling around there.  I know a couple people who
attended tapings of Friends and they would fool around so much while taping it that it took 6-7-8 hours to do it.
They even sent out for pizzas for the studio audience.

With the new cameras and high quality digital video I don't know exactly what they do nowadays.  I haven't been
to a taping in many years.  (I believe the last taping I attended was for the four season comedy STILL STANDING
with Jami Gertz (who's on the unexpectedly renewed NEIGHBORS now, and Mark Addy (one of the leads in the FULL
MONTY film).  Recurring characters were played by Sally Struthers and Joel Murray (who had a role in the Best Film
Wimmer The Artist).

I liked that series a lot, but it never got it's due, except that it was on for a few years.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on August 31, 2013, 11:01:37 AM
Exactly, Lyle.

Some shows should be multi-camera and some should be single camera.  You gave good examples.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 31, 2013, 11:06:36 AM

I can think of one series that started as a single camera series and then
changed to a three camera series.  Any ideas? I have one in mind, at least.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on August 31, 2013, 11:20:41 AM
HAPPY DAYS, unfortunately.  The shrieks and whoops from the idiot audience every time Henry Winkler entered made me quit watching the show pretty damned fast.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on August 31, 2013, 11:46:29 AM
Jeff, tell that little hotshot that multi-camera series can be just as great as single-camera ones! 

I guess you meant me.  He is not so little anymore and his aversion to "Big Bang..." apparently goes well beyond the shooting technique.
Anyway, he suggests the following which is pretty interesting, I think.
http://www.cybercollege.com/filmtap.htm (http://www.cybercollege.com/filmtap.htm)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 31, 2013, 12:01:15 PM
The shrieks and whoops from the idiot audience every time Henry Winkler entered made me quit watching the show pretty damned fast.

That pales in comparison to the ultimate "shrieks and whoops from the idiot audience" that Married with Children became.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 31, 2013, 12:56:20 PM
Anyway, he suggests the following which is pretty interesting, I think.
http://www.cybercollege.com/filmtap.htm (http://www.cybercollege.com/filmtap.htm)

It is interesting, but the only difference really noted about using one camera and three cameras, regardless if they're
film or videotape cameras, is that lighting varies because one set-up is lit for one camera and the three camera technique
necessitates lighting for multiple sets/set-ups which, the article says, creates more of a flat look.

I'd argue that with computers, nowadays, changes can be made on the scenes in the three-camera technique without
much of a problem.

AMPAS had an event about shooting movies in the digital age recently.  An event under the "Sciences" part of
the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts & SCIENCES.

From that article:
Quote
As they strive for perfection in today's high-budget feature film productions, some directors re-shoot scenes many times before they are satisfied.  (Possibly the record is held by one well-known film director who reportedly shot the same scene 87 times.)

I wonder why they wouldn't just say who that "well-known film director" is?  Even though I'm 99% per-cent sure I know
who they're referring to.

For all the people who were decrying the film colorization process 25 years ago because "that's not the way they were
meant to be seen" I have to ask why they aren't decrying digital video because they weren't meant to be seen that way,
either.  And The Wizard of Oz wasn't meant to be seen in IMAX and 3-D, but here it comes soon. And, to be really
anal, the opening and closing of The Wizard of Oz wasn't meant to be seen in black & white as it was for decades, besides,
it was supposed to be seen in a sepia tone as it was filmed.

I wonder if those people who hand-colored some early silent films, like A Trip to the Moon, were set-upon by those decriers?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on August 31, 2013, 01:09:50 PM
Also from that article:

Quote
Digital Update
05/05/2013
According the National Assn. of Theatre Owners' trade group by 2012 more than 85% of the U.S.' 4,044 theaters, representing 34,161 screens, had gone digital.

Those that haven't will have to either spend $60,000 or more for digital equipment or be forced to close, because soon movies will all be distributed on computer disks rather than film. 

Theaters that can't afford the move to digital are planning to close -- some after decades of serving small towns around the country.

Not only do digital "films" represent a major cost savings in duplication and distribution, but the technical quality (sharpness and clarity) of the image can be superior to film.

Many film buffs, including many film and TV directors, still strongly argue this point, of course. However, when "Hollywood" is 100% digital, this issue may only be a matter of historic interest.

Some comments.  Some of the recent AMPAS screenings have touted that the screenings might be the last time you'd get to see some films projected from actual film.

One local theatre has been asking patrons to donate and/or pay what they're calling a "digital fee" to help them pay for the conversion equipement needed to stay in business.

The line above talking about the distribution of films to theatres will be on "computer disks" might be a cost savings, but last year I attended a 40th anniversary screening of The Poseidon Adventure and later on learned that the picture we saw was projected from the blu-ray digital disk version of it.  Now while it looked fine, it felt like somehow I wasn't getting my money's worth because something you could do yourself at home (put a disk into a machine) was done at the theatre. It somehow seemed like something should be happening there that I couldn't do myself at home, audience and large screen notwithstanding.

As far as what the movies and tv shows look like nowadays, I've been watching a lot of tv series on the retro channels and, possibly because color televisions were new they purposely filmed their programs to emphasize the color more back then, but those shows, the sci-fi's and westerns and comedies and variety shows, all define what "color" means. If you watch tv shows now they all seem to look the same shades of blue and gray and rarely are you just wowed by how anything really looks. Concerning that and films (like the recent James Bond which was all gray and dark) I like to say I prefer when they used to film things in color.

I mean, I know they can do it--Mad Men looks like it came from that period when the TV shows looked the same way that Mad Men does now.  I just wonder why they choose not to.  For a starker example, look at the new and original versions of Hawaii Five-O.  Not only does it look more muted and bleaker in the new version, you hardly ever even see a colorful Hawaiian shirt, or aloha shirt  to be more kama'aina.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on August 31, 2013, 02:11:48 PM
"Mad Men" is an interesting example.  The first four seasons were in 35mm and the 5th season went to digital. It is still single camera.  The colors still seem quite saturated to me.
Here is another interesting piece on single camera vs. multi using Mad Men as an example.
http://www.criticalcommons.org/Members/jbutler/clips/mad-men-scene-analysis (http://www.criticalcommons.org/Members/jbutler/clips/mad-men-scene-analysis)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on September 01, 2013, 08:33:20 AM
Jack:
I have some knowledge of the subject however I find that the wiki article at the below link is pretty decent and may answer most of your questions.  Take a look.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single-camera_setup (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single-camera_setup)
thanks, will do.  i hear it talked about, even discussed, but anything i have heard so far has slid out as fast as it slid in.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on September 01, 2013, 08:47:53 AM

Anybody wanna take a stab at how the humor Sid Caesar did on Your Show of Shows--which was way before my time--compared to the type of humor that was done in Vaudeville?
even though vaudeville was before my time by maybe a decade or two, i had family members who remembered it, or lived where it was slow to die.  there were several stage equipped theaters in the albany, troy, schenectady area where i largely grew up, and on occasion there would be a half time show at intermission that at least used the capability.  a couple had the theatre organs that might entertain or accompany silent films.

from what i would hear from adults at the time, sid caesar was pretty much the transitional entertainment, vaudeville sketches cleaned up for tv, funny flowerpot hat clowns and all.  george burns and gracie allen took their act from the vaudeville stage directly to tv, and it is a tribute to their unerring timing that very little needed to be done for the transition.  somewhere along the line, not sure whether from get go or shortly after, a very thin sitcom structure was dropped over the act, but their little epilogues at the end of the show WAS their vaudeville shtick.  remember too that at that time i lived due north of the catskills, the favorite summer getaway of all the jews in NYC who could afford to take a cabin, even if dad had to commute all summer.  vaudeville acts were able to extend their viability by 20 years plus or minus, depending on whether they could hook the next generation.  think dirty dancing...
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on September 01, 2013, 09:06:57 PM
Thanks, Jack.  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on September 05, 2013, 09:51:18 AM

Because there's been very little new programs on TV lately, I've been watching quite a few
Alfred Hitchcock Presents episodes on Antenna-TV the past two weeks.  There's been some
really interesting ones and you never know what actor might pop up here and there.  There
was one with Jo Van Fleet who had recently won her oscar for East of Eden when she did
the episode.  Another had Carl Betz from the Donna Reed Show. William Redfield starred in
a tale with a surprise ending-I recognized that he was from One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest.
Another had Jean Hagen in a role so unlike what we all tend to think of her as, the clueless
blonde in Singin in the Rain! There was even a Christmas episode (!) which I liked a lot, I think
because it reminded me that this heat will go away eventually! That one starred Joseph Cotten
in a nasty little decidedly un-holiday spirited tale.

Having watched many of this series episodes the past year, I noticed a lot of them deal with
men cheating on their wives and the women they cheat with are invaritably irritated that
they won't marry them. One or the other seems to always feel disposing of them is a good
answer. The other night one of these involved a babysitter and the child was a witness!
I've never come across an episode where the woman is cheating on her husband, but I recall
one where the husband suspected his wife was cheating. I've also noticed that an actor named
Skip Homeier (sp.?) is often in episodes.  Not that I know who that is, but then you wonder--who
is that?

Retro channels can save a dull hot evening!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on September 06, 2013, 11:42:44 AM
Another had Carl Betz from the Donna Reed Show.

Now, there's a name I haven't heard in a very long time!

Quote
Retro channels can save a dull hot evening!

You can say that twice and mean it!

On one of last night's episodes of Magnum, P.I., the guest star was none other than Ol' Blue Eyes himself--Frank Sinatra!  :o
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on September 07, 2013, 12:22:14 PM

I also remember that Carl Betz was on a very well received drama series
from the 1960's called JUDD FOR THE DEFENSE, although it hasn't lingered
in the pulic consciousness since.  Do you remember that one, Jeff?

I keep forgetting that Frank Sinatra appeared on several 1980's series episodes!
I believe Tony Danza got him to make an appearance on Who's the Boss, as well!

I've always viewed Sinatra as kind of a Jekyll & Hyde personality.  He could be very
nice and very much the opposite as well! His daughter Tina is a chip off the old block!

I kinda regret that I didn't try harder to see the concert he did: Frank, Liza and Sammy!
It was supposed to be Dean Martin instead of Liza, but he couldn't do it and I lost some
interest and didn't pursue it. So I never got to see any of those people in person! (Except
Liza, whom I've seen many times--two concerts, Hollywood Bowl, an appearance at a screening
of the restored Meet Me in St. Louis and outside the Vanity Fair Oscar party in the 90's.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on September 07, 2013, 03:09:55 PM
I remember JUDD, FOR THE DEFENSE!

Only ran two seasons, but it was a damned good show.  Carl Betz won an Emmy and a Golden Globe for it.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on September 08, 2013, 01:49:13 PM
I also remember that Carl Betz was on a very well received drama series
from the 1960's called JUDD FOR THE DEFENSE, although it hasn't lingered
in the pulic consciousness since.  Do you remember that one, Jeff?

Yes. It only lasted a couple of seasons.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on September 11, 2013, 11:59:42 AM
Apparently no more Bewitched! at 8.p. Eastern Time weeknights on ME-TV. Last night I tuned in for Bewitched! and instead found Gilligan's Island--probably a first season episode, too, as it was in glorious black and white.

I didn't stick around to watch. It seems Gilligan's Island is one of those shows I like to remember but don't necessarily care to see again.

I don't know what they were showing at 8:30 instead of I Dream of Jeannie. I didn't check back to see.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on September 12, 2013, 10:31:55 AM

Mon. - Thurs. is  GILLIGAN'S ISLAND from 8-9pm.

HOGAN'S HEROES 9-9:30.
F TROOP  9:30-10:00.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: morrobay on September 12, 2013, 11:02:18 AM
Anyone remember Adventures In Paradise, with Gardner McKay?  I don't remember it being on at night, I used to watch it after school.


(http://capitainetroy.free.fr/images/mckay113.JPG)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on September 12, 2013, 02:28:40 PM
No, but he's cute!  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on September 12, 2013, 02:30:52 PM
Adventures in Paradise is an American television series created by James Michener which ran on ABC from 1959 until 1962, starring Gardner McKay as Adam Troy, the captain of the schooner Tiki III, which sailed the South Pacific looking for passengers and adventure. USA Network aired reruns of this series between 1984 and 1988. The plots deal with the romantic and detective stories of Korean War veteran Troy. The supporting cast, varying from season to season, features George Tobias, Guy Stockwell, and Linda Lawson.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/85/Gardner_McKay_Susan_Oliver_Guy_Stockwell_Adventures_in_Paradise_1961.JPG/628px-Gardner_McKay_Susan_Oliver_Guy_Stockwell_Adventures_in_Paradise_1961.JPG)

Gardner McKay, guest star Susan Oliver, and Guy Stockwell (1961)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on September 12, 2013, 02:55:06 PM
I remember knowing about the series, but I'm not sure if we ever watched it. Maybe there was something else on at the time.

No time-shifting back then!  :D



Ah, 1959, so the 50 star flag was correct even at the beginning of the series.

At 53 years, it's the longest time we've had a flag without design change in number of stars.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flag_of_the_United_States

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on September 12, 2013, 06:18:33 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Susan_Oliver


I thought Susan looked familiar!  Interesting bio......and kind of sad!  :'(
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on September 13, 2013, 10:27:01 AM
Anyone remember Adventures In Paradise, with Gardner McKay?  I don't remember it being on at night, I used to watch it after school.


(http://capitainetroy.free.fr/images/mckay113.JPG)

I have vague memories of it being on in the early evening. Maybe it was already in syndicated reruns then. The years 1959-1962 make it a little too early for me to have memories of it.

And what was Abner Kravitz (George Tobias) doing in it?  :D

McKay was an interesting character in his own right, aside from being a real hunk. Apparently he came by his interest in sailing naturally, even genetically.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gardner_McKay (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gardner_McKay)

I thought I remembered once reading of a connection to the John McKay who made a forture in Virginia City, Nevada, silver mining, but apparently my memory is playing me tricks (happens a lot these days), and I'm mistaken about that.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on September 13, 2013, 10:33:29 AM
What the heck is up with some of these stations showing classic shows?  >:(

Last night I was having my usual all-Magnum, P.I. Thursday evening.  :D Cozi-TV ran an episode where Dana Delaney was the guest star, playiing a love interest for Magnum, an L.A. lawyer who comes for a visit. Later in the evening, Cozi ran the episode where Magnum was in L.A. and met Delaney's character.

Why can't they run the episodes in original broadcast order, for cryin' out loud?  >:(

Spoiler Question:

Any other Magnum fans remember whether it was ever revealed whether or not Higgins was actually "Robin Masters"?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on September 13, 2013, 10:41:01 AM
Ah, 1959, so the 50 star flag was correct even at the beginning of the series.

I don't know  if people could get the 50 Star flag before the official flying of it, but the
official presentation of the 49 star flag was July 4, 1959 over Fort McHenry, presided over
by Pres. Eisenhower and the 50 star flag was official the following year on July 4, 1960.
Hawaii was admitted to the union on August 21, 1959.

I always though that if I were doing a movie set in the future, I'd have a U.S. flag with
several more stars (or several less!) as one thing to convey something different!

Or perhaps, if you read todays News & Current Events thread, speaking Chinese!



Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on September 13, 2013, 10:43:17 AM
Why can't they run the episodes in original broadcast order, for cryin' out loud?  >:(00

I do not know COZI's schedule, but I've noticed that M. P.I. usually airs two episodes back to back in
the evening.  Perhspas, later at night they show the same two episodes and you just happened
to watch them out of order.  Just a thought.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on September 13, 2013, 11:00:31 AM
I do not know COZI's schedule, but I've noticed that M. P.I. usually airs two episodes back to back in
the evening.  Perhspas, later at night they show the same two episodes and you just happened
to watch them out of order.  Just a thought.

Dunno.

Last night I watched three episodes, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. EDT. The Delaney visit episode was the 8 p.m. episode, the meeting episode was the 10 p.m. episode (it was actually the first part of a two-parter). I don't know what they show here at 7 p.m. In that hour I'm watching Jeopardy! first and then the B.B.C. America news broadcast.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on September 14, 2013, 08:08:31 AM
oh lord, i swooned over gardner mckay.  might even have gotten a bit of my love of the tropics from watching the show.  i know i did from reading michener's tales of the south pacific books.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on September 14, 2013, 12:36:09 PM
They've gotten up to the ninety-minute color episodes of Wagon Train, with John McIntire as wagonmaster Chris Hale and Robert Fuller as scout Cooper Smith. Today's principal guest stars were Ronald Reagan and Ann Blyth.

Also appearing was one of those reliable yeoman actors that I don't think they make anymore, Ron Hayes. I always enjoyed seeing him when I was a kid (manly fellow, masculine jaw, great smile). According to IMDb he passed away at age 75 in '04.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on September 14, 2013, 12:48:11 PM

Vin Scully was announced as the Grand Marshall of the next Rose Parade.
Someone found this site with a clip of him and Elizabeth Montgomery promoting
the Rose Parade for 1966.  Apparently they hosted it for ABC that year.  She was
a huge baseball fan, so she must've enjoyed this.

http://www.laobserved.com/archive/2013/09/vin_scully_and_elizabeth.php

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on September 27, 2013, 08:00:51 PM
I don't know if it is classic TV, but I have a client that I see once a week and every time I am there (same time each week) she is watching In the Heat of the Night.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Heat_of_the_Night_%28TV_series%29


Every episode I have watched so far has been really good.  I don't know why we never watched that show when it aired (I am certainly a fan of Carroll O'Connor).


I also didn't realize there were so many seasons!   Next time I see her, I must check the channel, see if I get it!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on September 30, 2013, 12:14:39 PM
I do not know COZI's schedule, but I've noticed that M. P.I. usually airs two episodes back to back in
the evening.  Perhspas, later at night they show the same two episodes and you just happened
to watch them out of order.  Just a thought.




Sometimes if they run two episodes and the series has many episodes the station will run one from the early years and one from the later years, for variety.  I don't like that, though.  I like them in order.  
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on September 30, 2013, 12:18:13 PM
Let's get this thread going again!

Any thoughts on THE BOB CUMMINGS SHOW, a/k/a LOVE THAT BOB?

It has a great supporting cast:  Rosemary DeCamp, Dwayne Hickman, Nancy Kulp, and especially Ann B. Davis, who won two Emmy awards for playing a lovelorn Girl Friday.

But Cummings is just grisly.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on September 30, 2013, 12:25:39 PM
Great news for lovers of ALFRED HITCHCOCK PRESENTS!

Season 6 is FINALLY coming out on DVD!  No date yet, but the announcement HAS been made!

This season has many terrific episodes, including "Incident in a Small Jail" (mousy John Fiedler is thrown in jail along with a suspected strangler), "Mrs. Bixby and the Colonel's Coat" (adulterous Audrey Meadows is given a mink by her lover and has to figure out how to hide it from her husband), and one of my favorites, "Coming, Mama" (Eileen Heckart is caught between her domineering mother and her boyfriend).

Looking forward to this box set!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on September 30, 2013, 03:26:46 PM
I remember Ann B. Davis much more from Bob Cummings than from her later shows.

One time on a quiz program she was performing stunts on roller skates, and it wasn't widely known that she had a twin sister, so the sister performed along with her, making it seem like she was zooming behind the curtains much faster than possible, which had the quiz panelists quite bewildered. I forget which quiz show it was.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on September 30, 2013, 04:28:47 PM
I forgot that Ann B. was a twin!  (Was her sister Ann A.?)

This would be fun to see!  I'll check YouTube.

I love Ann B. She deserved two Emmys for making us believe she could be in love with Bob Cummings!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: garyd on September 30, 2013, 04:57:37 PM
I forgot that Ann B. was a twin!  (Was her sister Ann A.?)

This would be fun to see!  I'll check YouTube.

I love Ann B. She deserved two Emmys for making us believe she could be in love with Bob Cummings!

LOL.
Her name is Harriet.  She appeared with Ann on roller skates on "I've Got A Secret" in the Spring of 1958.  Don't know the actual episode number.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on September 30, 2013, 06:44:24 PM
LOL.
Her name is Harriet.  She appeared with Ann on roller skates on "I've Got A Secret" in the Spring of 1958.  Don't know the actual episode number.

Oh yeah, that's the show! They were great on it!

Thanks, Gary!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on October 09, 2013, 05:32:41 PM
I told a client of mine the other day about the game show network that shows all the old classic games shows......she ordered it, so I am doing my bit!  :D


Thanks for keeping this thread moving guys!


I really do love old TV and with what's on these days, more and more I think that is what I should be sticking with, the old stuff!



http://classic-tv.com/



Problem with me is I am not seeing old TV or new TV these days!   But I can still go down memory lane....
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on October 09, 2013, 05:34:31 PM
OH, Match Game!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on October 09, 2013, 05:35:58 PM
Match Game is the best one!!   That is what she is loving right now!



Hey is Anne B Davis gay??


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ann_B._Davis


Lyle??   :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on October 09, 2013, 05:41:37 PM
Yeah, I believe she is.


I love the spoof on Match Game on RuPaul's Drag Race........"Snatch Game"
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on October 11, 2013, 03:49:16 AM
if we are going to mention favorite game shows over the years,  password tops my list.  it was the jeopardy of its day.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on October 11, 2013, 04:02:48 AM
Why would Lyle know about Ann B. Davis?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on October 11, 2013, 04:05:53 AM
PASSWORD was excellent.  A fun and intelligent game.  Allen Ludden was a great host.

Lord, I remember Art Fleming on JEOPARDY!

I like shows like those two, where brainpower is involved.  Also THE [insert s dollar amount] PYRAMID.

And HOLLYWOOD SQUARES and MATCH GAME.  (Not so much brainpower involved but the starpower atones for it.)

I hate game shows based on luck, like WHEEL OF FORTUNE.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on October 11, 2013, 04:33:32 AM
OH, Match Game!


Chuck and Mark had their [BLANKS] taken from them in Times Square!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on October 11, 2013, 04:49:11 AM
Chuck and Mark had their [BLANKS] taken from them in Times Square!

Oh lord!  :D :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on October 11, 2013, 05:06:18 AM
Wouldn't Charles have fun with that one?   :D

[Charles Nelson Reilly laugh which I can do beautifully in person but which doesn't translate to the page]
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on October 11, 2013, 10:34:03 AM
if we are going to mention favorite game shows over the years,  password tops my list.  it was the jeopardy of its day.

I thought Jeopardy! with Art Fleming was the Jeopardy! of its day.  ;)

Lord, I remember Art Fleming on JEOPARDY!

When I was in elementary school, that was broadcast over the lunch hour. Kids like me, who lived close to the school, were allowed to go home for lunch, which I did, and my mother and I used to watch it while we ate lunch.  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on October 11, 2013, 02:57:14 PM

The Gene Rayburn Cocktail:  One drink and your mind goes [blank].

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on October 11, 2013, 03:20:59 PM


Oddly enough, I love almost every game show one way or another
but I never really liked PASSWORD.  Although I did watch a whole weeks worth
of them (5) earlier this year on youtube with Agnes Moorehead as one of the guest stars!

If we had any time off from school, watching game shows was what I wanted to do!
Otherwise, they had to be on when I got home from school and that wasn't too many.

I remember the original New York produced MATCH GAME,
YOU DON'T SAY and LETTERS TO LAUGH-IN being on when
I got back from school.

Besides the real famous ones mentioned, does anyone remember these:

WHO, WHAT or WHERE?
EYE GUESS
THE GAME GAME
PERSONALITY
GENERATION GAP
EVERYBODY'S TALKING
SHOWDOWN
IT TAKES TWO
SHENANIGANS

I also loved CONCENTRATION because of the mechanical board and the clicking sound it made when
the boxes would turn.  In later revival years the computer graphic type boards were just not the same.

Of course, JEOPARDY! was always a favorite. When I was in college I applied
to be a contestant on the show. A month or two later it was cancelled.  When
I came to California there was a one or two year revival of Jeopardy with Art Fleming
that no one remembers. (There was a third round where you had to run a category
up and down or all categories across to win bonus money.)  I applied to be on that one,
too, and it was cancelled a month or two later.  (I remember being in LAX around that time once
and hearing "Would Art Fleming please come to the courtesy desk.")  When Jeopardy came back in
the early 80's I thought, I better not apply or it'll get cancelled.

There's a thread on the home tv forum that talks about how nearly all the game shows for one
reason or another were destroyed or erased in the early 1970's.

In the first years I lived in Los Angeles I saw these few game shows taped:
HOLLYWOOD SQUARES (one of their anniversary weeks so the set was decorated in balloons and such.)
THE MATCH GAME
THE GONG SHOW

And no, I don't remember who guested on those shows, except I remember Paul Lynde, because when they
were changing audiences (you either saw 2 or 3 of the weekly episodes taped) he stepped into the aisle in the
back of the studio to talk to someone and I almost ran into him! I also remember that compared to what you saw
on TV, the Gong Show was really "dirty."  Or should I say "ribald?"

I don't remember seeing any other game shows taped, except one for a pilot that never aired.  I want to
say it was called 100 to 1, but I'm not sure at all.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on October 11, 2013, 08:24:12 PM
When a bunch of us from Louisiana went to the New York World's Fair in 1964, we went to a taping of a game show with Dick Clark as host. Missing Links, maybe?

I got his autograph!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on October 12, 2013, 06:51:58 AM
hey fritz, i was at flushing meadows for that fair as well...  after first making a pest of my self on the moving walkway for viewing the pietà, i removed to the costa rican pavilion and the irish pavilion, dancing my ass off to the costa rican music and getting shitfaced drinking the most amazing irish coffee.  my exploring kind of ended right there.  i don't think there have been any world's fairs that i really wanted to attend since then...
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on October 12, 2013, 07:58:34 AM
Hey Jack! The one in New Orleans in 1984 was really great, I got down there several times during the year.

We were on a trip to Notre Dame for a student convention (that's when I decided I wanted more than anything to go there) which took place every year, but that year they went via New York and Washington. It was a fantastic trip, 17 busloads of us.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on October 12, 2013, 01:22:16 PM

Sorry this is way off topic, unless I mention that, for the first time,
TELEVISION covered the opening of the 1939 World's Fair and the other two
programs I mention I saw on television:

In 1964 I so wanted to go to the World's Fair in New York.  I only ended up getting
a World's Fair Game to play instead.

I have seen a documentary about the 1964 World's Fair and found it quite entertaining.
50 Year anniversary next year, egads!

Last April I saw one about the 1962 Seattle World's Fair and that also was very entertaining!

My favorite though, is the documentary narrated by Jason Robards, called THE WORLD OF TOMORROW
and is all about the New York World's Fair of 1939.  If I had a time machine, that's what I'd want to do.
Go back and visit that World's Fair!  The documentray itself is wondrous, fascinating, nostalgic, poignant,
sad, hopeful...most of all it's very entertaining.  That fair will be the 75th Anniversary next year!  Were you
boys at that one, too?   ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on October 12, 2013, 01:29:21 PM
Interesting episode of Wagon Train today. Suzanne Pleshette was the principal guest star. She played a preacher's daughter who had "gone bad," eloped (Charles Drake played her husband), and ended up addicted to opium. The actress who played her sister looked familiar, but I didn't catch the opening credits, and they weren't repeated in the closing credits. (It took me a while to remember Charles Drake's name, even though I recognized him immediately.)

I guess Wagon Train was something of a prestige show on which to appear as a guest star, "back in the day."

BTW, my grandparents took me to the 1964 New York World's Fair. I was in First Grade. ...  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on October 12, 2013, 04:07:03 PM
According to IMBD, the episode you're talking about was "The Myra Marshal Story", Coop accompanies Grace Marshall to visit her sister Myra whom, traumatized by an upbringing by an abusive father, Grace finds living a life of addiction and infidelity for which Grace wrongfully blames husband Vern.

The cast list shows Grace Marshall being played by Beverly Owen, who is best known as "Marilyn Munster" from The Munsters (1964).  She was Marilyn for one season, but had just married and left the show after one season, as she was pregnant.  She was replaced by Pat Priest.   Below Beverly Owen is on the left.


(http://i1.ytimg.com/vi/8TTIqK9nFH8/hqdefault.jpg)(http://www.markymunster.com/markymunster205.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on October 12, 2013, 05:52:51 PM
According to IMBD, the episode you're talking about was "The Myra Marshal Story", Coop accompanies Grace Marshall to visit her sister Myra whom, traumatized by an upbringing by an abusive father, Grace finds living a life of addiction and infidelity for which Grace wrongfully blames husband Vern.

The cast list shows Grace Marshall being played by Beverly Owen, who is best known as "Marilyn Munster" from The Munsters (1964).  She was Marilyn for one season, but had just married and left the show after one season, as she was pregnant.  She was replaced by Pat Priest.   Below Beverly Owen is on the left.


(http://i1.ytimg.com/vi/8TTIqK9nFH8/hqdefault.jpg)(http://www.markymunster.com/markymunster205.jpg)

Thanks, Sweetie! That's the episode.  :-*

I wouldn't have known her from The Munsters, but still, that was interesting. I didn't know anyone other than Pat Priest had played Marilyn.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on October 18, 2013, 12:03:14 PM
Good grief! In another "community" I have a short while ago discovered perhaps the one person ever who doesn't like I Love Lucy.  :o  :-\  :(

I'm totally puzzled. How can anyone not like I Love Lucy?  ???
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on October 18, 2013, 01:20:40 PM

I know, right?

I'd have to know what their reason(s) is/are, heh!

Did they say?



Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on October 18, 2013, 01:46:30 PM

They won't care about this item then:

CBS DVD Announces a Release of 'The I Love Lucy Christmas Special' and more

A three-episode collection on a single disc, with both colorized and original B&W versions of each

"CBS DVD has scheduled a November 5th release for I Love Lucy - The I Love Lucy Christmas Special. The DVD sports both colorized and original black-and-white versions of 3 episodes: "Lucy Christmas Special," "Lucy Goes to Scotland" and "Lucy's Italian Movie." This is ahead of an airing on December 20th by the CBS network for the colorized versions of the first and third items on this DVD."

*****

The Lucy Christmas episode of 1956 was never put into syndication and only aired once, Christmas Eve of 1956.
It was intended as a sort of special and featured three flashbacks to earlier episodes, specifically reminiscing about
Little Ricky being born and all.  It was resurrected in the early 90's (1990-91?) by CBS and they aired it for the first time
in over thirty years.  It scored a Top Ten rating in the Neilsen's that week!

The following year they colorized the episode, except for the "flashback" parts and aired it again.
Subsequently, they have released the Christmas episode separately and also included it on the dvd collections.

When they released a bonus disc of material for I Love Lucy they colorized the LUCY GOES TO SCOTLAND episode.
Supposedly, it was intended to originally be filmed in color to compete that year with NBC's color "Bell Telephone
Hour Series," but at the last minute CBS didn't want to pay for the color film production and they did the episode
anyway in b&w.

I've seen the above colorized episodes and it is interesting to see them that way.

Last year TIME-LIFE put out a dvd release of the 25 (or was it 30) best episodes of I LOVE LUCY.
As a bonus extra they included a colorized episode of LUCY'S ITALIAN MOVIE (the grape stomping
episode) which I'll now get to see on the Lucy network airing in December!

I always wondered why there was always such an outcry about colorization back in the 80's when company's
started doing it.  I don't see what the big deal is.  As long as they don't replace the original versions I'm
all for it.  The biggest hue and cry over it was that "director's didn't intend for those films to be that way."
Well, in the case of the Lucy Scotland episode, they did intend it to be that way, right?  And Mervyn LeRoy
did not intend for THE WIZARD OF OZ to be in 3-D IMAX and digital sound, either, but here it is in movie
theaters right now!  There was no hue and cry about showing their color films on black & white tv's back
when that was the only option, either, was there?  Nor did they cry about them being seen on tv's themselves
when they were meant to be seen on big movie screens.  Ennis del Mark sent me a copy of an article that
Kenneth Turan wrote rebutting the anti-colorization folks back in the 80's which I thought was spot on.

Anyhoo, for example, I watched Brokeback Mountain in black and white one night just to see what that
would be like, so sue me!  I've also watched it dubbed in French and Spanish.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on October 20, 2013, 05:58:00 PM
Good grief! In another "community" I have a short while ago discovered perhaps the one person ever who doesn't like I Love Lucy.  :o  :-\  :(

I'm totally puzzled. How can anyone not like I Love Lucy?  ???

I know, right?

I'd have to know what their reason(s) is/are, heh!

Did they say?

No, he didn't.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on October 20, 2013, 06:02:33 PM
They won't care about this item then:

CBS DVD Announces a Release of 'The I Love Lucy Christmas Special' and more
The Lucy Christmas episode of 1956 was never put into syndication and only aired once, Christmas Eve of 1956.
It was intended as a sort of special and featured three flashbacks to earlier episodes, specifically reminiscing about
Little Ricky being born and all.  It was resurrected in the early 90's (1990-91?) by CBS and they aired it for the first time
in over thirty years.  It scored a Top Ten rating in the Neilsen's that week!

If this is what I think it is, I saw it then and taped it myself off the broadcast, but it's been so long since I watched it that pretty much all I remember is Lucy having Fred cut so many branches off the Christmas tree that in the end they were left with just a stick. And they had the old-fashioned lights where if one burned out, the whole string went out.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on October 22, 2013, 03:24:56 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SW9So2kPZoo
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on October 25, 2013, 08:04:38 PM
There's nothing but smooth sailing for Gavin McLeod these days.

The actor, now 82, rose to fame playing Captain Merrill Stubing in the hit '80s series The Love Boat, but over the years, he's been steering an entirely new course for himself – one firmly anchored to his identity as a man of faith.

On Tuesday, McLeod released his memoir, This Is Your Captain Speaking: My Fantastic Voyage Through Hollywood, Faith & Life, which chronicles the choppy waters he's sailed: two heart attacks, two marriages and his battles with alcoholism and depression.

Now, in an interview with Religion News Service (via The Huffington Post), the actor, who is a devout member of the Pentecostal church, speaks out about his spiritual journey – one that took him from Roman Catholicism to the New Age movement to Pentecostalism. (He proudly describes himself as "ambassador for Christ.")


read on....or not!  :D


http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20749274,00.html
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on October 25, 2013, 10:36:34 PM
Good grief! In another "community" I have a short while ago discovered perhaps the one person ever who doesn't like I Love Lucy.  :o  :-\  :(

I'm totally puzzled. How can anyone not like I Love Lucy?  ???


Who was it?  I demand to know!

Just kidding.  I know several people who don't like it, and are tactless enough to remind me of the fact, knowing full well that Lucille Ball is my all-time favorite, and "I Love Lucy" is my second favorite TV show ever (nudged out of the top spot ever so slightly by "Friends").
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on October 25, 2013, 10:53:40 PM
There's nothing but smooth sailing for Gavin McLeod these days.

The actor, now 82, rose to fame playing Captain Merrill Stubing in the hit '80s series The Love Boat, but over the years, he's been steering an entirely new course for himself – one firmly anchored to his identity as a man of faith.

On Tuesday, McLeod released his memoir, This Is Your Captain Speaking: My Fantastic Voyage Through Hollywood, Faith & Life, which chronicles the choppy waters he's sailed: two heart attacks, two marriages and his battles with alcoholism and depression.

Now, in an interview with Religion News Service (via The Huffington Post), the actor, who is a devout member of the Pentecostal church, speaks out about his spiritual journey – one that took him from Roman Catholicism to the New Age movement to Pentecostalism. (He proudly describes himself as "ambassador for Christ.")


read on....or not!  :D


http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20749274,00.html

Despite all those years on The Love Boat, I still tend to think of him as Murray on The Mary Tyler Moore Show.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on October 26, 2013, 07:25:01 AM
Same here.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on October 26, 2013, 09:12:46 AM
Here too. never watched The Love Boat, as far as I can remember.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on October 26, 2013, 10:22:20 AM
I never watched Love Boat or it's companion, Fantasy Island, either.

Interestingly, I saw an episode last night of My Favorite Martian and Gavin McLeod played Mrs. Brown's brother.
(She was Martin's landlady.) Apparently he was on a few episodes of that show as that character. With a full head
of hair. Real or not? I kept wondering.

He pops up a lot in many tv series of the 60's.  I've seen him in Dick van Dyke, Hogan's Heroes, several episodes of
The Untouchables (so does Ed Asner) and Combat!  And come to think of it, wasn't he a regular, as one of the crew,
on McHale's Navy?  He could've titled his book "From PT Boat to Cruise Ship."
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on October 26, 2013, 10:27:33 AM

On Halloween, Antenna-TV is airing twenty-four hours of "Alfred Hitchcock Presents."  So that
would be 48 episodes.  It's titled the rather irking name of "Hitch-O-Ween."  They need to hire
ME-TV's clever ad people!

I watched a rather clever episode of that show last night called Hooked, with Anne Francis.

Usually when Antenna-TV airs a marathon of a series, it usually signals it's leaving the network.
Wonder if that's the case here.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on October 26, 2013, 12:22:05 PM
And come to think of it, wasn't he a regular, as one of the crew,
on McHale's Navy?  He could've titled his book "From PT Boat to Cruise Ship."


Lyle, he was in 73 episodes (out of 138), of McHale's Navy as Joseph "Happy" Haines. Gavin left prior to the last season.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on October 26, 2013, 06:43:10 PM
MacLeod's first movie appearance was a small, uncredited role in The True Story of Lynn Stuart in 1958. Soon thereafter, he landed a credited role in I Want to Live!, a 1958 prison drama starring Susan Hayward. He was soon noticed by Blake Edwards, who in 1958 cast him as a neurotic harried navy yeoman in Operation Petticoat with Cary Grant and Tony Curtis. Operation Petticoat proved to be a breakout role for MacLeod, and he was soon cast in another Edwards comedy, High Time, with Bing Crosby.

MacLeod also appeared as the villain on TV shows of the late 1950s and early 1960s, including Edwards's private-eye series, Peter Gunn. He played the role of a drug pusher, "Big Chicken", in two episodes of the first season of Hawaii Five-O. His first regular TV role came in 1962 as Joseph "Happy" Haines on McHale's Navy; leaving after two seasons to appear in The Sand Pebbles.[3] MacLeod had three guest appearances on Perry Mason: in 1961 he played Lawrence Comminger in "The Case of the Grumbling Grandfather", and in 1965 he played Mortimer Hershey in "The Case of the Grinning Gorilla", and Dan Platte in "The Case of the Runaway Racer".

MacLeod's role as Murray Slaughter on The Mary Tyler Moore Show won him lasting fame, and two Golden Globe nominations. His role as Captain Stubing on The Love Boat was his next notable role on a hit TV series. His work on that show earned him three Golden Globe nominations.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gavin_MacLeod
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on October 26, 2013, 07:10:20 PM
Marcia Wallace -- who voiced Edna Krabappel on "The Simpsons" -- died last night in Los Angeles ... TMZ has learned.

Marcia's caregiver tells us ... the actress passed away at home with her family by her side.  We're told she had been sick for the past few months ... but the caregiver couldn't go into specifics.

Wallace has been on TV since the 70's -- and spent 3 decades on various game show panels like "Hollywood Squares", "The $25,000 Pyramid" and "Match Game" ... as well as receptionist Carol Kester on "The Bob Newhart Show."

The actress was also a huge activist for breast cancer ... after being diagnosed with the disease in 1985.

She was 70.

Read more: http://www.tmz.com#ixzz2isdoeKqh
Visit Fishwrapper: http://www.fishwrapper.com
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on October 27, 2013, 06:19:31 PM
Marcia Wallace -- who voiced Edna Krabappel on "The Simpsons" -- died last night in Los Angeles ... TMZ has learned.

Marcia's caregiver tells us ... the actress passed away at home with her family by her side.  We're told she had been sick for the past few months ... but the caregiver couldn't go into specifics.

Wallace has been on TV since the 70's -- and spent 3 decades on various game show panels like "Hollywood Squares", "The $25,000 Pyramid" and "Match Game" ... as well as receptionist Carol Kester on "The Bob Newhart Show."

The actress was also a huge activist for breast cancer ... after being diagnosed with the disease in 1985.

She was 70.

Read more: http://www.tmz.com#ixzz2isdoeKqh
Visit Fishwrapper: http://www.fishwrapper.com


Sad news.  :(  I mainly knew her as Carol Kester on The Bob Newhart Show.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on October 27, 2013, 06:51:07 PM
Me too.  I loved her.

(I've never even seen The Simpsons.)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on October 28, 2013, 06:39:06 PM
(http://wac.450f.edgecastcdn.net/80450F/comicsalliance.com/files/2013/10/Marcia-Wallace-Edna-Krabappel.jpg)


Edna Krabappel /krəˈbɑːpəl/ is a fictional character from the animated TV series The Simpsons, who was voiced by Marcia Wallace. She is the teacher of Bart Simpson's 4th grade class at Springfield Elementary School, and Ned Flanders's wife in later seasons. Krabappel was the only character that Wallace voiced on a regular basis. Following Wallace's death, the show's producers intend to retire the character.

Marcia Wallace won an Emmy Award in 1992 for voicing Krabappel in the third season-episode "Bart the Lover".  IGN called "Special Edna" the best episode of the fourteenth season of the show.  Tilda Swinton modeled her hairdo in the film Burn After Reading on Krabappel's.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on October 29, 2013, 10:20:33 AM
(I've never even seen The Simpsons.)

Perhaps a bit OT, but I'm glad to know that there is at least one other person in this world in addition to myself who has never watched The Simpsons.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on October 29, 2013, 04:20:38 PM
Perhaps a bit OT, but I'm glad to know that there is at least one other person in this world in addition to myself who has never watched The Simpsons.

Me either. It was never appealing to me.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on October 29, 2013, 04:49:16 PM
Me either. It was never appealing to me.

Glad to know, Sweetheart!  :D  :-*

And when I look at stills from the show, and then compare it to the cartooning of the old Warner Brothers or Hanna-Barbera cartoons, I can't imaging sitting and watching it.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on October 29, 2013, 05:03:35 PM
Glad to know, Sweetheart!  :D  :-*

And when I look at stills from the show, and then compare it to the cartooning of the old Warner Brothers or Hanna-Barbera cartoons, I can't imaging sitting and watching it.

Yeah, Jeff. I am a diehard classic cartoon lover as well. I'll watch the classic forever, the new ones, never.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on October 29, 2013, 05:23:01 PM
Since its debut on December 17, 1989, the show has broadcast 532 episodes and the 25th season began on September 30, 2013. The Simpsons is the longest-running American sitcom, the longest-running American animated program, and in 2009 it surpassed Gunsmoke as the longest-running American primetime, scripted television series. The Simpsons Movie, a feature-length film, was released in theaters worldwide on July 26 and July 27, 2007, and grossed over $527 million.

The Simpsons is widely considered to be one of the greatest television series of all time. Time magazine's December 31, 1999, issue named it the 20th century's best television series, and on January 14, 2000, the Simpson family was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. It has won dozens of awards since it debuted as a series, including 27 Primetime Emmy Awards, 30 Annie Awards and a Peabody Award. Homer's exclamatory catchphrase "D'oh!" has been adopted into the English language, while The Simpsons has influenced many adult-oriented animated sitcoms.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Simpsons



I am always on the fence with The Simpsons, personally I don't watch it.  I doubt I have ever sat through one entire episode.  But both my boys are die hard fans (and their wives) they all grew up with it.  They can quote episodes line for line, the one who got married last year, even showed clips in a montage during his reception!   :">



I mean 25 seasons, that is crazy!!


The Flintstones ran for 6 seasons and it is going down in history, of course apparently the Simpsons is too!


I am just glad Marcia had a part in such a successful show, makes me think she was probably earning some decent money and got to enjoy some of the finer things in life, I hope so, because she was gone too soon!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on October 30, 2013, 12:12:42 PM

I love the classic Warner Bros. and Disney cartoons, too, and I grew up on Hanna-Barbera cartoons on TV, but
just last week the animated special Toy Story of Terror, which I myself dismissed at first, was freakin' brilliant. IMO.

Frankly, the old Warner Bros. and nearly all "theatrically released" animation are great quality.  But Warner Bros.
own shows they made for tv, like the Bugs Bunny Show are alot more inferior to the theatrical animated ones.
Just compare Columbia's Mr. Magoo animated shorts to the TV shorts they made.  Quite a difference. And
Hanna-Barbera's animation was always considered inferior by experts.  That doesn't mean they don't offer
anything or that people don't like them.  But I find a lot of merit to various current incarnations, too.

I always liked the Warner Bros. cartoon characters more than any Disney ones, for some reason.
Also liked Columbia's Mr. Magoo and United Artists Pink Panther.  And The Jetsons.

I can't imagine any series being worth being on for twenty-five years.  The animated characters don't even age
in all that time!  I wonder if anyone's thought about doing an animated series where they plan to age the characters
over time.  Like have the kids grow up and such?

I'm trying to find an animated smiley!  Heh.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Willowey on October 30, 2013, 01:51:47 PM
I enjoy The Simpson's. My friend Alisha has every season on DVD so far. I wouldn't say I'm that diehard, but if it's on TV, I'll watch it. I also liked King of the Hill and, yes, I also enjoy Family Guy. But that's not to say I don't enjoy some of the classic cartoons. I loved The Flintstones and The Jetsons and I still watch Bugs Bunny and Tweety with my mom.

What bugs me is some of the cartoons I grew up with are now computer animated like Care Bears and Franklin. It's a little frightening if you ask me, but my nieces and nephews don't seem to care, so I guess it's OK for them.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on October 30, 2013, 04:01:47 PM
Perhaps a bit OT, but I'm glad to know that there is at least one other person in this world in addition to myself who has never watched The Simpsons.
make that two.  seen it, but moved on rapidly.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on October 30, 2013, 05:06:58 PM
And Hanna-Barbera's animation was always considered inferior by experts.  That doesn't mean they don't offer anything or that people don't like them.  But I find a lot of merit to various current incarnations, too.

I'm one of those who was entertained by Hanna-Barbera, but looking back, I have to agree. 

And this comes from someone who owns all 13 DVDs from The Super Friends series.  LOL
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on October 30, 2013, 05:21:46 PM
The way I see it, there is animation, and then there is drawing, or cartooning, and I make a distinction between the two. I seem to remember that there is a difference, for example, in the number of drawings per frame of film, or something like that, between, say, a classic Disney like Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, and a Hanna-Barbera TV cartoon--and I suppose there may even be a difference between different Hanna-Barbera cartoons.

I find the drawing, or cartooning, style of The Simpsons totally unattractive. That's just my taste.

At least the Flintstones and the Jetsons had skin tones that looked like skin tones. Edna Krabappel looks like she has a severe case of jaundice.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on October 30, 2013, 05:32:39 PM
Yea count me in as one who finds the computer animated cartoons a bit scary, they are so life like!  :o




Here is a cute article, a few years old now though:

(http://blogs.babble.com/famecrawler/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/the-flintstones-300x225.jpg)


The Flintstone Characters Turn 50 Today

Fifty years ago today, the world was introduced to The Flintstones characters, most notably Fred, Wilma, Barney, and Betty. The cartoon was the first animated series to air in prime time, and adults and children alike couldn’t wait for the show’s premiere. The series, which was created by Hanna Barbara, ran for six seasons. It was the longest running animated prime time show up until the Simpsons came along.

The Flintstones was made to imitate modern time situations, but set in the prehistoric era. The Flintstones characters were even inspired by real life actors and actresses. It’s no secret that the show was modeled after The Honeymooners, with Fred being reminiscent of Jackie Gleason’s character, Ralph Cramden. Fred Flintstone’s neighbor and friend, Barney Rubble, was made to resemble Art Carney’s character, Ed Norton. Wilma and Betty took on the personalities of the wives on The Honeymooners.

The association was so apparent, that Jackie Gleason himself even threatened to sue Hanna Barbera. He supposedly decided not to go through with it, because he didn’t want to be known as “the guy who yanked Fred Flintstone off the air.”

Other Flinstones guest characters were also inspired by real life actors. For example:

“Cary Granite” – Cary Grant

“Stony Curtis” – Tony Curtis

“Ed Sulleyrock” – Ed Sullivan

“Rock Hudstone” – Rock Hudson

“Ann Margrock” – Ann Margaret

The Flintstones and its characters continue to delight kids to this day…especially in the form of Flintstone vitamins. Happy Anniversary to the Flintstones!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on October 30, 2013, 08:37:40 PM
Thanks, Bubba!  :)

I remember Stony Curtis and Ann Margrock!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on October 30, 2013, 09:13:54 PM
I can hear the music in my head!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on October 30, 2013, 11:08:18 PM
http://youtu.be/2s13X66BFd8
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on October 31, 2013, 10:35:39 AM


I love Ann Margrock!

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-P1E694GqxWU/TlJySQWCZ5I/AAAAAAAABRI/qQYgXBdBnpM/s400/FLINTSTONES-ANN-MARGRET.jpg)


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on October 31, 2013, 10:40:23 AM

And don't forget Darrin and Samantha lived in the neighborhood in a special October episode in 1965!
(I believe Hanna-Barbera did the animation in the Bewitched credits, as well.)

(http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BMjAzNDYyMzQ2MV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTYwNDA5OTE2._V1_SY317_CR17,0,214,317_.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on October 31, 2013, 10:41:44 AM

And since it's Halloween, I hope your evening is:

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9e/Bewitched_color_title_card.jpg)

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Willowey on October 31, 2013, 10:55:44 AM
I loved Bewitched. I watch it with my mom all the time. My favourite classic TV shows are:

1. Gilligan's Island
2. Happy Days
3. The Facts of Life

Perfect coming of age shows. Well, Gilligan wasn't really coming of age, but it was really funny and you grew to love the characters.  :)Mary Ann :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on October 31, 2013, 11:50:22 AM
And don't forget Darrin and Samantha lived in the neighborhood in a special October episode in 1965!
(I believe Hanna-Barbera did the animation in the Bewitched credits, as well.)

(http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BMjAzNDYyMzQ2MV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTYwNDA5OTE2._V1_SY317_CR17,0,214,317_.jpg)


D'oh! How could I forget that?!?!  :o  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on October 31, 2013, 11:52:34 AM
And since it's Halloween, I hope your evening is:

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9e/Bewitched_color_title_card.jpg)



I always liked the episode where Sam scared the daylights out of the candy manufacturer who thought witches were only old and ugly.

He sold more candy when he put a sexy witch on the package because it was bought by men on their way home from work!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on October 31, 2013, 01:11:49 PM
One of my favorites too, Jeff!

It was called THE WITCHES ARE OUT and was first broadcast on October 29, 1964.  It was the seventh episode of the series and the first appearance of Aunt Clara.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on October 31, 2013, 01:23:43 PM
One of my favorites too, Jeff!

It was called THE WITCHES ARE OUT and was first broadcast on October 29, 1964.  It was the seventh episode of the series and the first appearance of Aunt Clara.

That reminds me. I need to polish my doorknob collection. ...  ;)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on October 31, 2013, 02:40:36 PM
Speaking of theme songs!


http://www.bewitched.net/music.htm


 ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on November 10, 2013, 11:11:41 AM

Friday night ME-TV has a block where they are airing those reunion movies based on previous television series.
I don't know how many of these types of movies were made, but I don't know of any that ever got good reviews.
The one on Friday was Return to Mayberry and I watched about ten minutes of it before I had to give up. Mostly
these misguided efforts are sad and they have the characters you came to know trying to be as amusing and energetic
as they were a couple decades before. I remember one the Addams Family did. It was in color and that was jarring in
and of itself.  I know they did ones for Beverly Hillbillies and Green Acres and Gilligan's Island did three!  Mary & Rhoda
was another one.  It was a bit better than most in the genre, but not much.

A better idea is when they brought the casts back together for anniversary celebrations of their shows and showed clips
and told stories.  Then there was the genre of making tv movies about how awful it was to have made all these shows!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on November 10, 2013, 11:14:53 AM
These never work.  Kudos to the FRIENDS cast for ixnaying plans for a reunion movie.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on November 10, 2013, 11:16:14 AM

This week ME-TV has started airing The Alfred Hitchcock Hour. After 7 seasons of
Alfred Hitchcock Presents, they continued with it three more years in an hour format with this title.
I am enjoying these shows so far, but I noticed that they started last Monday with episode #4 on
and I wanted to see the first episode because Robert Redford guest starred on it. They must've
had a Halloween event or something and showed the first three episodes before Monday at some
point.  Wouldn't you know.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on November 10, 2013, 11:25:47 AM
These never work.  Kudos to the FRIENDS cast for ixnaying plans for a reunion movie.

They could call it Old Friends.  Lol!

Hi, Mark, old friend!
 
I think the first Gilligan's Island one at least had the best reason for a tv movie years later.  It's just
that the second hour of it was about Russian spies (Sherwood Schwartz always seemed to have some
idiotic affinity for plots about Russian spies) and, of course, they couldn't get Tina Louise to be sane.
She was on and off again about it and ultimately wanted a ransom for doing it and they wouldn't.
(Lots of stories about her being nuts in this town.) And, of course, the genius of that movie, and I know
that most would never associate that word genius with that show, but the denouement of that movie was
that they dared to have them end up on the same island again!  (Duh, of course!  Just like the series!)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Willowey on November 11, 2013, 10:14:58 AM
, but the denouement of that movie was that they dared to have them end up on the same island again!  (Duh, of course!  Just like the series!)

That's part of what makes the series what it is. :D Gilligan's Island never really made sense, but that's why I love it so much. The series and the characters are so innocent.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on November 14, 2013, 10:43:36 AM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/fave0173davidpu.jpg)


Any Partridge Family fans?  I use to watch it all the time, David was my first boyfriend!  Of course he didn't know it.


http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065333/
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on November 14, 2013, 11:06:55 AM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/kildareshow05.jpg)


Actually I lie, he was probably my first crush!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on November 14, 2013, 08:09:40 PM
Oh Damn!! Mine too!!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on November 15, 2013, 03:40:23 AM
ok, so who is it?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on November 15, 2013, 07:05:34 AM
Richard Chamberlain as DR. KILDARE!

A first crush for MANY of us!

(Chuck, ten demerits for you!)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on November 15, 2013, 10:59:15 AM

I remember when I got new school clothes in 1964 or 65 I got an official Dr. Kildare shirt.
It was tailored to look somewhat like a doctor's smock. I was too young to even stay
up and watch it, so I guess it was more for the mom's to know what it was and buy it.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bentgyro on November 15, 2013, 11:51:05 AM
Ben Casey was Dr Kildares TV rival.  Dr Kildare was one of my crushes, too!  Ben Casey was just too dark and hairy. ;)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on November 15, 2013, 12:48:31 PM
But Ben Casey (Vince Edwards) was so hunky! I liked him a lot!

http://myfirstgaycrush.blogspot.com/2011/09/steven-loves-brian-kelly.html

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on November 15, 2013, 06:50:36 PM
Richard Chamberlain as DR. KILDARE!

A first crush for MANY of us!

(Chuck, ten demerits for you!)


Dr. James Kildare is a fictional character, the primary character in a series of American theatrical films in the late 1930s and early 1940s, an early 1950s radio series, a 1960s television series of the same name and a comic book based on the TV show, and a short-lived second 1970s television series.


before my time, so there.   *sweeps away demerits*
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on November 15, 2013, 06:54:04 PM
Chuck would go for Ben Casey (Vince Edwards)

(http://www.poorwilliam.net/pix/edwards-vince.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on November 15, 2013, 06:57:15 PM
oh, yum!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on November 15, 2013, 07:04:33 PM
I thought so!! :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on November 15, 2013, 07:08:46 PM
Age is no excuse for not knowing about hunky men, Chuck!  Before your time or NOT!

You need to quit focusing on that Ciccone wench and bone up (and trust me, you WILL) on hunks of the 1950s, 60s, and 70s!

I'm keeping those demerits on file in case you become lax once again, young man!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on November 15, 2013, 07:15:49 PM
You need to quit focusing on that Ciccone wench and bone up (and trust me, you WILL) on hunks of the 1950s, 60s, and 70s!

to keep this on topic, did you know that Madonna was on an episode of Will and Grace?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TxYhUYxQDAs
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on November 15, 2013, 07:24:58 PM
I do indeed.

Back to the 60s, did anyone know that MY MOTHER, THE CAR was just released on DVD?

Hard to believe that Allen Burns and Chris Hayward created this one.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on November 15, 2013, 07:25:06 PM
Oh, for those who watch Christmas movies (on TV) Hallmark Movie Channel is going to run 3 Classic Christmas movies every Thursday night till Christmas. Make sure you know this is the Hallmark MOVIE channel which is different from the just plain Hallmark Channel which also shows classic TV shows.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on November 15, 2013, 08:09:37 PM
ok, so who is it?

 :D  Richard Chamberlin, it even looks like him?   Did you watch The Thorn Birds?


I was also young, probably six when I had my crush on him.  I use to sing.........take me up to hospital, take me up to my room, give me a needle cause I don't care, I'm in love with Dr. Kildaire!


 :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on November 16, 2013, 09:57:38 AM
Back to the 60s, did anyone know that MY MOTHER, THE CAR was just released on DVD?

50 years later I don't know what to say about this, except that when I was a child I did watch it
every week.  As a curiosity I'd check it out on an episode by episode basis. I have always thought
actor Jerry Van Dyke was annoying.  Either that, or he usually just played annoying characters. I
did not care for him on The DvD Show,  He was annoying on Coach. If he had played Gilligan
(it's stated he was offered that role) I probably would've hated Gilligan, too!  If the show was
broadcast in color I would like to see that, too, cause I wonder what color his mother was? What
I remember is that The Red Skelton Comedy Hour was on after this. (Maybe another network, but
same night.)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on November 16, 2013, 09:58:13 AM

Red Skelton is largely forgotten by modern audiences for whatever reason. Probably because he
mostly left the public eye when his last series went off the air in 1971. His show was on in various
incarnations over twenty years, but always ranked in the top ten--even the last year he was on CBS!
Can you imagine cancelling a show in the Top Ten? The last year NBC picked him up for a 1/2 hour
verison, but it didn't work and he left the airwaves.  If anything, most people who remember him
do so from his 1962-70 CBS hour long run, but there is scant little of that to see.  And it's probably
mostly due to the usual problem--expensive MUSIC rights. He had musical guests (like the Supremes!)
on his hour long shows, but the 1/2 hrs. usually did not. And, unlike his contemporaries, Red SKelton
didn't do guest spots on other people's shows (with rare exception) and appear on talk shows. Many
of his 1/2 hr. b&w shows from the 50's are available and the last season of NBC 1/2 hr. shows is available.
One annoying thing is that dvd releases of Red Skelton material are often poor quality and overlap in
content all over the place.  Oh, well.  But I remember enjoying him every Tuesday night. I suppose
modern audiences would think he was just plain too silly, but we need more silliness nowadays, don't
we?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on November 16, 2013, 10:06:07 AM

Just my opinion, about Richard Chamberlain...somehow I've always had the impression that he was like one
of those stereotypical frat boy snobs you see in movies. That he felt the common folk were beneath him or
something. I don't know why, just an impression I'd always have. Maybe it came from him being gay and
having an air of "don'tgettooclose" that he projected...I don't know.  But I still kinda feel that way. Especially
when he did come out...wrote a book...and then said he didn't really think other gay actors should do it
as it might harm their careers. And Richard Chamberlain was on Will & Grace, too! In fact, didn't every
formerly closeted celebrity who came out appear on W&G, like George Takei?
 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bentgyro on November 16, 2013, 01:57:59 PM
I remember Red Skelton and I always thought him hilarious.
I also watched him movies.
I seem to remember that Vince Edwards and Richard Chamberlain had a falling out that they didn't mend.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on November 16, 2013, 04:06:46 PM
:D  Richard Chamberlin, it even looks like him?   Did you watch The Thorn Birds?

Nope, I was 14 when it was on, and most likely at that time had no interest in it.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on November 16, 2013, 06:03:54 PM
I do indeed.

Back to the 60s, did anyone know that MY MOTHER, THE CAR was just released on DVD?

Hard to believe that Allen Burns and Chris Hayward created this one.

What on earth for?  ???  Probably the only thing worse was Me and the Chimp.  :D

Ann Sothern must have really needed the money. ...  8)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on November 16, 2013, 06:06:24 PM
Age is no excuse for not knowing about hunky men, Chuck!  Before your time or NOT!

Certainly no excuse for not knowing Richard Chamberlain.

Restores Chuck's demerits. ...
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on November 16, 2013, 06:10:53 PM
Red Skelton is largely forgotten by modern audiences for whatever reason. Probably because he
mostly left the public eye when his last series went off the air in 1971. His show was on in various
incarnations over twenty years, but always ranked in the top ten--even the last year he was on CBS!

We always watched him when I was a kid.

I still remember Gertrude and Heathcliff, the two seagulls.  8)  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on November 16, 2013, 06:24:29 PM
Red Skelton has always been my most favorite comedian.
His humor was so funny and yet so gentle.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on November 16, 2013, 06:44:33 PM
Certainly no excuse for not knowing Richard Chamberlain.

Restores Chuck's demerits. ...

I reject your restoration.  So there!

If I had to think of a childhood crush from classic tv, this man was the winner.  ;D





(http://www.sitcomsonline.com/photopost/data/1805/Gil4.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on November 16, 2013, 07:05:35 PM
I also thought Russell Johnson was handsome.

My big heartthrobs were Robert Conrad and Ross Martin.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on November 17, 2013, 10:00:26 AM
I still remember Gertrude and Heathcliff, the two seagulls.  8)  :D

Gertrude:  "Things nowadays are getting dangerous. You can't even be safe in the park.

Heathcliff: "I know what you mean. The other day I was in the park and asked for a cracker and I got a salted."
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on November 17, 2013, 10:25:38 AM
I liked Red Skelton a lot.

There's a bridge across the Wabash River carrying US 50 in Vincennes IN, his home town, named in his honor.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on November 17, 2013, 01:13:10 PM
Aww who doesn't like Red Skeleton!


Probably 90% of what is discussed in this thread, I never saw live, I was too young (and I am old  :D) but we catch it all in re-runs.  My daughter in law is a big I love Lucy Fan, she is 28.....  just like music, my son is a big John Lennon fan, sometimes I find it so hard to believe that John died before my son was even born!   He asked me one day "Mom where were you when you heard that news"?


So yea you gotta know the hunky men, all of them!   Which brings me to my next post, off to the movie thread!  :D



Oh and yea I always thought Richard Chamberlin was a bit stand offish, a bit full of himself, but it never put me off!      And see The Thorn Birds, read the book (anyone who hasn't) it's worth it.





Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on November 17, 2013, 07:08:43 PM
I never thought Chamberlain was stand-offish in mien, but with his looks he damn well deserved to be.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on November 18, 2013, 07:19:14 AM
I never thought Chamberlain was stand-offish in mien, but with his looks he damn well deserved to be.

I might have said "unapproachable" because he was so damn handsome, but I don't think that's quite the same as "standoffish."
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on November 26, 2013, 01:52:09 PM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-1341935/Richard-Chamberlain-Why-I-kept-gay-life-secret-Dr-Kildare.html

I didn't know he wrote a book, i will have to read that sometime.


(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a1/Richard_Chamberlain_Daniela_Bianchi_Raymond_Massey_Dr_Kildare_1964.JPG/495px-Richard_Chamberlain_Daniela_Bianchi_Raymond_Massey_Dr_Kildare_1964.JPG)


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on November 28, 2013, 05:01:51 PM
The Honeymooners star Jane Kean dies at 90 after suffering a stroke

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2515238/The-Honeymooners-star-Jane-Kean-dies-90-suffering-stroke.html#ixzz2lzJzBI6y
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on December 06, 2013, 06:05:12 PM
(http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d145/cccccarol/andy-griffith-show-3007_zps2adbb858.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on December 06, 2013, 08:01:47 PM
(http://snsimages.tribune.com/media/photo/2009-10/23725778764580-20092727.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on December 06, 2013, 08:02:41 PM
(http://snsimages.tribune.com/media/photo/2009-10/23725778761800-20092739.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on December 08, 2013, 12:51:37 PM

Tonight's Episode:

(http://www.jeffco.ca/chrspecials/wp-content/gallery/the-untouchables-the-night-they-shot-santa-claus/the-untouchables-the-night-they-shot-santa-claus-01.jpg)

(Any guesses?)

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on December 09, 2013, 01:36:25 PM
The Untouchables?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on December 09, 2013, 02:40:53 PM

You are correct!

It was the first episode of the fourth season. (Why? I don't know, maybe they figured it would disturb people in December! Or maybe
they figured they'd rerun it then? The series that year aired on the same day of the week Christmas was and they didn't air a new episode
that day, so maybe they did rerun it.) It stars one of my favorite actresses that usually only had guest star parts in tv series, Nita Talbot.
She may be best known for her recurring role as a Russian woman on Hogan's Heroes, for which she was Emmy nominated. She is still
around, I'm told. Another recognizable face in the episode: Ed Asner! Also, one of the little boys who witnesses this is Butch Patrick, who
in a couple more years would be Eddie Munster. Also saw him in a Mister Ed episode.

Here's a couple other shots from this very different "Christmas episode".

(http://www.jeffco.ca/chrspecials/wp-content/gallery/the-untouchables-the-night-they-shot-santa-claus/the-untouchables-the-night-they-shot-santa-claus-02.jpg)(http://www.jeffco.ca/chrspecials/wp-content/gallery/the-untouchables-the-night-they-shot-santa-claus/the-untouchables-the-night-they-shot-santa-claus-06.jpg)(http://www.jeffco.ca/chrspecials/wp-content/gallery/the-untouchables-the-night-they-shot-santa-claus/the-untouchables-the-night-they-shot-santa-claus-11.jpg)
(http://www.jeffco.ca/chrspecials/wp-content/gallery/the-untouchables-the-night-they-shot-santa-claus/the-untouchables-the-night-they-shot-santa-claus-12.jpg)(http://www.jeffco.ca/chrspecials/wp-content/gallery/the-untouchables-the-night-they-shot-santa-claus/the-untouchables-the-night-they-shot-santa-claus-15.jpg)(http://www.jeffco.ca/chrspecials/wp-content/gallery/the-untouchables-the-night-they-shot-santa-claus/the-untouchables-the-night-they-shot-santa-claus-20.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on December 11, 2013, 03:35:40 PM
 :D  Yea they should show it now!


(http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/dam/assets/131125122926-07-gift-ideas-1125-horizontal-gallery.png)


 If you never got a dinner ... check out "The Dean Martin Celebrity Roasts." Comedy Central does roasts now, but few comedic hours can match the classics hosted by Martin in the '70s and '80s. The guests included Ronald Reagan, Bob Hope, Johnny Carson and Hugh Hefner, and the panels featured Bob Newhart, George Burns, Lucille Ball -- and, of course, Red Buttons and Foster (hic!) Brooks. Priceless. (StarVista, $249.95)




I will take that under my tree!



http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/27/showbiz/entertainment-gift-guide-story/index.html?iref=allsearch&hpt=hp_c4


Actually a few neat ideas here.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on December 16, 2013, 05:47:33 PM
'I rarely drink spirits any more, as I find wine strong enough. I do enjoy a glass or two': Under the microscope with comedian Ronnie Corbett

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2524844/Under-microscope-comedian-Ronnie-Corbett.html#ixzz2ngknFoXt
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook


Anyone remember Ronnie Corbett?


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on December 16, 2013, 06:29:19 PM

Anyone going to watch the I LOVE LUCY Special on Friday? They
are airing two colorized episodes.  One is the Christmas episode
where they flashback to scenes of Little Ricky being born and such.

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-y7JQtbJtyu4/UmfmrrTm7LI/AAAAAAAAKpA/RuXB_Nl2M6A/s1600/I-Love-Lucy-Christmas-Special-in-Color.jpg)

The articles about this special say that it is being shown on primetime network tv for the first time in
color, which is not true. They first aired the episode again in 1990 and colorized it the following year
and it is on the dvd release. Other articles suggest it was “redone” and so that’s correct. We shall see.

The second episode they’re showing is Lucy’s Italian Movie which features Lucy “soaking up local
color” via the grape stomping scene.  I’ve not seen that one in color and am looking forward to it!

(http://greginhollywood.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/7705805252_deab403dd1_z-400x319.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on December 22, 2013, 03:27:39 PM

I guess no one watched.

For what it's worth, if they did redo the Christmas color episode I didn't see any difference, except I thought
Little Ricky's pajamas were blue the first time and not green.

The grapes episode is amusing, in color or not, but since I've seen them all so many times it's just
interesting to see them in a little different way. Since Lucy episodes were nearly 26 minutes long and
now shows are about 4 mins. shorter, it seems they had to edit out about 8 minutes. I think they took
most of it out of one of the flashback sequences in the Christmas episode.

***

I checked the dvd of the original colored Christmas episode and they did change his pajamas color (I thought
the blue looked better) and other minor things here and there.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on December 22, 2013, 04:10:12 PM
I totally forgot it was going to be on, so only saw part of it.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on December 27, 2013, 03:32:37 PM
I guess no one watched.

I did, and I was pleasantly surprised. The colorization looked more "natural" than I was expecting.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on December 28, 2013, 09:40:31 AM
Nope missed it, but spoke to a few people who did and everyone seemed to enjoy it!


Not sure if I posted this or not, but I was looking up Lucy one night and was surprised to read how she died:


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucille_Ball
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on December 28, 2013, 11:51:04 AM
I cannot believe that next April 26 will be 25 years since she died.  I remember the day like it was yesterday.  One of the saddest days of my life.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on December 30, 2013, 06:24:35 PM
I forgot to post this--one of my Christmas presents was the entire DVD box set of PERRY MASON!  All 271 episodes from 1957 to 1966!

I'm having a great time watching them!   
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on December 31, 2013, 07:17:41 AM
I forgot to post this--one of my Christmas presents was the entire DVD box set of PERRY MASON!  All 271 episodes from 1957 to 1966!

I'm having a great time watching them!   

Cool!  :)

I bought myself the DVD set of Elizabeth R, with Glenda Jackson as the first Elizabeth, part of my ongoing program to convert my videotape collection to DVDs in the interest of saving space. While it has its issues here and there, it's still more historically accurate than the Elizabeth movies of recent years.

Next up, The Six Wives of Henry VIII.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on December 31, 2013, 12:11:21 PM

Mark, did you know that ONE of the 271 episodes is in color?
Do you know why?

(I wonder if they mention it on the dvd?)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on December 31, 2013, 04:28:30 PM
(http://img2.timeinc.net/people/i/2014/gallery/old-hollywood-ny/lucille-ball-435.jpg)


HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on December 31, 2013, 04:29:49 PM
(http://img2.timeinc.net/people/i/2014/gallery/old-hollywood-ny/mae-west-435.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on December 31, 2013, 04:30:33 PM
(http://img2.timeinc.net/people/i/2014/gallery/old-hollywood-ny/bob-hope-435.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on December 31, 2013, 04:31:22 PM
(http://img2.timeinc.net/people/i/2014/gallery/old-hollywood-ny/debbie-reynolds-435.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on December 31, 2013, 04:32:35 PM
(http://img2.timeinc.net/people/i/2014/gallery/old-hollywood-ny/jayne-mansfield-435.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on December 31, 2013, 04:33:47 PM
(http://img2.timeinc.net/people/i/2014/gallery/old-hollywood-ny/shirley-temple-435.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on January 07, 2014, 04:35:04 PM
Not sure how classic it is, but I watched an episode of Quantum Leap today at a ladies home, she has the dejavu station.   She loves the show, I have to say the episode wasn't bad.


http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0096684/


(1989–1993)   I don't remember ever watching it.


Scott Bakula was a cutie!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on January 07, 2014, 07:26:50 PM
One of my favorite shows!!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on January 07, 2014, 07:29:28 PM
Mine too!  I loved Scott Bakula and Dean Stockwell!  Both should have won Emmys.

A very entertaining series.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on January 08, 2014, 07:42:39 AM
Not sure how classic it is, but I watched an episode of Quantum Leap today at a ladies home, she has the dejavu station.   She loves the show, I have to say the episode wasn't bad.


http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0096684/


(1989–1993)   I don't remember ever watching it.


Scott Bakula was a cutie!

I never watched it. I understand it had, or has, a cult following.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on January 08, 2014, 10:05:16 AM

I never watched it, either.

The "dejavu" station?

That's hilarious!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on January 08, 2014, 11:48:19 AM
I never watched it, either.

The "dejavu" station?

That's hilarious!

Makes more sense than "ME-TV."  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on January 08, 2014, 07:14:22 PM
Who loves LUCY??


http://www.buzzfeed.com/briangalindo/21-wonderful-behind-the-scenes-photos-of-i-love-lucy



Great pics!



Here is is Lyle:


http://www.dejaviewtv.ca/
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on January 08, 2014, 07:18:47 PM
http://www.buzzfeed.com/briangalindo/25-rare-photos-of-i-love-lucy-in-color


These ones are great too, she actually was very pretty!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on January 10, 2014, 11:37:46 AM
About a week or so ago I stumbled on an episode of F Troop. It was in black and white, so I presume it was from the first season. Don Rickles was the guest star. He played an Indian named--what else?--Bald Eagle.  :D

I always thought Ken Berry was kind of cute as the inept captain commanding the fort.  :)

I wonder whatever happened to Melody Patterson (Wrangler Jane)? I can't recall that I've heard of her since the show went off the air.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on January 10, 2014, 05:27:08 PM
About a week or so ago I stumbled on an episode of F Troop. It was in black and white, so I presume it was from the first season. Don Rickles was the guest star. He played an Indian named--what else?--Bald Eagle.  :D

I always thought Ken Berry was kind of cute as the inept captain commanding the fort.  :)

I wonder whatever happened to Melody Patterson (Wrangler Jane)? I can't recall that I've heard of her since the show went off the air.



(http://knoji.com/images/user/williamfelchner/ftroopkenberryautograph-2f839490.jpg)


According to Wikipedia:


Melody Patterson (born April 16, 1949 in Inglewood, California) is an American actress best known for her role as Wrangler Jane in the 1960s TV series F Troop. She was 16 years old when she first appeared on the show.   Since the 1967 cancellation of F Troop, Patterson has worked in television, radio and the theater, and entertained troops in Vietnam.

Melody was married to the actor James MacArthur who is best known for the role of Dan "Danno" Williams in the TV series Hawaii Five-O. During their marriage, she had to put her career aside to move to Honolulu, Hawaii. During the next seven years she appeared in many episodes of Hawaii Five-O, and started modeling and making commercials. While living in Hawaii she found herself again on the stage in the Herb Rogers production of Butterflies are Free, with Barbara Rush and Dirk Benedict. After that she appeared in other plays such as House of Blue Leaves, for the University of Hawaii, and played the part of Peggy in The Front Page written by Charles MacArthur, and directed by her husband James MacArthur. Before leaving Hawaii, she played the title role in the Strindberg classic, Miss Julie, for the Honolulu Performing Arts Company
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on January 10, 2014, 07:40:09 PM
When I think of Ken Berry, I think of Mama's Family, which I use to love!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on January 15, 2014, 12:41:09 PM
According to Wikipedia:


Melody Patterson (born April 16, 1949 in Inglewood, California) is an American actress best known for her role as Wrangler Jane in the 1960s TV series F Troop. She was 16 years old when she first appeared on the show.   Since the 1967 cancellation of F Troop, Patterson has worked in television, radio and the theater, and entertained troops in Vietnam.

Melody was married to the actor James MacArthur who is best known for the role of Dan "Danno" Williams in the TV series Hawaii Five-O. During their marriage, she had to put her career aside to move to Honolulu, Hawaii. During the next seven years she appeared in many episodes of Hawaii Five-O, and started modeling and making commercials. While living in Hawaii she found herself again on the stage in the Herb Rogers production of Butterflies are Free, with Barbara Rush and Dirk Benedict. After that she appeared in other plays such as House of Blue Leaves, for the University of Hawaii, and played the part of Peggy in The Front Page written by Charles MacArthur, and directed by her husband James MacArthur. Before leaving Hawaii, she played the title role in the Strindberg classic, Miss Julie, for the Honolulu Performing Arts Company

That's interesting. Thanks.  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on January 15, 2014, 05:21:10 PM
You're welcome!  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on January 16, 2014, 02:58:56 PM
(http://img2.timeinc.net/people/i/2014/news/140127/russell-johnson-2300.jpg)



Russell Johnson, who played Professor Roy Hinkley on Gilligan's Island, has passed away at age 89.

The actor died of kidney failure Thursday at his home in Washington, surrounded by his wife Constance Dane and daughter Kim Johnson.

"He died at home, peaceful, in his sleep at 5:21 a.m. today," Dane told ABC News. "[He was] a very brave guy who knew what he wanted, and he wanted to be at home."

His death came quickly, says his agent Michael Eisentstadt.



"I spoke to him right before the holidays and he did an autograph job," says Eisentstadt. "He had just done that and he was fine."

Dawn Wells, who played Mary Ann on the show, posted a picture of herself, Johnson and Bob Denver, who played Gillian and died in 2005, to Facebook to express her grief.

"My 2 favorite people are now gone. The Professor [passed] away this morning. My heart is broken."


Johnson was born in Pennsylvania and joined the United States Army Air Forces after high school. He flew combat missions in World War II prior to pursuing an acting career. He appeared in several films and television shows throughout the 50s and early 60s, including Alfred Hitchcock Presents and The Twilight Zone, before landing the role on Gilligan's Island in 1964.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the hit show about seven men and women stranded together on an island after their ship, the S.S. Minnow, wrecks during a storm.

Johnson continued to make appearances on television shows throughout the 70s, 80s and 90s, including roles on Lassie, Gunsmoke, The Jeffersons and Dynasty.




http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20776673,00.html
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on January 16, 2014, 03:37:46 PM
(http://ll-media.tmz.com/2014/01/16/0116-partridge-family-dave-madden-1.jpg)


Dave Madden  -- who played "The Partridge Family's" aggravated band manager on the 1970s TV show -- has died after a long illness at age 82 ... TMZ has learned.

Madden played Reuben Kincaid on the show ... who was often bedeviled by the antics of the Partridge kids, particularly Danny, played by Danny Bonaduce.

Dave's former agent tells TMZ ... he died of congestive heart and kidney failure early this morning.

Madden also appeared on another popular 70s TV show, "Laugh-In" and was the author of a couple books, including a book of memoirs published in 2007.

We're told Madden died in Florida ... where he lived with his wife.

Read more: http://www.tmz.com/2014/01/16/dave-madden-dead-partridge-family-reuben-kincaid/#ixzz2qbUfUdD4
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on January 17, 2014, 07:25:51 AM
(http://img2.timeinc.net/people/i/2014/news/140127/russell-johnson-2300.jpg)



Russell Johnson, who played Professor Roy Hinkley on Gilligan's Island, has passed away at age 89.

So I guess only Dawn Wells is left.  :(
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on January 17, 2014, 11:02:23 AM
So I guess only Dawn Wells is left.  :(
               (https://jaydeanhcr.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/tina-louise-yesterday.jpg?w=640)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on January 17, 2014, 11:07:29 AM

In the 80's when AIDS was new and scary and like Dalllas Buyer's Club etc., Russell Johnson's gay son
contracted it. Russell never hesitated to talk about his son, his disease and loved him so much and
worked for causes before and after he lost him. Kudos to you, Mr. Johnson.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on January 17, 2014, 11:42:17 AM
Lyle is right, both Ginger and Mary Ann are still alive.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on January 17, 2014, 11:43:44 AM
              (https://jaydeanhcr.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/tina-louise-yesterday.jpg?w=640)

I thought Tina Louise was dead. I'm glad to know she isn't.

I don't think I ever knew that "the Professor" had a name, or that he was actually a high school science teacher.

I always want to laugh when you see these people other places. Just the other night I saw "Mrs. Howell" in a small, one-scene supporting role in Anastasia.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on January 17, 2014, 01:02:56 PM
Five passengers (and one skipper and one first mate) set sail that day for a three-hour tour, but where are they now?

With the passing of "Professor" Russell Johnson Thursday, there are now two living cast members remaining of Gilligan's Island's original crew of seven — 75-year-old Dawn Wells, who played Mary Ann Summers, and 79-year-old Tina Louise, who played Ginger Grant.

Here's a look at what the cast did after the wildly popular 1960s show ended:



http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/people/2014/01/16/gilligans-island-where-are-they-now/4534695/
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on January 22, 2014, 04:23:39 PM
Because I had a holiday on Monday, and my office was closed today because of the declared snow emergency here in Philadelphia, I got to see two episodes of Daniel Boone on ME-TV (locally it runs at 9 a.m.). I don't know which season, or seasons, the episodes were from, but I thought it was funny that both episodes had Israel Boone's birthday as a plot point.  :D  In the Monday episode he turned 8 years old, and in today's episode he turned 9 years old.  :D

I could probably figure out which season or seasons these episodes were from by looking at the episode synopses on the shows fan web site.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on January 22, 2014, 04:54:27 PM
Anyone remember Captain and Tenile?   Boy I miss a good variety show.



Toni Tennille, whose real name is Cathryn Antoinette Tennille, 73, filed for divorce on Jan. 16, the Prescott, Arizona City courthouse confirms to PEOPLE.

Daryl Dragon, 71, also known as the Captain, was a keyboard player for the Beach Boys before meeting his wife. They released their first album in 1974, winning a Grammy the following year.

Tennille revealed on her blog in 2010 that Dragon was suffering from a neurological condition similar to Parkinsons that causes him to have tremors, which she said were "pretty severe at times" and interfered with his ability to play the keyboard.

The couple have no children. RumorFix was the first to report the couple's divorce.


http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20778840,00.html
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on January 22, 2014, 07:07:12 PM
Anyone remember Captain and Tenile?   Boy I miss a good variety show.

You bet! And I remember a bit of a scandal when they sang Muskrat Love at a dinner for Queen Elizabeth II.  ;D

Quote
Toni Tennille, whose real name is Cathryn Antoinette Tennille, 73, filed for divorce on Jan. 16, the Prescott, Arizona City courthouse confirms to PEOPLE.

Daryl Dragon, 71, also known as the Captain, was a keyboard player for the Beach Boys before meeting his wife. They released their first album in 1974, winning a Grammy the following year.

Tennille revealed on her blog in 2010 that Dragon was suffering from a neurological condition similar to Parkinsons that causes him to have tremors, which she said were "pretty severe at times" and interfered with his ability to play the keyboard.

The couple have no children. RumorFix was the first to report the couple's divorce.


http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20778840,00.html

I'm sorry to hear of their misfortunes.  :(
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on January 25, 2014, 11:09:06 AM

BATMAN -- The 1966 series is one of the most, if not the most, requested series to be available
on any home viewing format and for years has been the subject of so much legal entanglements over who
exactly owns the rights to the show that there have been numerous articles written about it.  (The rights stem
from use of the comic characters, the studios, the batmobile, the music and so many issues that it was thought
NEVER to see the light of day.) Then out of the blue this week comes an announcement:

Batman - POW! BAM! SOCKO! the Word We've All Waited For!
Warner Home Video confirms that the classic '60s series is coming out THIS YEAR!!
Posted by David Lambert

http://tvshowsondvd.com/news/Batman-DVDs-Planned/19353

If you're interested in how complicated this rights issue really is/was, here's an article
on the same website about it from 2008:

http://tvshowsondvd.com/news/Batman-Watchmen-Batman-Deal-Reported/10573
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on January 28, 2014, 12:28:21 PM

I've been watching the Alfred Hitchcock Hour on Me-TV the past couple months and there's been
some fascinating episodes and many guest actors that peak one's interest.

A couple nights ago they aired an episode titled "Memo from Purgatory." It was written by
the noted scribe Harlan Ellison and says was based on a book he wrote.

The plot concerned an aspiring writer who arrives in New York and he wants to make a name for
himself by going undercover and becoming part of a gang and then write about what makes these
people tick and such.  So, first, he has to become "one of them" and then initiated into this gang,
which was called "The Barons" in this episode.

Why I singled this episode out for attention is that there's a development in the story that propels
it in a different direction and this development is an accusation by the "writer" that the leader of
the gang (Tiger) is gay.

Now, all of this is done in 1964 terms, so the wording is not explicit and mentioned only once.
In the story, the author is initiated into the gang, but he alienates a couple of the gang members
along the way. They break into his apartment room at one point to trash it and they discover the
stuff he's been writing and that he's not who he's pretending to be.  A mock trial is set up with the
gang leader presiding (Tiger) and Tiger's sentence is to send him out of town on a rail, so to speak.
This doesn't go over well with the previously offended gang members who ask if Tiger's going to
let him get away like that, even after what he wrote about him. They proceed to read what he
wrote about Tiger and his observations that from all the evidence he's seen, Tiger doesn't like
women, basically.  Well, that obviously doesn't set well with Tiger and sets the story in a harmful
direction for the writer.  You can't out or call someone gay in that setting and get away with it.

You rarely see anything like this subject even hinted at in shows of this period so it was of great
interest. You can read things, sometimes, into a relationship or a line reading, that may or may not
really be there, but this was about as explicit as one could get back then.  And, of course, it was
decidedly something negative related to juvenile delinquency.

I also must say, the gang members of the early 60's in shows and movies like this are decidedly
so tame compared to what you'd see on TV nowadays.  In some ways so comical, too. Rarely
a gun is seen.  Only knives.  And drug use might be hinted at but never shown. In fact, smoking
is about the worst habit you'd actually see of the teen delinquents and I don't even think they
did that in this episode.  Like West Side Story, their hangout was a malt shop of sorts. It was
more the attitude of violence that was shown and that still can be pretty effective.

To think about the episode in a different way, consider this was aired one year later than the
opening events of Brokeback Mountain.

Below is a still I found online from the episode. The offended blond gang member on the left
is an actor named Chuck Courtney. The would be writer was played by James Caan and Tiger,
the gang leader, was played by Walter Koenig, one year shy of his Star Trek fame!

(http://claytonmoore.tripod.com/memo08.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on January 28, 2014, 12:35:45 PM

It is interesting watching shows like this because actors like James Caan appear who are still working
fifty years later!  Robert Redford was in two episodes, one I missed, Bruce Dern was also in two episodes
I saw recently and he plays weird off-beat characters in both of them. Watching shows like this also gives
the lie that the major movie actors looked down on TV and didn't want to be associated with it as stars galore
from the silver screen pop up frequently. Gloria Swanson, for example, was in a recent one. Although, maybe
they looked down on it, but they did it anyway, either for the money or just to work. In any case, it's nice to
come across them in guest starring roles. It adds spice.  Tab Hunter and Sal Mineo were both in Combat episodes
I viewed.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on January 28, 2014, 01:46:23 PM
It is interesting watching shows like this because actors like James Caan appear who are still working
fifty years later!  Robert Redford was in two episodes, one I missed, Bruce Dern was also in two episodes
I saw recently and he plays weird off-beat characters in both of them. Watching shows like this also gives
the lie that the major movie actors looked down on TV and didn't want to be associated with it as stars galore
from the silver screen pop up frequently. Gloria Swanson, for example, was in a recent one. Although, maybe
they looked down on it, but they did it anyway, either for the money or just to work. In any case, it's nice to
come across them in guest starring roles. It adds spice.  Tab Hunter and Sal Mineo were both in Combat episodes
I viewed.

Dennis Hopper played a "beatnik" poet in a first-season episode of Petticoat Junction. (Bobbie Jo, the bookish middle Bradley sister, had a crush on him.)

And of course there was the episode of The Beverly Hillbillies where the Clampetts wanted to make a silent movie starring Gloria Swanson, who appeared. 

And I believe it's been discussed before how major figures such as Charles Laughton and Bette Davis appeared in episodes of Wagon Train.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on January 28, 2014, 02:50:11 PM

Barbara Stanwyck did lots of TV besides her series.
She appeared as herself with Walter Brennan in The Real McCoys.
I know she also did two episodes of The Untouchables.

Bette Davis was also on an episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents.
And Gunsmoke. And Perry Mason.

***

I looked up a few more:  The Virginian, The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour (3 times), The
Hollywood Palace (once with Joan Crawford), Andy Williams Show and It Takes a Thief.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on January 28, 2014, 04:46:41 PM
I looked up a few more:  The Virginian, The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour (3 times), The
Hollywood Palace (once with Joan Crawford), Andy Williams Show and It Takes a Thief.

Who? Bette Davis or Barbara Stanwyck?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on January 29, 2014, 08:46:38 AM

Miss Bette Davis!

She also did a lot of anthology shows and talk/chat shows.
And later on, TV movies, none of which I really thought were good.
Hepburn did some really good ones, but Davis's were rather mundane,
IMO, although I can't say I've seen all of them.

Speaking of Joan Crawford, the only two series I can think of off-hand that
she did, besides that Hollywood Palace with Bette, was The Lucy Show where
she played herself and an episode of The Man from U.N.C.L.E. and, oh yeah,
that Night Gallery episode famously directed by Spielberg.  So there's probably
more.


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on February 01, 2014, 04:17:10 PM
Was at a clients today and I guess Saturday's are western day.......we watched Rifle Man with Chuck Connors.  It was good!  :D


And what a long tall cool drink of water he is!! ;D



(http://media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/0b/5b/28/0b5b2856217af3810a316e7304cba5bb.jpg)



And that kid is just too cute!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on February 02, 2014, 04:24:53 PM
i had some very perverted personal subplots about that relationship.  the addendum is that at the time i was only a little bit older than the boy.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on February 03, 2014, 07:59:41 AM
Was at a clients today and I guess Saturday's are western day.......we watched Rifle Man with Chuck Connors.  It was good!  :D


And what a long tall cool drink of water he is!! ;D



(http://media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/0b/5b/28/0b5b2856217af3810a316e7304cba5bb.jpg)



And that kid is just too cute!

Johnny Crawford does commercials for ME-TV, which shows The Rifleman in this area. That cute kid grew up to be an attractive man, and he's still an attractive man.  :)  He will be 68 years old next month, and he speaks very highly of Chuck Connors.

At one time he was a professional rodeo cowboy, too. Apparently he could afford a ropin' horse.  :D

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0186844/?ref_=nv_sr_1 (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0186844/?ref_=nv_sr_1)

And Chuck Connors was great as Lucas McCain.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on February 03, 2014, 12:22:11 PM

I met Johnny Crawford in the 80's.  He was singing and playing guitar in a club. Since I had
never been exposed to the Rifleman tv series, at least not much, growing up I  did not know
who he was until afterwards.

As for Chuck Connors, he was also on the 1/2 hour Western "Branded" which I did see and Me-TV
was airing on weekends up until several months ago. Am I correct that he nearly/or was an MLB baseball
player? My favorite thing is once he was on Laugh-In, in western gear, and did a joke with Alan Sues
which fell flat, so Alan Sues looks at him and then at the camera and says. "Big. But dumb." Connors
cracked up.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on February 03, 2014, 03:39:30 PM
 :D  That's funny!


I do remember Chuck from ROOTS, he played that nasty slave owner (is there any other kind??)   I will keep the Rifleman imagine in my mind now, much nicer.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on February 03, 2014, 04:24:53 PM
As for Chuck Connors, he was also on the 1/2 hour Western "Branded" which I did see and Me-TV
was airing on weekends up until several months ago. Am I correct that he nearly/or was an MLB baseball
player?

I'd have to check the run dates for The Rifleman, but it seems to me I was a pretty young child when it was in first-run; what I did see of it may have been syndicated re-runs. Heck, I was a kid when Branded was in first run, but I remember watching it. My memory is that it aired Sunday evenings after the Disney program, but I could be wrong about that. I don't know about the baseball thing. It might be in Connors' bio at IMDb.

I remember Connors in Roots, too. He was versatile.  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on February 03, 2014, 06:45:58 PM
I'd have to check the run dates for The Rifleman, but it seems to me I was a pretty young child when it was in first-run; what I did see of it may have been syndicated re-runs. Heck, I was a kid when Branded was in first run, but I remember watching it. My memory is that it aired Sunday evenings after the Disney program, but I could be wrong about that. I don't know about the baseball thing. It might be in Connors' bio at IMDb.

I remember Connors in Roots, too. He was versatile.  :)

He played center for the Boston Celtics in the 1946-47 season but left early for spring training with the Brooklyn Dodgers. Baseball had always been his first love, and for the next several years he knocked about the minor leagues in such places as Rochester (NY), Norfolk (VA), Newark (NJ), Newport News (VA), Mobile (AL) and Montreal, Canada. He finally reached his goal, playing for the Brooklyn Dodgers, in May 1949, but after just five weeks and one at-bat he returned to Montreal. After a brief stint with the Chicago Cubs in 1951, during which he hit two home runs, Chuck wound up with the Cubs' Triple-A farm team, the L.A. Angels, in 1952.

Chuck Connors died at age 71 of lung cancer and pneumonia on November 10, 1992 in Los Angeles, California. He is buried in San Fernando Mission Cemetery with his tombstone carrying a photo of Connors as Lucas McCain in "The Rifleman" as well as logos from the three professional sports teams he played for: the Dodgers, Cubs and Celtics.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on February 16, 2014, 12:36:08 PM
Last night (2/15/14) I saw two episodes of Maverick on COZI-TV. Now there was some good TV for you!  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on February 16, 2014, 05:00:11 PM
Good night Papa Walton!   :'(


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2559111/Waltons-patriarch-Ralph-Waite-dies-85.html
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on February 17, 2014, 08:46:23 AM
Well, that was pretty funny! This morning I caught an episode of The Lone Ranger, and there was Andy Griffith's Aunt Bea--Francis Bavier--as the matriarch of a family of robbers!  :D

Edit to Add:

Later I saw an episode of The Roy Rogers Show. I'd never seen an episode of The Roy Rogers Show before; what an odd mixture of the Old West and the 20th century!

What was notable to me about this episode was a couple of mentions of ... Riverton!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on February 17, 2014, 11:19:44 AM

The Roy Rogers Show was a vague memory somewhere, can't say I really remember it.
And I'm not sure the circumstances of it now, but by some fluke in the late 80's I actually
saw Roy Rogers and Dale Evans somewhere. Their popularity hasn't lasted in the public
realm, really, but they were huge celebrities back in the day. Am I correct that they were
also known as really great/nice people?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on February 17, 2014, 01:38:51 PM
They did have a reputation, deserved, of being good people. Conservative and prowar during the Vietnam era, not unusual for the time. It's a shame that their fame has vanished though. I'm glad I got to visit their museum in Victorville CA before it relocated to Branson MO. The latter museum has closed and the collection scattered. I believe the family insisted on keeping the stuffed remains of Trigger, and maybe Bullit.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on February 17, 2014, 01:46:33 PM
Some of their collection is at the Autry, Fritz.

They were very good people. Rogers and Evans were also well known as advocates for adoption and as founders and operators of children's charities. Even though they had natural children, they adopted several children. Both were outspoken Christians. In Apple Valley, California, where they made their home, numerous streets and highways as well as civic buildings have been named after them in recognition of their efforts on behalf of homeless and handicapped children. Rogers was an active Freemason and a Shriner, and was noted for his support of their charities.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on February 17, 2014, 02:10:30 PM
Since I saw those episodes of The Lone Ranger and Roy Rogers this morning, I've been thinking that it's interesting to me that "back then" the people who made shows like those two--not the actors but the writers, producers, directors, whoever--were able to tell a perfectly coherent and complete action-adventure-drama story in just half an hour--and I presume there were commercial breaks "back then," too, so it was really less than half an hour!

Linda, now that you mention it, I remember Roy and Dale being advocates for children's charities.  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on February 17, 2014, 05:11:20 PM
Some of their collection is at the Autry, Fritz.

They were very good people. Rogers and Evans were also well known as advocates for adoption and as founders and operators of children's charities. Even though they had natural children, they adopted several children. Both were outspoken Christians. In Apple Valley, California, where they made their home, numerous streets and highways as well as civic buildings have been named after them in recognition of their efforts on behalf of homeless and handicapped children. Rogers was an active Freemason and a Shriner, and was noted for his support of their charities.

Glad to hear that some of their pieces are still available to the public. Thanks, Linda!

There was a sort of rivalry between Roy Rogers and Gene Autry on Saturday morning TV, at least on the part of the marketers. Seems that in the long run Autry won.

I remember meeting a man from the French-speaking part of Louisiana back in the late 60's, his name was Autry Dominique. His wife had a distant relative visiting from Germany, and I was helping to translate for them.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on February 17, 2014, 07:31:15 PM
I have been watching a lot of The Lawrence Welk Show. It's shown pretty regularly on the PBS stations, but I am watching a lot of the earlier episodes on YouTube.

He had a local show in LA starting in 1951 and ABC picked up his show and was on the air from 1955 to 1982.

A clip from his premier show, 07/02/1955.

http://youtu.be/qzL4t7E-ZNw

Here`s the opening number from the very last concert with Lawrence and the band together! (1982)

http://youtu.be/siqOqits21E

If you want to watch the whole show, here is PBS restored episode of his first ABC network premier, 07/02/1955. (I was 3 yo)

http://youtu.be/q8XGAtm1xXA
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on February 18, 2014, 07:30:01 AM
I have been watching a lot of The Lawrence Welk Show. It's shown pretty regularly on the PBS stations, but I am watching a lot of the earlier episodes on YouTube.

He had a local show in LA starting in 1951 and ABC picked up his show and was on the air from 1955 to 1982.

A clip from his premier show, 07/02/1955.

http://youtu.be/qzL4t7E-ZNw

Here`s the opening number from the very last concert with Lawrence and the band together! (1982)

http://youtu.be/siqOqits21E

If you want to watch the whole show, here is PBS restored episode of his first ABC network premier, 07/02/1955. (I was 3 yo)

http://youtu.be/q8XGAtm1xXA

Our local PBS station runs it at 7 p.m. on Saturdays. I'm usually watching it over dinner. Last Saturday they ran a show from 1958. It featured the Champagne Lady who came before Norma Zimmer.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on February 18, 2014, 01:44:35 PM
Mary Grace Canfield, a veteran character actress who played handywoman Ralph Monroe on the television show "Green Acres," has died. She was 89.

Her daughter, Phoebe Alexiades, says Canfield died of lung cancer on Saturday at a hospice in the California coastal town of Santa Barbara.

Canfield had appearances on a number of TV shows during a four-decade career, including General Hospital and The Hathaways.

She was Harriet Kravitz on four episodes of the 1960s series Bewitched.

But she was best known for her role of Ralph Monroe in some 40 episodes of "Green Acres," which ran from 1965 to 1971 and starred Eddie Albert and Eva Gabor.

Monroe greeted folks in the town of Hootersville with a cheery "howdy doody," wore painters' overalls and was forever working on the Douglas family's bedroom with her brother, Alf (Sid Melton).


http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20787966,00.html
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on February 18, 2014, 04:39:08 PM
Mary Grace Canfield, a veteran character actress who played handywoman Ralph Monroe on the television show "Green Acres," has died. She was 89.

I remember her well. I'm sorry to hear she's gone.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on February 18, 2014, 10:16:39 PM
Our local PBS station runs it at 7 p.m. on Saturdays. I'm usually watching it over dinner. Last Saturday they ran a show from 1958. It featured the Champagne Lady who came before Norma Zimmer.
Yeah, that first episode showed the previous Champagne Lady. His first Champagne Lady was Jayne Walton Rosen (real name: Dorothy Jayne Flanagan). Jayne left Welk's show after her marriage and later pregnancy.
Norma Zimmer became the Champagne Lady on New Year's Eve, 1960.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on February 19, 2014, 02:57:31 AM
i remember the rivalry between gene autry and roy rogers well, it played out on my tv and on the movie screens.  autry had the better singing voice, although roy was tolerable, but to my as yet unshaped gay mind, roy was the more handsome, right up there with guy madison.  a while back, maybe a decade, i think the country powers to be missed an opportunity not coming up with a movie featuring both starring garth brooks and clint black, in the right clothes and lights dead ringers for autry and rogers.  pretty much too late now, but i did think it was a good idea.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on February 19, 2014, 07:40:56 AM
i remember the rivalry between gene autry and roy rogers well, it played out on my tv and on the movie screens.  autry had the better singing voice, although roy was tolerable, but to my as yet unshaped gay mind, roy was the more handsome, right up there with guy madison.  a while back, maybe a decade, i think the country powers to be missed an opportunity not coming up with a movie featuring both starring garth brooks and clint black, in the right clothes and lights dead ringers for autry and rogers.  pretty much too late now, but i did think it was a good idea.

I would agree with that.

I did some reading yesterday and confirmed my memory that Roy and Dale had had a child with Down syndrome, but I hadn't remembered that she had died that young.  :(
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on February 27, 2014, 11:54:14 AM
(http://img2-2.timeinc.net/people/i/2014/news/140310/jim-lange-300.jpg)


Jim Lange, the first host of the popular game show The Dating Game, has died at his home in Mill Valley, Calif. He was 81.


He died Tuesday morning after suffering a heart attack, his wife Nancy told the Associated Press Wednesday.

Though Lange had a successful career in radio, he is best known for his television role on ABC's The Dating Game, which debuted in 1965 and on which he appeared for more than a decade, playing host to many celebrity guests. Michael Jackson, Steve Martin and Arnold Schwarzenegger, among others, appeared as contestants.

Even a pre-Charlie's Angels Farrah Fawcett appeared on the program, introduced as "an accomplished artist and sculptress" with a dream to open her own gallery.

The show's format: a young man or woman questions three members of the opposite sex, hidden from her view, to determine which one would be the best date.

The questions were designed by the show's writers to elicit sexy answers.

"I've never been out on a date before. What do two kids like us do on a date?" a teenage Michael Jackson asked one of his potential dates on a 1972 episode of the show.


"Well, we'd have fun," the girl answered. "We'd go out to dinner, and then I'd go over to your house."

Lange was born on Aug. 15, 1932, in St. Paul, Minn., where as a young man he discovered a passion for local radio. He worked as a disc jockey for decades, and upon his retirement from broadcasting in 2005, he was the morning DJ for KABL-FM in the San Francisco Bay Area, which specializes in playing classics from the Big Band era to the 1970s.




"As much as he's known for his television work, his real love was radio," his wife said. "He loved doing local radio, especially before it was computerized."

Lange is survived by a sister, five children, two stepchildren and four grandchildren.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on February 27, 2014, 12:20:18 PM
Even a pre-Charlie's Angels Farrah Fawcett appeared on the program, introduced as "an accomplished artist and sculptress" with a dream to open her own gallery.

I understand Tom Selleck was one of the "bachelors." He didn't get picked.  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on February 28, 2014, 05:50:13 PM
He is a handsome man and getting better with age actually........but I wouldn't have picked him!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 06, 2014, 11:47:52 AM
(http://img2-1.timeinc.net/people/i/2014/news/140317/geoff-edwards-300.jpg)



Geoff Edwards, the hip-looking 1970s and '80s host of TV game shows including Jackpot! and two incarnations of Treasure Hunt, died Wednesday, his agent said. He was 83.

Edwards died of complications of pneumonia at St. John's hospital in Santa Monica, agent Fred Westbrook said.

Edwards also worked as a radio DJ and actor, appearing on TV shows including Petticoat Junction, 'I Dream of Jeannie and Diff'rent Strokes.

"Geoff was one of the cleverest, funniest radio and television personalities I've worked with," said fellow game show host Wink Martindale. The two were deejays at pop radio station KMPC in Los Angeles.

Edwards, a native of Westfield, N.J., hosted The New Treasure Hunt, a revival of a 1950s quiz show, from 1973 to 1977 and hosted Treasure Hunt in 1981-82. He also emceed the 1980s game show Jackpot! and appeared on other shows including Starcade.

Westbrook said his longtime client made a splash on TV by shedding the conservative look worn by his peers.

His hair was longer, he never wore a tie, and he favored jeans over suits, Westbrook said. "He was part of the new breed."

Edwards had been in good health, his agent said. In recent years, he wrote about travel on his website and did radio and TV programs on the subject.




He is survived by his wife, Michael, and stepsons Justin and Jason Feffer, Westbrook said. His survivors also include his ex-wife, Suzanne, and their children Todd, Shawn and Chess, as well as nine grandchildren.

Funeral plans were pending, Westbrook said.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 09, 2014, 02:18:41 PM
I knew her best as Alice on the "Honeymooners" segments of Jackie Gleason's variety show.

Ninety-two is a good age.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 09, 2014, 02:37:41 PM
It certainly is, we should all be so lucky!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on March 21, 2014, 05:06:37 PM
Maybe I'll break out one of these DVDs tonight.



(http://i327.photobucket.com/albums/k463/dcfmod/wacky%20races/sf.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on March 23, 2014, 10:39:41 AM
where's krypto?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on March 23, 2014, 02:11:02 PM
Ha, Krypto was part of the Superman story, but not part of Super Friends.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on March 23, 2014, 02:56:52 PM
Maybe I'll break out one of these DVDs tonight.



(http://i327.photobucket.com/albums/k463/dcfmod/wacky%20races/sf.jpg)

So, whose got better legs, Robin or Wonder Woman?  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: AshesOnBrokeback on March 23, 2014, 04:14:05 PM
If Robin wasn't a boy toy, then I don't know what is...:D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on March 30, 2014, 11:34:03 AM
British actress Kate O'Mara, best known for her role on the 1980s soap opera Dynasty, died Sunday at the age of 74, her agent said.

Phil Belfield said O'Mara died in a nursing home in southern England after a short illness.

The actress, who began her television career in the 1960s, became a household name for playing Cassandra "Caress" Morrell, sister to Joan Collins' Alexis Colby, on Dynasty.

In Britain she is often remembered for her role in Triangle – a soap opera set aboard a North Sea ferry that is often cited as the worst piece of British television.

She also appeared in the original run of British series Doctor Who and BBC drama Howards' Way. In the 1990s she starred in the comedy show Absolutely Fabulous with Joanna Lumley.

More recently she appeared in a 2012 stage adaptation of Agatha Christie's Death on the Nile.

She is survived by her sister, actress Belinda Carroll.


http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20801595,00.html
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on March 31, 2014, 02:47:15 AM
i recently discovered a british,i think, tv series called STAR MAIDENS, the gist of which is that a pair of subjugated males escape from a planet in which the women rule and the men are relegated to concubines and menials, manage, despite their limited male thinking, to land on earth, with two of the dominant women in hot pursuit.  shenanigans ensue on both planets.  it is hysterically dated, utterly sexist if not misogynistic, playing the role reversal to the hilt   i'm quite sure the importance of male equality will be demonstrated as these female oligarchs and military go all weak in the knees for their men.  its on youtube, and you can search it by name.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on April 04, 2014, 07:59:21 PM
Well, I decided to break out my DVDs and watch a few episodes of Charmed tonight.  Haven't seen it in a while, and it was one of the WB's more successful shows, running from 1998 - 2006.

For those who don't know the show, Charmed was the story of three sisters:  Prue (oldest), Piper (middle) and Phoebe (youngest) moving into their grandmother's house after her death.  Phoebe discovers a chest with a large book in it, the Book of Shadows.  Reading the first page aloud, Phoebe unwittingly unleashes their powers, making them The Charmed Ones, witches who are destined to protect innocents from evil.  


(http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g116/CellarDweller115/WitchTrial_zpsbb3ec86f.jpg)

Witch Trial -  On their 1st anniversary, the demon Abraxas steals the sisters' Book of Shadows.  While in his possession, he starts to read it backwards, saying the spells backwards.  This 'erases' them from the book, cancelling them out and restoring the demons the spells vanquished.   If he gets to the beginning of the book, and undoes the first spell, it will erase the sisters' powers.



Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on April 04, 2014, 08:04:57 PM
(http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g116/CellarDweller115/IceCream2_zpsc6a3b2df.jpg)

We All Scream For Ice Cream - Prue has a tune stuck in her head, and she can't figure out what it is.   She and Phoebe later hear a child humming the tune, and see an ice-cream truck driving by.  Realizing it's the middle of winter, Prue and Phoebe investigate, and see the child being sucked into the window of the truck.  When they try to help, they get caught in the truck, which has a strange, winter-like world inside of it, and a number of trapped kids.  They rescue the kids, only to find out afterwards that they are actually demons.  The Charmed Ones then need to track down the missing truck to recapture the demon kids.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on April 04, 2014, 08:16:14 PM
(http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g116/CellarDweller115/BlindedByTheWhitelighter_zpsbd323981.jpg)

Blinded By The White Lighter -  All witches have White Lighters, special guardian angels, who protect them and heal their battle wounds.  Piper us currently breaking the rules by having a relationship with her White Lighter, Leo.  While this is happening, the warlock Eames has successfully killed three witches, absorbing their powers in the process.  Fearing that Leo is no longer able to guide the sisters due to his relationship with Piper, he is removed, and replaced with his friend, Natalie, who is much more regimented in her style.  The stakes get higher when Eames kills a Dark Lighter, and steals his weapon, a crossbow.  The Charmed Ones then realize Eames intends to use the weapon to kill all White Lighters, which would leave witches defenseless.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on April 04, 2014, 08:24:58 PM
(http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g116/CellarDweller115/AllHellBreaksLoose_zpsdce13625.jpg)


All Hell Breaks Loose - The Demon Shax shows up at the Halliwell house to kill an innocent.  The battle moves outside, and Piper vanquishes him.  What she doesn't know is that she is filmed by a news crew, and the Halliwell sisters are exposed as witches.  The furor around their house continues to grow, with news crews, friends and crazed wiccan fans showing up.   Phoebe, looking for help, goes to the Underworld to a demon who loves her.  While Phoebe is down there, Piper is shot and Prue rushes her to the hospital, where she dies.  The demon Phoebe met up with makes a deal with her, saying he can turn back time if she agrees to stay in the underworld with him, which would save Piper.  She agrees, and the time reversal happens.  This time, however, when the demon Shax shows up, he confronts and kills Prue instead.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on April 04, 2014, 08:35:46 PM
At the end of season 3 (the episode above) it was revealed that Shannen Dougherty (Prue) was leaving the show, the rumor was she was constantly fighting with Alyssa Milano (Phoebe) and told producers "It's her or me" and they kept Alyssa.  This however, caused a problem because the center of the show was that the sisters had "the power of three", which made their magics so powerful. 


(http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g116/CellarDweller115/CharmedAgain_zps74718039.jpg)


Charmed Again -  This episode continues the story from the episode above, and starts with Piper and Phoebe planning Prue's funeral.  They are still witches, but no longer "The Charmed Ones".  Looking for answers, Piper contacts the spirit of her grandmother, who tells her 'her destiny still awaites'.  They later find out that the side of evil believe that the 'power of three' can be reconstituted.  Piper & Phoebe contact the spirit of their grandmother, and their mother's spirit shows up as well, and reveal a family secret.

Long before Piper fell for Leo, their mother fell in love with her White Lighter (Andy), and the relationship resulted in a pregnancy.  Afraid that her children would not receive their powers if the pregnancy was discovered, the newborn was placed for adoption, and given the name Paige.

Phoebe gets a premonition of an innocent in danger from Shax, and it turns out the innocent is Paige.  When Piper & Phoebe meet her, it reforms the 'power of three', and Paige helps them vanquish Shax.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bentgyro on April 05, 2014, 04:37:21 PM
I used to watched charmed from time to time......thanx for the memories. :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 05, 2014, 06:42:32 PM
i recently discovered a british,i think, tv series called STAR MAIDENS, the gist of which is that a pair of subjugated males escape from a planet in which the women rule and the men are relegated to concubines and menials, manage, despite their limited male thinking, to land on earth, with two of the dominant women in hot pursuit.  shenanigans ensue on both planets.  it is hysterically dated, utterly sexist if not misogynistic, playing the role reversal to the hilt   i'm quite sure the importance of male equality will be demonstrated as these female oligarchs and military go all weak in the knees for their men.  its on youtube, and you can search it by name.


 :D :D


(http://www.sorellarium13.space1999.net/catherine-bujold-starmaidens-dvd-cover.jpg)


I had to go look that up, that might make a neat Christmas gift for someone!



Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 05, 2014, 07:15:52 PM
Anyone remember Who's the Boss?


Danny Pintauro is now a married man.

The star of the popular '80s sitcom "Who's the Boss?", married his partner Wil Tabares on Thursday at a sunset beach ceremony in Dana Point, California.

The couple, who reside together in Las Vegas, got engaged in April 2013 after being together for a year. Pintauro, who came out as gay in 1997, reportedly works now as a restaurant manager. Wil works as an entertainer and casino employee at the Cosmopolitan hotel.

"Everything went off without a hitch," Pintauro, 38, tells Us Weekly. "The wedding was terrific and everyone was so happy to be there. We had fun! ... We went into it with no stress or worries or cares, except to have a good time."


pictures inside:


https://ca.celebrity.yahoo.com/blogs/celebrity-news/-who-s-the-boss---star-danny-pintauro-marries-wil-tabares-184055666.html
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on April 05, 2014, 07:42:09 PM
(https://s.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/4BNmf5L7SNBl7RS8_76EYQ--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7cT04NTt3PTMxMA--/http://l.yimg.com/os/publish-images/omg/2014-04-04/19b1a250-bc0f-11e3-b2da-a5824f2bed05_DannyPintauro_040414.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 07, 2014, 12:03:11 PM

Anyone remember this short-lived TV series from 1975?

(http://tvshowsondvd.com/graphics/news3/BarbaryCoast.jpg)

It's coming out on DVD. It's on 4 discs so there's probably 12-16 episodes. I vaguely remember it.
I've always liked Doug McClure so I believe I tried to watch it, but no vcr's in 1975, and it was on
Monday nights (in my memory), and I was in college. (Imagine if the kids nowadays went to college
and didn't have access to computers, or phones in their rooms, or most had no TV's? In 1975 anyone
was lucky if they had a typewriter!)

LOL, from my elders, when I was growing up, it was "I had to walk five miles to get to school in the snow," etc.
and the children's elders nowadays are "When I went to school we had no TV's or phones or computers." Wonder
what the current generation will be saying to their children?

A guess:  "When I was in college we actually had to leave the house and go somewhere."

Anyway, I wouldn't mind watching this DVD, but I probably won't go out of my way to find it, either.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 07, 2014, 12:28:00 PM

I looked up a bit about this series. Seems there was either a Pilot for the Series or a TV-movie
that turned into the series.  That aired in May of 1975. In the pilot Doug McClure was absent
and his part, or a different character, was played by Dennis Cole. Dennis Cole was a blond hunk
who appeared in dozens of series in the 60's and 70's and was given oh-so-many vehicles for
his own series, but none of them ever took. (One was called The Stutz Bearcats.) I believe he
had a small role in the Bracken's World two-season tv series as well, a behind the scenes series
about actors trying to make it big at a Hollywood Studio. I used to watch that nd would like to
see what that would be like now!

The Barbary Coast series aired 13 episodes. The info I read about the DVD release doesn't
indicate if the pilot will be included, often they are not because they are shot under different
agreements and often with different producers or studios. It took 17 years to get the original
Twin Peaks pilot included with the episode releases!

Bill Bixby also had a role in the Barbary Coast pilot and directed at least one of the episodes.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 07, 2014, 01:20:03 PM
I vaguely remember the title, Barbary Coast. I also remember Bearcats, because it also starred that other hunk Rod Taylor. Dennis Cole was definitely a hottie.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 07, 2014, 03:31:11 PM
Anyone remember this short-lived TV series from 1975?

(http://tvshowsondvd.com/graphics/news3/BarbaryCoast.jpg)



Anyway, I wouldn't mind watching this DVD, but I probably won't go out of my way to find it, either.


Ditto!  Look at William Shatner!!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on April 07, 2014, 05:38:11 PM
never heard of it.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 14, 2014, 11:18:10 AM

Bewitched was mentioned recently in another thread and I was wondering if anyone
remembers the spin-off they did in 1977 called Tabitha? Not that it's
classic, or anything!

Whereas the original has a timeless quality about it, the spin-off is strictly stuck in
the 1970's. I had never seen it before so a few years ago I bought the dvd, witch
contains all twelve episodes.

It starred Lisa Hartman as Tabitha working in a local L.A. television newsroom and her brother
Adam, played by the appealing David Ankrum. In this series, Adam was like Darrin, in that he
didn't want Tabitha to use her powers at all. Why? Who knows? Whereas that was a kind of
early 60's theme of a husband wanting the wife to be "a happy homemaker," it seemed so
out of date by 1977. And her brother wasn't her wife, either.

Robert Urich played her sexist co-worker and she had a guardian witch played by Karen Morrow,
named Aunt Minerva. She says she was always there for Tabitha even though we never saw her in
the original series!

The plots of these episodes were painful. There were even some cameos from original
Bewitched cast members, Dr. Bombay, the Kravtiz's (on vacation?) and the guy who
played the drunk man several times in Bewitched.

But, the gem on this dvd is that they included the original pilot they made for the series.
If they had gone in this direction, the show might've lasted. The original pilot starred an
actress named Liberty Williams and her brother was played by Bruce Kimmel. This pilot
took place in San Francisco and it lent a much needed air of "magic" that the humdrum
newsroom air of the actual series did not.

Tabitha's brother Adam, in this pilot, also had magical powers. The episode had a delightful tone
the series itself never equaled. For reasons I'm not privy to, they obviously didn't like this pilot.
Was it the actress, whom I thought was perfect? Did they want it to be more contemporary (a
working woman in L.A.?) or did they want to save money not shooting it in San Francisco? Did
they not like Adam having powers, too? (Would've surely opened up a lot more storylines!) Who
knows? Maybe it wouldn't have worked that way, either, but I bet the episodes would've been
a whole lot better than the 12 they did do.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on April 14, 2014, 11:39:12 AM
I hated TABATHA, Lyle.  You're right; the pilot was light years better and they should gone with those stars, let Adam have magical powers, etc.  The regular series was painful to watch, except for the ALWAYS watchable Robert Urich!   ;)  


(The original pilot is on YouTube.  Liberty Williams is appealing, and while no Robert Urich, Bruce Kimmel and Archie Hahn are kind of cute in their own ways.)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 14, 2014, 03:06:36 PM

Thanks, Mark, I did not know the pilot was on youtube!
Maybe some members will check it out!

I was always wondering if a spin-off series with Uncle Arthur (Paul Lynde) would've worked.
Although I don't know what the premise would've been. One of the Bewitched writers, Ruth
Brooks Flippen, says the writers always understood the Uncle Arthur character was gay. (That
doesn't explain the last Uncle Arthur episode, then, that had him infatuated with another
woman who did not like his playing jokes and tricks. Although that might've been a premise
for a series; trying not to do tricks, jokes, pranks and such, instead of magic, because his
girlfriend/wife doesn't like it. Obviously, there's no way they were going to have a gay lead
character at that time.)

Supposedly, Paul Lynde's one season tv series is very popular on the undergrond market if one can find it.
It truly was abominable from what I remember, though. I was in college without a tv, so I only saw a few.
Still, an occasional new Paul Lynde treat would be nice!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 14, 2014, 05:51:20 PM
Bewitched was mentioned recently in another thread and I was wondering if anyone
remembers the spin-off they did in 1977 called Tabitha? Not that it's
classic, or anything!

I was in college then and not seeing much of anything on TV. I remember that there was a series centered on Tabitha, but, apparently blessedly, I missed it.

Quote
Whereas the original has a timeless quality about it, the spin-off is strictly stuck in
the 1970's. I had never seen it before so a few years ago I bought the dvd, witch
contains all twelve episodes.

Nice pun, Lyle.  :D

Quote
It starred Lisa Hartman as Tabitha working in a local L.A. television newsroom and her brother
Adam, played by the appealing David Ankrum. In this series, Adam was like Darrin, in that he
didn't want Tabitha to use her powers at all. Why? Who knows? Whereas that was a kind of
early 60's theme of a husband wanting the wife to be "a happy homemaker," it seemed so
out of date by 1977. And her brother wasn't her wife, either.

Robert Urich played her sexist co-worker and she had a guardian witch played by Karen Morrow,
named Aunt Minerva. She says she was always there for Tabitha even though we never saw her in
the original series!

The plots of these episodes were painful. There were even some cameos from original
Bewitched cast members, Dr. Bombay, the Kravtiz's (on vacation?) and the guy who
played the drunk man several times in Bewitched.

But, the gem on this dvd is that they included the original pilot they made for the series.
If they had gone in this direction, the show might've lasted. The original pilot starred an
actress named Liberty Williams and her brother was played by Bruce Kimmel. This pilot
took place in San Francisco and it lent a much needed air of "magic" that the humdrum
newsroom air of the actual series did not.

Tabitha's brother Adam, in this pilot, also had magical powers. The episode had a delightful tone
the series itself never equaled. For reasons I'm not privy to, they obviously didn't like this pilot.
Was it the actress, whom I thought was perfect? Did they want it to be more contemporary (a
working woman in L.A.?) or did they want to save money not shooting it in San Francisco? Did
they not like Adam having powers, too? (Would've surely opened up a lot more storylines!) Who
knows? Maybe it wouldn't have worked that way, either, but I bet the episodes would've been
a whole lot better than the 12 they did do.

I do remember that the show starred Lisa Hartman (I wonder whatever happened to Liberty Williams?  ??? ).

Did they ever say anything about Samantha and Darrin and Endora, et al.?

I'm confused. I thought I remembered that baby Adam was a little warlock in Bewitched?  ???

I do remember the exchange between Darrin and Grandfather Maurice when they gave the baby his name:

Maurice: Adam was my grandfather's name.

Darrin: Adam was your grandfather?

Maurice: Not that Adam!

 :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on April 14, 2014, 06:07:37 PM
I do remember that the show starred Lisa Hartman (I wonder whatever happened to Liberty Williams?  ??? ).

:D :D :D

Liberty Williams was on Tabitha?

No way!


Liberty Williams is well, and not acting anymore, that I know of.

I've been in touch with her a few months ago.  I found her online, she was a voice over actress for animated shows as well.


She did the voice of "Jayna", one of the Wonder Twins from the Super Friends cartoon.

(http://img3.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20090720001650/superfriends/images/5/58/Jayna_2.png)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on April 14, 2014, 06:10:22 PM
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ARUuSEKLC_U/TjD_FdVoVMI/AAAAAAAACOg/sTwK24eo1H8/s1600/IMG_5405.JPG)


^^^^^^^^                                                                                      ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Liberty Williams                                                                                        Michael Bell
  (Jayna)                                                                                                     (Zan)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on April 14, 2014, 06:11:11 PM
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-XLIRksM7-6g/TjD-_iacNiI/AAAAAAAACOY/qZPB2uSLB4Y/s1600/IMG_5401.JPG)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on April 14, 2014, 08:48:53 PM
I liked Liberty as Debbie Morgenstern in her one-shot appearance on THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW. Very pert and pretty.

Forty years later, she STILL is!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on April 14, 2014, 08:56:25 PM

Supposedly, Paul Lynde's one season tv series is very popular on the undergrond market if one can find it.
It truly was abominable from what I remember, though. I was in college without a tv, so I only saw a few.
Still, an occasional new Paul Lynde treat would be nice!



I well remember the series (1972-73).  I was in eighth grade and watched it every week.  I'm positive it aired on Wednesday nights.  It was pretty funny, although Lynde went way over the top a lot.  It had a lot of recurring guest stars:  Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara as his son-in-law's parents, Charlotte Rae as his sister, and Mabel Albertson as his mother-in-law (who called him PHIL).

As with some other one-season comedies (HE & SHE, MY WORLD AND WELCOME TO IT, THE PRUITTS OF SOUTHAMPTON/THE PHYLLIS DILLER SHOW, et al) THE PAUL LYNDE SHOW definitely deserves a DVD release.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 15, 2014, 08:42:04 AM
I well remember the series (1972-73).  I was in eighth grade and watched it every week.  I'm positive it aired on Wednesday nights.  It was pretty funny, although Lynde went way over the top a lot.  It had a lot of recurring guest stars:  Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara as his son-in-law's parents, Charlotte Rae as his sister, and Mabel Albertson as his mother-in-law (who called him PHIL).

I have no memory at all of the show, but what a great group of "old pro" supporting players!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on April 15, 2014, 09:56:13 AM
never mind jayna and zan, who is the cutie in the middle   :o
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 15, 2014, 11:49:19 AM
Nice pun, Lyle.  :D

 Lol!

I'm confused. I thought I remembered that baby Adam was a little warlock in Bewitched?  ???

Looking around the web I found some info about the "discontinuities" with the original series.

The series takes place in the "present day" (late 1970's) yet does not reconcile how Tabitha and Adam could be in their early-to-mid 20's when they had been young children at the time Bewitched ended only five years earlier, nor why Adam is now the 'older' sibling, nor why Adam was now mortal rather than a warlock. As a pre-teen, Erin Murphy, who had played Tabitha on Bewitched, was far too young to play an adult Tabitha.

I don't have a problem with the strict "age" thing with the characters. After all, Tabitha was born in season two
of Bewitched and a few months later at the beginning of season three she was several years older.

In the original pilot Adam is the one who's using his powers and trying to encourage Tabitha to do so as well. She's
taking after her mother and not wanting to use them. Bruce Kimmel, the Adam in this pilot, said that "Liberty Williams
wasn't really right for the part. The network was still in their Rhoda mode."  I have no idea what he means by all that.
He was supposed to play Adam in the second pilot, too, but had been offered another pilot and couldn't do it! So he
would've still been Adam in the series, other than that. I'm still of a mind the first pilot was the superior one.

I had no idea that BOTH pilots of Tabitha were shown on ABC as "specials." By the way, the first pilot was titled "TABATHA"
like it was initially spelled in the Bewitched series. 

Did they ever say anything about Samantha and Darrin and Endora, et al.?

In the final episode of Tabitha, Samantha and Darrin's 25th wedding anniversary is being celebrated, even though their
marriage in the 1964 premiere episode of Bewitched had been only 14 years earlier.


I read that Elizabeth Montgomery was asked to reprise her role on Tabitha but she declined. I don't know if that means
as a guest or in a lot of episodes. Apparently a lot of irate people who disliked the series Tabitha wrote to E.M. to air their
grievances about it! She said, "I got almost as much mail about that as I get about anything else."

TODAY would've been Elizabeth Montgomery's 81st Birthday.

This is a bit of strange info, and they don't say "why" this was:

After the series premiered on September 10, 1977, the second episode aired over two months later on November 12, 1977.

The second pilot aired as a "special" (as I said) back in May, 1977. The first episode of the new series 4 months later.
Then the second episode two months later! Talk about waiting between episodes! The networks were doing odd things
at that time. They'd air two episodes of a new series and cancel it immediately if it didn't get big ratings. Like MTM's variety
series, or Battlestar Galactica, which held on a bit longer, or the Rue McClanahan series, Apple Pie.

A photo of Lisa Hartman and David Ankrum. From the only thing I really know him from--this series--I thought David was
quite appealing. He did various roles in quite a few series, transferred to doing more voice-over work and also became a talent agent.
(http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BMjI1MjY0NDU2OF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNTg2Nzk0NA@@._V1_SY317_CR20,0,214,317_.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 15, 2014, 11:59:03 AM
Adam was now mortal rather than a warlock.

Thanks, Lyle. At least I did remember that correctly.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 22, 2014, 09:56:11 AM
Yesterday I came across an episode of The Roy Rogers Show on one of the nostalgia stations. Roy's horse, Trigger, got mentioned in the opening credits before Dale Evans.  :-\
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on April 23, 2014, 02:37:36 PM
Imagine if Bullet and Nellybelle had gotten higher billing.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 23, 2014, 04:48:05 PM
Imagine if Bullet and Nellybelle had gotten higher billing.

Bullet may have; I don't remember. I just remember that the horse ranked higher than the wife.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on April 23, 2014, 09:10:55 PM
well, he had the horse before he had the wife...
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 26, 2014, 07:56:50 PM
Caught an episode of Maverick this evening. At first couldn't quite figure out what was up with the title, "Gun-shy," because it didn't seem to have anything to do with the plot. It actually didn't, but then I realized that some of the supporting characters collectively were a parody of Gunsmoke.  :D There was Marshall Milt Doolin; a doctor; a woman who kept saying to the marshall, "Milt, be careful"; and a deputy with a limp (got stepped on by his horse) and a real countrified accent.  :D

ETA: Apparently that name should be Mort Dooley. Thanks, Bubba.  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on April 26, 2014, 07:59:38 PM
Amazing that they would have taken on such a blockbuster back then!! :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 27, 2014, 08:26:22 AM
Amazing that they would have taken on such a blockbuster back then!! :D

I guess Maverick was a bit cheeky.  ;D

And I forgot to mention: At one point somebody said something about a gunfighter who had come through the town a short while before handing out business cards--a reference, of course, to Paladin, and his cards that read, "Have gun. Will travel."  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 27, 2014, 09:41:50 AM

I wish I'd seen that episode. Remember any references that could've pertained to Bonanza?
Maverick, the series, was known to be a bit tongue in cheek and playful and take itself less
seriously than the other shows of its genre! Can't say I've seen it much, though.
 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on April 27, 2014, 10:11:05 AM
I guess Maverick was a bit cheeky.  ;D

And I forgot to mention: At one point somebody said something about a gunfighter who had come through the town a short while before handing out business cards--a reference, of course, to Paladin, and his cards that read, "Have gun. Will travel."  ;D

Boy, they didn't pull any punches, did they!! I wish shows would do that now-a-days. :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 27, 2014, 03:00:16 PM
I wish I'd seen that episode. Remember any references that could've pertained to Bonanza? Maverick, the series, was known to be a bit tongue in cheek and playful and take itself less
seriously than the other shows of its genre! Can't say I've seen it much, though.

I can't say that I did. I should check the dates; perhaps this episode predated Bonanza.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 28, 2014, 10:41:17 AM

Oh, maybe so, I didn't think of that.
(Now I'm going to look it up!)

____________________________________________

Maverick
     (1957 - 1962 / 5 seasons / 124 hour long episodes)

Gunsmoke
     (1955 - 1975 / 20 seasons / 635 episodes, began as half-hour and later changed to one hour)

Have Gun Will Travel
     (1957 - 1963 / 6 seasons / 225 half-hour episodes)

Bonanza
     (1959 - 1973 / 14 seasons / 431 hour long episodes)

Maverick: "Gun-Shy"
   *This episode was the 43rd episode, the 16th episode of the second season
     and it aired on January 11, 1959.
   *Bonanza premiered in the fall of 1959, so it was not around before this
     particular episode was aired.
   *I noticed the title of the last episode of Maverick ever aired and it made
    me chuckle: "One of Our Trains is Missing."
   *Maverick did 124 episodes in 5 seasons and Have Gun Will Travel did
     225 in six? Even if Maverick was an hour long show that seems quite
     a big discrepancy.
   *I always thought Maverick was one of those half-hour westerns.
   *All those shows like Gunsmoke, Have Gun Will Travel, The Rifleman...were
     they all sponsored by the NRA?

Maybe I should watch some Mavericks. I see Me-TV has started airing
Welcome Back Kotter, but I've yet to bring myself to watch any of it.
Last summer or fall they had an afternoon where they showed several
episodes of the anthology series The Millionaire. I was hoping that they
would start programming that regularly.



Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 28, 2014, 10:58:58 AM

I don't recall this at all.

James Garner reprised Maverick in a new series called Bret Maverick
that aired from 1981 - 1982. They did 18 episodes.  It began in
December--I believe that was a year there'd been a writer's strike so
that may account for it's start in December and only doing 18 episodes.

Has anyone else done that before? Done a series and then twenty
years later continued, or reprised, it again? I know Jackie Gleason
did some special Honeymooners episodes on his variety show about
ten years later, but I can't think of anything else at the moment.
Interesting.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 28, 2014, 11:21:09 AM
Thanks for all that research, Lyle. That was interesting reading. I don't remember Bret Maverick, either.

I wonder why Westerns were such popular TV fare "back then"? I'm sure there must be some research about that somewhere. I'm sure there must have been some copycat element to it--one network had a big success with a Western, so the other two followed suit--but could that really account for so many? They were pretty staple fare through all of my childhood in the Sixties, if I remember correctly.

I doubt any of them were sponsored by the NRA, but I wouldn't be surprised if a lot of them were sponsored by cigarette brands.

Now I really ought to get off my butt and buy the early seasons of Wagon Train, expense be damned. They were good shows.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on April 28, 2014, 03:41:15 PM
I've always heard that it represented a clear cut moral universe in reaction to the Cold War.

Gunsmoke's long--term sponsor was L&M cigarettes.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on April 28, 2014, 05:52:14 PM
Television Westerns are a sub-genre of the Western. When television became popular in the late 1940s and 1950s, TV Westerns quickly became an audience favorite. Beginning with re-broadcasts of existing films soon a number of movie cowboys had their own TV shows. As the Western became more in demand new stories and stars were introduced. A number of long-running TV Westerns became classics in their own right. Notable TV Westerns include Bonanza, Gunsmoke, The Rifleman, Have Gun – Will Travel, Maverick, Rawhide, The Virginian, The Big Valley, and Wagon Train.

The peak year for television Westerns was 1959, with 26 such shows airing during prime-time. Increasing costs of American television production led to most action half hour series vanishing in the early 1960s to be replaced by hour long television shows, increasingly in color.[17] Traditional westerns died out in the late 1960s as a result of network changes in demographic targeting along with pressure from parental television groups. Future entries in the genre would incorporate elements from other genera such as crime drama and mystery whodunit elements. Western shows from the 1970s included McCloud, Hec Ramsey, Little House on the Prairie, and Kung Fu. In the 1990s and 2000s, hour-long Westerns and slickly packaged made-for-TV movie Westerns were introduced. Examples include Lonesome Dove and Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman. As well, new elements were once again added to the Western formula, such as the Western-science fiction show Firefly, created by Joss Whedon in 2002. Deadwood was a critically acclaimed Western series which aired on HBO from 2004 through 2006.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_%28genre%29



(http://www.tvshowsondvd.com/graphics/news3/Maverick_TVFavorites.jpg)



 
Late last year we passed along the fact that Warner Home Video had (rather casually) mentioned Maverick as being among their DVD plans to celebrate their 50th Anniversary of Warner Television throughout this year. Now we have lots of details about this initial DVD release of the classic western show starring James Garner, plus cover art.

    Maverick's the name. Poker's the game. And fun is the payoff in this 3-episode disc of the TV classic that lassoed an Emmy for Best Western Series. James Garner and Jack Kelly are brothers Bret and Bart, debonair bamboozlers who know when to hold 'em, show 'em or hightail it out of town. Shady Deal at Sunny Acres has Bret planning his own methodical fury against a banker who hoodwinked him. Pappy presents the old block the boys are chipped from, the oft-quoted old gent's only appearance in the series. And U.S. Marshal Mort Dooley (note the initials, trivia fans) aims to run Bret out of town in the famed Gunsmoke spoof Gun-Shy. Rake 'em in!


149 minutes of the classic series are presented the way it was originally broadcast: Black-and-White Full Frame with English Mono sound. Subtitles are available in English, French, and Spanish on the episodes, plus closed captioning for the hearing impaired. The street date and pricing for this release has not yet been announced, but we do have the cover art (all artwork is subject to change, of course):

Taken from: http://www.tvshowsondvd.com/news/Maverick/3368#ixzz30EDdS6Zd
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 29, 2014, 01:06:22 PM


Jeff, was Wagon Train always 90 minutes?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 29, 2014, 01:14:20 PM

I can't say that westerns were a favorite genre of mine. I liked Bonanza occasionally but that was probably because
my Dad liked to watch it. But once the Smothers Brothers came on opposite it I stopped watching! I liked watching
Doug McClure on any western he was on. I liked the more non-traditional series in the western category, like
Daniel Boone or the comedies like F Troop.  Although if it was around I'd probably have watched Guy Madison's
series that was on for eight seasons, I think, in the 50's, The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok.

And this film he did has an intriguing title:

(http://www.westernclippings.com/images/westernsof/guymadison_hardman.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 29, 2014, 02:48:54 PM
I liked the more non-traditional series in the western category, like
Daniel Boone or the comedies like F Troop.

I'm sure I have said this somewhere before, but Daniel Boone was my absolutely most favorite TV show during my childhood in the Sixties.

Quote
Although if it was around I'd probably have watched Guy Madison's
series that was on for eight seasons, I think, in the 50's, The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok.

I probably would have, too, unless it was on opposite Daniel Boone.  ;D

Jeff, was Wagon Train always 90 minutes?

No. If you scroll down the Wikipedia article to "Broadcast History," apparently it was a 90-minute show for only one season, 1963-64.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wagon_Train (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wagon_Train)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 03, 2014, 12:55:18 PM
(http://i998.photobucket.com/albums/af110/tootsiemom/eddbyrnes10.jpg)


Efrem Zimbalist Jr., Star of The F.B.I., Dies at 95


Handsome, debonair and blessed with a distinguished voice that reflected his real-life prep-school upbringing, Efrem Zimbalist Jr. seemed born to play the television roles that made him famous, that of hip Hollywood detective and brilliant G-man.

A prolific actor who also appeared in numerous films and stage productions, Zimbalist became a household name in 1958 as Stu Bailey, the wisecracking private investigator who was a co-partner in a swinging Hollywood detective agency located at the exclusive address of 77 Sunset Strip.

When the show ended in 1964, Zimbalist became an even bigger star playing the empathetic, methodical G-man Lewis Erskine in "The F.B.I."

The actor, who in recent years had retired to his ranch in Southern California's bucolic horse country, died there Friday at age 95.

"We are heartbroken to announce the passing into peace of our beloved father, Efrem Zimbalist Jr., today at his Solvang ranch," the actor's daughter Stephanie Zimbalist and son Efrem Zimbalist III said in a statement. "He actively enjoyed his life to the last day, showering love on his extended family, playing golf and visiting with close friends."

Zimbalist's stunning good looks and cool, deductive manner made him an instant star when 77 Sunset Strip began its six-season run in 1958.

When the show ended in 1964, Zimbalist segued seamlessly into The F.B.I. the following year and that program aired until 1974.

At the end of each episode, the series would post real photos from the F.B.I.'s most-wanted list. Some of them led to arrests, which helped give the show the complete seal of approval of the agency's real-life director, J. Edgar Hoover......


http://www.people.com/article/efrem-zimablist-jr-dies-95-the-fbi

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 04, 2014, 01:54:50 PM
Efrem Zimbalist Jr., Star of The F.B.I., Dies at 95

I hadn't heard. That is sad news, but 95 is a good age, God rest him.

(I wonder what Stephanie is up to these days. I loved her in Remington Steele.)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 04, 2014, 02:01:58 PM
I hadn't heard. That is sad news, but 95 is a good age, God rest him.

(I wonder what Stephanie is up to these days. I loved her in Remington Steele.)

Thanks for responding!  Actually my first thought was of Stephanie, I was a huge Remington Steel fan.  Looks like she was doing a lot of theatre.  I googled her, she has changed a lot, but then haven't we all?  ;)




Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 04, 2014, 06:15:54 PM
Thanks for responding!  Actually my first thought was of Stephanie, I was a huge Remington Steel fan.  Looks like she was doing a lot of theatre.  I googled her, she has changed a lot, but then haven't we all?  ;)

You bet!

I should Google her, too. Thanks for the tip.

Yep, soon as I saw the first Remington Steele, I knew Pierce Brosnan was going to be a star. Don't get me wrong; I like Doris Roberts; but I liked Remington Steele best in its first season, when they had Murphy and the secretary, Miss Fox (or was it Wolf?).  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 04, 2014, 07:38:42 PM
Oh I was the same, I knew Pierce would be a star and I felt the same way with Bruce in Moonlighting.  Some guys just kind of "have it".

Season 1

The first season included two recurring characters: Murphy Michaels, a detective, and rival for Laura's affections, played by James Read; and Bernice Foxe, the secretary-receptionist, played by Janet DeMay. Both Murphy and Bernice knew that Remington Steele was a fraud.

 Episodes in the first season set in motion the slow evolution of Laura and Steele's romantic relationship while revealing elements of the characters' backstory. The first season established the pattern where each episode made direct reference to an old movie (for example, The Maltese Falcon and The Thomas Crown Affair). Key episodes include "Thou Shalt Not Steele", which introduced Laura's mother and Felicia, a woman from Steele's past; "Sting of Steele", which introduced Daniel Chalmers (Efrem Zimbalist Jr., the real-life father of Stephanie) as Steele's former mentor; and "Vintage Steele", a fan favorite which focused on Laura's past.[32] Additionally, writer Joel Steiger won an Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America for his script for the first-season episode "In The Steele of the Night."[33]Remington Steele also received strong critical reviews in the first season, noting its intelligence and stylish sophistication.[34]



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remington_Steele


Interesting little tidbits at Wikipedia, now I hope it comes to Neflix!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 05, 2014, 07:12:41 AM
Key episodes include "Thou Shalt Not Steele", which introduced Laura's mother and Felicia, a woman from Steele's past.

One of my all-time personal favorites. Beverly Garland played Laura's mother, and Felicia was played by Cassandra Harris, Brosnan's wife, who died of cancer in 1991. His adopted daughter (Cassandra's daughter Charlotte) died last year.

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000112/bio?ref_=nm_ov_bio_sm (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000112/bio?ref_=nm_ov_bio_sm)

Quote
Interesting little tidbits at Wikipedia, now I hope it comes to Neflix!

Can't speak to Netflix, but I've owned the first season on DVD for years.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 08, 2014, 11:11:33 AM
I see Me-TV has started airing Welcome Back Kotter,
but I've yet to bring myself to watch any of it.

Well, I was flipping channels and came across this show last night, or was it the night before,
and I watched several minutes of the episode. I don't remember liking this show all that much
when it originally aired for whatever reasons and it doesn't hold up any better. It's pretty bad.
The characters of the students are sooooooo stereotyped and over-played that it induces the
cringes immediately.

It's one thing to have a breakout character on a show, like Urkel on Family Matters, or Jimmie
Walker on Good Times, or Fonzie on Happy Days or Alex Keaton on Family Ties, but this show
tries to have at least four of those annoying types, each one a different ethnicity or cultural
background. The dim-witted Jersey Shore type Italian (John Travolta), the Puerto Rican Jew
(Robert Hedges--he plays Juan Epstein), the loud obnoxious white boy nerd (Ron Palillo), and
the inner city black kid (Lawrence Hilton-Jacobs), not to mention the out of touch old white
principal (John Sylvester White) and all of these characters trying to outdo and over-act in
every scene is just way too much, in my opinion. They take so much focus away from the
ostensible lead, the teacher, Gabe Kaplan, that he seems almost irrelevant. The only regular
female on the show plays his wife (Marcia Strassman) to forgettable effect.

I looked up a bit about it, it lasted four seasons (!) and aired from Sept. '75 to June '79.
They did 95 episodes in four years. (Gilligan's Island did 98 in three!) Of all the people on
the show, Lawrence Hilton-Jacobs came off the best in the few minutes I watched it. He
seemed like a real character and not a cartoon. Although it's stretching incredulity to believe
any of these characters would really have associated with one another.

The best thing about the show was its theme song.

I have no intention to drop by that show again and I already wasted too much time talking about it!




 

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 08, 2014, 12:31:15 PM
I have no intention to drop by that show again and I already wasted too much time talking about it!

Never did watch it. It appears its run covered my senior year of high school and three out of four years of college, so certainly during the college years I had a lot more important things to do.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on May 08, 2014, 04:15:15 PM
I vaguely remember catching a few episodes in the late 70s.  A lot of kids in my school were using "Vinny Barbarino" lines on the schoolyard.   "Up your nose with a rubber hose!"

::)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on May 08, 2014, 05:09:21 PM
I have no intention to drop by that show again and I already wasted too much time talking about it!

I was newly married and then later buying a house, so I may have caught a few episodes, but never watched it for any length of time.

I liked the theme song as well.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 09, 2014, 07:52:18 AM
"Up your nose with a rubber hose!"

"And twice as far with a Hershey bar. ..."

  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 10, 2014, 11:06:18 AM
(http://img2-1.timeinc.net/people/i/2014/news/140526/nancy-malone-300.jpg)


Veteran actress and Emmy-winning director and producer Nancy Malone, a co-founder of the group Women in Film and a groundbreaking female executive at 20th Century Fox in the 1970s, died Thursday in Los Angeles from complications attributed to leukemia, said her representative, Harlan Boll. She was 79.

A producer of the 1970s series The Bionic Woman and director of numerous TV shows, including Beverly Hills, 90210, Melrose Place, Dynasty, Cagney & Lacey, “Star Trek: Voyager and Dawson's Creek, the Long Island native began her career at 7 as a child model and appeared in ads for Kellogg’s, Ford and Macy’s. At 10 she was selected for the cover of Life magazine's 10th anniversary issue, depicting "The Typical American Girl."

She went on to appear in one of TV’s earliest soaps, CBS's The First Hundred Years, and at 15 made her Broadway debut as the title character in Time Out for Ginger, starring Melvyn Douglas.

As an adult her acting credits included 51 episodes of the 1958-63 ABC dramatic series Naked City, as well as such familiar TV series as Bonanza, The Fugitive, The Partridge Family, Big Valley, The Rockford Files, Outer Limits, Dr. Kildare, The Andy Griffith Show, Hawaii Five-0, The Twilight Zone and Lou Grant, as well as the 1973 movie with Burt Reynolds, The Man Who Loved Cat Dancing, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

She won an Emmy in 1993 for producing, with Linda Hope and Don Mischer, the special Bob Hope: The First 90 Years. Malone is survived by Linda Hope, her colleague and longtime friend.

"Nancy Malone was a delight to work with on The Bionic Woman," its star, Lindsay Wagner, said Friday. "She was funny and energetic, and I had great admiration for her being one of the early women to be successful in the television industry."

Remarking on Malone's distinctive spirit and infectious laugh, actress Tyne Daly said, "She was one of the funniest known human beings. With her unfailing good taste and a heart of Irish gold, I loved working and playing with her."

Added Daly, "If there is a heaven, Nancy has arrived by limousine, and the first word out of her mouth was her personal favorite code word for the 'innkeeper' … 'NURSE!' "



http://www.people.com/article/nancy-malone-dies-actress-director-producer-pioneer-female-executive
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 10, 2014, 11:15:29 AM
, the loud obnoxious white boy nerd (Ron Palillo)

 


Palillo and his partner of 41 years, Joseph Gramm, lived in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida.[19][20] On August 14, 2012, Palillo suffered a heart attack at his home and was taken by ambulance to a nearby hospital, where he was pronounced dead on arrival.[20][21][22][23]

Palillo's funeral service was held in Palm Beach Gardens on August 22, 2012.[24] A memorial tribute directed by Lawrence Leritz and hosted by Tyne Daly, was held to honor and celebrate Palillo's life and career at NYC's The Triad Theatre, October 3, 2012.[25]



(http://thenypost.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/tcdwebaec011132837-300x300.jpg)




I actually didn't know he was gay, or maybe I did, I don't think that was public knowledge.   Long time with his partner!!



I use to watch the show, it was just a funny half hour sitcom, biggest thing to come out of that was John Travolta I guess and even then it took years for his career to get back on track to the "superstar" he is today! :D





Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 10, 2014, 02:06:45 PM
Veteran actress and Emmy-winning director and producer Nancy Malone, a co-founder of the group Women in Film and a groundbreaking female executive at 20th Century Fox in the 1970s, died Thursday in Los Angeles from complications attributed to leukemia, said her representative, Harlan Boll. She was 79.

A producer of the 1970s series The Bionic Woman and director of numerous TV shows, including Beverly Hills, 90210, Melrose Place, Dynasty, Cagney & Lacey, “Star Trek: Voyager and Dawson's Creek, the Long Island native began her career at 7 as a child model and appeared in ads for Kellogg’s, Ford and Macy’s. At 10 she was selected for the cover of Life magazine's 10th anniversary issue, depicting "The Typical American Girl."

She went on to appear in one of TV’s earliest soaps, CBS's The First Hundred Years, and at 15 made her Broadway debut as the title character in Time Out for Ginger, starring Melvyn Douglas.

As an adult her acting credits included 51 episodes of the 1958-63 ABC dramatic series Naked City, as well as such familiar TV series as Bonanza, The Fugitive, The Partridge Family, Big Valley, The Rockford Files, Outer Limits, Dr. Kildare, The Andy Griffith Show, Hawaii Five-0, The Twilight Zone and Lou Grant, as well as the 1973 movie with Burt Reynolds, The Man Who Loved Cat Dancing, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

I remember the name, from her acting career, but I would never have recognized her.  :-\
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 11, 2014, 01:44:15 PM
(http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/dam/assets/140507113507-08-tv-moms-restricted-horizontal-gallery.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 11, 2014, 01:45:22 PM
(http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/dam/assets/140507113502-06-tv-moms-restricted-horizontal-gallery.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 11, 2014, 01:45:54 PM
(http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/dam/assets/140507113445-01-tv-moms-restricted-horizontal-gallery.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 11, 2014, 01:46:46 PM
(http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/dam/assets/140507113451-03-tv-moms-restricted-horizontal-gallery.jpg)


HAPPY MOTHERS DAY!  ;)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 17, 2014, 09:30:55 AM
A few days ago, at the drugstore, I picked up a set of used DVDs of episodes of The Lone Ranger. Last night I watched the first few episodes in the set. I was pleased to find that the first couple of episodes were, apparently, the original first episodes of the TV series, as they were the "origin story" of the Lone Ranger. They were also done in serial fashion, just like the old movie serials--with endings, if they weren't exactly cliffhangers, didn't complete the story. Unfortunately, for whatever reason (and I suppose there could be many, including no surviving print in good condition), the third episode in the set was not a continuation of the story from the second episode. So I don't know if the Lone Ranger ever got Butch Cavendish.  :-\
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on May 18, 2014, 12:41:40 AM
i used to go to the local movie house, it was nearby so i could go alone, to what was then called the saturday serials, with jungle jim, tarzan, rocket man, and a variety of monsters, which cost a quarter and candy cost a nickel or a dime, and popcorn had real melted butter.  i can't even remember that boy.  i don't even think we had television, and i know the 2nd floor was unheated, relying on heat that came up through a single flue.  getting up in the morning in winter was an adventure, and may very well account for my love of tropical climates...
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 21, 2014, 08:31:20 AM
Wasn't anything on last night that I wanted to watch, but it was Charlie's Angels night on Cozi-TV.  :D

I guess I am getting old when it's fun to revisit the Seventies. I watched two episodes, both from when poor Farrah was billed as Farrah Fawcett-Majors. Fun to revisit Seventies haircuts and pornstaches on the guys, too.  :D  Dennis Cole was the "special guest star" on one episode. I recognized a couple of the other guest supporting players, too.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: fritzkep on May 21, 2014, 03:43:18 PM
Another thing about the 70's, there was a wave of nostalgia for music of the 50's.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 21, 2014, 08:35:45 PM
While TV didn't begin in the 1950s, practically no one had a set before then, there were few shows, and people looked to radio and newspapers for entertainment and news. In 1947 RCA mass produced a 7 inch TV and 170,000 of them sold. By 1949, 1 million sets had been sold. As the Fifties progressed the post-war boom included both babies and TV. In 1950 there are about 10 million sets in the U.S.


As TV became more commonly available, people were enthralled. This was much better than radio. You became very popular, very quickly if your family had a TV. And people would linger outside the windows of stores that sold this new wonder - hoping to catch a glimpse of the future.


The first thing you need to know about the early days of TV is that there wasn't much of it. Mostly, in the afternoons and evenings.


The second thing you need to know is that it was black and white. Actually, it was various shades of gray. Dithered, sort of. Even if color TV had been offered, your black and white set wouldn't have known the difference.


And, ladies, just think of it, No Remote Control!




You received your TV shows via an antenna. A big ugly thing that stuck up way above the roof line of your house. The thing had to be pointed correctly to receive your local stations. Customarily this directional adjustment was accomplished by Dad going outside to manually turn the antenna while someone with an eye on the TV yelled out an open window, "no, too far, come back a little."


The earliest TV shows were really radio and vaudeville moving to a new medium. Some of these were quite successful. I Love Lucy and Gunsmoke come to mind. Variety Shows populated the early years which gave many a vaudevillian comedian a chance to show off sight gags that radio wouldn't permit.


Back before Cable.tv got so darn complicated television used to be simpler. Before LOST and 24 were broadcast over satellite's like Dish Network there were shows like The Jack Benny Show and Father Knows Best coming to you over the airwaves. These were comedic and entertaining character studies that would, one day, give birth to the modern sitcom. In fact, you could even argue that without shows like these paving the way, television as you know and love it today, could have turned out a whole lot differently. These days, sitcoms are so popular that companies compete over who can offer the best Direct TV deals, and a wide variety of sitcoms are broadcast all day and evening long.


1953 the FCC had settled on the technical specifications for color standards, but broadcasting in color was expensive and few people had replaced those black and white sets with color ones. After all, they had just bought the B&W.



This would quickly change. By 1962 a million color sets had sold, by 1965, 5 million and the networks had gone to color, by 1970 there were 37 million color sets in the U.S.


Among the first TV shows included about 120 Westerns. Mostly in black and white, cowboys set the standards of right and wrong and taught us about heroes. A few went to color. Bonanza, the Virginian and Wagon Train, the latter two experimenting with 90 minute formats.



But as Bob Dylan said, "the times they are a changin" and TV would reflect that for better or for worse. Playhouse 90 and Howdy Doody end in 1960 but we have doctor shows to replace them, Ben Casey and Dr. Kildare. Adapting to changing times, Ed Sullivan brought us the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. In mid Sixties you have the secret agents - Man From U.N.C.L.E. , Mission Impossible, I Spy, the Avengers. The latter half of the decade gave us our hippies, The Mod Squad and the Monkees.



As a reflection of changing social sensibilities, Bill Cosby becomes the first black lead on prime time TV in 1965 on I Spy. This paves the way for Greg Morris on Mission Impossible Clarence Williams of Mod Squad and Don Mitchell of Ironside.


We watched Nixon lose a debate to Kennedy and then in despair over four days, watched Kennedy assassinated and buried.



Maybe the Viet Nam War so confused our notion of good guys and bad, or maybe we had evolved socially to the place where white guys wearing red makeup to pass as "injuns" was uncomfortable. I leave that for social historians. The fact remains that by 1970 the Western had gone thataway.



Variety shows are no longer with us either. The sitcom thrives and every one of those million dollar per episode Friend's actors owe respect to Lucille Ball and Dick Van Dyke who paved the way.



So let's get started with our reminiscing, click here for a complete list of shows with photo's, descriptions and fun facts about each!


http://www.fiftiesweb.com/tv-shows.htm

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on May 22, 2014, 06:20:25 AM
you didn't mention several hilarious gizmos that could be added to the small and later larger tv's.  one was a cellophane like screen with a green tint on the bottom, a yellowy beige center area, and a blue top area to simulate the sky.  it was as lame as it sounds.

less lame, but more dangerous was the liquid filled magnifying screen that could be attached via metal rods that magnified everything on the other side.  it worked, but the picture own viewed was somewhat distorted.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 22, 2014, 07:33:27 AM
I think I've mentioned this before, but my grandparents had an early version of a remote. It was tethered to the TV by a very ... long ... cord. You had to be careful not to trip over it when you walked across the living room!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 22, 2014, 03:14:01 PM
I think I've mentioned this before, but my grandparents had an early version of a remote. It was tethered to the TV by a very ... long ... cord. You had to be careful not to trip over it when you walked across the living room!  :D

Sounds like the first cell phone we had in our car!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 22, 2014, 03:17:00 PM
you didn't mention several hilarious gizmos that could be added to the small and later larger tv's.  one was a cellophane like screen with a green tint on the bottom, a yellowy beige center area, and a blue top area to simulate the sky.  it was as lame as it sounds.

l


 :D  That sounds familiar!   I do remember our first black and white TV, but I honestly don't remember going to colour, although we obviously did.



(http://www.curvymagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/tv_set.jpg)



I just can't imagine what people did who didn't have the best eye sight.   The smallest TV we have now in the house is 50 inch and it doesn't even seem "that big".


Sometimes size matters!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on May 22, 2014, 09:38:30 PM
I think I've mentioned this before, but my grandparents had an early version of a remote. It was tethered to the TV by a very ... long ... cord. You had to be careful not to trip over it when you walked across the living room!  :D

My Dad had one too. Notice I say my Dad, as we were not allowed to use it!!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on May 23, 2014, 03:19:37 AM
I think I've mentioned this before, but my grandparents had an early version of a remote. It was tethered to the TV by a very ... long ... cord. You had to be careful not to trip over it when you walked across the living room!  :D

Our first VCR had that feature as well, something like this, with the remote on the left of the pic.

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4154/5087262909_c756e5d023.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 23, 2014, 10:41:10 AM

When I got my VCR they told me it was the first one with a wireless remote.

I look at that photo and remember how heavy my VCR was. TV's weigh less now than the VCR did!

People didn't believe me years later when I told them that blank tapes used to cost $20 apiece!
Now people don't even know what "blank tapes" mean!


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 23, 2014, 02:04:28 PM
I remember renting the VCR and a half a dozen movies for the weekend and it cost a fortune!


My kids had the first Ghost Buster movie on VHS (when it came out) and it cost a bundle, friends of ours bought a copy from the video store  for them for Christmas and that thing was worth it's weight in gold! lol


We waited to see these TV shows (and movies) come on the television, it never even occurred to us that one day we could own them and watch them at our leisure.

And now even owning them is old news, thanks to PVR and Nefflix. 


The times they are a changing...
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bentgyro on May 23, 2014, 02:46:16 PM
You've heard the old jokes about the first remote controls being your kids, changing channels for the adults! :D :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 23, 2014, 05:00:22 PM
You've heard the old jokes about the first remote controls being your kids, changing channels for the adults! :D :D


(http://healthhub.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Baby-with-remote-control-190x155.jpg)


 :D



(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Ob5Xz_8uheA/TplllzKJkLI/AAAAAAAAEfQ/ZO3Lxy5ErXY/s400/classic-tv.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 26, 2014, 10:50:07 AM
Maverick marathon on Cozi-TV today.  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 26, 2014, 06:43:51 PM
I don't think we have ever talked about SOAPS in Classic TV, have we?


Here is one of the greats who passed, I never watched this soap, but I remember him oddly enough (his character) and seems like he did quite a bit of other TV as well.

And I had no idea the two of them were married, I really like her.   Rest in peace, poor man..  beautiful family.


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2639192/Christine-Baranskis-soap-opera-actor-husband-Matthew-Cowles-dies-age-69.html
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on May 28, 2014, 12:32:26 AM
i remember the remotes with cords as well.  i was going to say zenith, and it might have been, but it might also be that the zenith was that first wireless.

in any case, the tv console was a behemoth.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on May 28, 2014, 12:40:14 AM
Sounds like the first cell phone we had in our car!  :D
i wonder if you had what we had, not exactly a cell phone, but a ship to shore phone.  my grade school dropout dad was such an integral part of his water treatment facility design and maintenance operation that he talked the bigwigs into getting him a ship to shore phone for his truck, which he had also had customized for his special equipment needs  it had a regular handset, but you talked to an operator to get a land line.
http://weburbanist.com/2012/09/18/remember-millions-of-mobile-phones-in-the-1960s-you-should/
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 28, 2014, 06:59:59 AM
i remember the remotes with cords as well.  i was going to say zenith, and it might have been, but it might also be that the zenith was that first wireless.

in any case, the tv console was a behemoth.

I think you might be right about Zenith, Jack. That was more or less our "family brand," and I'm pretty sure the set my grandparents had was a Zenith.

I still have a Zenith VCR that was purchased 30 years ago this year. Don't know if still works, though.  :-\
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 28, 2014, 11:55:20 AM
It's looking quite possible that I may be spending much of this summer in a Wagon Train retrospective. At some expense I just bought the first season on DVD, and so far I've watched the first three episodes (from what I can tell, the episodes are on the discs in broadcast order). These first season shows are older than I am, but I think the stories are good, and such guest performers! The series debut episode had Earnest Borgnine, episode two had Ricardo Montalban (I admit it took me a few minutes to recognize him, until I heard that unmistakeable voice), and episode three had Carolyn Jones, Michael Rennie, Claude Akins, and Jack Elam.

And then there is the little matter that I think Robert Horton as scout Flint McCullough was sex on a stick. ...  ::)

Best I can determine, Horton is still "with us" and will be 90 years old July 29 of this year.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 28, 2014, 05:21:39 PM
Hey I was hooked on Rifleman there for a while!  :D


http://www.cnn.com/video/data/2.0/video/showbiz/2014/05/21/orig-the-sixties-television-quiz.cnn.html


 Name that '60s' TV show 

How well do you know your '60s' TV? See if you can name these famous TV shows from a few bars of their theme songs.



I missed one, they were actually too easy!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 29, 2014, 07:36:56 AM
Hey I was hooked on Rifleman there for a while!  :D

That was a good show, too. The Marx company even made a play set, with "character figures" of Lucas and Mark!  :D

Johnny Crawford grew up to be a hottie, and last I saw him a few months ago, doing commercials for a nostalgia channel, he was still an attractive man.  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 29, 2014, 12:15:35 PM
It's looking quite possible that I may be spending much of this summer in a Wagon Train retrospective. At some expense I just bought the first season on DVD, and so far I've watched the first three episodes (from what I can tell, the episodes are on the discs in broadcast order).

Click this link and it'll list the episode order for you.

http://www.epguides.com/wagontrain/

I've been watching Combat.  I just started the third season. Lots of guest stars in that show, too.
(Ricardo Montalban, as a matter of fact.) Perhaps an effort to get some younger viewers, but this show
had young crooners of the time guest starring in it like Frankie Avalon, Tommy Sands and Bobby Rydell.
They also had people like Eddie Albert, Lee Marvin, Mickey Rooney, Frank Gorshin, Jeffrey Hunter and
Robert Culp.

There were four gay men in guest starring roles so far, too:  Tab Hunter, Sal Mineo, Roddy McDowall and
Ramon Novarro! (I understand Sal Mineo did three episodes and Ramon Novarro did two, though I've only
seen one of each of them so far.)

Being the nature of the show there's few women in it, although they do have some occasionally like
Claudine Longet and an upcoming one has Luise Rainer in it!

There are actors in it who were not famous at the time, but went on to greater fame. Robert Duvall appears
more than once. Ted Knight often appears as a German character. James Caan was in a very good episode.

Interestingly, there's been several episodes involving stories with children, a young girl or boy will be
the focus of the story. Some of those are quite good and others a bit cringeworthy.

As a 10-15+ year old I was never much interested in the World War II series of the sixties at that time, but
thanks to dvd and the retro channels I've really been enjoying Combat and 12 O'Clock High. I'd like to see
more than the handful of episodes I've seen of the 70's series Baa Baa Black Sheep, too, also known as
The Black Sheep Squadron.

Others that I remember were on, but don't know much about were The Rat Patrol and Garrison's Gorilla's.
Or was it "Guerilla's"?

As for the WWII comedies, I try to like McHale's Navy, but it just veers into complete imbecility to me most
of the time. Most of the others, like Operation Petticoat, Mister Roberts and The Wackiest Ship in the Army
(yes "Army"), all of which were based on films by the way, Mister Roberts was also a play, but weren't on
long enough to have a studied opinion.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 29, 2014, 01:02:49 PM
Click this link and it'll list the episode order for you.

http://www.epguides.com/wagontrain/

Thanks, Lyle. I already had that site bookmarked--what clued me in that the epidsodes are in broadcast order on the DVDs. (Last night was episode 4, "The Ruth Owens Story," with Shellie Winters, Dean Stockwell, and Kent Smith. I saw this episode on a nostaligia channel maybe about a year ago. I recognized Dean Stockwell right away, but it took a few minutes to recognize Shellie Winters. It's not nice to say it, but I'd never seen her that thin before.  :-\ )

Quote
I've been watching Combat.  I just started the third season. Lots of guest stars in that show, too.
(Ricardo Montalban, as a matter of fact.) Perhaps an effort to get some younger viewers, but this show
had young crooners of the time guest starring in it like Frankie Avalon, Tommy Sands and Bobby Rydell.

They also had people like Eddie Albert, Lee Marvin, Mickey Rooney, Frank Gorshin, Jeffrey Hunter and
Robert Culp.

Reminds me that in one episode of the second season of Daniel Boone, Fabian played Jemima Boone's first crush--and he looked pretty nice with his shirt off!  :D

Quote
There are actors in it who were not famous at the time, but went on to greater fame. Robert Duvall appears
more than once. Ted Knight often appears as a German character. James Caan was in a very good episode.

That's always a very fun part of watching these old shows now.

Quote
As a 10-15+ year old I was never much interested in the World War II series of the sixties at that time, but
thanks to dvd and the retro channels I've really been enjoying Combat and 12 O'Clock High. I'd like to see
more than the handful of episodes I've seen of the 70's series Baa Baa Black Sheep, too, also known as
The Black Sheep Squadron.

Others that I remember were on, but don't know much about were The Rat Patrol and Garrison's Gorilla's.
Or was it "Guerilla's"?

As for the WWII comedies, I try to like McHale's Navy, but it just veers into complete imbecility to me most
of the time. Most of the others, like Operation Petticoat, Mister Roberts and The Wackiest Ship in the Army
(yes "Army"), all of which were based on films by the way, Mister Roberts was also a play, but weren't on
long enough to have a studied opinion.

The World War II dramas never much interested me when I was a kid. The comedies were OK, maybe because kids like silly things? I remember watching Hogan's Heroes regularly. I don't think Operation Petticoat lasted very long, but I remember it. I remember The Wackiest Ship in the Army, but maybe I'm confusing it with the movie. I guess maybe McHale's Navy was already in syndicated reruns when I saw it--it's where I first knew Tim Conway.

I wonder what the guys who fought World War II thought of those dramas?

Twelve O'Clock High was a movie, too--TCM showed it this week.

I remember my dad liked Baa Baa Black Sheep when it was in first run.

And I'm pretty sure it was Garrison's Guerillas.  ;)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 30, 2014, 12:06:04 PM
That's always a very fun part of watching these old shows now.

Yes, I agree, it's an added treat!

The World War II dramas never much interested me when I was a kid.

When I look back on what i liked until around age fifteen I guess I really didn't like dramas at all.
I liked the sitcoms best followed by variety shows, that emphasiszed comedy, and game shows!
And cartoons.

I remember watching Hogan's Heroes regularly.

Oh, yes, why I forgot about that, I don't know. I always watched that. I see it once in awhile
on Me-TV currently, too. That was said to be loosely based on Stalag 17. For some reason critics
hated that series. Yes, there was a lot of buffoonery in it, but so was McHale's Navy, even moreso,
yet they had no problem with that one.

I don't think Operation Petticoat lasted very long, but I remember it.

I didn't have access to a TV around the time this was on, so I only saw it once or twice. I like the
film, so I would've watched it. It was on for two seasons. For reasons I don't know, after the
first season they recast the entire show. Then it got pulled after a couple episodes the next fall,
but they aired all of the remaining episodes the following summer.

I wonder what the guys who fought World War II thought of those dramas?

Combat was the longest running of the WWII dramas. It ran five years, the last season in color.
One season it was in the Top Ten of all shows. Apparently, as is common with those who served
in wars, after they were out and the war was over they did not much talk about their experiences.

Over the years the people involved with Combat heard from a lot of the children of these men
who related that they grew to know and understand their fathers more because of their experience
of watching Combat together. Their fathers would make comments and open up and talk about
their own experiences during the war.

The former soldiers said that they thought the show captured much of what their actual experiences
were like. (Within the limits of violence and stories that could be depicted on TV at the time.) Many of
the cast and crews and guest stars had actually been in the service and experienced some of what they
were portraying.

The advent of home video and dvd's has resurrected interest in the show and even until very recently
they've had "Combat" conventions in various cities across the the U.S. where cast members and crew
would come and mingle with fans of the show etc.

The official book about the tv series was written by a woman, Jo Davidsmeyer. Most of the episodes on
the dvd's have some interesting facts, notes or oddities from the episode included along with it.

On the Combat dvd's, several of the episodes have commentary by directors, some of the cast and
some guest stars who were in episodes, like Ben Cooper, who I knew as the young sailor in the
film The Rose Tattoo.

I do wish Fox would put the 12 O'Clock High series on dvd. I would get that one. If it were not for
Me-TV I'd probably never have seen it. I believe I caught all or nearly all of the episodes, though it
was only being aired in the middle of the night and hard to record them all to watch because of that.

Fox is seemingly not so keen on spending money on old tv series in their vaults and if this one needed
restoration work probably even less so. (It IS a Quinn-Martin Production!) Because of the nature of the
series, it did give every British actor and actress in Hollywood, it seems, a chance to do a guest spot!
Even Judy Carne was in a couple episodes! And a favorite, Glynis Johns.

I had made notes of the guest stars when I was watching it. Some of the notables in that series were:
Sally Kellerman, Peter Fonda, Peter Duell, Ken Berry, Dabney Coleman, Brandon DeWilde, Roy Thinnes,
Bruce Dern, Rip Torn, Keir Dullea, Earl Holliman, Hermione Baddely, Barbara Feldon, Harold Gould, Lee
Meriwether, James Farentino, James Whitmore, Robert Colbert, James Brolin, Beau Bridges, Ted Bessell,
Tom Skerritt, Jack Lord, Warren Oates, Lois Nettleton, Burt Reynolds, William Shatner, Juliet Mills, Harry
Guardino, Michael Rennie, Robert Walker, Dina Merrill, Burgess Meredith, Bradford Dillman, Jill Ireland,
Roddy McDowall, Michael Murphy, James Franciscus, Edward Mulhare, William Windom, Kevin McCarthy,
Michael Constantine, Bernard Fox, Robert Blake, Wayne  Rogers, Norman Fell, James Broderick, Martin
Milner, Lilia Skala, Joseph Campanella, Ossie Davis, Ralph Bellamy, Andrew Duggan and Jon Voight.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on May 30, 2014, 12:13:41 PM
WOW that is quite a list.....Brandon DeWilde, there is a blast from the past!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on May 30, 2014, 12:29:29 PM

And I'm pretty sure it was Garrison's Guerillas.  ;)

I looked it up; it actually was  "Gorillas" -- lol!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 30, 2014, 12:52:12 PM
I looked it up; it actually was  "Gorillas" -- lol!

 :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 30, 2014, 01:03:32 PM
Combat was the longest running of the WWII dramas. It ran five years, the last season in color.
One season it was in the Top Ten of all shows. Apparently, as is common with those who served
in wars, after they were out and the war was over they did not much talk about their experiences.

Over the years the people involved with Combat heard from a lot of the children of these men
who related that they grew to know and understand their fathers more because of their experience
of watching Combat together. Their fathers would make comments and open up and talk about
their own experiences during the war.

The former soldiers said that they thought the show captured much of what their actual experiences
were like. (Within the limits of violence and stories that could be depicted on TV at the time.) Many of
the cast and crews and guest stars had actually been in the service and experienced some of what they
were portraying.

The advent of home video and dvd's has resurrected interest in the show and even until very recently
they've had "Combat" conventions in various cities across the the U.S. where cast members and crew
would come and mingle with fans of the show etc.

The official book about the tv series was written by a woman, Jo Davidsmeyer. Most of the episodes on
the dvd's have some interesting facts, notes or oddities from the episode included along with it.

On the Combat dvd's, several of the episodes have commentary by directors, some of the cast and
some guest stars who were in episodes, like Ben Cooper, who I knew as the young sailor in the
film The Rose Tattoo.

I do wish Fox would put the 12 O'Clock High series on dvd. I would get that one. If it were not for
Me-TV I'd probably never have seen it. I believe I caught all or nearly all of the episodes, though it
was only being aired in the middle of the night and hard to record them all to watch because of that.

Fox is seemingly not so keen on spending money on old tv series in their vaults and if this one needed
restoration work probably even less so. (It IS a Quinn-Martin Production!) Because of the nature of the
series, it did give every British actor and actress in Hollywood, it seems, a chance to do a guest spot!
Even Judy Carne was in a couple episodes! And a favorite, Glynis Johns.

I had made notes of the guest stars when I was watching it. Some of the notables in that series were:
Sally Kellerman, Peter Fonda, Peter Duell, Ken Berry, Dabney Coleman, Brandon DeWilde, Roy Thinnes,
Bruce Dern, Rip Torn, Keir Dullea, Earl Holliman, Hermione Baddely, Barbara Feldon, Harold Gould, Lee
Meriwether, James Farentino, James Whitmore, Robert Colbert, James Brolin, Beau Bridges, Ted Bessell,
Tom Skerritt, Jack Lord, Warren Oates, Lois Nettleton, Burt Reynolds, William Shatner, Juliet Mills, Harry
Guardino, Michael Rennie, Robert Walker, Dina Merrill, Burgess Meredith, Bradford Dillman, Jill Ireland,
Roddy McDowall, Michael Murphy, James Franciscus, Edward Mulhare, William Windom, Kevin McCarthy,
Michael Constantine, Bernard Fox, Robert Blake, Wayne  Rogers, Norman Fell, James Broderick, Martin
Milner, Lilia Skala, Joseph Campanella, Ossie Davis, Ralph Bellamy, Andrew Duggan and Jon Voight.

Thanks, Lyle. That was fascinating!

Boyoboy, do some of those names take me back!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on June 01, 2014, 05:17:59 AM
WOW that is quite a list.....Brandon DeWilde, there is a blast from the past!
omg, brandon de wilde in HUD, hero worshiping his brother, paul newman.  i had my own screenplay for that duo, and it was a lot more like front runner.

speaking of, same thing goes for the rifleman when i was a teen.  its a good thing they didn't have action figures in those days, i'd have been locked up for sure.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on June 01, 2014, 05:22:50 AM
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-LZ9ujiiIzV0/Uk3S8O5qEQI/AAAAAAAAEQ0/iAAyrpSCqUI/s1600/Hud-1963-Brandon-de-Wilde-Paul-Newman-pic-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 01, 2014, 08:37:18 AM
Brandon deWilde sure was a hottie. Another who died too young.  :(

I admit, the first time I saw Hud, considering when the film was released, I was a little surprised by the scene where he was clearly supposed to be naked under the sheets when Patricia Neal walks into his bedroom.

Hmmm. Him and Uncle Hud. ...  :o Thud!  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on June 01, 2014, 02:36:42 PM

I looked up Brandon De Wilde and he did quite a bit of TV.  When he was really young he did a
one season tv series where he was a regular. Some of the more notable series he made appearances
on were:

Ironside
Night Gallery
The Virginian (3 episodes)
The Young Rebels (a TV series I posted about here awhile ago concerning the Revolutionary War. Brandon played "Young Nathan Hale.")
Love, American Style (hmmmm...episode was called "Love and the Bachelor")
Hawaii Five-O
The Name of the Game
Combat! (glad to see he's in one of these, so I'll be seeing it!)
The Defenders
12 O'Clock High
Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color (a three part western themed story)
The Greatest Show on Earth (did you know there was a TV Series of this?)
Alfred Hitchcock Presents (interestingly, he was in the very last 1/2 hour episode of this series and the network censored it and didn't air it
                                    for reasons I used to know, but have forgotten. A couple years later, though, it was included in the syndication
                                     airings for the show and no one had any objections.)

Nearly all of these shows are airing on TV in one way or another right now.

__________________

As for Hud, it's one of my favorite films. I don't know the zeitgeist of the oscars at the time, but I happen to think
of the five nominated best  pictures that year that this one is better than all of those five. I don't know why it did
not get a nom for Best Picture. (The New York Film Critics had Hud runner-up in both Picture and Director to Tom Jones.)

Looking for standard clues about nominations it's hard to pinpoint anything. It was an era where huge big budget monstrosities got
nominations, whether worthy or not--things like The Longest Day, How the West Was Won, Cleopatra, Doctor Doolittle. Racial issues
were front and center which probably accounted for the nice but nothing extraordinary Lilies of the Field getting a nom and Poitier
winning over Paul Newman. Cleopatra was considered a turkey by most critics, but audiences appreciated it, at least somewhat. The
release dates were all over the place, including Hud those six films were released in February, May, June, October and two in December,
including Tom Jones. Tom Jones may have struck a chord because it was a kind of comedic romance with scenes scored in a silent movie
type way and after all the turmoil of the previous year and the British invasion on the way, it may have been a breath of fresh air and a matter
of timing.

The five films nominated that year, total nominations in parentheses, were America America (4), How the West Was Won (8), Lilies of the Field (5),
Cleopatra (9) and Tom Jones (10).  Hud had 7 nominations, including three acting (two won!) and writing, directing, cinematography (won!) and
b&w art direction. Only two of the BP nominees had corresponding director nominations so it was a foregone conclusion that one of those was
a probable win for Best Picture, too, and that was Tom Jones or America America. Both released in Dec. by the way.

The three other directing noms, by the way, were for: The Cardinal, Federico Fellini's 8-1/2 and Hud.

When you look at these six films on hindsight people now really feel lukewarm toward Tom Jones. It was
advertised as racy and bawdy and it does have a great scene with Albert Finney where he and his paramour
are practically making love in the guise of eating dinner. It was a scene much talked about and parodies,
including a hilarious episode of F-Troop. It all seems so tame now and rather boring. Even the cinematography
is unappealing. It was released in theatres in a director's cut (which was 2-3 minutes shorter than the original!)
in the late 80's or early 90's and I saw it (for the second time) on the big screen and was quite underwhelmed.

On the imdb boards, the users and critics ratings interesting give these films the following ratings:

7.9 Hud
7.9 America America
7.7 Lilies of the Field
7.1 How the West Was Won
7.0 Cleopatra
6.8 Tom Jones

Of all the films, Tom Jones is the lowest rated. And despite Hud & America America having the
same rating, America was rated by about 3,000 people and Hud by 13,000 people.

America America is perhaps one of those rather lost films that never appears anywhere for people to see.
Because of that, I thought it must have been way overrated at the time and probably "oscar boring."
It did have a limited vhs release once and I saw it then. To my surprise, even after a near three hour
running time I thought it a very worthwhile, good and entertaining film.

It certainly is a better made and told film than Cleopatra, but of those six films I'd rate Hud first, but Cleopatra
second because it's excesses are just too delicious to ignore, especially in 70mm in a movie theatre! My third
choice would be America America.

Hud deserved better at the oscars, but it did win three of them and obviously it seems people like it as evidenced
by its imdb rating, however skewed those might be at times.

By the way, I am not a fan of movie remakes unless there is a very good reason to do so.
I think HUD is near perfect, but there is a good reason to consider remaking it. In the original
story, the Patricia Neal character, Alma, is black, and the sensibilities of the time would not have
approved of that. In fact, on the imdb page there is a thread for pondering who might've been
cast back then f they'd stuck to the original story. There's not many replies, but it's an interesting
question to ponder.

Another film that could be remade because the times didn't allow it to be shot the way it was written
is a best picture nominee (1947, I believe) titled Crossfire. It's about soldiers accused of anti-semitism
and for bashing another soldier because of it. The original book, though, titled A Brick Foxhole, was
actually about a gay bashing.

Now back to Brandon De Wilde and classic TV, heh!

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on June 01, 2014, 05:22:42 PM
RIP dear, funny Ann B. Davis, who died today.  I just loved her, on THE BOB CUMMINGS SHOW (she won two Emmys as Schultzy) and THE BRADY BUNCH and everything else she did.  Also, she was a very sweet lady when I met her in 1995.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 01, 2014, 05:25:03 PM
RIP dear, funny Ann B. Davis, who died today.  I just loved her, on THE BOB CUMMINGS SHOW (she won two Emmys as Schultzy) and THE BRADY BUNCH and everything else she did.  Also, she was a very sweet lady when I met her in 1995.

Just heard on the NBC that she had died. Sad news. I don't know anyone who didn't like her.

How nice that you actually got to meet her!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on June 03, 2014, 10:35:33 AM
Really sorry to hear this, you and Mr. Brady together again!   :-*
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 08, 2014, 08:06:05 PM
Early Saturday eveing, as I was preparing to make my supper, I was channel surfing just to see what was on, and on one of the nostalgia stations, what should I stumble on but The Real McCoys!  ;D

And what is really spooky--almost creepy--it was the only episode of that show that I remember seeing as a small boy: The McCoys needed to dig a new well for their farm. Behind the back of Grandpa Amos (Walter Brennan), Luke (Richard Crenna) brought in a geologist to find water; Amos was sure he could find water with his divining rod. Guess who was correct?  :D

ETA: I just did a little research, and I must remember this episode from syndicated reruns. Wikipedia calls this one of the shows most-remembered episodes, but I still find it more than a little weird that the first time in maybe 50 years that I see an episode of the show, it's the only episode that I clearly remember.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on June 08, 2014, 08:07:38 PM
Did Amos say, "Gol darn these new-fangled inventions!"?

 
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 08, 2014, 08:31:39 PM
Did Amos say, "Gol darn these new-fangled inventions!"?

Not that I can recall.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on June 09, 2014, 06:27:28 AM
He probably said, "They just ain't no PLEASIN' ya!"  He does that about once an episode.

But I can tune out his tirades and look at Richard Crenna.  This had to be one of the most jaw-dropping moments for 1950s TV viewers:  From Walter Denton to THIS?!?

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 09, 2014, 07:37:46 AM
To the day he died (Jan. 17, 2003) Richard Crenna was a handsome man. At the time of The Real McCoys I would have called him a hottie!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 09, 2014, 11:42:52 AM
Well, here's a show I missed completely: The Quest.

Quote
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Quest_(TV_series)

It's only half-season was the fall of 1976. That was my first semester of college, and I wasn't watching too much television right then. Plus, I'd say it was doomed from the start, as a Western scheduled opposite Charlie's Angels.

But--holy smokes!--it had Kurt Russel and Tim Matheson as the stars!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on June 10, 2014, 09:00:16 AM
i haven't watched the episode yet, but screaming headlines and fainting fans have made it clear that ORPHAN BLACK has succeeded in blowing up twitter with its latest twist...
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 10, 2014, 01:17:12 PM
RIP dear, funny Ann B. Davis, who died today.  I just loved her, on THE BOB CUMMINGS SHOW (she won two Emmys as Schultzy) and THE BRADY BUNCH and everything else she did.  Also, she was a very sweet lady when I met her in 1995.

Because I was bored, I just looked up The Brady Bunch on Wikipedia. I don't recall ever knowing Alice's last name; according to Wikipedia it was Nelson.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 11, 2014, 09:47:05 AM
I guess I had a sort-of Agnes Moorehead evening last night. First I watched Bewitched! on a nostalgia channel, and then I watched her in "The Mary Halstead Story," from Season 1 of Wagon Train.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 11, 2014, 11:02:50 AM
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0104770/bio?ref_=nm_ov_bio_sm (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0104770/bio?ref_=nm_ov_bio_sm)

Henry Brandon

I looked this fella up at IMDb because recently I thought I recognized him--playing an Indian--in a Wagon Train episode, that is, recognized him as Acacius Page, Patrick Dennis' first New York schoolteacher in Auntie Mame. I was correct. Interesting to note that he was a "confirmed bachelor" (and we all know what that was code for, don't we?), and also a longtime companion of Judy Garland's fourth husband!

Apparently Auntie Mame was one of the few times he played a nice guy--and I thought he was very attractive in Auntie Mame.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on June 11, 2014, 03:13:51 PM
Confirmed bachelor!!  :D  

I love seeing people on these old shows and then looking them up!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 11, 2014, 04:53:45 PM
Confirmed bachelor!!  :D  

I love seeing people on these old shows and then looking them up!

That's a great old term, isn't it, "confirmed bachelor"?  :D

I forgot to mention that the guest star on one of the Bewitched! episodes last night was the wonderful Eve Arden. It was the episode where Tabitha is born, and Arden was the head nurse in the maternity ward.  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on June 11, 2014, 05:09:45 PM
Bewitched is on Netflix now, I totally plan to start watching from the begining, probably tonight!



I will always think fondly of Eve in the Mothers-In-Laws, loved that show when I was young. 

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on June 12, 2014, 03:43:30 PM
(https://scontent-a-ord.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/t1.0-9/1501712_489995134451124_2141434234_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 13, 2014, 07:34:55 AM
Two more episodes of Bewitched! on Antenna-TV last night, followed by an episode of Magnum, P.I. on Cozi-TV, followed by one episode of Wagon Train on DVD!  :D

We are still in the b&w episodes of Bewitched!, and I ws thinking last night that these episodes might be seen as reflecting changes that were taking place in customs in these years. I noticed that in some episodes, when Sam and Endora go out to lunch--say, in Paris--they wear hats and gloves. In other episodes, when Sam shows up at Darrin's office to go out to lunch with him, she's wearing gloves but no hat.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on June 13, 2014, 08:14:40 AM
Ah, the good old formal days...

Thanks for the memories, Jeff.  I love me some Bewitched and Agnes and Henry Brandon. He was extremely attractive in Auntie Mame, and yes, he was gay.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on June 15, 2014, 10:30:26 AM
TV Guide's '50 Greatest TV Dads of All Time'

1. Cliff Huxtable (The Cosby Show)
2. Ben Cartwright (Bonanza)
3. John Walton, Sr. (The Waltons)
4. Charles Ingalls (Little House on the Prairie)
5. Danny Williams (Make Room for Daddy)
6. Jim Anderson (Father Knows Best)
7. Steve Douglas (My Three Sons)
8. Andy Taylor (The Andy Griffith Show)
9. Howard Cunningham (Happy Days)
10. Ray Barone (Everybody Loves Raymond)
11. Reverend Eric Camden (7th Heaven)
12. Steven Keaton (Family Ties)
13. Dan Conner (Roseanne)
14. Mike Brady (The Brady Bunch)
15. Tom Corbett (Courtship of Eddie's Father)
16. Alex Stone (The Donna Reed Show)
17. Forrest Bedford (I'll Fly Away)
18. George Lopez (George Lopez)
19. Herman Munster (The Munsters)
20. Tim Taylor (Home Improvement)
21. Ozzie Nelson (The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet)
22. Rob Petrie (The Dick Van Dyke Show)
23. Tony Micelli (Who's the Boss?)
24. Archie Bunker (All in the Family)
25. Sandy Cohen (The OC)
26. Doug Lawrence (Family)
27. Michael Kyle (My Wife and Kids)
28. Ward Cleaver (Leave it to Beaver)
29. Jack Bristow (Alias)
30. Chester A. Riley (Life of Riley)
31. Andy Sipowicz (NYPD Blue)
32. Lucas McCain (The Rifleman)
33. Tom Bradford (Eight is Enough)
34. Philip Banks (The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air)
35. Homer Simpson (The Simpsons)
36. Rick Sammler (Once and Again)
37. Jason Seaver (Growing Pains)
38. John Robinson (Lost in Space)
39. Martin Lane (The Patty Duke Show)
40. Will Girardi (Joan of Arcadia)
41. Jim Walsh (Beverly Hills, 90210)
42. Fred Sanford (Sanford and Son)
43. Andy Brown (Everwood)
44. George Jefferson (The Jeffersons)
45. Rocky Rockford (The Rockford Files)
46. Michael Steadman (thirtysomething)
47. Bernie Mac (Bernie Mac)
48. Paul Hennessy (8 Simple Rules)
49. Graham Chase (My So-Called Life)
50. Benjamin Sisko (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on June 16, 2014, 09:48:50 AM
Disagree. Cliff Huxtable was always such a smartass and I cringed when he made fun of poor Vanessa "finally" getting visited by "the breast fairy."
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Sara B on June 16, 2014, 10:03:28 AM
John Walton for me....
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on June 16, 2014, 10:42:23 AM
That would probably be my choice, too.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 16, 2014, 11:41:48 AM
Lucas McCain. ...
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on June 16, 2014, 02:43:21 PM
Yea I hate to disagree with Cliff only because my kids would disown me, they were huge fans of the Cosby show and thought they were the "perfect family".

Of course I am as bad, I thought the Walton's and the Ingall's were the perfect families!  :D


So for me it would be a tie between Father (Daddy) Walton and Father (Pa) Ingall's.


BUT Lucas McCain sure did make a great Dad didn't he?

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 17, 2014, 08:25:08 PM
This evening I watched the "Riley Gratton Story" episode from Season 1 of Wagon Train. Riley Gratton was played by Guy Madison, whom I seem to remember being discussed at length somewhere around here.  :D

Come to think of it, there's a "slash" pairing for you, Flint McCullough and Riley Gratton. ...  ::)  ;D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on June 18, 2014, 09:02:21 AM
Flint McCullough and Riley Gratton.

To my mind, those are really awful names, lol!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 18, 2014, 09:33:21 AM
To my mind, those are really awful names, lol!

With those two guys, who cares about names?  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 20, 2014, 07:18:36 AM
Been meaning to mention that I've noticed, a number of the first season episodes of Wagon Train that I've watched so far were written by ... Aaron Spelling!  :)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 23, 2014, 09:43:33 AM
I was amused by a continuity error I noticed in the Wagon Train episode I watched last night, "The Gabe Carswell Story." In one scene Flint McCullough (Robert Horton) is talking with a young man who is half white and half Native American. In the distance shots at the beginning and ending of the scene, the young man is wearing war paint. In the close-ups in between, he is not wearing war paint. If that was caught, I suppose there was no time to fix it on a TV shooting schedule.

Incidentally, I was surprised how sympathetic that episode was to the Native American viewpoint for a TV episode from 1957/58. The Indians weren't just "hostile" for the dramatic necessity. They were given a perfectly rational and understandable reason for their anger: the influx of whites slaughtering and driving away the buffalo, causing starvation and threatening their way of life.

This episode starred James Whitmore, one of my all-time favorite character actors, as Gabe Carswell, a semi-legendary hunter-trapper-mountain man type who had lived for years with the Indians. The above-mentioned young man is Carwell's son. Seeing the coming end of the Indian way of life, Carswell wishes to return to white society, and bring his son with him. The young man does not wish to do this, and he points out that he will not be accepted by the whites, a point which is dramatized in a scene where father and son visit the wagon train and are ridiculed by some of the immigrants in the train.

I also learned something about my idol Robert Horton that I didn't know: he was a redhead. On black and white film, he looks brunet to me. This episodes features a sequence where a barechested Horton is tied down spread-eagled in sun and left to die. Whitmore rescues him.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 30, 2014, 04:25:51 PM
I'm always behind the times.  :-\

I learned today, that Patricia Blair, who played Rebecca Boone to Fess Parker's Daniel Boone in my favorite childhood TV show, passed away in September of 2013 at the age of 80.

So "Dan'l" and "Becky" are both gone now.  :(
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on June 30, 2014, 04:31:45 PM
I'm sure Darby Hinton and I know Veronica Cartwright are still with us, Jeff.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on June 30, 2014, 04:35:45 PM
When i think of James Whitmore, I think of Shawshank, what an amazing role for him!


As for Patricia:



(http://media-cache-cd0.pinimg.com/736x/94/59/40/945940ab3d436d8273dfe495d5018cfd.jpg)


I truly am obsessed with Rifleman and I can't tell you why!  :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on July 01, 2014, 07:26:36 AM
When i think of James Whitmore, I think of Shawshank, what an amazing role for him!

Never saw Shawshank, but I'll never forget James Whitmore in the one-man shows Will Rogers Tonight and Give 'Em Hell, Harry (as President Harry S Truman). He was a really great character actor. I don't think they make 'em like that anymore.


Quote
As for Patricia:



(http://media-cache-cd0.pinimg.com/736x/94/59/40/945940ab3d436d8273dfe495d5018cfd.jpg)



It seems very, very odd to me that I never knew Patricia Blair did a role on The Rifleman. Now I'd really like to see her Rifleman episodes. I really only knew her as Rebecca Boone. But it wouldn't surprise me if her role on The Rifleman is what gave somebody the idea to offer her the role of Rebecca. Something I read yesterday described her Rifleman character as "spunky," and you could say the same about Rebecca, at least in the early years of Daniel Boone. By the later seasons she was often not much more than a walk-on--walk on at the beginning, send Daniel and this then-current sidekick off on some adventure, and walk on again at the end of the episode.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on July 01, 2014, 07:37:17 AM
I'm sure Darby Hinton and I know Veronica Cartwright are still with us, Jeff.

Patricia Blair's obituary from The New York Times:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/01/arts/television/patricia-blair-dies-at-80-starred-in-televisions-rifleman.html?_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/01/arts/television/patricia-blair-dies-at-80-starred-in-televisions-rifleman.html?_r=0)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on July 01, 2014, 11:27:16 AM
Never saw Shawshank, but I'll never forget James Whitmore in the one-man shows Will Rogers Tonight and Give 'Em Hell, Harry (as President Harry S Truman). He was a really great character actor. I don't think they make 'em like that anymore.


It seems very, very odd to me that I never knew Patricia Blair did a role on The Rifleman. Now I'd really like to see her Rifleman episodes. I really only knew her as Rebecca Boone. But it wouldn't surprise me if her role on The Rifleman is what gave somebody the idea to offer her the role of Rebecca. Something I read yesterday described her Rifleman character as "spunky," and you could say the same about Rebecca, at least in the early years of Daniel Boone. By the later seasons she was often not much more than a walk-on--walk on at the beginning, send Daniel and this then-current sidekick off on some adventure, and walk on again at the end of the episode.


She was in 22 episodes apparently!


Television

    "The Dennis O'Keefe Show", 1 episode (10 May 1960)
    The Bob Cummings Show, 1 episode (1957)
    The Rifleman, 22 episodes (1958–1963)
    Tramp Ship, pilot (1961)
    The Virginian, 1 episode (1963)
    Perry Mason, 1 episode (1963)
    Bonanza, 1 episode (1964)
    Daniel Boone, 46 episodes (1964–1970)


Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on July 01, 2014, 01:23:52 PM
Television

    "The Dennis O'Keefe Show", 1 episode (10 May 1960)
    The Bob Cummings Show, 1 episode (1957)
    The Rifleman, 22 episodes (1958–1963)
    Tramp Ship, pilot (1961)
    The Virginian, 1 episode (1963)
    Perry Mason, 1 episode (1963)
    Bonanza, 1 episode (1964)
    Daniel Boone, 46 episodes (1964–1970)

That episode count for Patricia Blair for Daniel Boone seems low to me, given that she was on the show for its entire six-season run. Some time I'd like to look into that, starting with how many episodes the Boone show did a season (I'll bet the number declined as the years passed). One reason why I prefer the first two seasons of the series is because you saw a lot more of Rebecca, Jemima, and Israel than in subsequent seasons (of course, Jemima disappeared after Season 2).
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on July 02, 2014, 09:30:17 AM
That episode count for Patricia Blair for Daniel Boone seems low to me, given that she was on the show for its entire six-season run. Some time I'd like to look into that, starting with how many episodes the Boone show did a season (I'll bet the number declined as the years passed). One reason why I prefer the first two seasons of the series is because you saw a lot more of Rebecca, Jemima, and Israel than in subsequent seasons (of course, Jemima disappeared after Season 2).

IMDb gives 118 as the Daniel Boone episode count for Patricia Blair, and that seems "more like it" to me.

Later yesterday I located an on-line episode guide to Daniel Boone; unfortunately, it only lists the "guests" who appeared in each episode, and not the "regulars." I might add that whoever wrote the episode descriptions was a bit sarcastic and sometimes downright vulgar in my opinion. There was one sarcastic reference to Perry Mason and Matlock not going back in time, and I noticed several descriptions of characters as "assclowns," whatever that is.

The episode descriptions at IMDb appear to list the "regulars" as well as the "guests" who appeared in each episode.

I am still somewhat in mourning for Patricia Blair. Had I known she was living relatively close to me, I would have attempted to locate an address and sent her a fan letter--and I hope she would have appreciated that. I can remember to this day always feeling a little bit let down if Rebecca did not appear in a particular Daniel Boone episode.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on July 03, 2014, 08:56:31 AM
Bob Hastings, best known for his role in the 1960s sitcom McHale's Navy, has died at 89.

Allison Knowles says her grandfather died Monday in his Burbank, California, home.

Hastings won fans on McHale's Navy as Lt. Carpenter, a bumbling yes-man. Other memorable roles were on All in the Family and General Hospital.

The Brooklyn-born Hastings began his career at age 11 on radio dramas.

He branched into TV in its infancy, snagging a role on Captain Video and His Video Rangers in 1949.

Other early acting jobs included a recurring role on the military comedy The Phil Silvers Show.

Later TV appearances included Ironside, The Dukes of Hazzard, Major Dad and Murder, She Wrote.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2678159/McHales-Navy-star-Bob-Hastings-dies-age-89.html#ixzz36Pwnppz5
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: carew28 on July 05, 2014, 12:43:57 PM
Well, here's a show I missed completely: The Quest.

It's only half-season was the fall of 1976. That was my first semester of college, and I wasn't watching too much television right then. Plus, I'd say it was doomed from the start, as a Western scheduled opposite Charlie's Angels.

But--holy smokes!--it had Kurt Russel and Tim Matheson as the stars!


I remember The Quest. I always hoped that in some episode Kurt and Tim would get into a fight, and have a wrestling match. Maybe if it had lasted longer on the air, they would have.  Actually, that would have been a prime topic for some fanfiction.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on July 06, 2014, 01:42:13 PM
Bob Hastings, best known for his role in the 1960s sitcom McHale's Navy, has died at 89.


There's a face I saw countless times on television, but I don't know that I ever knew his name.  :-\
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on July 07, 2014, 02:46:52 PM
I know me too, it was like "I know that guy"!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on July 16, 2014, 07:37:50 AM
Word of advice: Do not go searching for your favorite old cartoons on Youtube late in the evening. You just might find them, and then you'll never get to bed at a decent hour.  8)  :P
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: jack on July 17, 2014, 10:02:34 AM
Word of advice: Do not go searching for your favorite old cartoons on Youtube late in the evening. You just might find them, and then you'll never get to bed at a decent hour.  8)  :P
its called the youtube rabbit hole, and i am disastrously familiar with it.  tonight it was the 8 part special on the huge tsunami covering the south pacific, narrated largely by eyewitnesses and using almost exclusively their photography of the events.  maybe its because i have lived coastally for much of my life, but the ignorance about tsunami, and especially what it means when the tide suddenly goes WAY out, was startling.  it can also happen hopping from one dance routine to another.  i don't have to look for them, they come after me...
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: CellarDweller115 on July 17, 2014, 10:34:17 AM
its called the youtube rabbit hole, and i am disastrously familiar with it.

I can say the same.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on July 17, 2014, 10:45:41 AM
i don't have to look for them, they come after me...

I am beginning to get that feeling, too, but, if I may say so, it's comforting to know my experience is not unique.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on July 17, 2014, 03:57:04 PM
(http://img2-2.timeinc.net/people/i/2014/news/140728/elaine-stritch-600x450.jpg)


Elaine Stritch – a showbiz survivor who at last became a household name in her 80s when she played Colleen Donaghy, the harridan mother of Alec Baldwin's Jack Donaghy, on TV's 30 Rock – died on Thursday at her home in Birmingham, Michigan, reports The New York Times. She was 89.




Only last year, in failing health, she left New York to return to her home state of Michigan to be near relatives, though in the days leading up to her departure from her luxury Carlyle Hotel residence, The Times chronicled her nearly every hiccup – she was such a fixture of the city. As it was, the newspaper noted, in 2003 the New York Landmarks Conservancy had declared her a Living Landmark.

And, just like the city, she was every bit as iconoclastic and unforgiving, to say nothing of boisterous. She was also nearly as famous for the roles she didn't keep as for the ones she did.




Stritch was the first Trixie when Jackie Gleason's The Honeymooners was about to launch (he fired her before airtime), and, years later, she claimed in her 2003 one-woman Broadway show, Elaine Stritch at Liberty, she blew her audition for a new NBC sitcom by dropping an expletive.

The role, that of Dorothy Zbornak on Golden Girls, instead went to Beatrice Arthur.





Broadway Baby

With a voice that was once compared to a car shifting gears without the clutch – and a presence likened to Godzilla in a stalled elevator – Stritch may have been an unlikely Broadway musical star, yet early in her career she understudied for the inimitable Ethel Merman in 1950's Call Me Madam.




In her own right – admittedly, there were dry periods – she went on to star in a 1952 revival of Pal Joey, Noël Coward's 1961 Sail Away, and the landmark 1970 Company, for which she copped a Tony and delivered her own signature song, Stephen Sondheim's paean to Manhattan's jaded upper crust, "The Ladies Who Lunch."

A strict Catholic, as well as the youngest of three girls and the only one to enter show business, Stritch spent 12 years at the Sacred Heart Catholic Girls School, and when she first came to New York, in 1944, she lived in a convent while taking drama classes.

"Let me tell you about those convents," she told PEOPLE in 1988, when she was kicking up dust playing a movie-star mother in Woody Allen's September. "Convent schools teach you to play against everything, which is what I'm still doing."





Married and Widowed

While studying acting at the New School in New York, she dated fellow student Marlon Brando, who "walked into a room and it was knockout time."

Stritch nearly married two other actors, Ben Gazzara and Gig Young, but, she admitted to PEOPLE, "I couldn't bring myself to marry outside the Catholic Church or tie the knot with a divorced man."




While in London in 1973, Stritch – then 47 – married American-born actor John Bay, then 45. It was his first marriage, too. "The word that applies to John is sweet," said Stritch, who, in 1982, the same year the couple returned to live in the U.S., lost him to a brain tumor.

There also was another love in her life: the bottle, despite finally having to go dry because of her diabetes. "Sure, I've gone on with a few drinks under my belt," she also told PEOPLE, "but I've always gone on."

No doubt, the same will hold true for her in the afterlife.

Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on July 17, 2014, 04:41:48 PM
I hope they dim the lights of Broadway for her. R.I.P.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: killersmom on July 17, 2014, 10:48:07 PM
Word of advice: Do not go searching for your favorite old cartoons on Youtube late in the evening. You just might find them, and then you'll never get to bed at a decent hour.  8)  :P

So very true!! However, I have discovered some amazing performers in my travels though YouTube!
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on July 20, 2014, 01:15:56 PM
Adios, Brett Maverick.

So long, Jim Rockford.

James Garner, 1928--2014.

 :'(
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on July 20, 2014, 01:19:59 PM
He really needs to be in two threads doesn't he?  :-\


(http://store.infinitecoolness.com/coolposters/personalities/therockfordfiles/therockfordfilestvposter001.jpg)


Such a handsome man.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on August 08, 2014, 07:36:14 AM
I loved Garner, and not just on a visceral level.

He will be very much missed.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on August 08, 2014, 01:15:28 PM
Since I couldn't get into the movie on TCM last night, I watched another episode of Wagon Train instead. Debra Paget was the principal guest star. I'd never seen her as a blonde before--I almost didn't recognize her, and I like her better as a brunette. Nick Adams--before The Rebel--was a sort of second-tier guest star.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on August 14, 2014, 05:10:00 PM
(http://www.treknews.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/arlene-martel-dies.jpg)


Los Angeles (CNN) -- Actress Arlene Martel, who "Star Trek" fans know as Spock's bride-to-be, died in a Los Angeles hospital Tuesday of complications from a heart attack, her son said. Martel was 78.

Martel's ethnic ambiguity earned her the nickname "The Chameleon" among Hollywood casting directors in the 1960s, son Jod Kaftan told CNN.

It gained her diverse roles, including as a Russian spy on "The Monkees" and "I Dream of Jeannie," a French Underground operative in "Hogan's Heroes," a Native American woman in a "Gunsmoke" episode and as a Vulcan on "Star Trek."

Trekkies still lined up at sci-fi conventions to meet Martel and pay for autographs because of her role as T'Pring, the Vulcan priestess engaged to Spock in the first episode of the iconic show's second season.

Leonard Nimoy, who was the original Spock, tweeted his tribute to her: "Saying goodbye to T'Pring, Arlene Martel. A lovely talent."

Martel is also known for two former boyfriends. She was one of James Dean's girlfriends in New York before he became a star, Kaftan said. She also dated actor Cary Grant for a time, he said.

Her acting career began on Broadway when she was a teenager. She was cast as Esther in the 1956 production of "Uncle Willie." She was still using her birth name Arline Sax for her credits then.

Her television career started in 1959 with a move to Hollywood. She soon landed guest roles on hit shows, including "Twilight Zone," "Death Valley Days," and "Have Gun -- Will Travel."

Although the roles slowed down over the decades, Martel always considered herself a working actress.

"She was still getting out there, doing roles," Kaftan said. "She had a lot of big dreams she was still pursuing."

Although battling cancer over the past five years, she still traveled around the world to conventions where "Star Trek" fans gathered.

Her son said it was an odd experience for him to go with her because "guys would have a crush on your mom because she's a sci-fi babe from the '60s."



http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/14/showbiz/obit-star-trek-arlene-martel/index.html?hpt=hp_t2
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on August 15, 2014, 07:24:03 AM
I think I saw the final episode of Magnum, P.I., last night.

I say think because, for whatever reason, I do remember that by the time the show ended its run, I was no longer watching regularly; I have no memory of why that was the case, I just remember that I was no longer watching regularly. Perhaps it was no longer in its original time slot when it ended its run?

But anyway, the episode had all the earmarks of a final episode. The title was "Resolutions," and all sorts of things were wrapped up. Higgins confessed to being Robin Masters (though he took it back at the very end). Rick was getting married. T.C., apparently, was reconciled with his wife. And Magnum was united with little Lily Catherine, his daughter by Michelle, and rejoined the Navy. And at the very, very end, Magnum, in uniform, turned to face the camera, said, "Good night," and clicked off a TV remote.

Unfortunately for me, Cozi-TV ran that episode in the 11 p.m. time slot, so it was midnight before I even started to get ready for bed.  :-\
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on August 27, 2014, 07:49:14 AM
In Antenna-TV's run of Bewitched! we have now moved from Darrin I to Darrin II. On Monday evening the first episode was Darrin I and the second episode was Darrin II. We have also added Esmeralda to the cast.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on August 28, 2014, 10:03:39 AM
I stumbled onto a couple of episodes from the first season of F Troop last night. In the first episode, Paul Petersen was the guest star. In the second episode the guest star was Jeannette Nolan (as Capt. Parmenter's mother).

Meanwhile, little Adam Stevens was born last night on Bewitched! From that episode, I always remembered Darrin saying incredulously to Maurice, "Adam was your great-grandfather?!" and Maurice's reply, "Not that Adam!"   :D
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on August 28, 2014, 04:17:57 PM
Idea for a drinking game--take a shot every time Dick Sargent purses his lips.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on August 28, 2014, 06:33:43 PM
Well, this was an interesting stroke.

Jeopardy! was pre-empted here this evening for a preseason football game.  >:(  ::)

So I checked out what was on Antenna-TV and found myself watching the debut episode of I Dream of Jeannie.  :D It was followed by what was probably the second episode. The shows are in glorious black and white, and I suppose when they first aired they may have been after my bedtime. I don't even remember seeing them in syndicated rerun.

(I'm skipping Bewitched! this evening in order to watch an episode of Sleepy Hollow to prepare for the season opener later next month. I think Tom Mison looks really handsome with that beard. And I love his boots. ...  ::))
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on September 04, 2014, 07:02:24 AM
(http://livedoor.blogimg.jp/dekodekoman/imgs/2/b/2be7d391.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on September 04, 2014, 07:03:41 AM
(http://images2.fanpop.com/images/photos/7400000/Bewitched-Wallpaper-bewitched-7428497-1024-768.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on September 04, 2014, 07:04:20 AM
(http://www.harpiesbizarre.com/repo/TBR_Tiffany1.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: bubba on September 04, 2014, 07:05:47 AM
(http://images2.fanpop.com/images/photos/5400000/Bewitched-w-paper-bewitched-5410499-800-600.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on September 04, 2014, 07:26:33 AM
Happy Birthday, Dick York.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on September 04, 2014, 10:08:01 AM

Who's the woman in the center at the bottom of this pic?
Doesn't look like EM to me.


(http://images2.fanpop.com/images/photos/7400000/Bewitched-Wallpaper-bewitched-7428497-1024-768.jpg)
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on September 04, 2014, 11:42:04 AM
I can't see any of bubba's pictures. What gives?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on September 04, 2014, 12:29:39 PM
I had to look at the links and paste them in. My computer is such that
I thought it might be just me, but they weren't coming up for me, either.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Sara B on September 04, 2014, 12:46:46 PM
Nor for me.
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on September 04, 2014, 02:12:07 PM
What are they, bubba?
Title: Re: Classic TV
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on September 12, 2014, 10:24:56 AM