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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT => Films & Theater => Topic started by: sydney on March 31, 2006, 07:20:49 PM

Title: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sydney on March 31, 2006, 07:20:49 PM
Hey everyone thought this would be an interesting thread.  List your all time favorite films besides BBM.

1.   Slaughter House 5
2.   Chinatown
3.   A Place In The Sun
4.   The Graduate
5.   Midnight Cowboy
6.   Next Stop Wonderland
7.   Casablanca
8.   The Way We Were
9.   Pulp Fiction
10. Close Encounters of The 3rd Kind

****forgot these.......The Ninth Configuration
                                Betrayal
                                Picnic 
                                Short Cuts
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on March 31, 2006, 07:47:41 PM
OK, but not in any particular order.  That changes with my mood.

1.   LOTR, ROTK
2.   LOTR, TT
3.   LOTR, FOTR
4.   Age of Innocence
5.   Casablanca
6.   Rudy
7.  The Adventures of Robin Hood
8.   Rebecca
9.   Singing in the Rain
10. The Empire Strikes Back

sorry, can't do just 10

11.  Billy Elliott
12.  King Kong (1933)
13.  The Last of the Mohicans
14.  Much Ado About Nothing
15.  Raiders of the Lost Ark
16.  The Searchers
17.  To Kill a Mockingbird
18.  Tarzan and His Mate
19.  The Wizard of Oz
20.  When Worlds Collide

These are just the ones that I thought of off the top of my head.  I love so many movies that tomorrow, many of these could be replaced by some I love equally, like Star Wars, The Usual Suspects, White Christmas, The Big Country, The Day the Earth Stood Still, Spartacus...I could go on and on.  So I'll stop.  Under protest. ;D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on March 31, 2006, 08:09:11 PM
This is a wonderful thread!  (http://smilies.sofrayt.com/fsc/clap.gif)

Here are my top 10 favorite films of all-time, besides BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN:

1.  Midnight Cowboy
2.  The Exorcist
3.  The Tell-Tale Heart
4.  Carrie
5.  The Bad Seed
6.  Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
7.  The Wizard of Oz
8.  Frankenstein (1931)
9.  Clockwork Orange
10.  Freaks
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lance on March 31, 2006, 08:26:12 PM
i will probably end up editing my post multiple times. i've always had a list of 20, but here are just xx plus BM. the list just wouldn't look right without it.

not in specific order, but the first one has been on the list since 1962.

Lawrence of Arabia
Goldfinger
The Crying Game
Star Gate
Fight Club
The Matrix
The Lord of the Rings [all three parts make one movie]
Brokeback Mountain
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
2001, A Space Odyssey
Neverending Story
Titanic
The Hunt For Red October
Raiders of the Lost Ark
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
Back to the Future
Stand By Me
Dragonheart
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sydney on April 01, 2006, 05:31:00 AM
Quote
author=paintedshoes link=topic=4461.msg136882#msg136882 date=1143859661]
OK, but not in any particular order.  That changes with my mood.
Quote
4.   Age of Innocence

sorry, can't do just 10

Painted Shoes:  loved AGE OF INNOCENCE, especially the scene where Archer spreads the opening of Michelle's glove, while on the carriage ride back from Washington DC, and kisses her inner wrist, so subtle, yet sooooooo hot, that's all they could settle for........gee, sounds like our boys, Jack and Ennis, doesn't it. Also, the narration by Joanne Woodward was a nice touch, especially when explaining all about the rules of  New York's  society.....How prohibitive, can't imagine having to live in such a world.
Thanks for sharing your list and here are a few more of mine which I'd forgotten:

5 EASY PIECES
SUMMER OF 42
CITY OF GOD
BOSSA NOVA (great indy film with Carlos Jobim music)
Godfather I & II  

***from Greylock's list: The Man Who Would Be King (great for Sean Connery and Michael Caine fams)
                                 The Remains of the Day (best Anthony Hopkins performance, other than when he played a psychotic ventriloquist) cant remember name ??
 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sydney on April 01, 2006, 05:43:13 AM
Quote
author=BrokenOkie link=topic=4461.msg136981#msg136981 date=1143863092]
A few of my favorites...
Dead Ringer

Hi there Broken Oakie:
I've always loved that Bette Davis film DEAD RINGER..........here's a little bit of trivia for you if you happen to remember the house in which Bette went to live after taking on her dead sister's identity.........I went on a tour of that home last November, here in Beverly Hills.  The home is called GREYSTONE MANOR and it once belonged to the DOHENY family (very rich oil family).  The house is frequently used for films, Jerry Lewis, THE DISORDERLY ORDERLY and  ALL OF ME with Steve Martin and Lily Tomlin. Anyway, once a year they have a Design Home walking tour through the grounds and home..........well worth the $25 price as always wanted to see those beautifully carved balustrades and infamous black and white marble floors which figured prominently in all of the films mentioned, including DEAD RINGER.  In fact, on the tour, I saw the bedroom where Bette's character had her maid get her jewels out of the safe, in her closet..........the closet is STILL the same.
Of course also loved MILDRED PIERCE which you have on your list, nothing like an ungrateful child....
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Dixon on April 09, 2006, 07:36:20 AM
 Hmmm, apart from BBM, in no particular order and subject to change on a whim...

 Amelie                     - Anything by Jean-Pierre Jeunet in fact
 City of Lost Children   - See above
 Baron Munchausen    - Terry Gilliam is a genius
 Donnie Darko            - My first Jake and a brilliant film
 The Matrix                - Best Scifi ever
 Spirited Away            - Hayao Miyazaki - Another genius
 Legend                    - The one with the Tangerine Dream soundtrack, lots of other Ridley Scott films too
 The Usual Suspects    - Bryan Singers finest
 2001                        - Psycotic computer, love it!
 Akira                        - Neo-Tokyo is about to E.X.P.L.O.D.E. - Need I say more?!


 I have to say, before BBM came along, no one film was ever my favorite.  But now there's just no contest...
 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lizandre on April 09, 2006, 08:19:21 AM
Legend.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: graylockV on April 09, 2006, 10:02:45 PM
OKAY, here's my Top 40, including Brokeback Mountain.  (Plus 3 more, in "special categories")

In alphabetical order:

Becket
Das Boot
Bringing Up Baby
Brokeback Mountain
Cabaret
The Dead
Dead Man Walking
The Duelists
East of Eden
The Elephant Man
Fahrenheit 451
The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
Hud
Inherit the Wind
The Last Picture Show
Lawrence of Arabia
The Lion in Winter
Lust for Life
A Man For All Seasons
The Man Who Would Be King
The Mission
The Natural
None But the Lonely Heart
Once Upon A Time in The West
Paths of Glory
A Place In The Sun
The Remains of the Day
A River Runs Through It
Spartacus
The Shawshank Redemption
Splendor in the Grass
Sullivan's Travels
Sunset Boulevard
Things to Come
Time After Time
To Kill A Mockingbird
True Confessions
Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf
The Wind and The Lion
Zulu

Favorite Disney Movie - Lady and the Tramp
Favorite Trashy Movie - Fatal Attraction 
Favorite Really Awful Movie - Mommie Dearest

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on April 10, 2006, 10:51:54 AM
greylocke5, I am struck by a couple of your choices.  John Huston's The Dead (I hope that is the one you are referring to) is one of the loveliest  and most fragile things of beauty ever captured on film.  I cannot hear the song used  at the end of the film without a feeling of such tenderness that it threatens to overwhelm me.  Very much the same way that I am affected by the score of Brokeback.


Things to Come:  I saw that film when I was just a kid.  I so loved Raymond Massey (especially with the shoulder pads in the future sequence) and who could ever forget Ralph Richardson as The Boss!  I've never before found anyone who had ever heard of it.  Thank you.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: graylockV on April 11, 2006, 11:12:23 AM
greylocke5, I am struck by a couple of your choices.  John Huston's The Dead (I hope that is the one you are referring to) is one of the loveliest  and most fragile things of beauty ever captured on film.  I cannot hear the song used  at the end of the film without a feeling of such tenderness that it threatens to overwhelm me.  Very much the same way that I am affected by the score of Brokeback.


Things to Come:  I saw that film when I was just a kid.  I so loved Raymond Massey (especially with the shoulder pads in the future sequence) and who could ever forget Ralph Richardson as The Boss!  I've never before found anyone who had ever heard of it.  Thank you.


Hi Jackie,

Yes, tou got 'em right.  "THe Dead" was John Huston's last movie.

And the Raymond Massey / Ralph Richardson 1936 classic, "Things to Come," based on an H.G. Wells story, with an incredible film score by Arthur Bliss, one of the greatest ever written, IMHO.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jack on April 11, 2006, 01:01:30 PM
greylocke5, I am struck by a couple of your choices.  John Huston's The Dead (I hope that is the one you are referring to) is one of the loveliest  and most fragile things of beauty ever captured on film.  I cannot hear the song used  at the end of the film without a feeling of such tenderness that it threatens to overwhelm me.  Very much the same way that I am affected by the score of Brokeback.


Things to Come:  I saw that film when I was just a kid.  I so loved Raymond Massey (especially with the shoulder pads in the future sequence) and who could ever forget Ralph Richardson as The Boss!  I've never before found anyone who had ever heard of it.  Thank you.


Hi Jackie,

Yes, tou got 'em right.  "THe Dead" was John Huston's last movie.

And the Raymond Massey / Ralph Richardson 1936 classic, "Things to Come," based on an H.G. Wells story, with an incredible film score by Arthur Bliss, one of the greatest ever written, IMHO.
well, ya found another one.  i can't gather my wits enough to make a list, but that and metropolis would be on my early movies list, and battleship potemkin and ivan the terrible, by eisenstein.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: TomS on April 12, 2006, 11:22:53 AM
What a fun thread!  Here are a few of mine:  might add some as they come to mind:

Brokeback Mountain
Cabaret
The Best Years of Our Lives
The Yearling
The Red Balloon
Nashville
Midnight Cowboy
A Room with a View
The Crying Game
The Deer Hunter
Annie Hall
M*A*S*H
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Ennis Del Mark on April 19, 2006, 04:32:01 PM
Hi, Sydney!

I love questions like these.  Of course now that "Brokeback" has gone straight to #1 on my list I had to make some adjustments.  Here are my top ten:

1.  Brokeback
2.  The Wizard of Oz
3.  Bull Durham
4.  A Letter to Three Wives
5.  Moonstruck
6.  Stage Door
7.  Calamity Jane
8.  The Farmer's Daughter
9.  Our Town
10. Indian Summer


Best wishes,

Mark
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on April 19, 2006, 04:33:27 PM
Mark, I love your choice of "Stage Door".  "The calla lilies are in bloom again.  Such a strange flower, suitable to any occasion..."
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: moonbeam on April 19, 2006, 05:53:39 PM
Ok, here is my top ten after Brokeback.. which is now and forever after will be FAVORITE MOVIE EVER!!
1. Dead Poet's Society
2. A Christmas Story
3. Napolean Dynamite
4. Good Will Hunting
5. Anne of Green Gables
6. Anne of Avonlea
7. CaddyShack
8. Anger Management
9. 12 Angry Men (the old version)
10. Runaway Jury

so.. there you have it!  :)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Dave Cullen on April 22, 2006, 11:55:47 PM
Tie between Wild At Heart and Moulin Rouge, the latter being unlikely, since I normally hate musicals. But it seemed more like a surrealist film than a musical to me, what Bunuel and Dali were going for way back in the 30s but never quite hit.

And Wild At Heart, because it was. Most alive I've ever felt in a movie theater.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: annabel on April 23, 2006, 05:16:38 AM
Corny, but "The Way We Were" and Franco Zeferelli's "Romeo and Juliet"  Up until Brokeback, they were my two favorite love stories.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 23, 2006, 09:48:55 AM
Top 50

1.  Grand Illusion
2.  The Pianist
3.  The Passion of Joan of Arc
4.  Brokeback Mountain
5.  Gone With the Wind
6.  City Lights
7.  Children of Paradise
8.  The Wizard of Oz
9.  2001: A Space Odyssey
10.  All About Eve
11.  Citizen Kane
12.  Rashomon
13.  Sunset Boulevard
14.  Tokyo Story
15.  Wuthering Heights ('39)
16.  Au Hasard Balthazar
17.  Battleship Potemkin
18.  M
19.  The Grapes of Wrath
20.  Andrei Rublev
21.  Beauty and the Beast ('45)
22.  Napoleon
23.  Lawrence of Arabia
24.  The Bicycle Thief
25.  The Crowd
26.  Make Way for Tomorrow
27.  The Miracle of Morgan's Creek
28.  A Man Escaped
29.  La Strada
30.  Intolerance
31.  Some Like It Hot
32.  Raging Bull
33.  City of God
34.  Odd Man Out
35.  Ballad of a Soldier
36.  Mr. Smith Goes to Washington
37.  The Third Man
38.  Kind Hearts and Coronets
39.  The Last Emperor
40.  Notorious
41.  The Magnificent Ambersons
42.  Jules and Jim
43.  Ikiru
44. The Shop on Main Street
45.  Bonnie and Clyde
46.  Beauty and the Beast ('91)
47.  Manhattan
48.  Field of Dreams
49.  To Kill a Mockingbird
50.  Wild Strawberries or
50.  Night of the Hunter
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Dave Cullen on April 23, 2006, 03:39:44 PM
Top 50

now who could order their life so extensively?

you have your cds alphabetized, don't you? hehehe.

i would put moulin rouge up against M as best surrealist (neo-surrealist?) flim any day.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 23, 2006, 09:22:31 PM
DAVE:

Glad I resisted the temptation to list my Top 100, LOL (actually, my top 200...the nerd horns are growing and growing).

I think the "best" surrealist films are Un Chien Andalou and L'Age d'Or by Bunuel.  I don't really think of M as surrealist, although you are right, it kind of is.  M was so creepy and disturbing, with Lorre's amazing performance, and then that incredible defense later on.  Blew me away when I was in my '20s.

Moulin Rouge was my favorite film of 2001; couldn't believe Baz Luhrmann was snubbed for a Best Director Oscar nomination, he should have won.  But it is not a personal all-time favorite.  It sounds goofy, but the editing was too fast for me.  I get distracted by flashy things, it took me out of the film too many times.  Also missed Elton John's version of "Your Song", which I love.

2001 was a good year, the rest of my top 10 were Mulholland Drive, LOTR: Fellowship (by far the best of that trilogy), The Others, In the Mood for Love, No Man's Land, Gosford Park (like you, my favorite Altman - not a fan of Nashville, MASH, Player, etc., though like McCabe & Mrs. Miller), Memento, Black Hawk Down, I Am Sam (I admit it), ; couldn't stand Oscar winner Beautiful Mind, though I would take it over the 2005 victor any day.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: downloaded1 on April 23, 2006, 09:25:24 PM
Dali had more of an imput in Un Chein than Bunuel.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 23, 2006, 09:46:30 PM
DOWNLOADED1:

Re: Un Chien, true, but the director traditionally gets the credit.  Also, considering Bunuel's career, I suspect he had a lot to do with it.  Think of Viridiana, Exterminating Angel & Nazarin (among others), he has to be the greatest "surrealist" film director ever.  Still, I have more respect for Bunuel than affection, just my taste. 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: downloaded1 on April 23, 2006, 09:48:44 PM
You should see "Innocence" by director Lucile Hadzihalilovic.........
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 23, 2006, 09:53:48 PM
DOWNLOADED1:

Thanks much for recommendation.  I don't know the film, but will make it a point find it.  That's what I love most about forums like this, learning about movies with which I am not familiar.  I had never previously heard of the 1986 animated film "Grave of the Fireflies", read about it from film buffs on another site, and now it is in my favorite 100 films ever (a real tearjerker).
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: downloaded1 on April 23, 2006, 09:56:50 PM
Is Night Of The Hunter with Robert Mitchum?
He's the preacher with "love" and "hate" tattooed on his knuckles?
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 23, 2006, 10:05:31 PM
DOWNLOADED1:

Re: Night of the Hunter, yes, Robert Mitchum (in an all-time great performance, not even nominated, should have won), Lillian Gish (ditto the paranthetical comment), Shelly Winters, and 2 amazing kids.  The little girl was so unique looking.  People always talk about Vertigo being the closest movie resembling a dream/nightmare, but I think Hunter takes the prize.  Too bad Charles Laughton never directed anything else - and what a great actor he was.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: downloaded1 on April 23, 2006, 10:06:25 PM
"Innocence" has a very surreal dream like feel also.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 23, 2006, 10:17:17 PM
DOWNLOADED1:

What are some of your favorite films? 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: downloaded1 on April 23, 2006, 10:19:24 PM
just look at YOUR list
really
 :D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 23, 2006, 10:33:03 PM
DOWNLOADED1:

Wow - that is extremely cool - thanks.  Tempted to list another 50, but will wait, it's 12:30 a.m. in NYC and I've gotta get to bed soon.

But - I can't help it - just a few quick things while you are on-line:

a.  Grand Illusion is so remarkable, it always bothers me when Rules of the Game is ranked higher.  I know it's ridiculous, they are both pretty universally considered to be in the top 25 films in world cinema, but Rules pretty much has the #2 spot, and I don't see why.  I understand it has the structure and I recognize it is brilliant (although it took me 3 times), but it just doesn't have the emotional pull or poignancy of the Grand Illusion. 

b.  Gone With the Wind has fallen out of favor, and to a degree I can why, but I don't think it is fair.  I know, the directorial styles of George Cukor, Victor Fleming and maybe others are not internally consistent, but so what, the end product remains one of the most ambitious Hollywood products ever.  That is one of the reasons I prefer it (strongly) to its big competitor for greatest romance, Casablanca, which was only supposed to be a B movie.   Like everybody else I think Casablanca is wonderful, but in some ways it plays almost more like a Shakespeare play (with all those great lines) than a piece of cinema.  And Grand Illusion used L'Marseille first, and to even better, semi-surrealistic effect.

c.  If I list another 50 films, a few Hitchcocks will make it, but not Vertigo.  It pretty much has the #3 spot in world cinema at this point, and certainly I respect it, but it meanders.  Kim Novak also didn't cut it for me - she should have switched roles with Barbara Bel Geddes, who was much more interesting (but of course Novak fit the ice blond Hitchcock mold).

Curious what you think.  Forgive me if I don't respond tonight, only another 5 minutes or so on-line.  thx

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: downloaded1 on April 23, 2006, 10:36:00 PM
Hitchcock
Rebecca
Rear Window
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 23, 2006, 10:48:59 PM
DOWNLOADED1:

Wow - we really do have similar taste.  If I had listed 60 films, Rebecca would definitely have made it.  Rear Window is in my 100.  So is Shadow of a Doubt.  Next would probably be North By Northwest or Strangers on a Train, both in personal top 200.

P.S.  If ever there should have been a Best Supporting Actress tie, Judith Anderson as Mrs. Danvers and Jane Darwell as Ma Joad would have been it.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: downloaded1 on April 23, 2006, 10:53:00 PM
Also like,
Requiem For A Dream and Pi
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 23, 2006, 10:59:36 PM
Here's where we part.  Not a Tarnofsky fan.  I respect his work, but too self-conscious for my taste.  I liked Pi more than Requiem since I felt Ellen Burstyn's (admittedly revered) performance was over the top.  He has a lot of talent, but I think he needs to reign himself in a little. 

Off to sleep - enjoyed chatting a lot, hope we can do it again soon.  Thanks much.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: downloaded1 on April 23, 2006, 11:00:03 PM
Sleep well.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: bluebird2 on April 24, 2006, 09:11:16 PM
The best films for me are those I have watched at least six or more times over the years.  They may not be the "best" if taken apart and critiqued in depth, but for me they work.  Among these are (in no particular order):

      East of Eden
      A Streetcar Named Desire
      Gone With the Wind
      La Strada
      And of course BBM!

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 24, 2006, 10:33:33 PM
bluebird2:

Great choices, imo.  3/5 are in my top 50 (2 in my top 5 also, Brokeback & GWTW).  Guiletta Masina may be best remembered for Nights of Cabiria (she was astounding), but I think her performance in La Strada is one of the dozen or so greatest ever filmed.  Richard Basehart was also superb.  My favorite Fellini.

Loved East of Eden - not even nominated for the (worthless) Oscar for Best Picture, though director Elia Kazan & James Dean were nominated (the latter posthumously), and Jo Van Fleet won (probably also because she was superb in "I'll Cry Tomorrow" same year).  Really captures the flavor of the equally amazing book.  In 1955, East of Eden, Night of the Hunter, Rebel Without a Cause and Bad Day at Black Rock, I think the 4 best english- language films of the year, were all overlooked for Picture nominations for the inferior Love Is a Many Splendored Thing, Picnic, The Rose Tattoo...and the very good Mister Roberts & winner Marty.

Streetcar of course is revered, though not a personal absolute favorite the way it is for so many.  Vivien Leigh was amazing, Marlon Brando was amazing, yet somehow to me they felt like they were in different movies.  Perhaps that was the point, but if so, I missed it, LOL.  Nonetheless, undeniably a 4 star classic.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: bluebird2 on April 25, 2006, 10:14:28 AM
jayiijay:

Yes, Jo Van Fleet was superb in East of Eden--the scene in her office with James Dean is so powerful...they're both great, and I recommend to anyone reading this to see the film just for this scene if nothing else...of course, the entire movie is excellent.  (I think I'll watch it again tonight...it's been a while!)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: mary on April 25, 2006, 10:17:36 AM
Just to let you know - I merged this thread with the one that sydney had previously begun in Meet and Greet. Mmost of those posts occured prior to this thread beeing created - so there's a page or so at the beginning of the thread now that you might not have seen
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: czterrier on April 25, 2006, 11:32:53 AM
Besides BBM which is #1, in no particular order:

Shawshank Redemption
Remains of the Day
Sense & Sensibility (Ang Lee's)
Alien
The Matrix
Harold and Maude
The Heiress
Billy Elliot
About a Boy
Double Indemnity
The Crying Game
Unbreakable
The Graduate
All This And Heaven Too
Star Trek: First Contact
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Meira on April 25, 2006, 11:37:24 AM
Ok.  You've all mentioned some I've loved but haven't thought of in a while, so , in no particular order, here are some of my favorites (aside from BBM - the all time fave - never to be replaced):

Dirty Dancing
Babe
Good Will Hunting
Sex, Lies and Videotape
The Man Who Would Be King
The Bourne Identity (and it's sequel)
Harold and Maude
The Reincarnation of Peter Proud
The Great Escape
The Sum of Us
Gladiator
The Terminator
Titanic
Desperately Seeking Susan (for Aidan Quinn, of course!)
Lethal Weapon
Million Dollar Baby
A Beautiful Mind
Little Shop of Horrors
Escape From Sobibor
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: BayCityJohn on April 25, 2006, 11:58:22 AM
My top 20 list:

1. IF I HAVE TO SPELL IT OUT YOU HAVEN'T BEEN PAYING ATTENTION
2. To Kill A Mockingbird
3. A Streetcar Named Desire
4. Meet Me In St. Louis
5. Auntie Mame
6. The Grapes Of Wrath
7. Singin' In The Rain
8. West Side Story
9. Superman
10. The Color Purple
11. Steel Magnolias
12. On Golden Pond
13. 42nd Street
14. Dr. Strangelove
15. Whatever Happened To Baby Jane
16. Bye Bye Birdie
17. Blink (because a friend is in the movie)
18. Inside Daisy Clover
19. Billy Elliot
20. Maurice
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on April 25, 2006, 12:01:19 PM
I hate lists (too many good movies) so maybe I will just steal from yours!

LOVED Babe :D (the pig, not the ballplayer)

Good Will Hunting

Titanic

Little Shop of Horrors

Shawshank

About a Boy


okay what the heck I will add some ...

The first two Godfathers

Deer Hunter

the first ROCKY

Platoon

Forrest Gump

As Good as it Gets

Pride and Predjudice (with Colin Firth)

Chicago

Some Like it Hot

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

The Rainmaker

Seven Brides for Seven Brothers

Mambo Kings

Don Juan DeMarco

Fried Green Tomatoes

Dangerous Liasons

The Notebook

Interview with a Vampire

Moonstruck

Stand by Me

The Sandlot


see that I mean the list is toooooooooo long.

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 25, 2006, 02:26:43 PM
bluebird2:  Jo Van Fleet was a great, underappreciated actress.  Did you ever see the 1960 movie Wild River directed by Elia Kazan co-starring Montgomery Clift & Lee Remick?  If not, check it out on www.imdb.com, she is fantastic in it.

Really enjoy reading people's favorite lists.  I was rooting for Babe to beat Braveheart in '95, but as usual the wrong film won.  The former was so original, funny and well-executed.  I was rooting for either Quiz Show or Shawshank to beat Forrest Gump in '94, though Shawshank had no chance since it didn't receive a director nomination, and is more highly regarded now than it was then.  All This and Heaven Too is an underappreciated Bette Davis film, though a Best Picture nominee in 1940.  Davis' nominationt that year was for The Letter, another great film & performance - never understood why somebody can't be nominated for more than one performance in the same year.  Like CZTERRIER, I was also one of the few who thought Remains of the Day was better than Schindler's List in '93.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on April 25, 2006, 02:34:40 PM
I have yet so see Schindlers List, I have only recently worked my way up to watching Life is Beautiful, which I did really like.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 25, 2006, 04:19:03 PM
Loved the first half of Life, had problems with the second half.  I respected Schindler's List and don't dislike it, but honestly, the three hour narrative was completely forgettable, the ending was unnecessarily manipulative, the nazis were portrayed more as black and white psychopaths than real people - which made it less effective (the "banality of evil", right?!), etc.

The Pianist blows both Schindler's List and Life Is Beautiful out of the water.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Poohbunn on April 25, 2006, 05:27:48 PM
OK, call me lame, but I think "Mary Poppins" is a splendid film.  I love the animation, music, story and cutie pie Dick Van Dyke!  Others on my list of favorites:

Babe
Romero
Victor, Victoria
Sound of Music (I'm a big Julie Andrews fan)
October Sky
Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day
Edward Scissorhands
Benny and Joon
My Name is Bill W.

I could go on and on, but you can see I don't have high falutin' tastes in movies. I love whimsy and things I can relate to.

Pooh
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 25, 2006, 07:09:24 PM
POOHBUNN:

Love Mary Poppins, Babe, Victor/Victoria, Sound of Music, all among my favorites too, plus Edward Scissorhands.

As a Julie Andrews fan, have you seen The Americanization of Emily?  She's outstanding in it.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: BayCityJohn on April 25, 2006, 10:02:59 PM
OK, call me lame, but I think "Mary Poppins" is a splendid film.  I love the animation, music, story and cutie pie Dick Van Dyke! 

I have never seen Mary Poppins. I love Julie Andrews and Dick Van Dyke.

I got to see Julie Andrews in Victor Victoria at the Schubert in Chicago a few years ago.

Dick Van Dyke did a movie back in 1974 called 'The Morning After'. I think it's the best performance of his career. I haven't seen the movie since it was first shown. I remember how this movie affected my family at the time. My father was an alchoholic, and it was like watching our own lives on tv. Not too long after that Dick Van Dyke 'came out' as an alchoholic at a press conference.

Here's a review from IMDB:

Richard Matheson has given us another masterful screenplay, and Dick Van Dyke is perfectly cast in the dramatic role of his career. I saw this on its initial television release date, and I recall the wide recognition that it garnered; but "The Morning After" seems to have slipped from visibility lately. Still, at the time of this film, "lovable drunk" jokes and comics were prolific on television – and since "The Morning After", and its terrific eye-opening impact, they disappeared almost overnight. Now there were other, numerous efforts in those days to increase the awareness of alcoholism ... but I maintain that the impact of this unforgettable, much-discussed television film, with its chilling end, had a huge impact on the American consciousness. But we'll never be able to measure the number of lives it must have saved. Highly recommended to all.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on April 25, 2006, 10:20:13 PM
Dick was chilling in The Morning After, I remember it well.

And Christmas before last I had the DVD collectors edition of Mary Poppins on my Christmas list, it is magic.   :)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: TomS on April 26, 2006, 09:41:00 AM
Dick was chilling in The Morning After, I remember it well.

And Christmas before last I had the DVD collectors edition of Mary Poppins on my Christmas list, it is magic.   :)

Way to go for mentioning Mary Poppins.  That was the very first movie I ever saw in a theater as a kid!!

40 years later I think the special effects are still amazing.  And Feed the Birds brings tears.  (Some of you might recognize the Bird-Woman as Jane Darwell, or Ma Joad in The Grapes of Wrath.)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: nkburlington on April 26, 2006, 09:59:52 AM
I'm not sure I can come up with ten.  Most movies, AFAIC are quite stupid but then again, some of the stupid ones are my faves;

(in no particular order)
The Last Seduction
The Usual Suspects
The Sixth Sense
Memento
Under Suspicion
Wild Things (I know, I know...but I liked it; trashy as it was)
 
I'm sure I'll think of more later.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Dave Cullen on April 26, 2006, 11:00:45 AM
The best films for me are those I have watched at least six or more times over the years.  They may not be the "best" if taken apart and critiqued in depth, but for me they work.  Among these are (in no particular order):

      East of Eden
      A Streetcar Named Desire
      Gone With the Wind
      La Strada
      And of course BBM!


I rarely watch a film more than once. But Streetcar is one of my favorites.

---

Nice to see About A Boy mentioned, Lola. Not on my all-time list, but I really liked that film a lot, have a great affection for it.

Same with Babe. And the one phrase definitely stuck in my head. I think of it often in particular situations, though i get some strange looks when I go ahead and vocalize it. "That'll do, pig."

hehehe.

I despise Forest Gump, though. Definitely on my most-overrated list in a catfight with Titanic for the top spot. Titantic tends to win because it got more acclaim, so the discrepancy is bigger. But there were a lot of good things in Titanic. Gump is just loathsome from conception through final product. It perches near the top of Gag Me list.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 26, 2006, 11:03:05 AM
NKBURLINGTON:

Linda Fiorentino was fantastic in Last Seduction, she really made the movie.  After deservedly winning the New York Film Critics Award for Best Actress, the Academy decided the film was ineligible since shown on HBO, disqualified Linda, and wound up giving the Best Actress prize to Jessica Lange (whom I like a lot) in her histrionic, overwrought performance in Blue Sky.  Yet another Oscar injustice.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: nkburlington on April 26, 2006, 11:05:28 AM
NKBURLINGTON:

Linda Fiorentino was fantastic in Last Seduction, she really made the movie.  After deservedly winning the New York Film Critics Award for Best Actress, the Academy decided the film was ineligible since shown on HBO, disqualified Linda, and wound up giving the Best Actress prize to Jessica Lange (whom I like a lot) in her histrionic, overwrought performance in Blue Sky.  Yet another Oscar injustice.

I know!  She was ripped!  She was fantastic and when I heard that the Academy had disqualified it I was totally bummed.  I've seen TLS probaly 50 or more times. 

Did you like her in Jade?  That movie was fucked up and I HATE David Caruso but she was good in that one too.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: johnk on April 26, 2006, 02:44:43 PM
I was really hoping someone would start a thread like this!  I was very interested in what sort of favorite film lists the members of the forum would have...anyway, my list:

1    Brokeback Mountain
2    Titanic (1997)
3    Gone With The Wind
4    The Graduate
5    American Beauty
6    All About Eve
7    The Godfather
8    Rebecca
9    Moulin Rouge
10  Dinner at Eight

...for what it's worth.

johnk
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: DaveinPhilly on April 26, 2006, 03:35:39 PM
Yes, Rebecca.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on April 26, 2006, 04:08:16 PM
Dave, I have been trying to find a DVD of Rebecca for several years, but it is out of print.  Used copies are ridiculously expensive, so I make do with my copy taped off of TV.  I love it too.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on April 26, 2006, 04:22:50 PM
Nice to see About A Boy mentioned, Lola. Not on my all-time list, but I really liked that film a lot, have a great affection for it.

Same with Babe. And the one phrase definitely stuck in my head. I think of it often in particular situations, though i get some strange looks when I go ahead and vocalize it. "That'll do, pig."

hehehe.


I bought About A Boy, I really did like it, it was different.

Babe I loved and yea for months I said............That'll do, pig. That'll do..............and people would look at me and say "uh excuse me?"  :D  I bought the original and the sequel as a set on DVD, the second one was terrible.

I also didn't eat any pork products for about a year!  :'(


Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: DaveinPhilly on April 26, 2006, 05:36:41 PM
Dave, I have been trying to find a DVD of Rebecca for several years, but it is out of print.  Used copies are ridiculously expensive, so I make do with my copy taped off of TV.  I love it too.

We've been making do with an old Video tape recording. I've seen it (*blushes*) more times than BBM, but only on the VCR mind you.

Gay men have for years also watched "The Women" which is hysterical and remarkable for its time (1945?) - a very jaded view of the "weaker sex".
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on April 26, 2006, 06:45:17 PM
Dave, "The Women" was done in 1939, MGM, all-female cast.  I think it is hysterical, also.  And I've probably seen Rebecca way too many times over the years.  Never get tired of it, though.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: peteinportland on April 27, 2006, 02:34:28 AM
Before BBM (that already seems such a huge demarkation point in my life), my favorite film was The Big Chill.

I also love Torch Song Trilogy, Fight Club, Seven, The Birdcage, Mystic River, Dangerous Liasions, LOTR, Harry Potter (all of them), Dead Poet's Society, Good Will Hunting, Top Gun, The Godfather 1 and 2, A Beautiful Thing, Angels in America (not technically a film, but a masterpiece). Any of these films I could watch at anytime. There are others, but I can't think of them all.

Pete
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: johnk on April 27, 2006, 08:43:21 AM
Dave, I have been trying to find a DVD of Rebecca for several years, but it is out of print.  Used copies are ridiculously expensive, so I make do with my copy taped off of TV.  I love it too.

Oh gosh, "Rebecca" - I also love this one.  This is the only movie poster I have hanging in my home besides BBM.  I read the book last summer and was surprised at how few liberties Hitchcock took with the original plot (the few changes he made were to get it past the censors, no doubt).

Try eBay.  I was recently able to get a brand new copy of the DVD from a distributor in Great Britain for less than USD20.

johnk
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: DaveinPhilly on April 27, 2006, 09:34:05 AM
Aside from Rebecca I'd list (in no partcular order) - Big Night, Schindler's List, Sophie's Choice, Howard's End, Passage to India, The Lion in Winter, My Beautiful Launderette, and far from the Madding Crowd. With BBM that makes my ten...
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on April 27, 2006, 09:35:24 AM
Am I the only person in the world who hasn't seen Rebecca, I had never even heard of it?  :'(
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: DaveinPhilly on April 27, 2006, 09:45:43 AM
Could be Lola. Early Hitchcock with Laurence Olivier - unblieveably & magnificently hot - and Joan Fontaine, George Sanders and Dame Judith Anderson, I think. It's a remarkable experience.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: johnk on April 27, 2006, 12:58:15 PM
Am I the only person in the world who hasn't seen Rebecca, I had never even heard of it?  :'(

Lola, you really should see it if you get a chance.  It's not everyone's cup of tea, but it has a kind of a modern (and very mysterious and edgy, I might add) feel to it.  Not to mention more plot twists than you can shake a stick at.  Some of the subject matter was rather daring for 1940 - some of it still is in 2006 (as the poster for the film indicated, "Not suitable for general audiences," whatever that means).  It was nominated for 11 Oscars (back when maybe that actually meant something), and won two including BP.  Olivier, Fontaine, Anderson, and Hitchcock all received noms for their efforts.  This is a classic that I never get tired of watching. jmho

johnk
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on April 27, 2006, 01:20:14 PM
I will have to watch it without hubby, he has a phobia about old movies, he hates them all! lol   They are also so darn hard to get ahold of on VHS or DVD.

Sometimes you have to buy them, in order to see them!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 27, 2006, 06:03:14 PM
I love Rebecca, it is in my top 100 for sure.  LOLA, you must see it, it is romantic and haunting.  Very faithful to Daphne du Maurier's book.

However, once again the Academy got it wrong.  Of course Hitchcock is undeniably one of world cinema's pantheon directors, it is a crime he never won (5 nominations).  Several of his films should have won Best Picture, including Notorious ('46), Rear Window ('54), Vertigo ('58) and Psycho ('60).  North By Northwest was better than winner Ben-Hur, though Some Like It Hot probably deserves the '59 prize.  Arguments can also be made for 39 Steps ('35), Shadow of a Doubt ('43 - believe it or not, Casablanca was actually an upset winner that year over Song of Bernadette & Watch on the Rhine- the one and only time an upset winner should have won - but the film should have been eligible in 1942), and even Strangers on a Train ('51).  But Rebecca should not have won.  The Grapes of Wrath is a seminal achievement in American cinema, was heavily favored after winning the precursors (there weren't many back then, but the New York Film Critics and National Board of Review used to hold great power), won Best Director for John Ford, but then surprisingly lost Best Picture.  If I had my druthers, I would have reversed it, giving Grapes Picture and Hitchcock director (though frankly Ford probably deserved it - close).  Film historian history has always proven the Academy wrong (again, except Casablanca).  Rebecca is very highly regarded and sometimes makes top 100 lists, but in 1977, Grapes of Wrath was voted #4 ever at the American Film Institute, then a shockingly low #21 at the 1997 AFI poll (a lesser poll in every respect since the voting was opened up to non-movie people, like the President, Secretary of State, etc.; their opinions are no more "valid" from a film-history perspective than any of the rest of us).  Rebecca made neither list, though it should have.  Grapes is also more highly regarded in world cinema, having made the top 50 at Sight & Sound at least twice.  Anyhow, probably too much information, Rebecca is a fantastic must-see, I just like trashing the Academy these days.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: BRAD1963 on April 27, 2006, 06:12:44 PM
I love Rebecca, it is in my top 100 for sure.  LOLA, you must see it, it is romantic and haunting.  Very faithful to Daphne du Maurier's book.

However, once again the Academy got it wrong.  Of course Hitchcock is undeniably one of world cinema's pantheon directors, it is a crime he never won (5 nominations).  Several of his films should have won Best Picture, including Notorious ('46), Rear Window ('54), Vertigo ('58) and Psycho ('60).  North By Northwest was better than winner Ben-Hur, though Some Like It Hot probably deserves the '59 prize.  Arguments can also be made for 39 Steps ('35), Shadow of a Doubt ('43 - believe it or not, Casablanca was actually an upset winner that year over Song of Bernadette & Watch on the Rhine- the one and only time an upset winner should have won - but the film should have been eligible in 1942), and even Strangers on a Train ('51).  But Rebecca should not have won.  The Grapes of Wrath is a seminal achievement in American cinema, was heavily favored after winning the precursors (there weren't many back then, but the New York Film Critics and National Board of Review used to hold great power), won Best Director for John Ford, but then surprisingly lost Best Picture.  If I had my druthers, I would have reversed it, giving Grapes Picture and Hitchcock director (though frankly Ford probably deserved it - close).  Film historian history has always proven the Academy wrong (again, except Casablanca).  Rebecca is very highly regarded and sometimes makes top 100 lists, but in 1977, Grapes of Wrath was voted #4 ever at the American Film Institute, then a shockingly low #21 at the 1997 AFI poll (a lesser poll in every respect since the voting was opened up to non-movie people, like the President, Secretary of State, etc.; their opinions are no more "valid" from a film-history perspective than any of the rest of us).  Rebecca made neither list, though it should have.  Grapes is also more highly regarded in world cinema, having made the top 50 at Sight & Sound at least twice.  Anyhow, probably too much information, Rebecca is a fantastic must-see, I just like trashing the Academy these days.


Just goes to show the Academy has had a long History of blunders.  They are really out of touch and I really did not realize it until this year.  All they are is a bunch a Elitests. 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on April 27, 2006, 06:45:20 PM
Alot of people are saying Rebecca was their favourite film, so maybe it did deserve it's win.

I checked Pycho and it was never even nominated for best pic, neither was Rear Window or Vertigo.

Casablanca won and it deserved to win.  (AFI has it rated as the #2 on the list of top 100)

Ben Hur was great and so was Some Like it Hot (it is one of my favourite films)

I think the Academy got it wrong this year, but pretty much every year I have agreed with their pics.

http://www.oscarworld.net/best_pic.htm

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: RickB on April 27, 2006, 06:57:20 PM
Hitchcock was furious with Selznick for interferring with Rebecca. Hitchcock considered it Selznick picture, not a Hitchcock film, by the time it was finished.
Hitchcock got the most interesting revenge. In Rear Window, Raymond Burr played a murderer who looked exactly like David O'Selsnick and all those knives in his kitchen were a comment about interference with editing. One of Hitch's many little jokes.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 27, 2006, 09:43:29 PM
RICKB:

"...I'm starting to think of Oscar as a 'Dickless Wonder'. "

That is priceless.  It's also incredibly accurate.  I think the Academy got it right about 25% of the time since 1927/8, and that is giving the benefit of the doubt in ignoring eligible foreign films.  Also a great tid-bit re: Raymond Burr as David O'Selznik in Rear Window.

LOLA, no disrespect intended by this question, but have you seen the films which the Oscar Best Pictures have competed against in order to know whether you agree with them?  After all, many people are citing Rebecca because someone cited it earlier, it reminds them of that movie they also love, but far more people in movie polls will pick Grapes of Wrath.  In fact, the 1940 "official order" is Grapes of Wrath, Philadelphia Story (#51 at AFI, I think), Fantasia (also in the AFI 100), then probably Rebecca (again, ignoring foreign greats).  Personally, I loved Rebecca too (I said it earlier), it was my strong #2 film of the year, more enjoyable than Grapes, but just because people are chiming in on how great it is (including me), it doesn't mean it deserved to win.  On the other hand, if you are saying that you liked most of the Academy choices as films, then yeah, I agree too, most were very good films (they should be!), even if they weren't the "best".  Citizen Kane lost to a beautiful, wonderful movie, How Green Was My Valley - and of course anybody has the right to enjoy Valley (or anything else) more than Kane.  But in my opinion, there are certain objective standards in judging art, and few movies are in a class Kane - certainly not Valley.  So, the Academy chose a great film, but not the "best" film, which is their self-proclaimed job after all, LOL.  1959 is another great example.  Like you, I love Ben-Hur.  I cried at the end the first time I saw it, and I always mist, but let's face it, it is somewhat lumbering, Charlton Heston is stiff, and while it is certainly epic, other than the slave-galley and chariot race scenes, it is kind of stilted - not a "moving" picture the way not-even-nominated Some Like It Hot and North By Northwest were the same year. 

As for Psycho, Rear Window and Vertigo (not to mention Notorious) not even being nominated, doesn't it prove the point that the Academy has always been somewhat out of touch.  Forget about all being on the AFI Top 100 which you cited re: Casablanca.  Vertigo for at least 20 years now has been considered by world cinema experts as one of the top 5 movies ever made, ranking with Citizen Kane, Rules of the Game and 2001 (also not even nominated), and even higher than seminal masterpieces like Grand Illusion, The Passion of Joan of Arc and Battleship Potemkin.  Personally, I don't love Vertigo.  I respect it as for Hitchcock's genius in creating a work of pure cinema, but to didn't do it for me the way many of his other films have.  But it's not about my personal opinion re: what I like better, it's trying to judge films on their artistic merits, just like we do literature and music.  Psycho is also considered to be in the top 35 in world cinema (and #18 at AFI), and Rear Window in the top 50 or 60 in the world.  Not bad!

As for Casablanca, yeah, almost everybody loves it, I certainly like it a lot too, and its hard to deny it deserved the prize, but catch its competitors if you haven't already seen them.  The Song of Bernadette is a wonderful film with a great Oscar winning performance by Jennifer Jones.  It won the first ever Golden Globe, and was favored to win the Oscar (it got 5).  Watch on the Rhine with Bette Davis & Oscar winner Paul Lukas is from a superb Lillian Hellman play and won the New York Film Critics Award.  The National Board of Review chose The Ox Bow Incident, perhaps the earliest anti-western, with Henry Fonda.  Hitchcock's Shadow of a Doubt wasn't even nominated  - a crime - Hitch said it was his personal favorite of all his movies.  I think it is my personal favorite of 1943.  Oh, and the other thing about Casablanca's victory - it won in the wrong year, it is always listed as a 1942 release, but the Academy blew it re: deadline confusion, the movie became popular, so they made it eligible for 1943.

P.S.  I went off on this because it aggravated me no end that Academy members openly admitted their refusal to see Brokeback Mountain on account of homophobia ("John Wayne would turn over in his grave") so it lost.  I think the Academy loses credibility for permitting anybody to vote who refuses to view all 5 nominees.  Every other credible organization has that requirement.  In 2000, I admit I enjoyed Gladiator, a fun, well-made film. But then I saw other nominees Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon & Traffic and strongly preferred those.  How can anyone vote for the "best" until they have seen them all.  That is the purpose of the nomination system - to narrow down the field to 5 to make it easy for the Academy members to view the films.  We all know they don't always do so, but when they proclaims they refuse to, and for such ugly reasons - ugh.

 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on April 28, 2006, 06:09:55 AM
JAY I was just replying down in the Oscar Snub post to something similar.  The academy may not have always got it right (and again that is open to interpetation) but many years they have got it right.  And sometimes more than one very good film are nominated for BP and only one can win (as you know).

As was mentioned in the Oscar Snub post, Wizard of Oz didn't win, you think how could that not win, well because it was up against Gone with the Wind.

Shawshank I think would have won any other year, if it hadn't been up against Forrest Gump and so on and so on.

I think this year the academy did not get it right, BB was the best film, it was the one that went in with ALL the prior wins, so yea "something stunk" lol

I am the first to admit I have not seen alot of older movies (movies from the 40's) so movies that people say are excellent (and they may be from an artistic point of view) I personally may not enjoy.

The fact that Some Like it Hot was never nominated is bad, but I can live with it losing to Ben Hur.  Some Like it Hot is one of my favourite movies.

I can't say as I was ever a big Hithcock fan, sorry if it is sacreligious to say that, but it is how I feel.  Although who can ever forget Pycho, maybe it was just too darn scary back then, it still scares the crap out of me.

I use to know a lady and The Song of Bernadette was one of her favourite movies ever, I should check that out, there are alot of older ones I should go back and check out.

You have certainly seen a ton of them, so I bow to you, you are obviously far more expert on the old movies than I am.

Anyway I am sure I am rambling and have not even answered your questions, if so just ask me again! lol

I will say again though 99% of the time I have agreed with the academy choices, I truly have.  I have watched the Oscars since I was a young teen and this is the first year I remember being stunned.

Now when I say I have agreed, I can't really speak for everything in the 40's (I wasn't alive and haven't went back and checked those out, even films from the 50's and 60's I have went back and checked out as an adult). 

And heck I manage to see ALL the nominated films and performances most years, so why the hell can't the voters?  And yea if they can't, then don't vote.

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: BRAD1963 on April 28, 2006, 10:50:19 AM
This year's Oscars really made me take notice on their choices for Best Picture over the years.  I find the films most remembered over the past 30 years (at least) DID NOT win Best Picture and some cases not even nominated.  Examples include Goodfellas, The Exorcist, Fargo, Raging Bull, 2001..., Do The Right Thing, Pulp Fiction, Network (or Taxi Driver and All The President's Men all from 1976), Brokeback Mountain just as a few examples.  The only time I think they ever took a chance was with Midnight Cowboy.  They have a history of making 'safer' choices and really are not the barometer as far as THE BEST is really concerned.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: johnk on April 29, 2006, 06:36:01 AM
Hitchcock was furious with Selznick for interferring with Rebecca. Hitchcock considered it Selznick picture, not a Hitchcock film, by the time it was finished.
Hitchcock got the most interesting revenge. In Rear Window, Raymond Burr played a murderer who looked exactly like David O'Selsnick and all those knives in his kitchen were a comment about interference with editing. One of Hitch's many little jokes.

RickB, great post BTW.  I keep imagining Hitchock being furious with Selznick.  He didn't seem like a dish thrower to me :).   This kind of inside juice is way interesting.  I always thought Hitch was kind of a hands off director.  I read "Rebecca" last summer and I was surprised at how close he stuck to the plot despite the admittedly tough subject matter.  I mean, the eponymous character was not exactly a nice person.

Selznick had just shepherded GWTW through several directors and apparently was not the the mood to be indulgent.  Olivier was unhappy that his girlfriend Viv was not selected for the role of the second Mrs. DeWinter and made his dislike of Fontaine well known on the set.  Hitchcock lapped up this tension like a cat laps up milk.  The end product speaks volumes.

Thanks again!

johnk
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: johnk on April 29, 2006, 07:32:44 AM
JAY I was just replying down in the Oscar Snub post to something similar.  The academy may not have always got it right (and again that is open to interpetation) but many years they have got it right.  And sometimes more than one very good film are nominated for BP and only one can win (as you know).


And heck I manage to see ALL the nominated films and performances most years, so why the hell can't the voters?  And yea if they can't, then don't vote.



Lola, you should be in AMPAS!

Check out "Goodbye, Mr. Chips" and "The Best Years of Our Lives."  The latter (BP in 1946) was one of the rare instances when Hollywood actually dealt face on with a real problem (i.e., GIs returning from the war).  As regards Mr. Chips, 1939 was a great year for movies.  I would pay good money just to watch Greer Garson take the trash out - see "Mrs. Miniver."

...for what it's worth
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: DaveinPhilly on April 29, 2006, 08:11:04 AM
Yeah, The Best Years of Our Loves was a superb film! Interesting how tragic stories are often forgotten by the public.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on April 29, 2006, 08:15:50 AM
JAY I was just replying down in the Oscar Snub post to something similar.  The academy may not have always got it right (and again that is open to interpetation) but many years they have got it right.  And sometimes more than one very good film are nominated for BP and only one can win (as you know).


And heck I manage to see ALL the nominated films and performances most years, so why the hell can't the voters?  And yea if they can't, then don't vote.



Lola, you should be in AMPAS!

Check out "Goodbye, Mr. Chips" and "The Best Years of Our Lives."  The latter (BP in 1946) was one of the rare instances when Hollywood actually dealt face on with a real problem (i.e., GIs returning from the war).  As regards Mr. Chips, 1939 was a great year for movies.  I would pay good money just to watch Greer Garson take the trash out - see "Mrs. Miniver."

...for what it's worth

I feel so bad I have not seen ALL these older films!  But like I said above how the heck do you get to see them.  My Blockbuster barely carries movies from the 1980's  :-\
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: DaveinPhilly on April 29, 2006, 08:32:28 AM
There are some things good about being over the hill.... I saw them all as a child on TV! (but that was the 1950's & 60's a very long time ago.)

But there are other sources for films than Blockbuster. TLA Video has an excellent assortment.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: mary on April 29, 2006, 08:52:16 AM
I feel so bad I have not seen ALL these older films!  But like I said above how the heck do you get to see them.  My Blockbuster barely carries movies from the 1980's  :-\

Lola I have found that my local library carries a lot of the old films - I'm planning to go borrow Rebecca today. So that might be a place to start.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: johnk on April 29, 2006, 08:53:36 AM
[
I feel so bad I have not seen ALL these older films!  But like I said above how the heck do you get to see them.  My Blockbuster barely carries movies from the 1980's  :-\

Dave is totally right.  TLA has a great selection.  You should also check out:  "Cavalcade," "Dinner at Eight," "It Happened One Night," and "Golddiggers of 1935."  The last one is just for fun but Gloria Stuart is in it, Buzby Berkley does all the choreography, and there's a great "Lullaby of Broadway" number in it.  Enjoy!

johnk
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: TomS on April 29, 2006, 04:21:03 PM
Yeah, The Best Years of Our Loves was a superb film! Interesting how tragic stories are often forgotten by the public.

I agree 100%.  In fact, until this year, Best Years of Our Lives was may all-time favorite.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on April 29, 2006, 08:54:06 PM
Tom, "The Best Years of Our Lives", RKO, 1946, was an amazing film.  Harold Russell is, I believe, the only person to win 2 Oscars for the same role, in the same film:  Best Supporting Actor and an Honorary Oscar for "bringing hope and courage" to other veterans.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 29, 2006, 09:13:57 PM
I too loved The Best Years of Our Lives.  It was a very important film in its day and remains poignant.   1946 was a wonderful year for movies.  Other major releases included Its a Wonderful Life, Brief Encounter, Notorious and Henry V (Olivier version, not Branagh, LOL), all of which are now considered to be as good or better as cinema art (personal best: Hitchcock's Notorious), but perhaps the Academy was correct (for a change), Best Years was the film of the moment, the war had ended, and as the film beautifully demonstrates, veterans faced tough issues - people should have viewed this film back in the 1970s post Vietnam.  Other 1946 releases also included The Yearling, The Razor's Edge, The Big Sleep, Deception, Anna and the King of Siam, The Jolson Story, The Postman Always Rings Twice, To Each His Own, The Killers, and foreign masterpieces Children of Paradise and Open City were released in America.  Children of Paradise is one of my 10 favorite films ever, nicknamed the French Gone With the Wind for those who are curious.

JOHNK also mentioned the wonderful Mrs. Miniver which, like Best Years, was directed by one of my absolute all-time favorite directors, William Wyler.  Although he won 3 Oscars for those two movies and Ben-Hur, Wyler has fallen out of favor with film snobs.  I don't understand that, considering his filmography also included Wuthering Heights, Dodsworth, The Little Foxes, The Letter, Roman Holiday, The Heiress, Funny Girl, Dead End, These Three, Jezebel, Detective Story, The Desperate Hours, The Collector, The Westerner, etc., what a collection of films!


LOLA:  Check out NETFLIX.  Thousands of old films will be at your disposal.

 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on April 29, 2006, 09:39:00 PM
jayiijay, it is such a pleasure to read your informed and attentive film critiques.  By my moniker, you may assume that I know a little about film, but I am not able to express myself nearly so well as you.  I look forward to reading more from you.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: johnk on April 29, 2006, 10:15:13 PM
"Jezebel" - really like this one too.  It's often regarded as "Gone With The Wind" - lite.  However, I think it stands on its own. This was actually one of Davis's more subdued performances (relatively speaking, of course).  JMHO.

johnk
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 29, 2006, 10:26:55 PM
PAINTEDSHOES:

That is so nice of you - thank you.  You have made my night.

And yeah, obviously you know your stuff too (re: Harold Russell).

OK, since I can't help myself, here's another kind-of-related fun one: Barry Fitzgerald is the only person nominated for both the Lead and Supporting Actor performances for the same role as Father Fitzgibbon in Going My Way, another wonderful film (that ending!) that didn't deserve the Best Picture Oscar.  Fitzgerald won for the latter.

Despite my knowledge of movie & Oscar trivia (useless but I think fun, LOL), I am no longer interested in the Oscars.  I have always known that the Academy is usually "wrong", history proves it, but I never used to mind.  Good films usually won, there were "excuses" for better films losing (e.g., precursor awards, box office, cultural moments, etc.), and while the Oscars were always political, I thought they were industry-movie political.  It never occurred to me they were homophobic, but this year dozens of members openly confessed they were (not just Tony Curtis & Ernest Borgnine).  Can you imagine the outcry if people went around saying they refused to see a movie because it was about African-Americans, Jews, Hispanics, Asians, women, etc.??  Yet that's exactly what happened this year, but there was deafening silence.  Worse, the Academy cowered and by-passed masterpiece Brokeback in favor of a well-intentioned but third rate film so they wouldn't "offend" the right and be perceived as tolerant or, heaven-forbid, "pro-gay".  Believe me - please - that is exactly what happened, I know this as a most unfortunate fact.  Accordingly, people should no longer care what the Academy thinks, they have lost credibility.  I would be kidding myself if I went cold turkey and ignored my 30 year hobby forever, and I find the history fun as a reference to film history, but as I post, I will keep noting Oscar errors because I really want people to see that the Academy never has been the "last word" arbitor of what is good - and they sure as heck aren't now.  For what it's worth, many feel the Golden Globes are becoming more important than the Oscars, they are earlier and this year had a much bigger impact on the U.S. box office than the Oscars, plus their ratings are almost as high.  In my opinion, their nominations are always much better than the Academy's, this year's case in point by their choices of Brokeback Mountain, Good Night, and Good Luck, A History of Violence, The Constant Gardner, and Match Point...notice what didn't even get nominated.  Also, for people interested in seeing great films, see what the critics say; check out the Sight and Sound lists of greatest films (published once per decade years ending in 2; they picked Brokeback best this year, just like virtually everyone else); see what movie buffs say on the major film sites, I have received many wonderful recommendations for oscarwatch people; and let's keep sharing with each other by participating on forums like this!  Thanks much.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: johnk on April 29, 2006, 10:57:42 PM
PAINTEDSHOES:

That is so nice of you - thank you.  You have made my night.

And yeah, obviously you know your stuff too (re: Harold Russell).

OK, since I can't help myself, here's another kind-of-related fun one: Barry Fitzgerald is the only person nominated for both the Lead and Supporting Actor performances for the same role as Father Fitzgibbon in Going My Way, another wonderful film (that ending!) that didn't deserve the Best Picture Oscar.  Fitzgerald won for the latter.


Dude, love your posts!  Since you obviously know your stuff too, two questions:

Besides Kate Winslet and Gloria Stuart in "Titanic," have two people ever been nominated for playing the same person in the same movie?

Is there another movie beside "Rebecca" in which one of the main protagonists is neither seen nor heard during the entire film?

Thanks and keep'em coming.

johnk
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 29, 2006, 11:18:16 PM
JOHNK:

Hey, thank you too for the nice message!

Judi Dench & Kate Winslet were both nominated for Actress & Supporting Actress in 2001 for playing Iris Murdoch in "Iris".  I don't think it has ever been done by actors.  Both Marlon Brando & Robert de Niro played Vito Corleone but in separate films, Godfather 1 & II, respectively.  Other people have been nominated for playing the same character in separate movies:  Bing Crosby as Father Chuck O'Malley in Going My Way (1944) and The Bells Of St. Mary's (1945); Paul Newman as Fast Eddie Felson in The Hustler (1961) and The Color Of Money (1986); Peter O'Toole as King Henry II in Beckett (1964) and The Lion In Winter (1968); and Al Pacino was nominated twice as Michael Corleone (Godfather 1 & II).

The second one is trickier.  "A Letter to Three Wives" I think is one, the movie is narrated by "the other woman", but I barely remember it.  Curious what you are thinking, too tired to think, it's 1:15 a.m. in NYC.  thx

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: johnk on April 30, 2006, 01:32:33 AM
JOHNK:

Hey, thank you too for the nice message!

Judi Dench & Kate Winslet were both nominated for Actress & Supporting Actress in 2001 for playing Iris Murdoch in "Iris".  I don't think it has ever been done by actors.  Both Marlon Brando & Robert de Niro played Vito Corleone but in separate films, Godfather 1 & II, respectively.  Other people have been nominated for playing the same character in separate movies:  Bing Crosby as Father Chuck O'Malley in Going My Way (1944) and The Bells Of St. Mary's (1945); Paul Newman as Fast Eddie Felson in The Hustler (1961) and The Color Of Money (1986); Peter O'Toole as King Henry II in Beckett (1964) and The Lion In Winter (1968); and Al Pacino was nominated twice as Michael Corleone (Godfather 1 & II).

The second one is trickier.  "A Letter to Three Wives" I think is one, the movie is narrated by "the other woman", but I barely remember it.  Curious what you are thinking, too tired to think, it's 1:15 a.m. in NYC.  thx



Well, I'm down here in Philly.

I think "Sunset Boulevard" was over-narrated by Joe.  But he actually appeared in the film.  The director of "American Beauty" saw the first cut and said, "Despite giving it away at the beginning, Lester has to be at the beginning and the end."

No more beans!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sunspot on April 30, 2006, 03:58:29 AM
I despise Forest Gump, though. Definitely on my most-overrated list in a catfight with Titanic for the top spot. Gump is just loathsome from conception through final product. It perches near the top of Gag Me list.

I think if you read it literally it's an awful piece of work, but I didn't think that was the intention at the time, and still don't.  I saw a lot of people heaping praise on it when it was released who didn't seem to get it, in my opinion (especially on the right here in the States).  The same with those who were critical of it.  As I wrote at the time:

I was stunned to see an American film which clearly didn't insist that we are all masters of our own fate.  Indeed, Forrest Gump is a powerful refutation of America's trademark insistance on absolute self-reliance.  In this picture not one single person is solely responsible for their own fate, Gump himself least of all.  The film goes to great ends to show us just how stupid the title character really is, yet in spite of that fatal handicap he ends up a champion under the standards imposed by our social system.  So much for the insane practice of applying Darwinian species evolutionary theory to individuals.  As this film shows, it's like trying to weigh an elephant with a clock.

I'd be curious to hear what it is about the film that made you dislike it so strongly.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on April 30, 2006, 11:05:56 AM

Is there another movie beside "Rebecca" in which one of the main protagonists is neither seen nor heard during the entire film?
johnk
johnk, in the film "the Women", Norma Shearer's character's husband is the fulcrum around which the main activity occurs.  Shearer and Joan Crawford fight for him.  Yet, he is never seen (in fact, there are NO men in the film), only referred to.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on April 30, 2006, 07:56:56 PM
I despise Forest Gump, though. Definitely on my most-overrated list in a catfight with Titanic for the top spot. Gump is just loathsome from conception through final product. It perches near the top of Gag Me list.

I think if you read it literally it's an awful piece of work, but I didn't think that was the intention at the time, and still don't.  I saw a lot of people heaping praise on it when it was released who didn't seem to get it, in my opinion (especially on the right here in the States).  The same with those who were critical of it.  As I wrote at the time:

I was stunned to see an American film which clearly didn't insist that we are all masters of our own fate.  Indeed, Forrest Gump is a powerful refutation of America's trademark insistance on absolute self-reliance.  In this picture not one single person is solely responsible for their own fate, Gump himself least of all.  The film goes to great ends to show us just how stupid the title character really is, yet in spite of that fatal handicap he ends up a champion under the standards imposed by our social system.  So much for the insane practice of applying Darwinian species evolutionary theory to individuals.  As this film shows, it's like trying to weigh an elephant with a clock.

I'd be curious to hear what it is about the film that made you dislike it so strongly.

http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19940706/REVIEWS/407060301/1023

I would love to know as well, although who knows why some like and some dislike a film.  I LOVED Forrest Gump, I think it is a masterpiece.  No matter what movies I see, it will always remain top of my list.   I love the way Forrest looks at life, we should all be so blessed to be able to do that.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on April 30, 2006, 10:00:13 PM
SUNRISE - ****

This is kinda last minute notice, but silent masterpiece "Sunrise" is starting in 5 minutes on the east coast on Turner Classic Movies.  In the 2002 Sight & Sound World Cinema poll, this placed in the Top 5 (and for what it's worth, it's in my personal 100).  Simple story of a farmer who is lured by a city woman to maybe kill his wife and run away with her - it's all in the execution.  To this day the cinematography has not been topped, and Janet Gaynor won the first Best Actress Oscar for this (along with her performances in the also wonderful Seventh Heaven & Street Angel).  Of course the Academy foolishly did not nominate it for Best Picture, but in their defense (for a change), they had an award called "artistic quality of production", which this movie won over fellow-masterpiece "The Crowd".  The director is the great F.W. Murnau ("Nosferatu" & "The Last Laugh", the latter another all-time great).  Catch this movie, there's nothing like it!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on April 30, 2006, 10:27:00 PM
Shoot, jay, I've been busy at the Diner.  I'll have to catch it another time.  RATS!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: TomS on May 01, 2006, 08:51:34 AM

Is there another movie beside "Rebecca" in which one of the main protagonists is neither seen nor heard during the entire film?


johnk (with a nod to jaiijay for confirmation)

How about the character of Alex in The Big Chill? (Kevin Costner was cast to play the part and was cut entirely out of the film).  True, we see him being prepared for his funeral at the beginning but we don't see his face. After that, we don't see or hear him at all, and he's sort of the main character.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Boris on May 02, 2006, 11:44:22 AM
There have been plenty of those in TV shows like mrs. Columbo (Columbo) or Sheridan Bucket in Keeping up Appearances. But movies, this is tricky one.

The truck driver in "Duel", Harvey in "Harvey" and Bill in "Kill Bill vol. 1" are the only ones that come to mind.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on May 02, 2006, 07:47:55 PM
How about best opening sequence of a film?  I have several to start, again in no particular order:

Raiders of the Lost Ark...The whole opening, up til Indy climbs into the sea plane and remarks on Reggie the snake, could have made a movie all by itself...so much excellent character exposition in such a short time.  Alfred Molina had a small role as the guide.

Touch of Evil...the long tracking sequence of Charleton Heston and Janet Leigh still stands as one of the most brilliant openings in movie history.  Orson Welles did a brilliant job of directing this masterpiece.

Much Ado About Nothing...from the first words spoken by Emma Thompson (Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more..) against a black screen, to the picnic, to the words:  "Don Pedro is approaching" and the site of all the men on horseback galloping to the villa, to everyone bathing and changing clothes before meeting at last...breathtaking.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 02, 2006, 08:03:02 PM
PAINTED SHOES:

Great topic - best openings - love it.

Personal Top 10 (no order)

1.  Sunset Boulevard - Bill floating in the pool about to narrate his own story from a watery grave.
2.  The Crowd - it's brief, but the zoom-ins remain impressive almost 80 years later.
3.  The Sound of Music - I'm not embarrassed - when she comes over that hill, how can anyone not smile?
4.  Citizen Kane - sets the mood.
5.  Beauty and the Beast ('91) - wonderful homage to old musicals becomes a great one in itself.  The audience applauded at the end of the first number.
6.  Top Hat - love the white tie & tails song, again, sets the tone.
7.  Manhattan - the slide show set to Rhapsody in Blue - thrills me - biased, from NYC 
8.  The Pianist - playing away as the bombs go off - just brilliant - tells us so much about Spillman.
9.  Ben-Hur ('59) - a bit cheesy, I know, but that circled star across the sky gets me - and I'm not even Christian!
10.  Like you said, Touch of Evil.  Audacious - amazing how the Academy and most critics missed it in '58.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on May 02, 2006, 09:11:10 PM
Thanks, Jay.

I aagree about Top Hat, The Pianist, Sound of Music, and Citizen Kane.  And Sunset Boulevard.  Hadn't thought of that one.  Love Ben-Hur, but never thought of the opening as being so good.  Guess I have to go back and look at it.  Isn't that what makes this forum so great?  So many opportunities to discover, to re-visit?
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 02, 2006, 10:07:28 PM
PAINTEDSHOES:

What about The Crowd?  That opening gets me, it may be my favorite.  It tells the entire story in 30 seconds.  Yeah, Ben-Hur isn't an obvious choice, maybe not even a good one, but I remember being awed as a kid when I first saw it, the circled star mystically crossing the sky, the awe-struck villagers, that music...

thx
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on May 02, 2006, 10:11:26 PM
Jay, I must admit, I do not know "The Crowd".  I bow to your superior knowledge.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 02, 2006, 10:59:04 PM
PAINTEDSHOES:

See "The Crowd".  It is by King Vidor, silent, absolutely wonderful.  It made the top 10 films ever made at a writer's guild poll about 20 years ago and has fallen out of favor slightly, but is occasionally on Turner Classic Movies and I assume is available on netflix.  It is a simple love story about an ordinary guy trying to get ahead in the big city, but the turns it takes are moving.  thx
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on May 03, 2006, 10:02:40 AM
Thanks, Jay.  Don't do netflix, but will see if my local video store has it, and look for it on TCM.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Katie of Sweden on May 03, 2006, 10:35:42 AM
Fight club - the best movie seen ever...
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: DaveinPhilly on May 03, 2006, 10:38:50 AM
Ever?!

I've heard it is good so it's on my list to see.

The Ice Storm is of course another Ang Lee masterpiece and his Sense & Sensibility is exquisite.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Katie of Sweden on May 03, 2006, 10:43:46 AM
(yes, ever!)   ;)

It has this rythm in it...very good. The cinematography is  p e r f e c t, love it! Have seen it 15 times. Even BBM doesn't beat it. Go see it now!  :)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: DaveinPhilly on May 03, 2006, 10:45:33 AM
Them's fightin' words Kate!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Boris on May 03, 2006, 10:48:32 AM
I liked Fight Club and have seen it a couple of times but its nihilistic worldview and violent chic makes the experience rather uncomfortable for me. Guilty pleasures, I presume. David Fincher is a visionary but his visions are too void of real hope and meaning for me.

If someone seeks antidote to gloom and doom try to find a little French gem called "Amelie" starring Audrey Tautou. It is rare movie because it makes you feel happy, you just can't help it.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: DaveinPhilly on May 03, 2006, 10:52:48 AM
Amelie is indeed charming and a good antidote to too much seriousness. Isn't Audrey Tatou in the Da Vinci Code or have I mixed my French actresses?

I've kind of avoided Fight Club due to it's supposed homoeroticism, though that's not my usual thing to avoid!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Katie of Sweden on May 03, 2006, 10:54:31 AM
Amelie - a gem indeed!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Katie of Sweden on May 03, 2006, 11:05:51 AM
I've kind of avoided Fight Club due to it's supposed homoeroticism, though that's not my usual thing to avoid!

I avoided it because of the violent title! A couple of ys after it had left the cinemas I was pursuaded to see it on VHS and that was it! Homoerotisism - maybe.. but I wouldn't say that is the focus in the film at all. Would love to get your reactions after you saw it.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on May 03, 2006, 11:08:20 AM
I watched "Fight Club" one time and disliked it intensely.  Didn't know how to express why not, til I read Boris's comments.  They state my feelings acurately.  Thanks, Boris.

"Amelie" is indeed a lovely film.  And yes, Tatou is one of the stars of "The DaVinci Code".



Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Boris on May 03, 2006, 12:15:32 PM
Amelie is indeed charming and a good antidote to too much seriousness. Isn't Audrey Tatou in the Da Vinci Code or have I mixed my French actresses?

I've kind of avoided Fight Club due to it's supposed homoeroticism, though that's not my usual thing to avoid!

Audrey Tautou is in DaVinci Code. Rather surprisingly I might add, I would have expacted the role to go to more classically beautiful actress in style of Juliette Binoche.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: DaveinPhilly on May 04, 2006, 08:02:52 AM
Years ago, my partner and I were stunned by the film -Year of Living Dangerously - we recently saw it again and think it stands up as a remarkable fim.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on May 04, 2006, 09:22:13 AM
Linda Hunt was a revelation in that film.  Even knowing she is a woman, there is only the man on-screen.  Brilliant performance.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 04, 2006, 10:59:25 AM
Linda Hunt is a woman?  Who knew?

It bothered me how at the time everybody was saying "Cher is gonna win for Silkwood".  Ridiculous, Cher wasn't even a "movie" star yet, Hunt was amazing, I was very relieved when she got her due.  But even now people still say "Cher should have won for Silkwood", without even knowing who she was up against.  Anyhow, it's one of those rare times where the Academy actually got it right.

Of course the Academy got plenty of other categories wrong, among others, Best Picture & Director.  I was moved by Terms of Endearment like everyone else, but c'mon, how can you not get misty when a recalcitrant kid is saying good-bye to his dying mother?  I give the film more credit than that, but when it comes down to it, it is an entertaining, well-acted soap opera - but as a piece of film "art", it was not as good as The Right Stuff or Local Hero or especially Fanny and Alexander (or Night of Shooting Stars).  I know the Academy never gives foreign films the Oscar, but that's a bad excuse since they could if they wanted to, and especially since "Fanny" was in serious contention for 6 awards, winning 4 (foreign film, art direction, costumes, cinematography), a record for foreign films.  Ingmar Bergman was considered a dark horse for director, James Brooks' (whom I think is great) work on Terms wasn't in the same league.  Anyhow, if one considers English-language films only, The Right Stuff still got the shaft, Philip Kaufmann wasn't even nominated for director, and Local Hero was shut out.  To me, other Best Picture nominees Tender Mercies and The Dresser were very well acted but kind of slow and dull (the latter worked much better on stage), and The Big Chill was virtually unwatchable apart from the great soundtrak.  Not the best year, but had the Academy been artistically (instead of commercially) inclined, Fanny would have swept, it made the 2002 Sight & Sound Top 50 films in world cinema, the highest rating of any film from 1981-2001.  Needless to say Terms didn't make any lists (about 200 films typically make 3 or more lists).
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: TomS on May 04, 2006, 02:02:49 PM
Jayiijay--

I always loved fillms of Ingmar Bergman.  Fanny and Alexander has a special place for me because my partner and I saw it at the Castro on our first trip to San Francisco a couple years back.
Here's a question related to Brokeback:  Did you find it Bergmanesque?
In my opinion, the scene in Jack's parents' house struck me as achieving the same kind of artistry and intensity of some of Bergman's work.  In the framing and the lighting, and the spare soundtrack, it reminded me of scenes from Fanny or Cries and Whispers.

I know I'm not the only persion to have thought this, but this idea came to me before I had read it anywhere else.

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Katie of Sweden on May 04, 2006, 02:07:54 PM
In my opinion, the scene in Jack's parents' house struck me as achieving the same kind of artistry and intensity of some of Bergman's work.  In the framing and the lighting, and the spare soundtrack, it reminded me of scenes from Fanny or Cries and Whispers.

I thought of it!! Especially the Jack's house interior is very much Bergmanish'!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 04, 2006, 07:44:46 PM
TOM and KATIE:

Yes, I thought of it too, although not until the second time I saw the film.  But not Cries or Fanny - Shame & The Silence.  There is even a cabin in the former that reminds me of the Jack's-parents-scene.  Brokeback also evoked Carl Dreyer (Ordet, Days of Wrath and even Gertud, to a less degree) and Robert Bresson - possibly my favorite director - the stark framing of A Man Escaped and Mouchette.  But Brokeback moved me even more, because the film didn't start in Jack's parent's house, and the trailer, it ended there.  Bergman and the others present the bleak throughout, Brokeback takes us down.  However, if you mean just the artistry, then yes, the way the film orally and visually shrink together matches almost anything I've ever seen.  Much more impressive than the flashy film school b.s. that dazzles so many, all form, no substance.  What a movie.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on May 04, 2006, 08:39:18 PM
There you go, Jay, being all literate about film and stuff.  Puts me to shame.  Did you study film?
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 04, 2006, 09:00:03 PM
PAINTEDSHOES:

LOL.  You are nice.  Obviously I've seen a lot of movies, but have made it a point to see virtually everything on the world's best movie lists, like Sight & Sound, Cahier du Cinema, Cinemateque Belgique, plus a number of terrific web sites that compile lists of great films. The way I see it, if I'm gonna take the time see a movie, I might as well take a chance on something that others who have studied film consider good, and 9 times out of 10 I have seen way.  So in a way, yeah, I guess I do study film, by seeing the great ones.  As you know, the more you see, the more you learn, the better a "judge" you become.  Occasionally I just don't get it - like Antonioni's L'Avventura, in the 60s considered in the top 5 films ever made, still in the top 25 - plodding, dull.  But thanks to these lists, and the good fortune of being in a classic-film-friendly city (NYC), plus VCR's, I've gotten to know a lot of amazing stuff.  I hope that's not totally snobby, it's not meant to be, it's just like studying anything else, whether it be literature, physics or music: practice, LOL.  Of course I have my own sensibilities like anyone else.  For example, you'll never see "What's Up, Doc?" on any great movie lists, but it is in my personal 100, makes it me laugh.

Also,  I know a bad film when I see it, and Crash is a bad film.  Needless to say I respect anybody's right to say they enjoyed it - like I said, everyone has their own sensibilities - but as a work of art, I believe in using objective standards.  To state the most obvious, Citizen Kane is a masterpiece.  It may bore some, fine, but if they say it's bad, well, they're as wrong as people who think 1 + 1 = 3 (in base 10 - haha).  Anyone who knows anything about film will tell you that.  Then, it gets a bit less obvious - Au Hasard, Balthazar (Bresson) and The Passion of Joan of Arc (Dreyer) are great - again, a fact.  People don't always get to see these films, they are harder to find, so those who study them know, and will concur.  There's maybe 50 to 100 films ever made that fall into this category, and after that, reasonable movie-educated types will debate.  So, once again, Crash is a bad film.  When you look at the lists of the nation's top film critics, virtually all agree.  Sorry, I'm a broken record, but I'm still kind of having a problem with what happened on March 5th!!  As soon as I have time, I'm going to start posting my personal analsyses of Oscar history decade-by-decade, arguing the Academy is wrong about 75-80% of the time.  Misery loves company.  Thanks again PS.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Katie of Sweden on May 05, 2006, 11:57:05 AM
I wouldn't know about Bergman if I wasn't Swedish... Except for Fanny & ALexander, Bergman really sucks... IMO.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on May 05, 2006, 01:24:39 PM
Regarding "The Passion of Joan of Arc," I own the Criterion version on DVD.  It was amazing to learn how an original copy of the movie was found in a Norwegian mental institution in 1981.  This movie was made in 1928 and the tears flowing down Joan's cheeks is so moving.  Wonderful movie!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 05, 2006, 04:26:06 PM
CASPER:

Isn't it amazing how some of the best movies ever made are lost and found?  In addition to Passion, just a few years ago they found the original print of Grand Illusion, restored and re-released it in theaters to sell-out crowds (I forget where they found it - not as colorful as Passion).  As for Passion, in my personal top 5, with Falconetti's performance the greatest ever captured on screen by anyone .  A shame it's the only film she ever made, her story is a sad one, but won't get into it, too many spoilers!  thx
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on May 05, 2006, 07:43:43 PM
Jay, thank you so much for your thoughtful and insightful comments.  I have always loved movies, and film, as they are often not the same thing, as you know.  I have not seen, or understood many of the films that you mentioned, though I am familiar with, and loved, "The Passion of Joan of Arc".  My taste often runs more wide than deep, so I appreciate someone with your knowledge and understanding.  Thank you.

What films, or movies, would you like to discuss now?  I look forward to your suggested comments on the Oscar wins.  I, too, have often disagreed with the winners, though our reasons may differ.

I would love comments from others also.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on May 06, 2006, 02:06:45 AM
CASPER:

Isn't it amazing how some of the best movies ever made are lost and found? 

True!  I own "Metropolis" that has been restored but there is still footage that has never been retrieved.  I also learned that 15 minutes from "The Bride of Frankenstein" has never been found. 

This "Passion of Joan of Arc" is indeed a cinema classic.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on May 06, 2006, 02:30:20 AM

What films, or movies, would you like to discuss now?  I look forward to your suggested comments on the Oscar wins.  I, too, have often disagreed with the winners, though our reasons may differ.

I would love comments from others also.

My grudge with the Academy goes back to 1974.  I was furious that THE EXORCIST  did not win Best Picture of the Year.  Practically everyone I speak to agrees with me that THE EXORCIST  should have received the Best Picture Award.  It won the Golden Globe Award for Best Picture and even Linda Blair won Best Supporting Actress Award at the Globes.  THE EXORCIST  was the highest grossing film and so many movie critics were placing their bets on this film to win. 

I see striking similarities between this year's loss with BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN  and THE EXORCIST.  There are definite parrallels to 1974 and 2006.  Many AMPAS members were scared to see THE EXORCIST as they were with BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN.  If THE EXORCIST  would have won Best Picture, it would have been the first horror movie to cop that coveted prize.  The Academy still has a hang-up with a horror film winning Best Picture.  Likewise, if BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN  would have won Best Picture, it would have been the first gay-themed movie to have won Best Picture award.  As of now, the Academy has refused to award any gay-themed movie with a Best Picture Award.  Both screenwriters had scornful words at the losses of their movies.  William Peter Blatty blasted the Academy for not choosing THE EXORCIST  because he knew it was the better film.  Annie Proulx blasted the Academy for not choosing BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN  because it was the better movie.

Many Academy members were "fraidy cats" to look at BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN  and the same scenario existed for THE EXORCIST.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: johnk on May 07, 2006, 03:17:55 AM
[Many Academy members were "fraidy cats" to look at BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN  and the same scenario existed for THE EXORCIST.

I totally agree with you conceptually, but "The Exorcist" was up against "American Graffiti" (a well done feel good movie) and "Cries and Whispers" (my personal favorite, but you don't feel good at the end).  I liked"The Sting," but I feel that any of the above mentioned films could have easily taken an Oscar.  JMVHO.   Oh and BTW, if "Brokeback Mountain" had been featured in 1973 instead of 2005, this country would be a very different place.

Prego,  johnk



Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 07, 2006, 09:15:23 PM
Interesting analogy re: THE EXORCIST & BROKEBACK, thanks.  I'll add another factor in support of CASPER'S contention:  1973 was the only other year a non-Golden Globe Best Picture nominee won the Oscar.  However, unlike Crash, which was simply deemed unworthy of the top 5 dramas by the Hollywood foreign press (in favor of Brokeback, Good Night & Good Luck, Constant Gardner, Match Point and A History of Violence - great group), they say there was category confusion over The Sting's omission, was it a drama or comedy?  Plus, The Sting won the major director's guild award, and while slightly behind The Exorcist at the box office, was a huge phenomenon, all time top 10 (or 5?) in its day.  Plus it tied for the most nominations - 10, and it won the National Board of Review.  So, with fewer precursors split pretty evenly among The Sting, The Exorcist and Day for Night (eligible in 1974), with Cries & Whispers Oscar-eligible in '73 having won major precursors the year before (like Best Picture from the New York Film Critics over legendary films like Godfather & Cabaret), I think it is fair to say the Brokeback upset was much much bigger than the Exorcist loss - it was considered a pretty close call.  Also, I don't think one can compare voting against a film on account of being homophobic or fear of being perceived as gay friendly, vs. not voting for a film because it was a "horror" movie.

With that said, I really enjoyed The Sting, but as JOHNK said, Exorcist, American Graffiti and Cries & Whispers were all better, and are considered better by most.  Cries & Whispers almost doesn't count because it is foreign-language, which never ever wins (from 7 nominees in 78 years).  American Graffiti (winner of the Globe as best comedy) made the American Film Institute Top 100 poll in 1997, while The Exorcist (surprisingly missing from the AFI list) often makes other important lists of great films.  The Sting is beloved, but not in the same class per most.  Part of the reason it won was that Butch Cassidy lost 4 years earlier.  So, for me, I would have voted for Cries if the Academy was truly the world cinema organization it pretends to be, but since it is not, and voting for Cries would have been a throw-away vote (the reason I never voted for Ralph Nader, LOL), then to me, The Exorcist was robbed.  I am not a religious person, but the film gets under your skin.  Ellen Burstyn is kind of over the top, especially at the beginning, but as the film turns over to Jason Miller, Max von Sydow & Linda Blair, it becomes increasingly riveting.  It stays with you, the mark of good stuff.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on May 07, 2006, 09:29:16 PM
Jay, I find that I cannot agree with you about the Exorcist.  This is personal, only.  I do not like so-called modern "horror films" and had a tough time with "The Exorcist".  While by impartial standards, it was a great film, it does not agree with me.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on May 07, 2006, 09:32:25 PM
Jay, I find that I cannot agree with you about the Exorcist.  This is personal, only.  I do not like so-called modern "horror films" and had a tough time with "The Exorcist".  While by impartial standards, it was a great film, it does not agree with me.

AMEN!  I think if that had won back then, I would have stopped watching!   The most disturbing movie I have seen to date, in my life.  And I only saw it once, that was enough.   :o


1973 -- THE STING

From Universal. Producers : Tony Bill, Julia Phillips, Michael Phillips. (Rated PG)
A lighthearted, enjoyable film taking place during the Depression. Two con men attempt to seek revenge on a racketeer by setting him up in a fake off-track horse betting ploy. It was nominated for 10 total Oscars, and won 7. Starred Robert Redford, Paul Newman, Robert Shaw. Directed by George Roy Hill.


THE OTHER FILMS NOMINATED : American Graffiti, Cries and Whispers, The Exorcist, A Touch of Class


Personally I would have picked American Graffiti for best pic.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 07, 2006, 10:09:22 PM
PAINTEDSHOES:

What I love about your response is that you are able to separate your personal preferences from objective quality.  That is a rare thing to be able to do, I sure have trouble respecting things that don't suit my particular taste...wouldn't even know where to start with examples.  I keep separate lists: personal favorites vs. "official" greatest.  Renoir's Rules of the Game is on the latter list, it has to be, the world's critics have considered it to be top 3 the past 30 or 35 years, but it is nowhere near my personal 100.  It is artful and after three tries I finally recognized the brilliance, but top 3, over Renoir's other masterpiece Grand Illusion, no way, LOL.

Hey, if you don't already know "Black Narcissus" by Powell & Pressburger with Deborah Kerr & Jean Simmons, it is on Turner Classic Movies today at 4:15 p.m. est.  Beautiful movie!   At midnight, TCM is showing another world masterpiece, Buster Keaton's The General, another film that I great respect and admire more than I love...my personal preference (and in my top 100 is his earlier 1922 "Our Hospitality", not as highly regarded as General or Sherlock Jr., but wonderful).  Anyhow, it is only  1 1/4 hrs., a must for any serious film buff!!  After, TCM shows the excellent In Which We Serve by David Lean & Noel Coward, winner of the 1942 New York Film Critics Best Picture.  What a channel!  Off to bed, thx

P.S.  OOOPS:  It is 10 minutes later, was heading to bed, noticed The General is on NOW, I'm off a day, sorry, LOL.  If awake, catch/tape In Which We Serve.  Black Narcissus no doubt will be on again.  Sorry, thx.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: DaveinPhilly on May 08, 2006, 07:39:41 AM
A while back we were discussing The Remains of the Day I think,and I must have been in a state of confusion (not unusal at my advanced age) thinking we were talking about Howard's End. Please do forgive me. Just an anglophyliac Yank who watches too many Brit films.

DaveinPhilly
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on May 08, 2006, 08:46:39 AM
I was thinking this morning of another Academy Award "robbery."  I think "Cabaret" deserved the Best Picture Award over "The Godfather."  This is just my opinion.  "Cabaret" won 8 Oscars while "The Godfather" won 3.  "Cabaret" won Best Actress, Best Supporting Actor, and Best Director but lost the Best Picture Award.  The editing in "Cabaret" is impeccable.  To me, it is the best editing I have ever seen in a movie.  In fact, when I was watching the Oscars that night (they were held in April back then), I thought "Cabaret" was going to pull off an upset when the Best Director Award was announced.  I was later proven wrong with my intuition. 

I have seen "The Godfather" but I just think "Cabaret" was the better movie. 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 08, 2006, 10:13:54 PM
CASPER:

We are in the distinct minority, but I 100% agree with you, Cabaret deserved Best Picture over The Godfather, and clearly almost won.  It's 8 Oscars is a record for most without Best Picture, no doubt Godfather's box office & hoopla put it over the top, but to me, Cabaret is one of the top 5 films of the 1970s, with iconic performances by Liza Minnelli (I'm not otherwise a fan of her acting) and Joel Grey.  In 1977 the American Film Institute took its first greatest films survey.  They chose 50.  Gone With the Wind was #1, Citizen Kane #2, Casablanca #3, they finished the top 10, and then 40 more.  Both Godfather and Cabaret were in that unranked 40.  If you check out the most overrated films thread, you'll see I named The Godfather films in my top 10 (they're good, but not that good!).  Glad to find a kindred spirit in this regard!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on May 08, 2006, 10:31:38 PM
Well, Jay, it looks as if we disagree once again.  I absolutely adore "The Godfather" and, while I admire the style and sophistication of "Cabaret", I do not LIKE it.  It was too, what, "precious", maybe, too self-serving, too self-knowing.  I felt that I was somehow being manipulated by the film.  "Look at mee, I'm a great film".  That may be too tough.  I admit to not having seen "Cabaret" for many years, since it did not move me in any way, so time may change my perspective, if I ever chose to see it again, which I doubt.

On another note..."Black Narcissus", which you noted above, is, to me, a mesmerizing film, almost hallucinogenic in it's cimematography and allusions...to me, it is a true classic.

Isn't this fun, though, to agree or disagree, with you and Casper and Lola and any one else who ventures an opinion...to me, it is the exchange of ideas that is the most fun.

Now, for something completely different:

Since this is a category of all-time "favorite', not necessarily "best' films, how about some "guilty pleasures".  Films which rank on no one's lists of top 100, but are watched anyway for sheer fun.

I nominate  "The Fifth Element" as a cheesy, fun, silly entertainment with no redeeming qualities except a good time and no thought necessary.

Your thoughts, anyone?
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 08, 2006, 11:30:02 PM
PAINTEDSHOES:

"What's Up, Doc"
"Blazing Saddles"
"South Park: Bigger, Longer, Uncut"
"A Fish Called Wanda"
"Sleeper"
"Take the Money and Run"
"Groundhog Day"

I would contend these are all very good movies, but would find it harder to argue they are great ones, thus guilty pleasures.

I am sincerely curious:  what is so great about The Godfather movies???  The music is beautiful and most of the acting fine, but they are too long, often drag in between murders (LOL), are redundant, thematically all over the place, derivative (especially Part II - see Elia Kazan's America America), glorify some pretty unsavory characters and therefore don't move me.  I have tried at least 3 times with each and still don't get it.  thx
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sinne on May 08, 2006, 11:33:34 PM
PAINTEDSHOES:

What I love about your response is that you are able to separate your personal preferences from objective quality.  That is a rare thing to be able to do, I sure have trouble respecting things that don't suit my particular taste...wouldn't even know where to start with examples.  I keep separate lists: personal favorites vs. "official" greatest.  Renoir's Rules of the Game is on the latter list, it has to be, the world's critics have considered it to be top 3 the past 30 or 35 years, but it is nowhere near my personal 100.  It is artful and after three tries I finally recognized the brilliance, but top 3, over Renoir's other masterpiece Grand Illusion, no way, LOL.

Hey, if you don't already know "Black Narcissus" by Powell & Pressburger with Deborah Kerr & Jean Simmons, it is on Turner Classic Movies today at 4:15 p.m. est.  Beautiful movie!   At midnight, TCM is showing another world masterpiece, Buster Keaton's The General, another film that I great respect and admire more than I love...my personal preference (and in my top 100 is his earlier 1922 "Our Hospitality", not as highly regarded as General or Sherlock Jr., but wonderful).  Anyhow, it is only  1 1/4 hrs., a must for any serious film buff!!  After, TCM shows the excellent In Which We Serve by David Lean & Noel Coward, winner of the 1942 New York Film Critics Best Picture.  What a channel!  Off to bed, thx

P.S.  OOOPS:  It is 10 minutes later, was heading to bed, noticed The General is on NOW, I'm off a day, sorry, LOL.  If awake, catch/tape In Which We Serve.  Black Narcissus no doubt will be on again.  Sorry, thx.


I taped "Black Narcissus" (based on your recommendation awhile back) but haven't watched it yet.  Was all set to watch "The General" last night too but it wasn't on when it stated.  Darn. 

Re personal picks and "great films - I agree.  On the ballots at my Oscar parties, we were always allowed to fill out two choices:  our predictions and our personal choice.  Of course, only predictions counted for the final tally and prizes, but it just felt so good to be able to mark your personal choice, even when you knew they didn't have a hope in hell of winning.

I remember the year of "The Godfather" and "Cabaret".  Tough call.  I LOVE both of them, but I must say I have watched "The Godfather" more often since, but I saw "Cabaret" more times in the theatre and absolutely became Sally Bowles for months afterwards - green nail polish and everything!  And played the sound track over and over.  I saw it on stage a few years ago in Vancouver - quite different from the film (much darker) but I really enjoyed it.  It's not the same watching "Cabaret" now though.  When I first saw it at 18 I thought Sally Bowles was the height of sophistication.  Now of course I see that she was really quite a sad, pathetic figure.  I think I preferred watching it through my 18-year old eyes.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 08, 2006, 11:47:13 PM
SINNE:

But as you know, Sally Bowles is supposed to be a sad and pathetic figure.  Our views of many films change as we age, the wide-eyed visions we have in our youth sometimes sour when we achieve a greater understanding of the artistic work.  I was 7 yrs old when Cabaret was released and hated it because it was so dark.  I saw it in at college in the 80s and was blown away.  I saw it again a few years ago and found the experience sobering.  The reactions were more about myself than the film, but isn't that true of us all to one degree or another?  Cabaret is just so artful and vivid and terrifying, with that great score.  Godfather, well, I just couldn't care less about Al Pacino's portrayal of Michael Corleone, he is a wuss who "tragically" becomes his father, and then worse, a monster.  So what.  Lots of swelling music creating a sense of self importance; women relegated to shrill non-performances; the endless Hyman Roth business dealings and subsequent senate hearings in Part II (impossible to watch, just deadly dull); and the same family squabbles over and over.  It's just me, I know, I'm "wrong", but I've tried and give up!  Off to bed.  thx
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on May 09, 2006, 08:03:45 AM
Guilty pleasure films?  Hmmmmm......I would have to say any Laurel & Hardy film.  I always laugh whenever I see one of their movies.  People back then were paid so little yet they put their whole heart and soul into what they were doing.  Movies back in those times had one main directive -  make 'em laugh!  :D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on May 09, 2006, 08:32:17 AM
CASPER:

We are in the distinct minority, but I 100% agree with you, Cabaret deserved Best Picture over The Godfather, and clearly almost won.  It's 8 Oscars is a record for most without Best Picture, no doubt Godfather's box office & hoopla put it over the top, but to me, Cabaret is one of the top 5 films of the 1970s, with iconic performances by Liza Minnelli (I'm not otherwise a fan of her acting) and Joel Grey.  In 1977 the American Film Institute took its first greatest films survey.  They chose 50.  Gone With the Wind was #1, Citizen Kane #2, Casablanca #3, they finished the top 10, and then 40 more.  Both Godfather and Cabaret were in that unranked 40.  If you check out the most overrated films thread, you'll see I named The Godfather films in my top 10 (they're good, but not that good!).  Glad to find a kindred spirit in this regard!

I think the AFI list that is out now is the best!

I think the Godfather was the greatest movie ever made. 

Voted the number one movie was CITIZEN KANE, Orson Welles' 1941 classic, which he directed, produced, wrote and starred in at the age of 25. The rest of the top ten, in order, are: CASABLANCA (#2), THE GODFATHER (#3), GONE WITH THE WIND (#4), LAWRENCE OF ARABIA (#5), THE WIZARD OF OZ (#6), THE GRADUATE (#7), ON THE WATERFRONT (#8), SCHINDLER'S LIST (#9) and SINGIN' IN THE RAIN (#10).

I don't think Cabaret was even on the list!   The second Godfather film was rated at #32.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: TomS on May 09, 2006, 10:31:48 AM
Cabaret was my all time favorite movie at the time.  It made me want to be a filmmaker.  Bob Fosse was my idol then.  Imagine what he would have done with Chicago on film!
Having grown up in an Italian family, The Godfather perfectly captured a sense of obligation one feels in return for any kindnesses received, and an unspoken sense of menace should one not fulfill that obligation.
I loved them both, but Cabaret was my personal inspiration that year.

Guilty Pleasures?
Beyond the Valley of the Dolls--Dir: Russ Meyer; screenplay by (yes!) Roger Ebert
Valley of the Dolls, with Patti Duke and Susan Hayward!
Where Angels Go Trouble Follows, and The Trouble With Angels (Rosalind Russell as Mother Superior) a product of my Catholic guilt
Performance--Mick Jagger and James Fox
Plan 9 From Outer Space--still makes me giggle
..do I need therapy?
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 09, 2006, 11:16:30 AM
TOMS:

I don't think the sense of menace was "unspoken" in the Godfather films, LOL, I think it was over-the-head blatant.  Yeah, Godfather nicely juxtaposes family and business (what a business) and a sense of guilt I think most people feel, but I can name a dozen other movies that do it just as well, my point being, it's good, maybe very good, but not THAT good.  Cabaret was a film that jumped off the screen and stayed with me too - that's what makes a great film, something we are awed by and remember.  For those who have seen it only once, sure there are memorable scenes in the Godfathers (thanks to our culture and re-runs), but can you fill in the "blanks" and truly describe the narrative?  I defy anyone to do it for Part II, which I tried again just 2 weeks ago and already barely remember.


LOLA:  FYI, the 1997 American Film Institute list was universally trashed by film historians and movie buffs the world over as pathetic.  No offense to you in any way, I'm just stating a fact.  The incredibly low placement of films like Vertigo and The Searchers (I think 91) was ridiculed, the exclusion of masterpieces like Sunrise, The General, Intolerance, Greed, The Magnificent Ambersons, Touch of Evil, The Crowd, Nashville, etc. etc. - one of those etc.'s including Cabaret led to the complete dismissal of the list by most of the European film community altogether.  AFI has continued their annual lists because they do well in the ratings (heck, I watch every year, they are fun and good cause for debate), but as for their authority, they have little to none.  Oh, and by the way, the 1997 film poll does not rank Godfather II as the best of its year; that honor goes to #19 Chinatown.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on May 09, 2006, 12:05:22 PM
Voted the number one movie was CITIZEN KANE, Orson Welles' 1941 classic, which he directed, produced, wrote and starred in at the age of 25. The rest of the top ten, in order, are: CASABLANCA (#2), THE GODFATHER (#3), GONE WITH THE WIND (#4), LAWRENCE OF ARABIA (#5), THE WIZARD OF OZ (#6), THE GRADUATE (#7), ON THE WATERFRONT (#8), SCHINDLER'S LIST (#9) and SINGIN' IN THE RAIN (#10).

So are these picks trashed by film historians and movie buffs the world over as pathetic ?   :-\  Or just some of the list?   ???

We will have to agree to disagree on this one, because it is hard for me to debate two movies (Godfather I & II) which I think were the greatest movies ever.

Cabaret was good, I liked it, I own it.  If you want to talk best song in a movie (is there a list?) I would say Cabaret would be in the top 10.

And Chinatown lost just about every award to Godfather II, including best picture!



Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: johnk on May 09, 2006, 12:11:43 PM

Since this is a category of all-time "favorite', not necessarily "best' films, how about some "guilty pleasures".  Films which rank on no one's lists of top 100, but are watched anyway for sheer fun.


Oh gosh, guilty pleasures...here they are in no particular order:

Spaceballs
There's Something About Mary
The Anniversary
Caddyshack
Animal House
Airplane
Diamonds Are Forever
The Stepford Wives (1975)
Babette's Feast

Actually, I don't feel that guilty about the last one (it won an Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film in 1988, for what it's worth).  I just don't know anyone who likes this film (besides me).

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: johnk on May 09, 2006, 01:42:47 PM
Valley of the Dolls, with Patti Duke and Susan Hayward!

"I want a doll!  I want a doll!"

Forgot to put this one on my list.  Gosh, there was so much scenery-chewing in this movie I'd be amazed if there was anything left of the sets by the time they finished filming.

No therapy needed.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: DaveinPhilly on May 09, 2006, 01:55:52 PM

Since this is a category of all-time "favorite', not necessarily "best' films, how about some "guilty pleasures".  Films which rank on no one's lists of top 100, but are watched anyway for sheer fun.


Oh gosh, guilty pleasures...here they are in no particular order:


Babette's Feast

Actually, I don't feel that guilty about the last one (it won an Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film in 1988, for what it's worth).  I just don't know anyone who likes this film (besides me).



Are you kidding?! It was a magnificent film!!!!!!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: johnk on May 09, 2006, 02:55:58 PM

Babette's Feast

Actually, I don't feel that guilty about the last one (it won an Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film in 1988, for what it's worth).  I just don't know anyone who likes this film (besides me).



Are you kidding?! It was a magnificent film!!!!!!


Thanks, friend.  That makes at least two of us! 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: TomS on May 09, 2006, 03:13:09 PM
Valley of the Dolls, with Patti Duke and Susan Hayward!
No therapy needed.
Thanks, that's a relief.  By the way I loved Babette's Feast too.  Been a while, I might check that one out again soon.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on May 09, 2006, 03:23:07 PM
Movie memories come back to me with the mention of "Valley of the Dolls."  That movie and "Myra Breckenridge" were the campy films that one just had to see back in those hedonistic days.  :)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 09, 2006, 06:46:03 PM
LOLA:

I don't want to debate you, but (a) it was the entire Top 100 that was scorned, not the top 10 alone (but films like Graduate, Schindler, and even On the Waterfront were shockers to receive such high placement - later I will send you a link with current world cinema historians top 100, none make it), and (b) no, Godfather II won more Oscars, but not other awards.  Chinatown actually swept the Golden Globes that year (Picture, Director, Screenplay, Actor), did better at the critics' awards, and well, again, ranked higher at AFI.

JOHNK:

Caddyshack!!  Great choice, love that movie.  Airplane and There's Something About Mary too.  And how about Best in Show and Waiting for Guffman?  There haven't been any truly hilarious movies in awhile, I think 40 Year Old Virgin comes closest.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on May 09, 2006, 07:10:50 PM
Voted the number one movie was CITIZEN KANE, Orson Welles' 1941 classic, which he directed, produced, wrote and starred in at the age of 25. The rest of the top ten, in order, are: CASABLANCA (#2), THE GODFATHER (#3), GONE WITH THE WIND (#4), LAWRENCE OF ARABIA (#5), THE WIZARD OF OZ (#6), THE GRADUATE (#7), ON THE WATERFRONT (#8), SCHINDLER'S LIST (#9) and SINGIN' IN THE RAIN (#10).

I can't say as I am shocked by anything on that top 10 list.

LOLA:

I don't want to debate you, but (a) it was the entire Top 100 that was scorned, not the top 10 alone (but films like Graduate, Schindler, and even On the Waterfront were shockers to receive such high placement - later I will send you a link with current world cinema historians top 100, none make it), and (b) no, Godfather II won more Oscars, but not other awards. Chinatown actually swept the Golden Globes that year (Picture, Director, Screenplay, Actor), did better at the critics' awards, and well, again, ranked higher at AFI.


As for Godfather beating Chinatown, I was "only" talking about Oscars.   ;) 

TOMS:

Quote
There haven't been any truly hilarious movies in awhile, I think 40 Year Old Virgin comes closest.

okay now you are just scaring me! lol    I dind't find that movie funny at all   :P


Anyway I look forward to seeing that link!   But we all have our personal tastes and I suppose no lists changes that.

Wonder if BB will ever make any of these lists?
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sinne on May 09, 2006, 07:16:45 PM
Guilty (?) Pleasures:

Airplane
Waiting for Guffman
Best in Show
A Mighty Wind
What Planet Are You From
Desperately Seeking Susan
Bridget Jones Diary
Glen or Glenda
Legally Blonde
Yentl
Young Frankenstein
High Anxiety
Rat Race

Actually, those aren't really "guilty pleasures". More like "pure enjoyment, no heavy lifting required."
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Carissa on May 09, 2006, 07:43:30 PM
Ooh, we should have a guilty pleasures thread. :)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on May 09, 2006, 07:56:53 PM
Bridget Jones Diary
Legally Blonde
Yentl

for sure!  ;)


Jerry Maguire
Don Juan DeMarco
The Specialist
When Harry Met Sally
Sleepless in Seattle
St. Elmos Fire
Breakfast Club
Ferris Bueller
The Wedding Singer
Urban Cowboy
Top Gun
Terminator
Scarface
Risky Business
Christmas Vacation
Blood Sport
Kickboxer
9 1/2 weeks
Cocktail

just to name a few guilty pleasures   :P
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: TomS on May 09, 2006, 08:05:50 PM
To Lola and jayiijay
(Clearing his throat nervously, in his best diplomatic way)
I'm flattered, both of you, but credit for Caddyshack, Airplane, Something About Mary, etc. should go to johnk.
(withdraws from the stage, slightly blushing, but feeling proud of his nice deed)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on May 09, 2006, 08:12:50 PM
Ooh, we should have a guilty pleasures thread. :)
Nah, isn't that what "favorites" really are...not "the best", but the ones we watch all the time for the fun of it?

The Fifth Element...with which I started the "guilty pleasures" thought
The Princess Bride
The Adventures of Robin Hood
The Day the Earth Stood Still
National Velvet
Reign of Fire
The Mummy Returns
Mighty Joe Young
The Name of the Rose
Starship Troopers
When Worlds Collide

just a few if mine
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Carissa on May 09, 2006, 08:38:06 PM
Ooh, we should have a guilty pleasures thread. :)
Nah, isn't that what "favorites" really are...not "the best", but the ones we watch all the time for the fun of it?
I took favorites to mean favorites.  My guilty pleasures include all of those stupid teen movies like Bring it On, Can't Hardly Wait, and What a Girl Wants.    I love them but they aren't my favorites.  That's the way I understood it. :)    Entertainment Weekly always did a guilty pleasure issue.  I don't know when it comes out but that's what I always think of when I hear guilty pleasures. :)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 09, 2006, 08:39:42 PM
PAINTEDSHOES:

The Adventures of Robin Hood
The Day the Earth Stood Still
National Velvet

All classics, hardly "guilty" pleasures.  And Princess Bride is a mini-classic, imo, with a large cult following.  In fact, it is being turned into a Broadway musical, with the score to be composed by the brilliant brilliant Adam Guettel (grandson of Richard Rodgers; last year's very deserving Tony winner for Light in the Piazza; also composer of the Floyd Collins, etc.).  Bet its gonna be good.

The Mummy Returns and Starship Troopers - ok, now you can blush, LOL.

How about The Notebook as a guilty pleasure?  I think it is a very underrated film, I was misty more than once.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on May 09, 2006, 08:45:38 PM

How about The Notebook as a guilty pleasure?  I think it is a very underrated film, I was misty more than once.

look at my signature line, LOVED the movie and the book!  And I don't feel guilty!  ;)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on May 09, 2006, 08:58:15 PM
I liked "The Notebook", didn't love it.  Did love the film of "Light in the Piazza".

I guess that definitions can be confusing.  "Guilty" pleasures may mean more "Starship Troopers" than "Robin Hood".  I don't care.  I just love all kinds of movies and films.  Like "Bring it On" and " What a Girl Wants" and any movie that takes me out of myself and makes me happy or sad or just makes me feel...I guess that is what I want in an evening or an afternoon in a movie theater.  So, bring 'em on, is what I say.  What films make you light up at the mention of their names, at the sound of a few notes from the soundtrack, at a few words of dialogue, at an image on a poster?  That make you glad to be ALIVE?
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on May 09, 2006, 09:07:10 PM

How about The Notebook as a guilty pleasure?  I think it is a very underrated film, I was misty more than once.

look at my signature line, LOVED the movie and the book!  And I don't feel guilty!  ;)
Lola, I had been trying foe along time to remember where those lines came from.  Now that you say it, I can hear the lovely James Garner as he speaks those words.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 09, 2006, 09:33:15 PM
LOLA:

Glad to see we agree on something, LOL.  But it's short-lived, because I'm gonna criticize the Academy yet again.  James Garner and Gena Rowlands didn't just deserve nominations, they deserved supporting oscars for their roles (over the great Morgan Freeman in Million Dollar Baby, but a part he had done numerous times before in his sleep, and Cate Blanchett doing a superb imitation of Katharine Hepburn, but nowhere near the emotional depth of Rowlands).  I also would have nominated Rachel McAdams for Best Actress.  It was the first time I was cognizant of her presence in a film, she blew me away (was the only good thing in the awful Family Stone).  The Notebook also did extremely well at the box office, not like blockbusters, but it performed far beyond expectations for a film of its scope and budget - well deserved.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sinne on May 09, 2006, 09:40:06 PM
I liked "The Notebook", didn't love it.  Did love the film of "Light in the Piazza".

I guess that definitions can be confusing.  "Guilty" pleasures may mean more "Starship Troopers" than "Robin Hood".  I don't care.  I just love all kinds of movies and films.  Like "Bring it On" and " What a Girl Wants" and any movie that takes me out of myself and makes me happy or sad or just makes me feel...I guess that is what I want in an evening or an afternoon in a movie theater.  So, bring 'em on, is what I say.  What films make you light up at the mention of their names, at the sound of a few notes from the soundtrack, at a few words of dialogue, at an image on a poster?  That make you glad to be ALIVE?

Thanks Painted Shoes!  I didn't know there was a film of "Light in the Piazza".  I've been hearing such good things about it on Broadway, but I'm 3000 miles away.  I'll try and catch the film.

A couple of things I've noticed re buying DVDs for my collection is I only buy films I've already seen and want to own, and, even though there are many films I've LOVED, I wouldn't necessarily want to own them or watch them over and over.  The ones I buy are usually the ones I know I'll watch repeatedly.  Although sometimes I buy them 'cause I want to listen to the director's commentary and watch the extras, even though I've already seen the film. 

And - speaking of extras - does anyone love watching all the behind-the-scenes stuff but then wish they could have it erased from their memory?  I sure do.  It really ruins watching a film again when you've seen a dramatic scene that showed the actor flubbing their lines and laughing and the crew all around.  That's why I want another version of BBM with way more extras but NO "out-takes", "bloopers".  God forbid!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on May 09, 2006, 09:46:45 PM
What films make you light up at the mention of their names, at the sound of a few notes from the soundtrack, at a few words of dialogue, at an image on a poster?  That make you glad to be ALIVE?

"A Hard Day's Night"
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: downloaded1 on May 09, 2006, 09:49:11 PM
What films make you light up at the mention of their names, at the sound of a few notes from the soundtrack, at a few words of dialogue, at an image on a poster?  That make you glad to be ALIVE?

Rosemarys Baby




(just kidding)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sinne on May 09, 2006, 10:12:43 PM
Hey!  Any really GOOD film makes me glad to be alive.  So "Rosemary's Baby" fits that criteria, but "A Hard Day's Night" does too and is a lot more fun!   :D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on May 09, 2006, 10:17:34 PM
Sinne, the film of "A Light in the Piazza" came out in 1962, MGM, starring Olivia DeHavilland, Rosanno Brazzi, Yvette Mimieux and George Hamilton.  I do not know if it is available on DVD, but it is shown sometimes on TCM.  A lovely film.


Downloaded1, you are entitled to your opinion, ...but I'm glad you are kidding! ;D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: hifrommike65 on May 09, 2006, 11:27:35 PM
One of my favorite 1950s films is PICKUP ON SOUTH STREET (1953, dir. Samuel Fuller).  It's a tightly done noir story with excellent performances: Thelma Ritter was nominated for an Oscar as supporting actress, & the leads (Richard Widmark & Jean Peters) are just as good.  Just marvellous. 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on May 10, 2006, 06:37:13 AM
LOLA:

Glad to see we agree on something, LOL.  But it's short-lived, because I'm gonna criticize the Academy yet again.  James Garner and Gena Rowlands didn't just deserve nominations, they deserved supporting oscars for their roles (over the great Morgan Freeman in Million Dollar Baby, but a part he had done numerous times before in his sleep, and Cate Blanchett doing a superb imitation of Katharine Hepburn, but nowhere near the emotional depth of Rowlands).  I also would have nominated Rachel McAdams for Best Actress.  It was the first time I was cognizant of her presence in a film, she blew me away (was the only good thing in the awful Family Stone).  The Notebook also did extremely well at the box office, not like blockbusters, but it performed far beyond expectations for a film of its scope and budget - well deserved.

Yea I could go for that.  But Morgan Freeman was due, it was his time.  And I actually loved the Aviator and I thought Cate was incredible as Katherine (one of my favourite actresses and not easy to pull off)   But they should have got something for sure.  Gena and James were great, so were Ryan and Rachel.

I guess you know they are a real life couple!!  :-*   Hey at least they won best kiss at the MTV awards!  ;)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: DaveinPhilly on May 10, 2006, 06:49:34 AM
Splendour in the Grass is now only supplanted as my all time teariest film by BBM.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: aceygirl on May 10, 2006, 10:42:09 AM
My unabashedly "guilty" and not-ashamed-of-it favorite movie is Terminator 3. I love all the Terminator movies (especially Linda Hamilton and her ripped physique in II) but this one was good old-school-style camp sci-fi with big budget effects. And it featured Nick Stahl and Claire Danes, both of whom can ACT! Arnold was really in his element here, playing a deadpan robot with an accidental sense of humor. Kristanna Loken didn't have to do anything but look hot and menacing while running in high heels, which she does quite well.  ;D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on May 10, 2006, 11:49:22 AM
My unabashedly "guilty" and not-ashamed-of-it favorite movie is Terminator 3. I love all the Terminator movies (especially Linda Hamilton and her ripped physique in II) but this one was good old-school-style camp sci-fi with big budget effects. And it featured Nick Stahl and Claire Danes, both of whom can ACT! Arnold was really in his element here, playing a deadpan robot with an accidental sense of humor. Kristanna Loken didn't have to do anything but look hot and menacing while running in high heels, which she does quite well.  ;D

You know we saw the first two a million times, my kids owned them and watched them alot.  Then the third one came out in theatres.  We were on a cruise and they were showing it one night in one of the theatres on the ship, we figured what the heck, we will check it out.

We had a ball watching it and so did everyone in the theatre.   We came home and I bought a copy to round out the collection. 

P.S. I am still working on my Linda Hamilton biceps  :-\
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 10, 2006, 05:29:14 PM
HIFROMMIKE65:


Pickup on South Street is a terrific choice, it also belongs in the underrated movies forum.  Richard Widmark is a perfect example of the Academy's incompetence.   Nominated only once for supporting in '47 for his terrifying debut as Johnny Udo in Kiss of Death (and unfairly losing to Edmund Gwenn's sweet-but-safe-and-hardly-a-stretch turn as Kris Kringle to Miracle on 34th Street), there are strong arguments he should have been nominated for Pickup, No Way Out, Night and the City, Panic in the Streets (my favorite performance of his), Broken Lance, Two Rode Together, and Cheyenne Autumn.  What did they have against poor Richard, LOL, he was amazing.  Also, as you probably know, Thelma Ritter has a record six supporting actress nominations without a victory, another crime.  Peter O'Toole & Richard Burton each had seven nominations without a win (Burton 6 lead, 1 support), which is even worse.  But I digress.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on May 10, 2006, 06:23:09 PM
No you don't, Jay.  I always love your insightful comments.  Richard Widmark was a favorite of mine.  And he was spectacular as Johnny Udo...that terrifying giggle sent chills up and down my spine.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on May 10, 2006, 07:20:20 PM
jayiijay, I share your disappointment with Richard Burton never receiving an Oscar.  The Academy should bow their heads in shame.  :-[
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on May 10, 2006, 07:22:40 PM
Since "Poseidon" is coming out this weekend, memories of sour grapes are rekindled with the Academy not giving the Best Supporting Actress Award to Shelley Winters in the original.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 10, 2006, 08:11:25 PM
CASPER:

Agreed on all fronts.  Shelly Winters as Mrs. Rosen should have won (at least among the nominees, since my personal choice that year was non-nominee Madeline Kahn in What's Up, Doc?), certainly she made the biggest splash, hahaha.  She likely lost because she had already won twice before, but that should be irrelevant, though never is.  Once again the Golden Globes got it right, Shelly took their prize.  Always loved her acting, especially in A Place in the Sun, Night of the Hunter and the underrated Lolita.  She was a fun character on the late night circuit too.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sinne on May 10, 2006, 09:16:09 PM
CASPER:

Agreed on all fronts.  Shelly Winters as Mrs. Rosen should have won (at least among the nominees, since my personal choice that year was non-nominee Madeline Kahn in What's Up, Doc?), certainly she made the biggest splash, hahaha.  She likely lost because she had already won twice before, but that should be irrelevant, though never is.  Once again the Golden Globes got it right, Shelly took their prize.  Always loved her acting, especially in A Place in the Sun, Night of the Hunter and the underrated Lolita.  She was a fun character on the late night circuit too.

And "A Patch of Blue".  I loved Shelley too.  And Madeline Kahn, who died too young. She's so good in "Young Frankenstein", "Paper Moon" and "Hight Anxiety".  And surely Thelma Ritter got a Lifetime Achievement Award?  God!  I hope so.  She was always perfect in every role.  I just watched her in "The Misfits" the other night.  (and don't get me started on poor Marilyn Monroe, who should have won and Oscar for "Some Like It Hot" and at least been nominated for "Bus Stop").
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 10, 2006, 09:24:48 PM
SINNE:

Ditto everything you said.  But no, Thelma didn't get a special Oscar, and her 6 nominations included neither The Misfits nor Rear Window...those tasteless fools, LOL (but true).  Marilyn Monroe's non-nomination for Some Like It Hot is particularly egregious, considering what a weak year it was for actresses...c'mon, Doris Day in Pillow Talk over Marilyn Monroe's Suger???  As for Madeline Kahn, don't forget her in Blazing Saddles.  Her rendition of "I'm tired" ("...let's face it...everything from the waist down is kaput") is classic.  Why I ever cared so much about the Oscars is beyond me...why anyone still cares after their actions two months ago is even crazier.  I am very happy that thousands (or more) no longer do.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sinne on May 10, 2006, 11:31:10 PM
SINNE:

Ditto everything you said.  But no, Thelma didn't get a special Oscar, and her 6 nominations included neither The Misfits nor Rear Window...those tasteless fools, LOL (but true).  Marilyn Monroe's non-nomination for Some Like It Hot is particularly egregious, considering what a weak year it was for actresses...c'mon, Doris Day in Pillow Talk over Marilyn Monroe's Suger???  As for Madeline Kahn, don't forget her in Blazing Saddles.  Her rendition of "I'm tired" ("...let's face it...everything from the waist down is kaput") is classic.  Why I ever cared so much about the Oscars is beyond me...why anyone still cares after their actions two months ago is even crazier.  I am very happy that thousands (or more) no longer do.

Poor Marilyn.  Not even one Oscar nomination.  It would have meant so much to her.  I love her.  (Have visited her grave twice and the house she was found dead in.)

Yes - Madeline in Blazing Saddles - especially that song!  She was always so perfect.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: johnk on May 11, 2006, 12:28:50 AM
SINNE:

Ditto everything you said.  But no, Thelma didn't get a special Oscar, and her 6 nominations included neither The Misfits nor Rear Window...those tasteless fools, LOL (but true).  Marilyn Monroe's non-nomination for Some Like It Hot is particularly egregious, considering what a weak year it was for actresses...c'mon, Doris Day in Pillow Talk over Marilyn Monroe's Suger???  As for Madeline Kahn, don't forget her in Blazing Saddles.  Her rendition of "I'm tired" ("...let's face it...everything from the waist down is kaput") is classic.  Why I ever cared so much about the Oscars is beyond me...why anyone still cares after their actions two months ago is even crazier.  I am very happy that thousands (or more) no longer do.

Dude, you are preaching to the choir.  I thought Monroe was startling in "All About Eve."  One of my favorite lines is "You have a point.   It's a ridiculous point."  I believe it revolved around a butler.  Or a man named Butler. Oh well,,


...for what it's worth. 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: TomS on May 11, 2006, 08:44:22 AM
I love movies from 1969-70.

One of my all-time favorites is They Shoot Horses Don't They?

Not a lighthearted evening's entertainment, admittedly heavy-handed in spots, but utterly mesmerizing.

Some trivia (and I'll rely on you experts to confirm:)

Michael Sarrazin turned down the role of Joe Buck in Midnight Cowboy to star in this film.
They Shoot Horses...remains the most-Oscar-nominated film (9 nominations) with no Best Picture nomination.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 11, 2006, 09:10:41 AM
TOMS:

Everything you said about They Don't Shoot Horses is true.  How could they nominate it for everything (including director, screenplay, supporting actor, supporting actress) and not picture?  Then again, neither The Wild Bunch nor Easy Rider was best picture nominated that year either (both made the AFI Top 100).  Midnight Cowboy & Butch Cassidy were good selections, but the aforementioned films should have taken the last 3 spots instead of foreign-language winner Z (the first foreign film nominated for Best Picture since 1938 (Grand Illusion); did they really need to give Z a spot instead of Wild Bunch, Horses or Easy??); the good but uninspired Anne of the Thousand Days (the year's most nominated film with 10), and the abysmal Hello, Dolly, with Barbra Streisand at her Mae West worst.  I am not a Barbra hater, but Carol Channing should have been Dolly, Streisand was miscast.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on May 11, 2006, 10:07:10 AM
Regarding the Oscars, George C. Scott wanted nothing to do with them.  Before he was even nominated he issued this direct quote:  "Life isn't a race. And because it's not a race I don't consider myself in competition with my fellow actors for awards or recognition. That is why I have rejected the Oscar and nomination for playing Patton." 

It took alot of guts to confront the Academy with his declaration, but he said what was true in his heart. 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on May 11, 2006, 10:16:51 AM

One of my all-time favorites is They Shoot Horses Don't They?

I like this movie also.  I remember my Mom telling me about those dance marathons and how people would actually collapse on the floor.  They were taken advantage of from the Depression.  It's notable that Gig Young won the Best Supporting Actor Award but in real life ended up killing his wife and turning the gun on himself.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: TomS on May 11, 2006, 03:34:00 PM
Regarding the Oscars, George C. Scott wanted nothing to do with them.  Before he was even nominated he issued this direct quote:  "Life isn't a race. And because it's not a race I don't consider myself in competition with my fellow actors for awards or recognition. That is why I have rejected the Oscar and nomination for playing Patton." 
It took alot of guts to confront the Academy with his declaration, but he said what was true in his heart. 
Casper, at the time I was annoyed by Scott's refusal.  Well hey, I was 13, a movie fanatic and Oscar groupie.  Things have sure changed; I truly understand his sentiments now.
By the way, you've reminded me of another all-time favorite, which I happened to see as part of a double feature [(remember those?) with Patton:  M*A*S*H.  My first ever R-rated movie. (Yes, things sure have changed!!)  One of the best times I ever had at a movie.
(By the way, George C Scott's son Campbell Scott reads Brokeback Mountain on the Audio Book.)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on May 11, 2006, 03:39:10 PM
TomS, I certainly do remember double features, especially at the drive-in.   :)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on May 11, 2006, 04:17:14 PM
What is your favorite Stanly Kubrick film?

Mine is CLOCKWORK ORANGE.  I have seen that movie at least 10 times and the film is so futuristic and presents a nightmarish world.  I still remember Beethoven and ultra-violence and that orchestration of gang violence set to "The Thieving Magpie" is surrealistic and brazen.  The message of the movie is both political and social.  This is a flawless movie that still continues to shock today.  The movie originally had an "X" rating and was nominated for 4 Oscars including Best Picture.  Again, the Academy did an injustice.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 11, 2006, 04:44:59 PM
CASPER:

Well said.  George C. Scott was so right.  I always knew it but never cared, until now.  Finally awoke, better late than never.

My favorite Kubrick film is 2001: A Space Odyssey.  As Franco Zefferelli said, "it made me dream eyes wide open".  Also love Clockwork, Paths of Glory, Barry Lyndon and Spartacus.  I respect Dr. Strangelove more than I like it, just my taste (and of course another great not-nominated George C. Scott performance, not to mention deserving but never-nominated Sterling Hayden and Slim Pickens).  All the rest were good or very good, from Killers, Killing, Lolita, Shining, except for Eyes Wide Shut, which I couldn't stand.  Ooooh, that piano note.  But apart from that nit, I never understood why Kubrick elected to star sub-par actors in certain films, like Ryan O'Neil in Barry Lyndon and Tom Cruise in Eyes.  I know many will disagree with these statements, but you can't talk me out of it, LOL.  What I am confident all will agree with is that it is a shame Kubrick didn't get to direct A.I.  That is not meant to disparage Spielberg's film (although one could, parts are virtually unwatchable, especially re: the dysfunctional child-adult relationships at the beginning and very end of the movie), but Kubrick's take I think would have been fascinating.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: daannzzz on May 11, 2006, 08:46:50 PM
1. To Kill a Mockingbird

The rest switch around but the above film always remains in the top spot.
The Reivers
The Other
The Day of the Locust
Nashville
Pleasantville
Kronos
Koyaanisqatsi
Close Encounters of the Third Kind
And of course BBM

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on May 11, 2006, 10:29:42 PM
I think the Academy did a faux pas by not bestowing the Best Picture Award to "Babe."   :)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sunspot on May 12, 2006, 01:02:23 AM
All-Time Favorite Films?  Why, Zardoz, of course . . .

OK, not really.  But it is staggeringly awful, in the way only a film featuring Sean Connery running around in an orange diaper for 2 and a half hours could be.  The most pretentious unintentional comedy ever filmed.

I am happy to have finally an avatar for the forum, though . . .
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on May 12, 2006, 08:47:33 AM
OMG, Sunspot, I didn't know that anyone else had been suckered into watching that god-awful piece of laughable ...  I actually felt sorry for Sean Connery.  And I love you avatar.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 12, 2006, 09:28:22 AM
CASPER:

I couldn't agree more re: "Babe", it definitely deserved the 1995 Best Picture prize.  However, the mere fact they even nominated it was victory enough, I think it was the National Society of Film Critics Best Picture prize that started its ascent. 

My top 10 of 1995, in order (more or less): Babe, Toy Story, Dead Man Walking, The Usual Suspects, Nixon, Sense and Sensibility, Antonia's Line, Seven, Leaving Las Vegas, and Casino.  Carrington (with an unjustly snubbed performance by Jonathan Pryce), Apollo 13, Bridges of Madison County, Il Postino, Richard III, Twelve Monkeys, To Die For and even Mighty Aphrodite are runners-up.  Undeserving winner Braveheart ranks lower because while rousing with a terrific James Horner score, it was redundant (two battles too many), gratuitously violent (the last 15 minutes are unforgivable), woodenly acted (except by Patrick McGoohan as the homophobic king, another minus LOL), and an overall mess.  Yup, it should have been Babe's year.  Odd its only Oscar was visual effects (over Apollo 13).
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on May 12, 2006, 11:25:24 AM
jayiijay, when I heard the Best Make-Up Award being announced for "Braveheart," I busted out laughing thinking someone just smears blue paint on someone's face (William Wallace) and gets an Oscar for it? (http://smilies.sofrayt.com/fsc/jeer.gif)

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on May 12, 2006, 03:15:33 PM
"The Bad Seed"
1956
Directed by:  Mervyn LeRoy

This movie was so daring back in 1956 that it received a "C" rating and I remember seeing a poster at the lobby window that no one under 16 was allowed inside.

"The Bad Seed" adheres to the theory that murder can be hereditary.  Nancy Kelly put on a dynamic performance as the mother who suffers the most severe form of mental perdition imaginable.  She was nominated for Best Actress but the Academy did not choose her.  :-[  Also, Patty McCormack and Eileen Heckart were both nominated for Best Supporting Actress Awards and the Academy ignored them.   :-[

The b+w cinematography is outstanding in this movie and I am always attracted to the storyline.  The acting was so good in this movie that it tugs at your heart.  I could feel the mental pain that Nancy Kelly was going through.

Oh, the handsome William Hopper is in this movie as Rhoda's Dad.

"The Bad Seed" can still send up chills with today's audience.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: daannzzz on May 12, 2006, 09:47:42 PM
"The Bad Seed"
1956
Directed by:  Mervyn LeRoy

This movie was so daring back in 1956 that it received a "C" rating and I remember seeing a poster at the lobby window that no one under 16 was allowed inside.

"The Bad Seed" adheres to the theory that murder can be hereditary.  Nancy Kelly put on a dynamic performance as the mother who suffers the most severe form of mental perdition imaginable.  She was nominated for Best Actress but the Academy did not choose her.  :-[  Also, Patty McCormack and Eileen Heckart were both nominated for Best Supporting Actress Awards and the Academy ignored them.   :-[

The b+w cinematography is outstanding in this movie and I am always attracted to the storyline.  The acting was so good in this movie that it tugs at your heart.  I could feel the mental pain that Nancy Kelly was going through.

Oh, the handsome William Hopper is in this movie as Rhoda's Dad.

"The Bad Seed" can still send up chills with today's audience.

Casper. I Love "The Bad Seed" I don't wathc it often but it  is such a good and fun and horrifying film. We saw this for the first time back in the nid sixties at the ages of 10 - 12 and were all mesmerized.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 12, 2006, 11:13:54 PM
CASPER: Best Makeup to Braveheart was inane even for the Academy.  But it was obvious it was going to win since the other nominees were Mi Family Mi Familia and Roommates, neither of which was commercial enough to win an Oscar.  Let's face it, most members probably never even heard of the other nominees!

The Bad Seed is a terrific movie, and brings me to 1956, one of the Academy's all-time biggest shames, which is saying a lot.  John Ford's masterpiece The Searchers is now universally regarded as one of the absolute 10 or 20 greatest masterpieces of world cinema.  It was not nominated for a single Oscar.  The justly-maligned 1997 American Film Insitute poll only had Searchers at 90-something, but when you look at the REAL movie buff polls like Sight & Sound etc., The Searchers is on another level with anything else released that year.  In fact, 1956 was a fine year for movies.  My top 25 were The Searchers, La Strada (really 1954 but Oscar eligible in '56), Umberto D, The Seven Samurai (Oscar eligible in '56), Giant (BP nominee), Written on the Wind, Friendly Persuasion (BP nominee), The Lady Killers, The Man Who Knew Too Much, The Killing, Invasion of the Body Snatchers,  Bigger Than Life, Lust for Life, The King and I, The Catered Affair, The Red Balloon, Richard III, Somebody Up There LIkes Me, Anastasia, The Wrong Man, Bus Stop, Gervaise, The Brave One, The Solid Gold Cadillac, and the hoaky but fun The Ten Commandments (BP nominee).  I didn't list the Oscar winner: Around the World in 80 Days, an endless travelogue with distracting cameos that is universally considered one of the 5 worst films to ever win.  It's funny, Jon Stewart commented that everyone in the Oscar audience was in Crash...it was really true of 80 Days.  As for the acting winners, well, it's late, I won't get into it much except to say: (a) how could Anthony Quinn win for his 10 minutes in Lust for Life over his non-nominated co-star Richard Basehart in La Strada; answer: the Academy has always been a xenophobic organization and shouldn't even pretend to know anything about world cinema; other worthier nominees included Robert Stack for Written on the Wind and Mickey Rooney in his best performance in Bold & Brave; (b) some of the deserving non-nominees for Best Actress included Guiletta Masina, the deserved winner for La Strada; Marilyn Monroe in Bus Stop (she felt badly about being snubbed, rightfully so); Elizabeth Taylor in her 2nd best performance (after Virginia Woolf) in Giant; Judy Holliday in Solid Gold Cadillac; Bette Davis in her underrated turn in Catered Affair.  Sorry, Carroll Baker was dull in Baby Doll, and the great Katharine Hepburn was just re-playing the usual African Queen-Summertime-etc. spinster in Rainmaker; and Deborah Kerr was nice in King & I but paled besides Yul Brynner; if they were gonna nominate her it should've been for Tea & Sympathy; and (c) missing lead actor nominees included Carlo Battisti in Umberto D (deserved winner...though wait), Toshiro Mifune in Seven Samurai, Anthony Quinn in La Strada, Gary Cooper in Friendly Persuasion, Alec Guinness in The Lady Killers (those teeth!) and, in the performance of his life, John Wayne in The Searchers, the other person who perhaps should have won.  Wayne loved his Searchers character he named his son Ethan.  I suppose it's hard to fault them for selecting Dorothy Malone for supporting for Written on the Wind, the history books say her performance was a sensation, but I don't know, Patty McCormack was pretty great in Bad Seed.  Yikes, what a bunch of screw-ups.

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on May 13, 2006, 02:49:46 AM
jay11jay, as you stated, 1956 was a sensational year at the movies.  I saw "Giant" a couple of times and I think that movie was cheated from the Best Picture Oscar.  Like "Brokeback Mountain," the director was given the Oscar but his movie was denied the Best Picture Oscar.  When you look at "Giant," you see a movie classic.  By the way, Rock Hudson was so good in that movie.  To me, he was the handsomest movie actor.    I liked how you saw the transformation of the characters through the decades in "Giant."  The make-up had them all aging gracefully. But I couldn't help but thinking of Mercedes McCambridge making all of those wretched noises years later with "The Exorcist."

Wasn't it a media sin years later when Sal Mineo, who was murdered outside his apartment, had his lifestyle plastered all over every newspaper? 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: johnk on May 15, 2006, 07:54:39 AM
I didn't list the Oscar winner: Around the World in 80 Days, an endless travelogue with distracting cameos that is universally considered one of the 5 worst films to ever win.  It's funny, Jon Stewart commented that everyone in the Oscar audience was in Crash...it was really true of 80 Days. 

You are being too kind as regards "Around the World in 80 Days."  I can't believe I wasted three hours of my life sitting through this snoozarama.  How the heck this film beat both "Giant" and "Anastasia" for BP was surely the biggest Oscar screwup until the "Crash" win this year...
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 15, 2006, 01:42:15 PM
JOHNK:

Anastasia wasn't even nominated.  But while I agree with almost everything you said, I've got quite a few additional doozies for you that challenge Around the World/Searchers/Giant/etc. as the worst screw-up since the Brokeback fiasco.  More when I have time, but in very brief:

1958: Gigi over Vertigo and Touch of Evil???  Vertigo is now considered one of the 3 greatest films in world cinema (with Kane & Rules of the Game), and Evil is in the top 30 (at worst).  Neither is a personal favorite, but that's not what this is about, as you know.

1964: Dr. Strangelove (#26 at AFI, considered top 50 in world cinema) losing to My Fair Lady.

1967: The Graduate (#7 at AFI)  & Bonnie & Clyde (#27 at AFI) losing to In the Heat of the Night (not in the 100).

1968:  Oliver! over non-nominee 2001 (now considered in the top 10 films in world cinema).

1976: Rocky beating Network, Taxi Driver and All the President's Men.

1979: Apocalypse Now (#28 at AFI) and Manhattan losing to Kramer vs. Kramer (personally I think Apocalypse is overblown but it's hard to argue with the artistry).

1980: Raging Bull (now considered in the top 20 in world cinema) losing to Ordinary People.

1981: Reds and Raiders losing to Chariots of Fire.

1989: Driving Miss Daisy over non-nominees Do the Right Thing, Crimes & Misdemeanors, etc.

1990: Dances with Wolves over Goodfellas.

1994: Forrest Gump over anything (sorry, it's semi-unwatchable).

1995: Braveheart over Babe and almost anything as well, it's not a great film.

1996: The English Patient over Breaking the Waves (of course Elaine Benes ("Seinfeld") hated English Patient, it sucked)

1997: Titanic over L.A. Confidential

1998: Shakespeare in Love over Saving Private Ryan

1999:  The smarmy American Beauty over almost anything, including non-nominee Being John Malkovich

2000: Gladiator over Crouching Tiger (another slap to Ang Lee) and Traffic and non-nominees Almost Famous and the underrated Istvan Szabo Sunshine

2001: A Beautiful Mind over Moulin Rouge, Fellowship, Gosford Park, non-nominees Mulholland Drive, Memento, etc.

2002: Chicago over The Pianist (I predict the latter will come to be regarded as a world cinema masterpiece, it is certainly on its way)

There are many other years since 1956 where they selected the wrong winner, but these are particularly egregious as film "history" already proves, most in the same league with the Around the World idiocy.  I know I have listed a lot, but these are BAD choices.  Personally, I have agreed with the Academy's Best Picture choice only once since 1987 ($ Dollar Baby; I'm a sucker, I cried), so why I still care that they cowardly turned their collective back on Brokeback is beyond me.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on May 15, 2006, 01:59:22 PM
But remember these are just your opinions!  Here are the wins I totally agree with (I left in your comments though, to lazy to edit)!  And was it you that was going to post me that "other" AFI list?   ;)


1968:  Oliver! over non-nominee 2001 (now considered in the top 10 films in world cinema).

1976: Rocky beating Network, Taxi Driver and All the President's Men.

1979: Apocalypse Now (#28 at AFI) and Manhattan losing to Kramer vs. Kramer (personally I think Apocalypse is overblown but it's hard to argue with the artistry).

1981: Reds and Raiders losing to Chariots of Fire.

1989: Driving Miss Daisy over non-nominees Do the Right Thing, Crimes & Misdemeanors, etc.

1994: Forrest Gump over anything (sorry, it's semi-unwatchable).

1995: Braveheart over Babe and almost anything as well, it's not a great film.

1996: The English Patient over Breaking the Waves (of course Elaine Benes ("Seinfeld") hated English Patient, it sucked)

1997: Titanic over L.A. Confidential

1999:  The smarmy American Beauty over almost anything, including non-nominee Being John Malkovich

2000: Gladiator over Crouching Tiger (another slap to Ang Lee) and Traffic and non-nominees Almost Famous and the underrated Istvan Szabo Sunshine

2001: A Beautiful Mind over Moulin Rouge, Fellowship, Gosford Park, non-nominees Mulholland Drive, Memento, etc.

2002: Chicago over The Pianist (I predict the latter will come to be regarded as a world cinema masterpiece, it is certainly on its way)

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 15, 2006, 02:21:19 PM
LOLA:

No, these are not my opinions, these are "film expert" consensus opinions on both a national and international level.  Maybe those will change over time, but that's what they are now.  My opinions don't matter vis-a-vis criticizing the Academy because what we each individually like and don't like is subjective.  The "film expert" consensus is an attempt to objectify cinema as art.  For example, obviously Citizen Kane is better than say, Santa Claus Conquers the Martians (though the latter can sometimes be more fun, LOL).  If you or I or anyone says they prefer Santa, fine, we each like what they like; but if someone says Santa is a "better" film, well, then they are simply wrong from an artistic point of view.  Everything else falls somewhere in between.  And again, my personal opinions are often different.  For example, I personally prefer My Fair Lady to Dr. Strangelove, just my taste, and I am entitled to it.  Certainly Lady is a good film, but based upon script, importance (then and now), etc., Lady just isn't in the same league as Strangelove.  Etc.  There are numerous sites around the web compiling lists of the world's great films according to the experts (e.g., directors, critics, teachers - people who actually study film and often make a living so doing), but I am at work and don't have time to find sites, sorry.  Google "greatest films" and no doubt you'll come up with a lot, if you are curious.  :)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on May 15, 2006, 02:37:15 PM
Actually I referred to the AFI list one day and I thought it was you who said their current list was not up to snuff, but you would provide me with their older version.  If it wasn't you, don't worry about it.


I guess we would have to define "film expert"  I think Roger Ebert knows alot about film, but alot of people would agree, in fact alot of people on this site seem to disagree with the vast majority of what the critics and film buffs liked.

I think art is subjective, and I just don't think anyone could convince me otherwise.

AND that is the beauty of film.   :)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: johnk on May 15, 2006, 02:44:45 PM
JOHNK:

Anastasia wasn't even nominated.  But while I agree with almost everything you said, I've got quite a few additional doozies for you that challenge Around the World/Searchers/Giant/etc. as the worst screw-up since the Brokeback fiasco.


And let's not forget 1952's bloated "The Greatest Show on Earth."  How this sleeping pill on film was selected as BP over "The Quiet Man" and "Ivanhoe" is completely baffling to me. 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: DaveinPhilly on May 15, 2006, 02:48:16 PM
It's 'cause Hollywood produces mostly s**t which it wants to sell badly and only rarely do they fall upon something excellent, let alone magnificent. The Quiet Man ! They probably forgot they even made it. But The Greatest Show on Earth - great all the kids and their folks'll come and buy popcorn. Sad, Sad, Sad.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 15, 2006, 03:02:00 PM
JOHNK, DAVEINPHILLY:

I was only addressing post-1956, but yeah, The Greatest Show on Earth Victory is unspeakable, but not just on account of The Quiet Man losing (at least it won John Ford his 4th director Oscar), but because it also beat High Noon and not-even-nominated Singin' in the Rain.  Other superior films in 1952 included Moulin Rouge, The Lavendar Hill Mob, Breaking the Sound Barrier, Viva Zapata, The Bad and the Beautiful, Come Back Little Sheba, The Man in the White Suit, Monkey Business, Rancho Notorious, Pat & Mike, The Star, Limelight, etc.  And of course this doesn't even address foreign-language films like Forbidden Games.  Greatest Show wasn't in the top 10 by 1952 standards, and it ain't top 10 by today's...unless of course Crash is the new barometer, in which case Greatest Show is most deserving.  Not LOL - sad.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: dejavu on May 15, 2006, 08:25:23 PM
I'm taking this as an exercise in fun, not in film criticism.  I don't watch that many movies but I do own quite a few, including most of the ones below.  These are all-time FAVORITES or multiple-viewings, not necessarily what anybody else would consider "best".

1. Brokeback Mountain
2. Camelot
3. East of Eden
4. The Graduate
5. Midnight Cowboy
6. A Beautiful Mind
7. October Sky
8. Moonstruck
9. Field of Dreams
10. Wizard of Oz
11. Women in Love
12. Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid
13. Hud
14. Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (don't own this one, haven't seen for years)
15. Gone With the Wind
16. Captain Corelli's Mandolin
17. Maurice

Other "classics" I own but haven't watched yet; but have every intention of adding to above list after I
do watch based on their reputation:
18. The Last Picture Show
19. A Streetcar Named Desire
20. Glory
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 15, 2006, 09:24:18 PM
DEJAVU:

Thanks for the great list.  I really like about 15 of your 20, so based on your recommendation I will watch Captain Corelli's Mandolin the first chance I get.  To me, that's point of this thread, discovering new movies (and trashing the Oscars, the so-called arbitors of great films, not).
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: lembregts on May 16, 2006, 04:17:24 AM

Ten of my all-time favorite films (not counting Brockeback Mountain and not necessarily in this order)

Missing
Coming Home
The Deer Hunter
The Graduate
The Killing Fields
To Kill A Mockingbird
Ryan's Daughter
The Pianist
West Side Story
Terms of Endearment


Ria
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on May 16, 2006, 06:00:26 AM

Ten of my all-time favorite films (not counting Brockeback Mountain and not necessarily in this order)

Missing
Coming Home
The Deer Hunter
The Graduate
The Killing Fields
To Kill A Mockingbird
Ryan's Daughter
The Pianist
West Side Story
Terms of Endearment


Ria

Coming Home & The Deer Hunter are two of my favourites!  What is Missing?
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: lembregts on May 16, 2006, 06:30:32 AM

For Lola.

"Missing" is a movie by Costa-Gavras, released in 1982 and based on the book by the same name written by Thomas Hauser on the disappearance and execution of Charles Horman, a young American writer and film maker who together with his wife (played by Sissy Spacek in the movie) is witness to the overthrow of President Allende by Pinochet and his henchmen in Chile in September 1973 and who became one of the thousands of people arrested and disappeared during and after that coup.  He was later found executed.  Jack Lemmon plays Horman's outraged father who goes to Chile to try and find his son.

Both the book and the film are outstanding and deeply moving. 
It is a true story.

Ria
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 16, 2006, 08:49:34 AM
LEMBREGTS:

The Pianist and Brokeback are also in my 10 favorites ever.  Great minds, LOL.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on May 16, 2006, 09:34:53 AM

For Lola.

"Missing" is a movie by Costa-Gavras, released in 1982 and based on the book by the same name written by Thomas Hauser on the disappearance and execution of Charles Horman, a young American writer and film maker who together with his wife (played by Sissy Spacek in the movie) is witness to the overthrow of President Allende by Pinochet and his henchmen in Chile in September 1973 and who became one of the thousands of people arrested and disappeared during and after that coup.  He was later found executed.  Jack Lemmon plays Horman's outraged father who goes to Chile to try and find his son.

Both the book and the film are outstanding and deeply moving. 
It is a true story.

Ria


Sounds very interesting, I will check for that nex time I am in the video store!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: lembregts on May 17, 2006, 08:30:58 AM

Some other films I love and have on DVD:

Once Upon a Time in America (and oh, the music in that movie...so haunting and beautiful).
The Big Chill (and yes, that soundtrack, too).
From Here to Eternity.

Let us know what you think of 'Missing' if you get to watch it Lola.

Ria
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on May 17, 2006, 03:47:06 PM
"The Picture of Dorian Gray"
1945
Directed by:  Albert Lewin

A cast to die for:  George Sanders, Peter Lawford, Angela Lansbury, Donna Reed, and Hurd Hatfield. 

This can be classified as a horror movie that someone who doesn't like horror movies can enjoy.  The evil is there but the viewer sees it on a portrait.  This portrait gets uglier and uglier.  I saw the version that has the portrait transform to technicolor and the effect is stunning.  Dorian remains young throughout generation after generation but he enjoys his wicked ways.  Whenever he does something evil, the picture gets more hideous. 

I still get a kick of Angela Lansbury singing, "Goodbye, Little Yellow Bird."  She did win the Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress.  She was so young in this movie.

Peter Lawford is very handsome.

Darn it!  This is one movie that yet has to be released on DVD.

By the way, I did read in Variety where a remake is in production right now.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: johnk on May 18, 2006, 10:44:47 AM

I still get a kick of Angela Lansbury singing, "Goodbye, Little Yellow Bird."  She did win the Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress.  She was so young in this movie.


I never get tired of watching Angela Lansbury in the original "The Manchurian Candidate."  Her performance as Mrs. Iselin, the world's most evil mother, is as startlingly off-character (as seen through the lens of 12 years of Jessica Fletcher) as Mary Tyler Moore's was as the icy Beth Jarrett in "Ordinary People."
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: TomS on May 18, 2006, 10:49:24 AM

Ten of my all-time favorite films (not counting Brockeback Mountain and not necessarily in this order)....
The Deer Hunter
Ria
I loved The Deer Hunter too.  I saw it again recently and found some unexpected parallels to Brokeback...
--At its heart, the story of the love between 2 men, who were even more closeted than Jake and Ennis
--One is reticent, cannot express himself; the other more fun-loving and sensitive
--One of them dies tragically
--Almost painfully beautiful scenes in the mountains
--A plaintive guitar score
--A new angle on masculine iconography (soldiers, steelworkers, hunters instead of cowboys)
--A female character in love with one of the men but who cannot understand him
--A finale open to many interpretations, the last line being a tribute to the character who died.

The similarities end there, but I think I like The Deer Hunter even more than before because of them.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: dejavu on May 18, 2006, 02:48:40 PM
DEJAVU:
...based on your recommendation I will watch Captain Corelli's Mandolin the first chance I get. 

OK, jayiijay.  Be forewarned, that's one I wasn't sure other people would like, and I missed it in the theater so maybe it wasn't popular for too long.  So I had to buy it (the VHS tape), and played it for several other groups of people.  I enjoyed it a lot.  There is a love story.  There is a war.  The Italians are the "good guys" compared to the Germans in Greece during WW II.  There is a lot of humor between the soldiers, as I recall (Nicolas Cage).  I read the book, Corelli's Mandolin, first, and while that was more complete as history, thank goodness they cut the movie off in time when they did.  No SPOILERS here, but if you ever read the book, you'll see what I mean.  It totally changes the outcome of the personal stories of the main characters.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Dal on May 18, 2006, 03:04:16 PM
I never get tired of watching Angela Lansbury in the original "The Manchurian Candidate."  Her performance as Mrs. Iselin, the world's most evil mother, is as startlingly off-character (as seen through the lens of 12 years of Jessica Fletcher) as Mary Tyler Moore's was as the icy Beth Jarrett in "Ordinary People."

I gotta concur.  She is bone-chilling.  And that kiss....!!  One of the most revolting moments in film IMO. 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: johnk on May 18, 2006, 09:56:46 PM
I never get tired of watching Angela Lansbury in the original "The Manchurian Candidate."  Her performance as Mrs. Iselin, the world's most evil mother, is as startlingly off-character (as seen through the lens of 12 years of Jessica Fletcher) as Mary Tyler Moore's was as the icy Beth Jarrett in "Ordinary People."

I gotta concur.  She is bone-chilling.  And that kiss....!!  One of the most revolting moments in film IMO. 

Oh gosh, yeah, still gives me the creeps. And trust me, there is no end for my admiration for Streep, but this is one thing IMVHO she simply could not have pulled off in the same way.  Lansbury was nominated for BSA for "The Manchurian Candidate"  (why not Best Actress, I don't know - perhaps Jay can explain).  The field for both Best Actress and BSA was tough that year:  Best Actress noms were-Anne Bancroft, Lee Remick, Katherine Hepburn, Bette Davis, and Geraldine Page.  BSA noms were - Patty Duke, Angela Lansbury, Thelma Ritter (her sixth and last), Shirley Knight, and Mary Badham.

...for what it's worth.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 18, 2006, 10:21:07 PM
Hey JOHNK.

I am only guessing, but Lansbury was likely classified supporting by the producers (and therefore the Academy) because she wasn't that big a star at the time, plus likely stood a better chance in the supporting category due to the strong leads.  Patty Duke was terrific in Miracle Worker, hard to fault her win, but I do (LOL), only because Lansbury in Candidate gave arguably one of the 5 great "supporting" performances in American cinema.  Yeah, that's a lofty mouthful, but it is a remarkable, memorable performance.  Like you said, even the great Streep couldn't touch it.

Manchurian, which deservedly made the AFI Top 100 in 1997, was not nominated for Picture.  In fact, neither were The Miracle Worker, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, Whatever Happened to Baby Jane, Days of Wine and Roses, Long Day's Journey Into Night, A Taste of Honey, Ride the High Country, David and Lisa, Billy Budd, Lolita,  and a slew of foreign masterpieces including, among others, Jules and Jim, Vivre sa Vie, The Exterminating Angel and Last Year at Marienbad.  So what did they nominate instead?  Lawrence of Arabia & To Kill a Mockingbird; right; The Longest Day; very good film, though no Manchurian or Liberty Valance; The Music Man; fun, but c'mon; and the remake of Mutiny on the Bounty, which ranks as one of the 10 worst films ever to be nominated.  Even then most major critics gave it one or two stars, and today it's all but unwatchable.  But the Academy nominated it for the same reason they nominated Cleopatra the following year: the studios spent a lot of money in making the films and wanted nominations to help recoup costs.  So much for integrity.  But we all know that.  Why why why have I ever cared about the Oscars???
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: johnk on May 18, 2006, 11:09:25 PM
Hey JOHNK.

I am only guessing, but Lansbury was likely classified supporting by the producers (and therefore the Academy) because she wasn't that big a star at the time, plus likely stood a better chance in the supporting category due to the strong leads.  Patty Duke was terrific in Miracle Worker, hard to fault her win, but I do (LOL), only because Lansbury in Candidate gave arguably one of the 5 great "supporting" performances in American cinema.  Yeah, that's a lofty mouthful, but it is a remarkable, memorable performance.  Like you said, even the great Streep couldn't touch it.

  So much for integrity.  But we all know that.  Why why why have I ever cared about the Oscars???

As regards your second point, YEAH!

As regards BA for 1962, imagine having to compete against Lee Remick, Bette Davis, Katherine Hepburn, and Geraldine Page.  Yikes!  I guess the producers called it, but take your pick.  IMVHO Lansbury's performance is more enduring than Duke's. 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: lembregts on May 19, 2006, 04:54:40 AM

Ten of my all-time favorite films (not counting Brockeback Mountain and not necessarily in this order)....
The Deer Hunter
Ria
I loved The Deer Hunter too.  I saw it again recently and found some unexpected parallels to Brokeback...
--At its heart, the story of the love between 2 men, who were even more closeted than Jake and Ennis
--One is reticent, cannot express himself; the other more fun-loving and sensitive
--One of them dies tragically
--Almost painfully beautiful scenes in the mountains
--A plaintive guitar score
--A new angle on masculine iconography (soldiers, steelworkers, hunters instead of cowboys)
--A female character in love with one of the men but who cannot understand him
--A finale open to many interpretations, the last line being a tribute to the character who died.

The similarities end there, but I think I like The Deer Hunter even more than before because of them.


TomS, those are brilliant observations!!  I saw the movie way back in 1978 when it was released and in those days you could stay in the movie theatre as long as you wished, for the price of one ticket.
After I watched the movie the first time I stayed in my seat for a second showing.  I was blown away by it - great acting performances  by the entire cast - I think I never loved De Niro more than in that movie (these days he makes films I am not really interested in - I think he is wasting his talent).
I also think this is a movie, like Brockeback Mountain, that grows on you with every addtional viewing.

Ria
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: DaveinPhilly on May 19, 2006, 07:14:27 AM
Deer Hunter was a truly magnificent and touching film and I agree probably De Niro's best work. I also a fan of another film with him in it, though he was probably miscast in it - "The Mission" which was stunning. Remarkable cinematography some splendid acting. and an unbelievably beautiful score.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 19, 2006, 03:31:18 PM
DAVEINPHILLY:

The Mission - winner of the Palme d'Or and my personal favorite of 1986 (by a nose over Peggy Sue Got Married, A Room with a View & Blue Velvet, then Platoon).  I know I sound grandiose, but in my (strong) opinion on this, Ennio Morricone's score is the most magnificent ever composed for a film, and a great work of art.  It won the Golden Globe but then lost the Oscar to 'Round, Midnight because the morons in the Academy gave it to (justifiably popular) Herbie Hancock rather than Morricone, who amazingly has never won.  Nothing is in the league of atrocities as this year's Best Picture prize, but that particular score loss is otherwise as bad as it gets.  At least the magnificent cinematography won.  Thanks for mentioning that film.  Yeah, De Niro may be slightly miscast, but he pulls it off, and Jeremy Irons is outstanding.  A fascinating, wonderful film.  And again, Morricone's score - incredible - great running music too, LOL.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sunspot on May 20, 2006, 12:13:57 AM
Ah, the films of 1985.  Saw Peggy Sue Got Married again recently, and thought it was crap.  Loved it the first time I saw it, back in the early '90s, but now?  I think it's a stinker.  Nice attempt, a few good moments, but doesn't work - a dated product of its times.

A Room With A View is one of my all-time favorites, and as a period piece has held up very well.  I've seen it at least half a dozen times (mostly forcing friends to watch it - one still references it from time to time herself), and even have it on DVD around here somewhere.  I've seen some of the other Merchant-Ivory films and didn't care for them a bit - I don't even remember Howard's End, although I saw it less than 10 years ago - but View has stuck with me.  I think it may still be Helena Bonham Carter's finest hour (Planet of the Apes sure as hell wasn't), and Maggie Smith steals the show as poor Cousin Charlotte.  She won a Golden Globe for that performance, but lost the Oscar to Dianne Wiest in Hannah & Her Sisters.  I adore Wiest, but Smith's performance is clearly superior, and she should have got the statue.  Wiest probably should have won for The Lost Boys - who would expect such a great performance in a popcorn flick?  Olympia Dukakis was good in Moonstruck, but some of the other supporting actress nominees (Ann Archer for Fatal Attraction?) are real head-scratchers.  And how in the hell could Cher win over Glenn Close in Fatal Attraction?

Close lost again the next year for Dangerous Liaisons, to Jodie Foster in The Accused.  Hard to slag Jodie Foster - I thought Close was transcendently evil in Liaisons, but unlike Cher at least Foster is a great actress.  How Rain Man even got nominated - let alone won - over an incredibly entertaining work of art like Dangerous Liaisons I'll never know.  Rain Man was the weakest film nominated that year (although it managed to score a Golden Globe as well - go figure).
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Chuck Ivins on May 20, 2006, 11:01:12 AM
I'm not  a movie buff.  I will have to rent some of the movies you all have listed, so I can get more edjamacated on film.  Anyways, here's my list of favorites, in no particular order:

Brokeback Mountain
The Lion in Winter (with Kathryn Hepburn)
The Wizard of Oz
The Day the Earth Stood Still
Mommy Dearest (one of my favorite comedies!)
What Ever Happened to Baby Jane (another favorite comedy of mine)
The Crying Game
A Room with a View
A Streetcar Named Desire
Fight Club

I'm sure there are other, more sophisticated films I've enjoyed but can't think of them right now.  I'll add them as I think of them.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Dal on May 20, 2006, 02:26:38 PM
The Day the Earth Stood Still
Klatu Verada Nikto!!!

(can not belIEve I remember that after about thirty years!)

Allow me to recommend Teenagers from Outer Space
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: hifrommike65 on May 21, 2006, 05:28:02 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klaatu_barada_nikto

It's "KLAATU BARADA NIKTO."

My favorite film of all time is 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY.  In fact, there are a number of ways that I think 2001 resembles BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN, including the early primarily nonverbal sequences on the mountain (equivalent of 4 milliion years ago), the ambiguity of transcendance vs. boring reality, & the mountain as an icon (instead of the monolith). 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Dal on May 21, 2006, 05:55:14 PM
It's "KLAATU BARADA NIKTO."

O excuse me!  Guess my command of Intergalactic spelling is a little out of practice.

Hey, wait a minute -- in the film, do we ever actually get to see it written down?  I may be at a disadvantage, 'cause I haven't seen it since the Carter Presidency.

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: hifrommike65 on May 21, 2006, 09:33:59 PM
http://thenostalgialeague.com/olmag/bates.html

The spelling of Klaatu derives from the original story by Harry Bates, "Farewell to the Master."  The spelling of the other words, "barada nikto," have become traditional in discussions of the film. 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 21, 2006, 10:01:10 PM
LA GRANDE ILLUSION (1937) d. Jean Renoir (grandson of Pierre August Renoir)

Orson Welles said if he could only save one film, it would be Grand Illusion.  FDR also famously sang its praises.  Perhaps more telling is the converse:  although neither fascists nor Nazis are mentioned, both Mussolini and Goebbels banned it, the latter declaring it to "cinematic enemy #1 of the Third Reich".  The only foreign-language film nominated for the (dubious) Best Picture Oscar during from 1928-1968 (losing, unbelievably, to the mediocre You Can't Take It With You), and always ranked high in world cinema polls of greatest ever made, Grand Illusion is the best film I have ever seen, and probably my favorite since I saw it back in high school.

On its surface, Illusion is the story of both motley and aristocratic GI's attempting escape from prison camps during WWI, but it is really about escaping the confines of the artificial barriers that separate us as erected by man.  Apart from the obvious condemnation of war, other "illusions" exposed include inequalities presented by of social class, religion, language, sex (including a scene in which soldiers in drag sing "L'Marseille" a la "Casablanca" - but Illusion was first), race (briefly), and the notion of nations.  Picture the movie version of John Lenon's "Imagine", LOL. 

The film opens with a German commandant inviting French officers he just shot down to lunch.  The unorthodox dining with so-called enemies sets the film's tone, as later a ridiculed Jew shares his food with anti-semites, a German woman opens her home to protect possible comrades of those killed her husband, etc.  But the commandant is not without prejudice, as he only wishes to dine with fellow officers, his perception of his true equals.  He is not at all a bad guy, but does not see how he clings to labels and titles to elevate himself at the expense of others.  It is only through the microcosm prison camp where close, intimate exposure between all types of people levels the field.   

Unique (at the time) to this anti-war film is the omission of battles, and the minimal amount of gun fire.  Renoir is confident we know where we are, we must move past fights; don't do it unless you absolutely absolutely have to, and even then.  Besides, there are things more powerful than guns, as illustrated by a scene in which music (via flutes) is a character that aids an escape.  The hope and joy of this movie is that if we want, these artifices really can be illusions if we desire hard enough to change things and live another way.  No spoilers, but the 4th (and final) act presents a very different setting in which loneliness and other man-made barriers still prevail (especially language), but its arch-enemy, love, enters the frey and does silent battle to heart-breaking effect. 

Most exhilirating is how Renoir imbues Illusion with his passionate belief in the possibilities of many's humanity to man.  If you treat your enemy well, eventually you will ask yourself why you are enemies.  As a lonely soldier says in a monologue to a cow in the 4th act, "well, I suppose we both do our best".  But Illusion still manages to respect all viewpoints, and does not readily dismiss the commandment's elitism.  Rather, Illusion mourns the death of honor and chivalry, extinguished by "the war to end all wars", presenting pre-WWI Europe as a civilization truly "gone with the wind".  It simultaneously ushers in and celebrates an idealized new world order, where all men (and women) are, or at least should be, created equal.  Renoir is not naive; he understands that is the greatest illusion of all.  It is no wonder Goebbels banned this film on the eve of war.

Like Brokeback Mountain, Grand Illusion is a quiet film that sneaks up on you, and requires repeated viewings to absorb its multi-layered complexities.  I have discovered new things each time (4).  Something different makes me choke up, not because of anything "traditionally" sad, but because of deepening realization of the director's vision.  He presents so many possibilities, with infinite intelligence, wit and compassion.   I hope everyone sees this beautiful film.  thx
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 21, 2006, 10:51:15 PM
P.S.  re: Grand Illusion

Renoir's Rules of the Game (1939) is now even more revered (top 3 in world cinema), obviously worth seeing also, but Grand Illusion is more accessible and to me, much better!!

(good genes, LOL)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 24, 2006, 09:51:05 PM
THE PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC, 1928, d. Carl Theodore Dreyer

Revered film critic Pauline Kael said Rene Maria Falconetti's performance in The Passion of Joan of Arc is perhaps the greatest ever recorded on screen.  I agree, it is in a class by itself.  Even if you don't like silent movies (or don't think you do), this is a film like no other, also arguably the best ever made (with Grand Illusion per prior post, and a select few others).  Better on each viewing (3), each time it left me breathless.

Using unique, often bizarre camera angles, the film is a study of the abuse of power and intimidation pitted against self-determination and an Antigone-like sense of "higher law".  Based verbatim on the transcripts of the famed 15th century trial of 19 year old Joan for heresy,  Dreyer paints a harrowing, claustrophic landscape in which we feel trapped with Joan.  The cinematography is magnificent, consisting primarily a series of extreme close-ups of the face of the naive saint, juxtaposed against those of her monstrous interrogators, so-called men of God.  Falconetti's sorrowful, teary eyes and tortured expressions are heartbreaking, a virtual case-study of art imitating life.  Primarily a stage actress, she briefly appeared in only one other (earlier) film and died young not 20 years later, but you can never forget her face.

At least one current version contains Richard Einhorn's beautiful score "Voice of Light" composed after the film's original release, but matches beautifully. 

The original prints of Passion were thought to be lost in a fire, but rediscovered intact 25 years ago in a Norwegian mental hospital (an interesting similarity to original Grand Illusion prints, also thought to have been lost).  Passion is a film that undeniably proves films can be great art, I hope you all see it!  thx
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on May 26, 2006, 09:38:12 AM
jayiijay, I own "The Passion of Joan of Arc" on DVD.  It is the Criterion collection.  Every word you say, jayiijay, gives credence to the movie.  You see all of the tortured emotion through Joan's eyes in this silent movie.

A classic!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 26, 2006, 06:18:42 PM
Thanks Casper.  But what about Grand Illusion?  I was hoping somebody would echo my sentiments on how wonderful it is, LOL!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Dal on May 27, 2006, 06:21:03 AM
^^^^^

Hold your horses, you'll have to wait jayiijay!  On your recommendation, I just rented the DVD; reckon I'll get around to taking a look this weekend, if things quiet down.  Appropriate for Memorial Day, n'cest pas?
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on May 29, 2006, 04:17:38 PM
^^^^^

Hold your horses, you'll have to wait jayiijay!  On your recommendation, I just rented the DVD; reckon I'll get around to taking a look this weekend, if things quiet down.  Appropriate for Memorial Day, n'cest pas?

OK Dal, so what did you think??  LOL.  But I am curious.  Incidentally, if you have time, watch it twice.  thx
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sinne on May 29, 2006, 08:47:01 PM
My criteria for my favourite films are, would I actually be able to watch them, say, 100+ times.  Some of theses I've watched over 50 so far:

Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Some Like It Hot
Roman Holiday
Sabrina
The Apartment
The Godfather
The Shop Around the Corner
Last Tango in Paris
Clockwork Orange
The Odd Couple
Stevie (with Glenda Jackson, not the documentary that came out a few years ago)
Dead Man Walking
and of course, Brokeback Mountain


Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Byzantinist on June 01, 2006, 06:54:17 PM
Dear folks:

I'd say a good start would be -

The Third Man - sigh!
Withnail and I
Godspell
Velvet Goldmine
Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolf
Kwaidan
Le Temps Retrouve
Brideshead Revisited (OK it's BBC TV!)
The Producers
High Anxiety
Young Frankenstein
Play it Again Sam
Manhattan
Radio Days
Bullets Over Broadway
Parting Glances
Bride of Frankenstein
Hey Babu Riba
A special day
Amarcord
Juliet of the Spirits
Beauty and the Beast (Cocteau)
Carpenter's the Fog
Rocky Horror Show
Animal House
Ikiru
Maurice
Room with a View
Portrait of Jennie

Gee whiz, there are so many!

And Brokeback Mountain (of course!)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on June 02, 2006, 09:44:19 AM

Ten of my all-time favorite films (not counting Brockeback Mountain and not necessarily in this order)....
The Deer Hunter
Ria
I loved The Deer Hunter too.  I saw it again recently and found some unexpected parallels to Brokeback...
--At its heart, the story of the love between 2 men, who were even more closeted than Jake and Ennis
--One is reticent, cannot express himself; the other more fun-loving and sensitive
--One of them dies tragically
--Almost painfully beautiful scenes in the mountains
--A plaintive guitar score
--A new angle on masculine iconography (soldiers, steelworkers, hunters instead of cowboys)
--A female character in love with one of the men but who cannot understand him
--A finale open to many interpretations, the last line being a tribute to the character who died.

The similarities end there, but I think I like The Deer Hunter even more than before because of them.


TomS, those are brilliant observations!!  I saw the movie way back in 1978 when it was released and in those days you could stay in the movie theatre as long as you wished, for the price of one ticket.
After I watched the movie the first time I stayed in my seat for a second showing.  I was blown away by it - great acting performances  by the entire cast - I think I never loved De Niro more than in that movie (these days he makes films I am not really interested in - I think he is wasting his talent).
I also think this is a movie, like Brockeback Mountain, that grows on you with every addtional viewing.

Ria

WOW how did I miss this, couldn't agree more!   Deer Hunter is one of my favourite movies and the love between Mike and Nick is beautiful.   The music, the scenes in the mountains, it is a haunting movie, I never tire of watching it.  I own it on DVD and still watch it often, even though the Russian Roulette scenes are hard to take.  :'(
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Bethie on June 03, 2006, 11:33:34 PM
Just popping in over here. I'm doing the town so to speak!

My favorite films! Some are really not very thought provoking but I love all the same.

My all time Favorite = Leaving Normal Christine Lahti and Meg Tilly Love love
October Sky, baby Jake but a great film, true story
I love Sister Act, could watch over and over.
Ahhhh... BBM?!?! Goes without saying

Old Old movies, Sidartha (sp)
Harold and Maude !!
Squuee! Rocky Horror Picture Show.
Brother Sun, Sister Moon

I was a teenager when these showed, but  they have stayed with me
all this time.

 I know I should come up with someting more thought provoking and stimulating
but these are my all time favs.  :D


Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on June 04, 2006, 08:44:03 AM
I saw Sister Act on TV last weekend, I had never seen it before, I thought it was really, really cute!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on June 15, 2006, 08:45:50 AM
Not sure where this should go:

LOS ANGELES, California (AP) -- George Bailey's brother proclaimed him the richest man in Bedford Falls. Now the story of the despondent businessman, who got a chance to see how ugly the world would be without him, has been proclaimed the most inspiring American movie.

Frank Capra's "It's a Wonderful Life," starring James Stewart as the disillusioned George, led the American Film Institute's list of inspirational films revealed Wednesday in the group's annual top-100 TV special that aired on CBS.

"We all connect to that story. We may not all connect to the story of a fighter from Philadelphia or a singing family in the Austrian Alps," said the TV special's producer, Bob Gazzale, referring to two other films on the list, "Rocky" and "The Sound of Music."

"But there's no way to get away from the inspiring story of George Bailey. It relates to us all."

"To Kill a Mockingbird," with Gregory Peck as the upright Southern dad seeking justice for a wrongly accused black man, was No. 2 on the list chosen from 300 nominated films on ballots sent to 1,500 filmmakers, actors, critics and others in Hollywood.

Steven Spielberg's "Schindler's List," starring Liam Neeson as a German businessman who saves his Jewish workers from extermination by the Nazis, was No. 3.

Sylvester Stallone's "Rocky" was fourth, while another Capra-Stewart collaboration, the political saga "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington," ranked fifth.

Spielberg landed two other films in the top 10, "E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial" (No. 6) and "Saving Private Ryan" (No. 10). Rounding out the top 10: "The Grapes of Wrath" (No. 7), "Breaking Away" (No. 8) and "Miracle on 34th Street" (No. 9).

http://www.cnn.com/2006/SHOWBIZ/Movies/06/15/afis.most.inspiring.ap/index.html
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jen_i on June 15, 2006, 11:37:05 AM
Life of Brian

Absolutely hilarious.  There's something in it to offend everyone.  Not at all PC (and I am usually very PC).  So obviously created by a bunch of teenage boys, but such on the nose humor sometimes ("Right!  This calls for immediate discussion!").

I saw it first in college, a small Mennonite college, Bethel, in Kansas.
I was busting my guts laughing nearly every minute, at the same time noticing not many others were laughing...
It was actually a kind of spiritual and physical release for me, since I had spent too many hours struggling so sincerely about my faith. I felt great truths were contained in the sermon on the mount.  Mennonites are pacifists, and "Blessed are the peacemakers..."  is quite meaningful to me.  Then to hear "Blessed are the cheesemakers..."  Couldn't have been better!

I never get tired of it.
Plus, those guys are so hard to understand most of the time that I get another joke everytime I watch it.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: IMJackNasty on June 15, 2006, 04:58:47 PM
These are my Top 10..based on the fact I can watch these movies anytime and anyplace and enjoy them.

1. Brokeback Mountain (but y'all knew that already. It surplanted #2 on my list that was #1 for a long time)

2. Whatever Happened To Baby Jane (Davis..Crawford...total classic!)

3. Hairspray (I'm not thrilled they are doing a remake of what was a great camp classic. John Travolta as Edna Turnblad? Please...Divine must be spinning in his grave).

4. The Trouble With Angels (Rosalind Russell is my favorite old time actress..she was the perfect Mother Superior)

5. Auntie Mame (More of Rosalind....she was fabulous and the best Mame ever to me)

6. Steel Magnolias (I love Olympia Dukakis and Shirley MacLaine together in this movie)

7. Imitation of Life (A much better movie about racism than Trash...with Lana Turner and a very risque topic since it was filmed in the staid 1950's)

8. Trick (Jack and Ennis's grandsons meet in New York and live happily ever after...LOL!)

9. Gypsy (Continuing the Rosalind theme...I like her better as Mama Rose over Ethel Merman)

10. Porky's (Classic American Teenage Sex Movie! Has anyone seen Mike Hunt? LMAO!)

Can you tell by this list that I'm gay?  :D

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: doodler on June 15, 2006, 09:25:33 PM
Not sure where this should go:

LOS ANGELES, California (AP) -- George Bailey's brother proclaimed him the richest man in Bedford Falls. Now the story of the despondent businessman, who got a chance to see how ugly the world would be without him, has been proclaimed the most inspiring American movie.

Frank Capra's "It's a Wonderful Life," starring James Stewart as the disillusioned George, led the American Film Institute's list of inspirational films revealed Wednesday in the group's annual top-100 TV special that aired on CBS.

"We all connect to that story. We may not all connect to the story of a fighter from Philadelphia or a singing family in the Austrian Alps," said the TV special's producer, Bob Gazzale, referring to two other films on the list, "Rocky" and "The Sound of Music."

"But there's no way to get away from the inspiring story of George Bailey. It relates to us all."

"To Kill a Mockingbird," with Gregory Peck as the upright Southern dad seeking justice for a wrongly accused black man, was No. 2 on the list chosen from 300 nominated films on ballots sent to 1,500 filmmakers, actors, critics and others in Hollywood.

Steven Spielberg's "Schindler's List," starring Liam Neeson as a German businessman who saves his Jewish workers from extermination by the Nazis, was No. 3.

Sylvester Stallone's "Rocky" was fourth, while another Capra-Stewart collaboration, the political saga "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington," ranked fifth.

Spielberg landed two other films in the top 10, "E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial" (No. 6) and "Saving Private Ryan" (No. 10). Rounding out the top 10: "The Grapes of Wrath" (No. 7), "Breaking Away" (No. 8) and "Miracle on 34th Street" (No. 9).

http://www.cnn.com/2006/SHOWBIZ/Movies/06/15/afis.most.inspiring.ap/index.html

I am SOOO tired of 'It's a Wonderful Life' winning 'most everything' I actually groaned out loud. Was talking with a friend of mine today and asked if she saw any of the show and her only comment was she 'was sooo tired of 'It's a Wonderful life' winning....'  A good many of the other choices were 'interesting' considering the theme (inspiration.) The 100 years went through 2004, right? Does ANYONE think the AFI will have any more guts than that other Hollywood group when it goes through 2006? Perhaps we could start campaigning NOW to have BBM included (doesn't have to START off at #1, top 10 will suffice.)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sinne on June 15, 2006, 10:03:19 PM
These are my Top 10..based on the fact I can watch these movies anytime and anyplace and enjoy them.

1. Brokeback Mountain (but y'all knew that already. It surplanted #2 on my list that was #1 for a long time)

2. Whatever Happened To Baby Jane (Davis..Crawford...total classic!)

3. Hairspray (I'm not thrilled they are doing a remake of what was a great camp classic. John Travolta as Edna Turnblad? Please...Divine must be spinning in his grave).

4. The Trouble With Angels (Rosalind Russell is my favorite old time actress..she was the perfect Mother Superior)

5. Auntie Mame (More of Rosalind....she was fabulous and the best Mame ever to me)

6. Steel Magnolias (I love Olympia Dukakis and Shirley MacLaine together in this movie)

7. Imitation of Life (A much better movie about racism than Trash...with Lana Turner and a very risque topic since it was filmed in the staid 1950's)

8. Trick (Jack and Ennis's grandsons meet in New York and live happily ever after...LOL!)

9. Gypsy (Continuing the Rosalind theme...I like her better as Mama Rose over Ethel Merman)

10. Porky's (Classic American Teenage Sex Movie! Has anyone seen Mike Hunt? LMAO!)

Can you tell by this list that I'm gay?  :D

Did you know one of our forum members was in "Imitation of Life"?  She played the young girl.  I don't know if she's still active in the forum or not though.  We were discussing it well over a month ago.  Can't recall her user name - but it was either her real first name (which you'd know from the credits) or the character's name in the movie.   ???
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on June 16, 2006, 10:02:51 AM
Can you tell by this list that I'm gay?  :D



YES! LOL   What can I even say about Porky's, it was a classic! lol   And I never saw a movie version of Hairspray, I saw it live though and LOVED it, bought the soundtrack and a t-shirt!  ;D

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on June 16, 2006, 10:04:26 AM
I am SOOO tired of 'It's a Wonderful Life' winning 'most everything' I actually groaned out loud. Was talking with a friend of mine today and asked if she saw any of the show and her only comment was she 'was sooo tired of 'It's a Wonderful life' winning....' 

Agreed!!  I was so glad to see Rocky on there though, very insperational.  Hopefully BB will get on it and I would add Cinderella Man for something more recent.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: IMJackNasty on June 16, 2006, 10:30:34 AM
Can you tell by this list that I'm gay?  :D



YES! LOL   What can I even say about Porky's, it was a classic! lol   And I never saw a movie version of Hairspray, I saw it live though and LOVED it, bought the soundtrack and a t-shirt!  ;D



OMG! "Hairspray" is on TV all the time...especially Comedy Central! You have to see it! It was Ricki Lake's first movie...it had Sonny Bono...Debbi Harry...Pia Zadora...Ric Ocasek and Ruth Brown among it's cast. Jerry Stiller played Divine's husband! I never saw the play but I'd be afraid I wouldn't like it as much as the original movie.

I can still hear Ricki Lake saying after she comes home from being on the Corny Collins Show..."Finally...all of Baltimore knows that I'm Big...Blonde...and Beautiful!"

As one can imagine...I've seen Hairspray far more times than I've seen Brokeback (and that's alot) so I pretty much can recite almost all the lines to the movie.

For what it's worth....
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: DaveinPhilly on June 16, 2006, 10:36:45 AM
But Jack Nasty - what about The Women? Surely you haven't forgotten this gay icon film?! Maybe you're not really gay??!!!!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on June 16, 2006, 11:50:25 AM
[OMG! "Hairspray" is on TV all the time...especially Comedy Central! You have to see it! It was Ricki Lake's first movie...it had Sonny Bono...Debbi Harry...Pia Zadora...Ric Ocasek and Ruth Brown among it's cast. Jerry Stiller played Divine's husband! I never saw the play but I'd be afraid I wouldn't like it as much as the original movie.

I can still hear Ricki Lake saying after she comes home from being on the Corny Collins Show..."Finally...all of Baltimore knows that I'm Big...Blonde...and Beautiful!"

As one can imagine...I've seen Hairspray far more times than I've seen Brokeback (and that's alot) so I pretty much can recite almost all the lines to the movie.

For what it's worth....

LOL  Well I will definitley try and see it, rent it, buy it or something. I like Ricky Lake, did you ever see her in Cry Baby with Johnny Depp? 

Jerry Stiller as the Father, tooooooooooooooo funny!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: CANSTANDIT on June 16, 2006, 03:18:27 PM
IMJackNasty,
I LOVE half the films on your list, esp Hairspray, BBM and The Trouble With Angels. I can't believe anyone still remembers that last one...
I love the line where Stella Stevens as the "hip" young nun in granny glasses, tells Michael Christian, the nasty guy who appears to be about to molest her, that  " I fear for my mortal life; not my immortal soul." That is one of my favorite lines in all of filmdom, and as a  good little Catholic girl, that was a line of great heroism to me.
 Ah, we catholic martyrs......Well, we're good film fodder anyway.
And in a Disney comedy, no less! (I think it was Disney-?)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: All4one on June 16, 2006, 03:29:44 PM
Actually, the one with Stella Stevens as the 'hip' young nun was "Where Angels Go, Trouble Follows"
But they did both have Rosalind Russell.

The Trouble With Angels had Hayley Mills and her 'scathingly brilliant' ideas.  :)

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: CANSTANDIT on June 16, 2006, 05:36:08 PM
OOps, I stand corrected. Add that one to the list!
And now am suddenly a bit more intrigued by you, All4One....
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: All4one on June 16, 2006, 06:54:28 PM
 :D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: IMJackNasty on June 18, 2006, 07:39:32 PM
But Jack Nasty - what about The Women? Surely you haven't forgotten this gay icon film?! Maybe you're not really gay??!!!!

Can you believe that I have never seen it? I don't think I've ever seen it around for rental. But...I've seen enough Doris Day movies so I think my Gay Card is safe.  :D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: IMJackNasty on June 18, 2006, 07:41:24 PM
[OMG! "Hairspray" is on TV all the time...especially Comedy Central! You have to see it! It was Ricki Lake's first movie...it had Sonny Bono...Debbi Harry...Pia Zadora...Ric Ocasek and Ruth Brown among it's cast. Jerry Stiller played Divine's husband! I never saw the play but I'd be afraid I wouldn't like it as much as the original movie.

I can still hear Ricki Lake saying after she comes home from being on the Corny Collins Show..."Finally...all of Baltimore knows that I'm Big...Blonde...and Beautiful!"

As one can imagine...I've seen Hairspray far more times than I've seen Brokeback (and that's alot) so I pretty much can recite almost all the lines to the movie.

For what it's worth....

LOL  Well I will definitley try and see it, rent it, buy it or something. I like Ricky Lake, did you ever see her in Cry Baby with Johnny Depp? 

Jerry Stiller as the Father, tooooooooooooooo funny!

I did see Cry Baby...and I liked it...but not nearly as much as Hairspray. I love John Waters movies....with "Polyester" and "Serial Mom" among my other favorites. His early cult movies are...well.....interesting to say the least.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: IMJackNasty on June 18, 2006, 07:45:21 PM
IMJackNasty,
I LOVE half the films on your list, esp Hairspray, BBM and The Trouble With Angels. I can't believe anyone still remembers that last one...
I love the line where Stella Stevens as the "hip" young nun in granny glasses, tells Michael Christian, the nasty guy who appears to be about to molest her, that  " I fear for my mortal life; not my immortal soul." That is one of my favorite lines in all of filmdom, and as a  good little Catholic girl, that was a line of great heroism to me.
 Ah, we catholic martyrs......Well, we're good film fodder anyway.
And in a Disney comedy, no less! (I think it was Disney-?)


Actually...the movie with Stella Stevens was the sequel to "The Trouble With Angels" called "Where Angels Go, Trouble Follows" It wasn't as good as the first as it had a different director. Both movies had scenes filmed here in the Philadelphia area....and I just saw the gothic building that was the school only a few weeks ago!


BTW...12 years of Catholic school here...so of course you know that is one of the reasons why I love these movies!

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: DaveinPhilly on June 19, 2006, 07:40:20 AM
But Jack Nasty - what about The Women? Surely you haven't forgotten this gay icon film?! Maybe you're not really gay??!!!!

Can you believe that I have never seen it? I don't think I've ever seen it around for rental. But...I've seen enough Doris Day movies so I think my Gay Card is safe.  :D

It's an outrageous satire on stereotypical female behavior in the 40's. Claire Bothe Luce wrote the play and it is a gay fantasy...
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Nax on June 19, 2006, 08:00:22 AM
OK new and asking - has anyone across the pond seen Roseanna's Grave (1997) or in Europe Rosanna's letzter Wille. Jean Reno - just fantastico!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on June 24, 2006, 04:04:18 PM
For those interested, "Black Narcissus" is on TCM tonight at 8pm EST.  Fabulous film.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Warren Piece on July 12, 2006, 04:55:36 PM
It's always fun to compose lists of stuff. Here are my fave films (not in a particular order):

The Poseidon Adventure - scoff if you will, but I related to every one of those characters and I found it gripping (over 50 times)!

Brokeback Mountain - um, of course

What's Up Doc? - "Eunice? This is a person named Eunice?"

The Way We Were - I still want them to be together, even though I know it will never work

Life of Brian - "It's not meant to be taken literally, it refers to any manufacturers of dairy products."

The Bourne Identity - Matt is my very favorite actor and he was soooo good in this film

The Talented Mr. Ripley - I loved Matt in the lime-green banana hammock

Young Frankenstein - I still crack up over "Abby Normal"

Koyaanisqatsi - the music of Philip Glass and the images of Godfrey Reggio worked brilliantly together

Working Girl - Melanie Griffith was never better

Big - really touching in its simplicity

Superman - "You've got me? Well, who's got you?"

What's Eating Gilbert Grape - Leonardo's absolute best performance so far

That's an unlucky 13, but I can't think of others at the moment...
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on July 12, 2006, 05:57:07 PM
It's always fun to compose lists of stuff. Here are my fave films (not in a particular order):


What's Up Doc? - "Eunice? This is a person named Eunice?"



What's Up Doc? is one of my all-time favorites too, I love that you agree, so forgive me: "Eunice?  There's a person named Eunice?".  Sorry.  But do you know what the yellow pills are for?
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on July 12, 2006, 06:16:07 PM
Brokeback Mountain - um, of course

What's Up Doc? - "Eunice? This is a person named Eunice?"

The Way We Were - I still want them to be together, even though I know it will never work

The Talented Mr. Ripley - I loved Matt in the lime-green banana hammock

Young Frankenstein - I still crack up over "Abby Normal"

Koyaanisqatsi - the music of Philip Glass and the images of Godfrey Reggio worked brilliantly together

Working Girl - Melanie Griffith was never better

What's Eating Gilbert Grape - Leonardo's absolute best performance so far


I agree with all these.  But my favourite film of Matt's is Good Will Hunting, by far.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Warren Piece on July 12, 2006, 08:32:05 PM
It's always fun to compose lists of stuff. Here are my fave films (not in a particular order):


What's Up Doc? - "Eunice? This is a person named Eunice?"



What's Up Doc? is one of my all-time favorites too, I love that you agree, so forgive me: "Eunice?  There's a person named Eunice?".  Sorry.  But do you know what the yellow pills are for?



Thanks for the correction, jayiijay, but actually, neither of us was right. But we were both close. The line is "That's a person named Eunice?" As for the yellow pills, they were to remind the judge to take the blue pills, 'natch.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sinne on July 13, 2006, 11:39:10 AM
I LOVE "What's Up Doc" too and one of my all-time favs is "Young Frankenstein", which has so many good lines in it, such as:

"He vas my boyfriend!"

"It's just a rat.... a filthy, slimy rat."

"Vould you like a roll in za hay? .... Roll, roll, roll in za hay."   

I could go on and on but I'll stop there and just add that the "Putting on the Ritz" scene is absolute perfection!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Ellen (tellyouwhat) on July 13, 2006, 12:35:21 PM
For those interested, "Black Narcissus" is on TCM tonight at 8pm EST.  Fabulous film.

Oh wow Jackie -- we rented that film a while back because I read the Rumer Godden novel.  Actually, I read every Rumer Godden novel.  She was ahead of her time and Black Narcissus IMO was a film ahead of its time although you can see where it's dated by being ahead of its time, if that makes sense.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Warren Piece on July 13, 2006, 12:54:28 PM
Back to Young Frankenstein for a moment..."Oh you men are all alike, seven or eight quick ones and then you're out with the boys to boast and brag."

Madeline Kahn was such a brilliant comedienne.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on July 13, 2006, 01:16:41 PM

Madeline Kahn was such a brilliant comedienne.


She really was.  Nobody has mentioned her role as Lily von Shtupp in Blazing Saddles.  Her rendition of "I'm Tired" is an all-time great ("let's face it, everything from the waist down is kaput").  She was also terrific in Paper Moon.  My favorite is Eunice Burns in What's Up, Doc?  Not even nominated for an Oscar when she should have won (who the hell remembers Eileen Heckart in Butterflies are Free...and the only reason SHE won is they didn't wanna give Shelly Winters a 3rd award for playing Mrs. Rosen in Poseidon Adventure). 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Warren Piece on July 13, 2006, 01:57:36 PM
jayiijay, you're making me like you a whole lot here. First, saying Madeline Kahn deserved to win an Oscar for her portrayal of Eunice Burns ("I am not A Eunice Burns, I am THE Eunice Burns"), and then saying Shelley Winters almost won for playing Belle Rosen. I just love when people agree with each other. ;)

And no, I'm afraid I don't remember Eileen Hackart in Butterflies Are Free. But I remember her in The Five Mrs. Buchanans. Does that count?
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on July 13, 2006, 02:47:40 PM
jayiijay, you're making me like you a whole lot here. First, saying Madeline Kahn deserved to win an Oscar for her portrayal of Eunice Burns ("I am not A Eunice Burns, I am THE Eunice Burns"), and then saying Shelley Winters almost won for playing Belle Rosen. I just love when people agree with each other. ;)

And no, I'm afraid I don't remember Eileen Hackart in Butterflies Are Free. But I remember her in The Five Mrs. Buchanans. Does that count?


LOL.  It counts.  But do you remember her as "Aunt" Flo in The Mary Tyler Moore Show?
Back to Madeline:  "I'M COMING IN!"
Liam Dunn was also awesome in Doc (and Saddles).  See earlier post.
Kenneth Mars too.  "I find that hard to swallow like this potash angelie (sp?)."
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Rosewood on July 13, 2006, 04:31:24 PM
Lists. Lists. I too love making lists.
Especially lists of favorite anything....

My five favorite movies of all time:

BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN - well, yeah. If I had to pick one movie, this would be it.

MASTER AND COMMANDER - though I'm not a big fan of Russell Crowe, I love him in this.
Love the cinematography. The score. The acting. The everything. There's one scene of
Crowe as the captain, hanging tight off the rigging on the side of the speeding
(well, wind-speeding)ship which is absolutely THRILLING. Also love the scenes between Crowe
and Paul Bettany as his best friend and ship's doctor. Love the battle sequences.
Love the minutia of 19th century ship life.
A couple of scenes: close up of live stock in the hold. The glitter of frightened bovine eyes.
Who knew?
View of the powder monkeys, little boys squirreling about in the dark hold,
risking life and limb. Sad but true.
There's a closeup of Crowe as he spots a beautiful native woman in a rowboat/canoe/whatever 
by the side of the ship. His delight is palpable. He gives her such a lovely, wistful smile.
Hardly credit him capable of such tenderness.
Gorgeous.
As you can tell, I'm besotted with this movie.

Jean Cocteau's very early version of BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.
In French, with subtitles.
This is such a gorgeous movie that it almost defies description.
Shot in black and white, but remembered in color.
In my very humble opinion, if you don't fall in love with Jean Marais's beast, then
you're not capable of love.

DIVA
My favorite thriller of all time.
In French with subtitles. (I don't like dubbed in mish-mash.)
Made in the eighties, it doesn't age one bit.
Three very quirky stories wrapped around each other, so you have to pay a bit
of attention. But it is SO worth it.
Love story featuring an opera singer who has never heard her own voice in recording.
An enigma.
The mail man (!) who loves her from afar.
These creepy Asian guys who are into the counterfeit music trade.
Murder.
Crooked cops.
Vile, evil, especially squirmy villains.
AND the hero's strange Paris apartment, (formerly a garage) is totally to die for.
AND last, but not least, the film features one (Or is it two?)
of the most GORGEOUS Citroens ever made!
I LOVE this movie!!!!

THE BLACK STALLION
What can I say?
Caleb Deschanel's cinematography is unbelievably, breathtakingly beautiful.
Moves me to tears everytime.
The scenes on the deserted island are beyond anything you can ever imagine.
Hard to describe this movie, it is so damned exquisite.
Yeah, that's the word: exquisite.
More than a movie, it is an experience.
The race in the end always, ALWAYS makes my heart pound.
This is the most gorgeous horse movie ever made.
Well, actually, one of the most gorgeous movies ever made.
Period.
And that black horse.....oh my goodness.
There's a closeup in natural light of his face as the sun sets on the island
that just captures and fills your imagination. Says all that needs to be said about
the 'otherness' of animals.
The overhead scenes of the shipwrecked boy riding bareback are wonderous.
The shipwreck itself is spectacular.
Even the underwater stuff...I'd never seen a horse's legs and hooves underwater.
I mean, how could I? The way the horse swims in that blue-green water.
The way the boy tames him.
It is magical.

There's not a lot of dialogue in this entire movie, so the visuals are even more
important to move the story along. The soundtrack by Francis Ford Coppola's brother
is perfection.

Deschanel was robbed of an Oscar that year and if I'm not mistaken, the guy who
won mentioned something about, "...we know who really won this."
Amazing.









Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on July 13, 2006, 06:35:43 PM

...and Black Narcissus IMO was a film ahead of its time although you can see where it's dated by being ahead of its time, if that makes sense.
Ellen, I do know what you mean.  Black Narcissus does not fit in with the films of it's time.  It seems somehow "other-worldly".  "Ethereal"  That's the best I can come up with.   
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Rosewood on July 13, 2006, 07:43:54 PM
BLACK NARCISSUS is great.
Saw it again recently on Turner Classic Movies.
Thanks for reminding me.
I love this and THE RED SHOES, both done, I believe by Michael Powell.

Liked Deborah Kerr, though I always felt she played the
same person in all her movies - her persona was that strong.
I can't remember who played the nun who goes nuts.
Wow. She was something. Totally creepy.
And Sabu as the weak little prince. Perfect.

Loved the cinematography, the strong use of color.
The convent perched on the side of the windy cliff.
How ridiiculous that tall English actor looked atop the small horse.
Stange film, so very hypnotic.

I could never figure out if the male actor fell in love with Kerr or not.
Probably not.
In fact, I couldn't figure out why he was so angry all the time.
Total enigma.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sinne on July 15, 2006, 08:40:56 PM
jayiijay, you're making me like you a whole lot here. First, saying Madeline Kahn deserved to win an Oscar for her portrayal of Eunice Burns ("I am not A Eunice Burns, I am THE Eunice Burns"), and then saying Shelley Winters almost won for playing Belle Rosen. I just love when people agree with each other. ;)

And no, I'm afraid I don't remember Eileen Hackart in Butterflies Are Free. But I remember her in The Five Mrs. Buchanans. Does that count?

LOL.  It counts.  But do you remember her as "Aunt" Flo in The Mary Tyler Moore Show?
Back to Madeline:  "I'M COMING IN!"
Liam Dunn was also awesome in Doc (and Saddles).  See earlier post.
Kenneth Mars too.  "I find that hard to swallow like this potash angelie (sp?)."

Madeline Kahn was brilliant in everything!  "I'm Tired" is a classic - absolute perfection!  I wonder what Marlene Dietrich though of it - anybody know?  She should have had at least one Oscar and she died much too young.

Of course we remember Aunt Flo in MTM!  Now there's a show with a lot of great quotes:

I think in the first episode Lou Grant asks Mary if she wants a drink and she declines.  By the end of their conversation she changes her mind and asks for a Brandy Alexander!  (You have to see this scene to realize why it's so funny.)

And one of my other favorite scenes is when Phyllis has a job interview and they're trying to find out what kind of skills she might have and she offers, "I seem to have a knack for selecting the right wine with dinner." 

There are so many other great scenes!  Such a fabulous show!  And they left with us wanting more.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sunspot on July 21, 2006, 12:16:51 AM
The gun is good!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pQR9cHkyeFM&search=zardoz

Of course this is my favorite film!   :D :o ::) ;)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: DaveinPhilly on July 21, 2006, 08:01:33 AM
Secrets and Lies.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jayiijay on August 01, 2006, 09:04:54 PM
Deepa Mehta's "Water" enters my Top 100.  It is currently in theater, see it!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on August 11, 2006, 08:19:16 PM
"The Song of Bernadette" starring Jennifer Jones.  This movie is one of those that should never be remade.  Jennifer Jones won the Best Actress Award on her first nomination and she deserved it.  The movie is so emotional that no matter how many times I see its ending, I get misty-eyed.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Dave Cullen on August 14, 2006, 12:15:55 PM
Some films are so hard to be objective about. which begs the question of why the hell we should construe this as objective.

the film i'm thinking of at the moment is The Way We Were. i'm hesitant to say anything definitive about it overall. it's been, god, twenty years, maybe, since i've seen it--yikes, maybe 30--and i recall the political content, which was a lot of it, being mishandled. tedious, maybe, or overly preachy, or maybe just not a good fit for the rest of the film. i'm not sure, those are just reservations.

but all that does, i think, is throw it into the flawed great films, category. because it did one thing so powerfully well. thirty years later, i just saw an alzhiemer's commercial that used a clip of the original song--yes, barbara singing--along with some footage of their own, and it unleashed a wave of emotion, that exact same feeling i had watching the credits 30 years ago, i could barely get up, i was so overcome. it was the perfect fusion of song and movie, of course. i remember so clearly the (final?) scene of her running around the streets of ny pamphleting or something again, and running into him. she was who she was, and so glorious being that, and he was somebody totally differnt, but he still made her feel good. and she missed that feeling.

i was only a teenager and i'd never even had those feelings of looking back like that, but i could intuit them from what the film gave me, and it already made me terribly sad, in advance for those feelings still ahead of me.

it got the feelings right. i had a somewhat miserable childhood and didn't have any memories at that point that i wanted to hang onto, much less go back to, but i was expecting i would, and the feeling it anticipated was just what i ended up experiencing. (or did it actually create the template for those feelings for me to replay later when they actually happened to me?)

it took a few years for me to see the film on tv, but i obviously heard the song a million times when it was released in 1973, and god, i hated it. i was twelve, and a hardcore little rocker, and i was moved by a lot of ballads, too, but not that kind of marvin hallmishy treacle. but it was precisely in tune with the film, and in that context, as the credits rolled (i think that's when it came), i was won over, powerfully, and permanently.

i love that song now, and its fused with the film: i cannot experience one without pulling in the other. on its own, i'm probably moved more by pearl jam's "Elderly Woman Behind The Counter In A Small Town" ( http://www.seeklyrics.com/lyrics/Pearl-Jam/Elderly-Woman-Behind-The-Counter-In-A-Small-Town.html ), but the other song and film together overwhelm it.

the combined experience moved me in a way only a handful of films ever have, and it has stood one test of time--that the feelings stayed with me, and the film itself echos with them. i don't know what it would be like to watch the film today. that's a different kind of time test--how it would feel 30 years later either for the original audience, or to a new audience. but i think that unlike books, the principle audience for films are generally their contemporary audience, and the more important question is whether their impact on us is fleeting or lasting. god, this one has lasted for me. and i have a feeling i'm not alone there, by a long shot.

i have a feeling this film fails to get its due on most best lists--except perhaps love stories, where i think people feel much more free to include their guilty pleasures. too bad. i'm better for having it in my memories.

it also raises the question of the impact of a powerful song on a film. it can really catapult the film into a different realm. music is such a powerful force because our brain seems to attach emotional memories to them. this film had a major advantage of being tied with one of the all-time great love songs to trigger memories, and it also had the advantage of the song helping create them in the first place at the emotional climax of that film, which came in the final moments. it illustrates how important it is for a director to search high and wide to find just the right bit of music to encapsulate the emotion of his or her film.

and i can't help thinking how fortunate and wise ang lee (and/or james schamus) was to hire gustavo santaolalla to compose Wings. i still can't go near that song. just a few plucks of that guitar and i fall apart.

and i can only guess at this now, but i will wager that 30 years from now, when i'm 75, if i see a tv commercial looking back at a life, with Wings as the soundtrack, i'm going to feel a sudden rush of the exact feelings that overcame me last november, and i'm going to be a mess for a few minutes.

good work, ang.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Dave Cullen on August 14, 2006, 01:39:05 PM
can i go off topic for just one post? i know i could just post this in one of the songs threads, but for me it's inextricably linked to the last post. it's a change of venue for the artist, but not the idea.

those Way We Were and Elderly Woman . . . feelings brought me to my favorite pearl jam song, and apparently one of my all-time faves by anyone, an incredibly simple song called Wishlist.

i'm a little too caught up in the feelings it's provoking to see the connection clearly, but i guess it's the mirror of those memories-feelings: it's the ones we have not had, but hope to. we've surely had glimpses of them, but the wishlist items represent the pinnacle, mostly beyond the achievable, but the ultimate feeling we are striving for.

and it may be the rare lyric that is powerful by itself, without the music. at least it works for me without playing the music or hearing eddie sing it in my head:

I wish I was a neutron bomb, for once I could go off
I wish I was a sacrifice but somehow still lived on
I wish I was a sentimental ornament you hung on
The Christmas tree, I wish I was the star that went on top
I wish I was the evidence, I wish I was the grounds
For 50 million hands upraised and open toward the sky

I wish I was a sailor with someone who waited for me
I wish I was as fortunate, as fortunate as me
I wish I was a messenger and all the news was good
I wish I was the full moon shining off a Camaro's hood

I wish I was an alien at home behind the sun
I wish I was the souvenir you kept your house key on
I wish I was the pedal brake that you depended on
I wish I was the verb 'to trust' and never let you down

I wish I was a radio song, the one that you turned up
I wish...
I wish...


i love every line of that, give or take one or two that still escape me.

i love how he captured my heart early with one of my favorites in the second line, but otherwise builds upward with more and more beautiful ideas as the song progresses. the second line is the most unattainable--even more than being moonlight, because moonight actually exists. the idea of being the sacrifice itself is chilling, but then to have it both ways and live on is even more appealing--having it both ways. experiencing the ultimate sacrifice, and yet not having to make the sacrifice. or experiencing it yet living on to experience all the other wishes still to come.

i love how he drifts back and forth apparently aimlessly between human situations, objects and ideas he would like to embody. some of them ground the song--like the sailor, especially, and the house key souvenir. we can relate very directly to that sailor-lover, because we have missed people ourselves and know the intensity of that situation. and it's the one item on the list that we can actually achieve--along with being as fortunate as we already are, which takes the main thrust of the song in an entirely different direction for just a moment: out of wishing, toward accepting.

but it only lingers there for a moment, because the next item is so powerful, who could resist being the messenger, with all the news being good? i guess that one's attainable, too--so it's followed immediately by one of the most gloriously emphemral. not just moonlight, but moonlight in a particular, vivid situation, reflecting off a camaro's hood; we can fill in the rest of the details ourselves, and i don't know about the rest of you, but it takes me right to my first romantic encounters--no camaro in the real ones, but i would have liked it to me one, so it's a heightened version of my actual experience. as i experience the line, i feel the moonlight both vicariously sharing the first-love/first-sex jittery exhuberance and helping to create it. it gets to relive it even while being a bit of the daddy observing its creation. magical. like the thought of actually getting to feel like a burst of moonlight.

then it's right back to a human--more or less--of an alien behind the sun (which is one point where the singing really changes it; on paper it's kind of a throwaway, but he sings it so wistfully, it's just a cool, otherworldly image--and also, briefly, the tranquility of being home again after a long journey, in this case, a VERY long journey). and then on to the other most grounding line, the house key souvenir. wow. we sure know the value of that: the thing standing in for the most prized memory in our lives, the thing we hold close to us all the time, and that we keep physically tied to the literal keep to our home, and to the lock which protects us. wow. hard to top that one.

so from there, to one of the sweetest moments, and the one idea done twice in a row, really, first as physical object--the brake pedal--and then the idea itself: to actually be the verb "to trust"--and never letting you down.

and this is the one place in the song where it really has it both ways, giving us the literal and the figurative with a single wish: it is probably the most metaphysical on the entire list--to be a verb--yet, the add-on line about never letting you down conjures up the person who acts that way.

it is the most selfless moment in the song, suggesting finally not just what he wants to be, but what he wants to do for someone. it's a new direction, with the focus really away from the wisher for the first time.

and then it fades out with the most glorious idea of all, because it wishes just to be exactly what it is: a radio song. and a good one, good enough that you turned up, which i had, the first time i heard it, before i had gotten to that line, and every time after.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: BRAD1963 on August 14, 2006, 01:55:40 PM
It's always fun to compose lists of stuff. Here are my fave films (not in a particular order):

The Poseidon Adventure - scoff if you will, but I related to every one of those characters and I found it gripping (over 50 times)!

Brokeback Mountain - um, of course

What's Up Doc? - "Eunice? This is a person named Eunice?"

The Way We Were - I still want them to be together, even though I know it will never work

Life of Brian - "It's not meant to be taken literally, it refers to any manufacturers of dairy products."

The Bourne Identity - Matt is my very favorite actor and he was soooo good in this film

The Talented Mr. Ripley - I loved Matt in the lime-green banana hammock

Young Frankenstein - I still crack up over "Abby Normal"

Koyaanisqatsi - the music of Philip Glass and the images of Godfrey Reggio worked brilliantly together

Working Girl - Melanie Griffith was never better

Big - really touching in its simplicity

Superman - "You've got me? Well, who's got you?"

What's Eating Gilbert Grape - Leonardo's absolute best performance so far

That's an unlucky 13, but I can't think of others at the moment...

I could have written this list!  Brokeback... Mr. Ripley... Way We Were...What's up Doc?... Bourne Identity....

There would be no arguments in what to watch in our household.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on August 14, 2006, 02:07:52 PM
Some films are so hard to be objective about. which begs the question of why the hell we should construe this as objective.

the film i'm thinking of at the moment is The Way We Were. i'm hesitant to say anything definitive about it overall. it's been, god, twenty years, maybe, since i've seen it--yikes, maybe 30--and i recall the political content, which was a lot of it, being mishandled. tedious, maybe, or overly preachy, or maybe just not a good fit for the rest of the film. i'm not sure, those are just reservations.


I think music and film can be a deadly combination as far as the emotions go.  And just reading your post and thinking about the Way We Were and Katie and Hubbell, so gorgeous..........and that music.......it makes me teary eyed just to think about it.
 :'(

Maybe we need a "music in the movies" category!

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: lovebbm on August 14, 2006, 05:58:06 PM
Das Boot.  Gripping film-making, great acting.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: MarinJakeFan on September 06, 2006, 09:31:26 AM
Here’s my list:

Harold and Maude
The Deer Hunter
The Piano
Chicago
October Sky
Mountains of the Moon
BBM – of course!

I also like documentaries, when they are good and of a subject that interests me. These are my four favorites:

Touching The Void
Shackleton
March of the Penguins
Step Into Liquid

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: WyomingBoy on September 06, 2006, 02:23:49 PM
Ok I'll bite (not in order cuz I'm too tired)

Braveheart
Field of Dreams
BBM
The Notebook (yeah I know sappy)
The Maltese Falcon
Legends of the Fall
Aliens (with the s #2)
Crash
Red River

and I forgot.  The Shawshank Redemption
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: AHappyMan on September 06, 2006, 06:31:33 PM
I'll throw my Stetson into the ring....

The Exorcist
BBM
The War of the Roses
Jaws
Alien
The Last Picture Show
The Poseidon Adventure
Superman (the first one with Chris Reeve RIP :'()
Looking for Mr. Goodbar

There's more, but that's a start.
Rick
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Castro on September 09, 2006, 10:11:03 PM
Well, for one, This is Spinal Tap, that rock-band mockumentary. Because it's wickedly funny and makes me laugh, and because all the same it has an inherent sweetness.  (Maybe that's Canadian humor?)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: cynical21 on September 17, 2006, 05:41:45 PM
Okay - I'm in.  Let's see:

Brokeback Mountain - goes without saying
Moulin Rouge
Vertigo
The Prince of Tides
Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

And - AHEM - Donnie Darko - for one specific bit of dialogue:
    "Do you even know who Graham Greene is?"
    (Smugly) "I think we've all seen 'Bonanza'."
    Knock me out funny.

CYN
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on September 17, 2006, 05:50:38 PM
OMG, CYN, that DD quote IS priceless.  I haven't seen the movie in ages and had forgoten about that.  Thanks.   :D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on September 17, 2006, 06:20:15 PM
LOL I just commented on that line down in the other post.


The Prince of Tides I LOVED (Lowenstein!!!)  I am reading the book right now for the second time.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Carissa on September 17, 2006, 10:58:43 PM
The Prince of Tides I LOVED (Lowenstein!!!)  I am reading the book right now for the second time.
I have to say that that is the one movie I truly, truly hated.  I absolutely adored the book.  I just couldn't stand what Babs did to it.  I think she butchered it totally.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: annabel on September 18, 2006, 07:08:13 AM
Some films are so hard to be objective about. which begs the question of why the hell we should construe this as objective.

the film i'm thinking of at the moment is The Way We Were. i'm hesitant to say anything definitive about it overall. it's been, god, twenty years, maybe, since i've seen it--yikes, maybe 30--and i recall the political content, which was a lot of it, being mishandled. tedious, maybe, or overly preachy, or maybe just not a good fit for the rest of the film. i'm not sure, those are just reservations.

but all that does, i think, is throw it into the flawed great films, category. because it did one thing so powerfully well. thirty years later, i just saw an alzhiemer's commercial that used a clip of the original song--yes, barbara singing--along with some footage of their own, and it unleashed a wave of emotion, that exact same feeling i had watching the credits 30 years ago, i could barely get up, i was so overcome. it was the perfect fusion of song and movie, of course. i remember so clearly the (final?) scene of her running around the streets of ny pamphleting or something again, and running into him. she was who she was, and so glorious being that, and he was somebody totally differnt, but he still made her feel good. and she missed that feeling.

i was only a teenager and i'd never even had those feelings of looking back like that, but i could intuit them from what the film gave me, and it already made me terribly sad, in advance for those feelings still ahead of me.

it got the feelings right. i had a somewhat miserable childhood and didn't have any memories at that point that i wanted to hang onto, much less go back to, but i was expecting i would, and the feeling it anticipated was just what i ended up experiencing. (or did it actually create the template for those feelings for me to replay later when they actually happened to me?)

it took a few years for me to see the film on tv, but i obviously heard the song a million times when it was released in 1973, and god, i hated it. i was twelve, and a hardcore little rocker, and i was moved by a lot of ballads, too, but not that kind of marvin hallmishy treacle. but it was precisely in tune with the film, and in that context, as the credits rolled (i think that's when it came), i was won over, powerfully, and permanently.

i love that song now, and its fused with the film: i cannot experience one without pulling in the other. on its own, i'm probably moved more by pearl jam's "Elderly Woman Behind The Counter In A Small Town" ( http://www.seeklyrics.com/lyrics/Pearl-Jam/Elderly-Woman-Behind-The-Counter-In-A-Small-Town.html ), but the other song and film together overwhelm it.

the combined experience moved me in a way only a handful of films ever have, and it has stood one test of time--that the feelings stayed with me, and the film itself echos with them. i don't know what it would be like to watch the film today. that's a different kind of time test--how it would feel 30 years later either for the original audience, or to a new audience. but i think that unlike books, the principle audience for films are generally their contemporary audience, and the more important question is whether their impact on us is fleeting or lasting. god, this one has lasted for me. and i have a feeling i'm not alone there, by a long shot.

i have a feeling this film fails to get its due on most best lists--except perhaps love stories, where i think people feel much more free to include their guilty pleasures. too bad. i'm better for having it in my memories.

it also raises the question of the impact of a powerful song on a film. it can really catapult the film into a different realm. music is such a powerful force because our brain seems to attach emotional memories to them. this film had a major advantage of being tied with one of the all-time great love songs to trigger memories, and it also had the advantage of the song helping create them in the first place at the emotional climax of that film, which came in the final moments. it illustrates how important it is for a director to search high and wide to find just the right bit of music to encapsulate the emotion of his or her film.

and i can't help thinking how fortunate and wise ang lee (and/or james schamus) was to hire gustavo santaolalla to compose Wings. i still can't go near that song. just a few plucks of that guitar and i fall apart.

and i can only guess at this now, but i will wager that 30 years from now, when i'm 75, if i see a tv commercial looking back at a life, with Wings as the soundtrack, i'm going to feel a sudden rush of the exact feelings that overcame me last november, and i'm going to be a mess for a few minutes.

good work, ang.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: annabel on September 18, 2006, 07:11:49 AM
Woops!  Sorry about the quote thing.  Dave I got so excited because in all my years I have only purchased two movies:  Brokback and The Way we Were.  When she pushes that lock of hair off his face, oh my.  I also used a quote from the movie on the movie quote thread.  Remember when Hubble wrote that paper and it started out "Everything came to easily for him" and you know he was talking about himself and it was so eloquent.

OK, I'm calm now.  But you got me.  Until Brokeback, that movie was my all-time favorite.  Still runs a CLOSE second.  Thanks, I'm under the weather today, I think I'll go watch it again :)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on September 18, 2006, 07:20:44 AM
Annabel I am with you it is one of my favourites.  I am actually very excited, I may be going to see her live next month!  :)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: annabel on September 18, 2006, 10:57:36 AM
Lola, lucky you!  Love her!  Just saw the rerun skit from SNL when she did that cameo on Linda Richman's "Coffee Talk"  with Madonna.  I almost cried I laughed so hard!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: annabel on September 26, 2006, 07:32:36 AM
I'm sure this will roll some eyes, but one of my favorite movies is "Bad Santa"  I just saw Billy Bob thornton on a talk show and it reminded me.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on September 26, 2006, 07:45:25 AM
I'm sure this will roll some eyes, but one of my favorite movies is "Bad Santa"  I just saw Billy Bob thornton on a talk show and it reminded me.

Annabel, I howled with laughter at "Bad Santa."  It's a good one!  :D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on September 26, 2006, 08:07:55 AM
I'm sure this will roll some eyes, but one of my favorite movies is "Bad Santa"  I just saw Billy Bob thornton on a talk show and it reminded me.

Annabel, I howled with laughter at "Bad Santa."  It's a good one!  :D

I picked up a VHS copy not that long ago for $1.99, I had never seen it, it was actually alot better and funnier than I thought it was going to be. I actually think that was John Ritters last film.  :'(
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on September 26, 2006, 08:54:43 AM
I was kind of shocked at how much I laughed at "Bad Santa."  The language is SO foul, but, the story is such a sweet one.  I really liked it, a lot!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Carissa on September 26, 2006, 01:24:09 PM
I'm sure this will roll some eyes, but one of my favorite movies is "Bad Santa"  I just saw Billy Bob thornton on a talk show and it reminded me.
I LOVE that movie. :)  I watch it every time it's on tv no matter how many times I have seen it. :D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on September 29, 2006, 11:11:47 AM
"Sons of the Desert"   1933   Laurel & Hardy

O.K.  I must have seen this Laurel & Hardy classic about 20 times but it is so good that I can see it yet another 20 times. 

Laurel & Hardy are at their best when they deceive their wives thinking they are on a trip to Honolulu when actually "the boys" are at a Sons of the Desert convention in Chicago.  Lots of laughs!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jimspain on October 03, 2006, 02:09:28 PM
Aside from a little pic not many of you will know about 2 guys in cowboy hats, 'Cinema Paradiso' is probably my all time favourite film...I know it's manipulative and schmaltzy, but the final sequence of edited out kisses just breaks my heart every time I watch it! It's the ultimate homage to film itself! Swoontastic!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on October 03, 2006, 03:14:10 PM
I also adore "Cinema Paradiso."  The score alone, one of the best ever written, can bring the whole film back to me in an instant.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jimspain on October 03, 2006, 03:45:09 PM
Would you believe I just downloded some of the music from 'Paradiso' last week!

Gorgeous ! In the full sense of that word! And takes me right back into the movie!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: All4one on October 04, 2006, 05:04:42 PM
I was reading a review of a favorite old movie, and this jumped out at me:

Though it's one of my favorite films, I wondered about what it was saying about how to live your life. Is it better to retreat into yourself and live in a dream world of a love that can never be than it is to go out seeking someone to spend your life with, but risk having your heart broken again? Captain Gregg himself tells Lucy this very thing - that happiness is worth almost any risk. But then again, if she's only truly happy with Captain Gregg, isn't it worth risking wasting her mortal life away in the hopes that someday they will be together again? I guess how you choose to live your life all depends on whether your boyfriend is a ghost or not.

The movie it spoke of was 'The Ghost and Mrs Muir", from 1947,starring Rex Harrison and Gene Tierney
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on October 04, 2006, 10:01:44 PM
"The Passion of the Christ"

Positively an emotional movie that made me tremble.  When I saw the suffering, I felt the pain inside.  This is a religious movie that is a stand alone.  The movie is a powerhouse!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sinne on October 04, 2006, 10:58:23 PM
I'm sure this will roll some eyes, but one of my favorite movies is "Bad Santa"  I just saw Billy Bob thornton on a talk show and it reminded me.

Annabel, I howled with laughter at "Bad Santa."  It's a good one!  :D

BAD SANTA was made by the brilliant Terry Zwigoff, who made the documentary "CRUMB" about underground cartoonist R. Crumb.  If you haven't seen it - rent it!  It's amazing.  Gets 94% at Rotten Tomatoes:  http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/crumb/

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on October 05, 2006, 07:48:08 AM
"The Blob"  1958 Original version

When I saw this movie when I was a kid, I must have been feeling underneath my bed for about 2 weeks.  The film scared the daylights out of me.

I own the Criterion DVD of "The Blob" and the film has been restored in great fashion.

Steve McQueen and Aneta Corsaut (she played Miss Crump on "The Andy Griffith Show") are the main stars.

"The Blob" is an icon of the 50's.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on October 05, 2006, 08:11:43 AM
"The Blob"  1958 Original version

When I saw this movie when I was a kid, I must have been feeling underneath my bed for about 2 weeks.  The film scared the daylights out of me.

I own the Criterion DVD of "The Blob" and the film has been restored in great fashion.

Steve McQueen and Aneta Corsaut (she played Miss Crump on "The Andy Griffith Show") are the main stars.

"The Blob" is an icon of the 50's.

LOL now that would be worth seeing again, I will never forget that one!

My husband watched one a few weeks ago called SSSSSSS Apparently he saw it as a kid and it scared the heck out him, I had never heard of it in my life.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070622/
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on October 05, 2006, 09:47:34 AM
I own SSSSSSSSSSSS! on DVD.  That snake swallowing the man, and you see his shoes sticking out of the snake's mouth, is a hoot! 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on October 05, 2006, 12:12:24 PM
I own SSSSSSSSSSSS! on DVD.  That snake swallowing the man, and you see his shoes sticking out of the snake's mouth, is a hoot! 

ROTFLMAO!!   Well we watched it together and he had this serious look on his face through the whole movie,  I just kept trying to keep from laughing.  :D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Laurentia on October 06, 2006, 12:40:09 AM
Well, for one, This is Spinal Tap, that rock-band mockumentary. Because it's wickedly funny and makes me laugh, and because all the same it has an inherent sweetness.  (Maybe that's Canadian humor?)

I've seen it twice and was rolling around under the coffee table wheezing for breath because I laughed so hard, both times! But neither of the times did the person I saw it with move a muscle in their face, except for darting worried looks at me. Maybe it's funnier the more familiar you are with 80's heavy metal and/or band interviews in general?
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Marc on October 17, 2006, 01:08:39 PM
1.   That gay cowboy movie.  The name escapes me.

2.   Wizard of Oz.  The best children’s movie there will ever be.  When I was lad in the 50s, my
   grandparents had a color TV, and seeing anything in color at their house was always a thrill.  An
   annual treat was going to see “The Wizard of Oz.”  When she opens that door, it’s just magical.
   And of course when the witch was cackling in the crystal ball, it scared the bejeesus out of me.  I’ve
   had the movie memorized since about 1970, and it was my favorite movie from childhood through
    December 2005.  Its major problem is continuity, though mostly because of the edits they made
     to shorten the final film.  BBM's major problem, for me, is also continuity, but just the run-of-the-mill
    problems any movie would have.

3.   Gone with the Wind.  The best moments are the Atlanta train station and the early scene with
   Scarlett and her father near the oak tree when he’s saying “It will come to you, this love of the
   land.”  The pullback at the end of that scene is magnificent.  Vivien Leigh’s acting is up there on
   the perfection plateau along with Heath Ledger’s and Jake Gyllenhaal’s.

   The worst moment is when Scarlett and Ashley are at Tara after the war and Scarlett tries to
   persuade Ashley to run away with her to Mexico.  Ashley emotes, “… but Scarlett I’m not going to
   forget her!”  The second worst is when Rhett and Mammy are discussing her red taffeta petticoat
   and Clark Gable affects a southern accent.  Thank God he didn’t do that through the whole movie.
   If only BBM’s Joy Ellison had been around as dialect coach.  It’s also a magnificent book.

4.   Casablanca.  A few weeks ago, I made the painful decision that BBM was a better romance.  I’ve
   got a lot of dialog memorized.  Its best dialog bits are awesome:

   -- I’m shocked—shocked—to find that there is gambling going on in here!  [that’s close]
   -- Your winnings, sir.
   -- Oh, thank you very much.

5.   The Wanderer, a French film from about 1969, based on the novel Le Grand Meaulnes.  I should
   buy the DVD.  I worry it might not be as good as I remember.

6.   Chinatown.  And I still think you’re hiding something.

7.   The Music Man.  My favorite musical.  I have the movie memorized.

8.   Singin’ in the Rain.  I don’t quibble with those who think this is the best musical ever made.  If it
   isn’t, it’s second to The Music Man.

9.   Dial M for Murder.  It’s not one of the best, but the scene where Ray Milland persuades Anthony
   Dawson to murder Grace Kelly is awesome; I could watch it over and over.  Hitchcock has never
   been one of my favorite directors, however.  I’ve never liked how he directed action scenes, and he
   used rear-screen projection way too often. 

10.   2001:  A Space Odyssey.  Until BBM, I’d seen this movie in theaters more than any other.  The cut
   between the falling bone and the Pan Am spaceship always makes me lose my stomach.  A friend
   commented that the dullest parts of the film were when people were talking.


Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on October 17, 2006, 01:23:43 PM
Hey Marc, good pics!   The Wizard is a favourite of mine too, the flying monkeys scared the crap out of me when I was a kid.   :o

And who doesn't like Gone with the Wind, although honestly I never saw the attraction to Ashley, I would have been all over Rhett like a cheap suit!  ;)

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on October 17, 2006, 01:48:57 PM
I don't like GWTW!  Never have.  I could never understand Scarlett's interest in Ashley (as you stated, Lola).  And I could never feel any sympathy for Scarlett, except a little after Bonnie died.  The railroad yard scene is haunting, I'll grant that.  But, I won't ever waste my time watching it again. 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on October 19, 2006, 02:15:47 PM
Since Halloween is coming, I want to say that "The Omen" is a favorite film of mine.  The movie is downright sinister and there isn't even a single funny line in that movie to break up the tension.  The housekeeper will scare the daylights out of anyone. The dog's eyes lighting up red even influenced the real life "Son of Sam" murders.  I think "The Omen" is the only horror movie that Gregory Peck ever starred in.  Lee Remick was real good as the mother.  Everytime I hear that opening theme to "The Omen," I get chills up and down my spine. 

I just purchased the remake today on DVD.  I'm anxious to watch it this weekend to compare.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on October 19, 2006, 02:43:39 PM
I don't think I have a favourite horror movie!  But if I had to pick one (as Halloween approaches) I guess it would be The Dead Zone (with Christopher Walken)  Also I have liked alot of Stephen King's movies, they are scarey to me, but not too scarey.  And I have usually read the book, so I know what is coming next.  :o
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on October 19, 2006, 03:02:37 PM
My all time favorite Stephen King film is "Carrie."  Piper Laurie was so frightening as Carrie's mother.  I would hate to make the mistake of going Trick or Treatin' to her house!  She was one basket case!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on October 19, 2006, 03:06:20 PM
The original "Halloween" is another horror movie favorite of mine.  The music score makes one jitterrey.  When Michael Myers confronts Jamie Lee Curtis in the clothes closet, it's a nail biter!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on October 19, 2006, 03:30:02 PM
My all time favorite Stephen King film is "Carrie."  Piper Laurie was so frightening as Carrie's mother.  I would hate to make the mistake of going Trick or Treatin' to her house!  She was one basket case!

I just watched The Faculty not long ago and she was in it, boy was she creepy, she really hasn't changed alot, she has a certain "look" to her!  :o

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0133751/
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on October 19, 2006, 03:40:08 PM
I read where Ronald Reagan one time dated Piper Laurie.  ;D

I watched "The Faculty" on cable TV just the other night.  That huge, creepy monster in the gym freaked me out.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Rosewood on October 19, 2006, 05:16:21 PM
Some of my favorite Piper Laurie movies are from the fifties.
I always liked her as a red headed dancing girl in those Arabian fantasies,
mostly featuring Tony Curtis with his Bronx accent intact.
Hysterical.

Then later I loved her in TIM with Mel Gibson.
Older woman, younger man with a Problem.
The only Mel Gibson movie I actually like.
I mean, the man was breathtakingly beautiful to look at in
those early days. His profile was exquisite.
What's not to like?
Too bad he didn't wear well.

A movie I haven't seen mentioned on here is
ANGELS AND INSECTS with Patsy Kensit and Mark Rylance.
It even features Kristin Scott Thomas in a role that actually manages
to make her look plain. I kid you not.
And yet.....

This is one of those films that seethes with sexuality.
I mean it just sizzles.
But not always in a good way.
There's a lot of dark, hidden beneath the surface stuff going on here
and one or two icky moments, but still, the photography
and the costumes and the pacing are FABULOUS. In fact, I'd say
that period costume-wise, these are the best I've ever seen.
They enchant you.

How is it possible to be enchanted by clothing?
You'll see.

There are very few likeable people in this film, if any.
Well, maybe the hero. The Scottish actor Mark Rylance.
Although he is oddly passive for most of the film.
When the BIG aha! moment comes you almost want to scream:
IT'S ABOUT TIME, YOU DUNCE!!!
But maybe that's just me.  :)

You know, there's SO much strangeness in this film that
it's hard to describe it. Takes place, if I remember
correctly, in Victorian times, or a bit earlier.
Rylance plays a biologist who barely survives a trip down
the Amazon and somehow winds up back in England
living with a very wealthy family that is burdened with more
than the usual amount of secrets. I mean, these are secrets
with a capital S!

This is the first mainstream film I think I ever saw where one of the
main male actors is shown nude, briefly sporting an erection.
Call me naive, but I'd never seen that before.
Or maybe it's that I'd never noticed.
Not a reason to see a film, but I just thought I'd mention it.  ;)

In fact, this particular actor later appeared in MASTER AND COMMANDER,
another favorite film of mine, and every time he was onscreen, I smiled.
I'm awful, I know. But I couldn't help it.

Though ANGELS AND INSECTS features some really creepy unpleasantness,
I still recommend it, especially for the cinematography and costumes and maybe even,
for the over-the-top strangeness.






Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on October 20, 2006, 07:29:30 AM
One of my favorite scary movies and a good choice for Halloween is "The Tell-Tale Heart."  I will advise that no one should watch this movie alone.  It's a B+W British film starring Laurence Payne and was made in 1960.  This movie is really creepy and when you hear the heart beating underneath the floorboards, your nerves will get frazzled. 

This film earns the title:  "SCARY."
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on October 20, 2006, 08:42:27 AM
Some times the older ones are the creepiest, ever see this one:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0080516/
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on October 20, 2006, 10:36:23 AM
Some times the older ones are the creepiest, ever see this one:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0080516/

I saw "The Changeling" a long time ago.   :)  George C. Scott starred in it.  It was eerie.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on October 24, 2006, 01:01:55 PM
The original "Halloween" is another horror movie favorite of mine.  The music score makes one jitterrey.  When Michael Myers confronts Jamie Lee Curtis in the clothes closet, it's a nail biter!

Horror fans are in for a real treat this year when the original 'Halloween' movie returns to theaters for the first time since its release in 1978.

The film will be preceded by a 20-minute featurette that includes interviews with original cast members, including JAMIE LEE CURTIS.

Jamie Lee, who made her big screen debut in 'Halloween,' earned the title of "scream queen" with her subsequent roles in horror films such as 'The Fog,' 'Prom Night' and 'Terror Train.'

In preparation for its return to the big screen 28 years after its debut, 'Halloween' has been digitally remastered in high definition. The film will play at selected theaters across the country at 8 p.m. on October 30 and 31.

Fans can also look forward to a brand new installment of the series next year when ROB ZOMBIE takes a stab at 'Halloween 9.' Rob will write and direct the eighth sequel to the highly popular movie franchise.

 :o
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Casper on October 24, 2006, 01:55:58 PM
No one can kill off Michael Myers!  The "Halloween" franchise is a lucrative one.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Boppity on October 24, 2006, 03:53:31 PM

This is the first mainstream film I think I ever saw where one of the
main male actors is shown nude, briefly sporting an erection.
Call me naive, but I'd never seen that before.
Or maybe it's that I'd never noticed.
Not a reason to see a film, but I just thought I'd mention it.  ;)

If you want to see more of Mark Rylance, try "Intimacy" where he can be seen apparently engaging in actual sex acts. 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: michaelflanagansf on December 20, 2006, 05:16:01 PM
An announcement from the moderators about the slowdown problem that we’ve been experiencing at various times, centering from about 9:00 am until about 12:00 noon GMT:

The administration has been working extremely hard to solve the slow down issue that has been plaguing the forum for some months now. It has been determined that to solve this we will have to change the host company of the forum. The new host server has now been contracted with by Dave as of today.

We are proceeding rapidly now and hope to have the conversion complete within a few weeks at the latest and hopefully much sooner. We will keep you (members) apprised. Please look for announcements in the Newsbox. Some changes will likely come up suddenly--that is the nature of computer conversions, so it is impossible to know before we test whether something will go flawlessly and take two hours, or uncover thorny issues that will take days. The testing process is being started. This will not affect the forum at this point.

So taking this into consideration, we don't want to give you timeframes that are unrealistic. As soon as we finish a stage, we'll proceed immediately to the next, and the exact changeover will likely come on very short notice to you (members). We will post this changeover time in the Newsbox as well as in the individual threads, and will give you as much lead time as we can manage. This will enable us to end the slowdown ASAP.

Thank you for your patience.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Brokeback_1 on December 21, 2006, 03:33:06 AM
How nice a thread no one will bother to read. i can post what i like! And in no particulkar order whatsoever except for the first 3!!!

1--BBM
2--Casablanca
3--The Godfather 1
4--The Godfather 2
5--Judgement At Nuremburg
6--La Cage aux follies
7--In Harms Way
8--Dolores Claibourne
9--Stargate
10--Hotel Rwanda
11--The Constant Gardener
12--Key Largo
13--Ninotchka
14--Auntie Mame [with Rosalind Russel]
15--Star Trek 3:The Search For Spock [ i always cry when enterprise blows up]
16--Hurricane
17--The Pianist
18--North by Northwest
19--Out Of Africa
20--Gone With the Wind
21--All About Eve
22--Now, Voyager
23--Rear Window
24--Bringing Up Baby
25--His Girl Friday
26--Dinner At Eight
27--My Sister Eileen
28--Sleepers [NOT by Woody Allen!!!]
29--Schindler's List
30--Gladiator
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on December 21, 2006, 06:01:05 AM
I am reading!  ;D

8--Dolores Claibourne, loved that movie.  I enjoyed the book, but Kathy Bates just made the film.

Good call on the Godfather Films, they are my top 2!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on December 21, 2006, 10:24:52 AM
I read here, too, Jack!   ;)

I like your selections very much, though I disagree with GWTW, as I stated long ago in this thread.  I'm thrilled to see another "Stargate" fan.  And I certainly agree with Lola about the Godfather films.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Brokeback_1 on December 21, 2006, 05:38:01 PM
Dolores Claibourne is sooo good. Every 6 months or so my mother and i used to sit down and watch it. That is one well informed and intelligent movie critic lol!

And Stargate was wonderful, i LOVE Stargate. GWTW is a film i remember from when i was a kid, it was rereleased in what, 68-69--so it was almost the first film I went solo with friends too. In the theaters. It had an impact LOLOL.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: michaelflanagansf on December 21, 2006, 07:26:27 PM
1--BBM
2--La Cité des enfants perdus (City of Lost Children)
3--A Clockwork Orange
4--Die Büchse der Pandora (Pandora's Box)
5--M
6--Metropolis
7--Desk Set
8--The Times of Harvey Milk [The gay movie I cried at first]
9--Un chien andalou
10--Sunset Blvd.
11--The Exorcist
12--La Battaglia di Algeri [Now more than ever!]
13--Monty Python and the Holy Grail
14--Fight Club
15--2001: A Space Odyssey
16--À bout de souffle (Breathless)
17--Parting Glances
18--Dr. Strangelove
19--Cabaret
20--Memento
21--Beyond the Valley of the Dolls
22--Valley of the Dolls
23--The Usual Suspects
24--Requiem for a Dream
25--Lola rennt (Run Lola Run)
26--Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens
27--Trainspotting
28--Rosemary's Baby
29--Brazil
30--Strangers on a Train
31--Chelsea Girls
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Brokeback_1 on December 21, 2006, 07:47:26 PM
I left out:
31--Ride the High Country
32--True Grit
33--Rebel Without a Cause [HOW did I leave that out, one nickname of mine was rebel w/o a clue..]
34--Giant [fantaaaastic!!!!!!!]
35--Cleopatra[Claudette Colbert]
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Brokeback_1 on December 21, 2006, 07:48:00 PM
Michael you ARE an artistic filmgoer!!!!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: michaelflanagansf on December 21, 2006, 07:53:40 PM
Michael you ARE an artistic filmgoer!!!!

I blame it on my undergraduate experience.  I took several film classes including a Bunuel, Goddard, Fellini and Bergman class.  And if I were to add more they would be:

32: Johnny Guitar
33: The Seventh Seal
34: La Dolce Vita
35: Morocco ['There's a foreign legion of women, too']
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: circe1202 on December 31, 2006, 10:42:14 AM
Hi everyone,

I'm new here, but this seemed like an interesting thread to post my first message to... Here's my list (although it can vary from time to time)

1) Rebel without a Cause
2) Cry-Baby
3) Sleepers
4) The Truth about Cates and Dogs
5) The Replacements
6) The Green Mile
7) Million Dollar Baby
8) East of Eden
9) Children of Men
10) The Crow

Of course Brokeback Mountain comes in at number 1 of the altime favorites, but since it said favorites besides Brokeback Mountain  :)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on December 31, 2006, 12:49:38 PM
Welcome, Circe.  I like some of your choices, especially Cry-Baby and The Truth About Cats and Dogs, two films I really like a lot.  I hope you will feel comfortable here.  Feel free to comment in any thread.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: annabel on February 01, 2007, 05:59:21 PM
Just caught a repeat on TV of "Edward Scissorhands" I forgot how much I liked it and how charming Johnny Depp is even in white paint and deadly fingers.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: BRAD1963 on February 01, 2007, 06:28:41 PM
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v323/BADBRAD/1667160049.jpg)
1.    Brokeback Mountain (2005) dir: Ang Lee
2.    Norma Rae (1979) dir: Martin Ritt
3.    Network (1976) dir: Sidney Lumet
4.    Amelie (Fabuleux destin d'Amélie Poulain, Le) (2001) dir:Jean-Pierre Jeunet
5.    2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) dir: Stanley Kubrick
6.    Sullivan's Travels (1941) dir: Preston Sturges
7.    Hud (1963) dir: Martin Ritt
8.    Cinema Paradiso (1989) dir:Giuseppe Tornatore
    (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v323/BADBRAD/unbearable.jpg)
9.   The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1988) dir: Phillip Kaufman
10.  Touch of Evil (1959) dir: Orson Welles
11.  Nashville (1975) dir: Robert Altman
12.  The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek (1944) dir: Preston Sturges
13.  I am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang (1932) dir: Mervyn Leroy
 (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v323/BADBRAD/citylights.jpg)
14.  City Lights (1931) dir: Charlie Chaplin
15.  Maurice (1987) dir: James Ivory
16.  Rear Window (1954) dir: Alfred Hitchcock
17.  Pride & Prejudice (2005) dir: Joe Wright
18.  The Birds (1963) dir: Alfred Hitchcock
19.  East of Eden (1955) dir: Elia Kazan
20.  GoodFellas (1990) dir: Martin Scorsese
21.  Le Samouraï (1967) dir: Jean-Pierre Melville
22.  Out of Sight (1998) dir: Steven Soderberg
23.  The Bad and the Beautiful (1952) dir: Vincent Minnelli
24.  The Way We Were (1973) dir: Sydney Pollack
25   Bad Education Mala educación, La (2004) dir: Pedro Almodóvar


 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: annabel on February 02, 2007, 04:59:08 AM
Brad I could watch Joe Pesci in "Goodfellas"  a thousand times!!!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Saena on February 09, 2007, 10:19:06 AM
1) Pleasantville
2) The Royal Tenenbaums
3) the Lord of the Rings movies
4) A Beautiful Mind
5) Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

Saena
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: jpq716 on February 10, 2007, 11:05:46 AM
May I put in a word here in support of Saena’s selection of Pleasantville? I don’t know just how great a film Pleasantville may be, but it affected me very deeply. I myself am quite a traditional, conservative person, which is why I need the jolt of a film like Pleasantville to remind me that memory is highly selective and that the good old days were not so good at all. And alas, there is no justice in this world: Joan Allen did not win an Oscar for her heart-tugging role as the mother. I don’t care what the critics say, one way or the other: Pleasantville is one of my personal favorites. Thank  you, Saena, for championing it here! :D :D :D

P.S. Both A Beautiful Mind and The Lord of the Rings resonate very deeply with me too, Saena!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on February 10, 2007, 11:39:23 AM
I loved Pleasantville, another one I bought.  I have followed Toby Maguire's career ever since. It was different and very well done.   ;D


http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120789/
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Saena on February 10, 2007, 03:06:48 PM
It's at the top of my list for a reason.  ;D ;D ;D

Saena
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Brokeback_1 on February 10, 2007, 10:53:48 PM
yeah i loved that film too.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Carissa on February 10, 2007, 10:59:41 PM
1) Pleasantville
2) The Royal Tenenbaums
3) the Lord of the Rings movies
4) A Beautiful Mind
5) Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

Saena
Sounds like a movie list from my favorites Saena! :D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Tiffany Joan on February 11, 2007, 11:34:06 AM
 In no order:

Broke Back Mountain

The Passion Of Joan of Arc

Metropolis

Midnight Cowboy

2001 A Space Odyssey

Rebecca

A Clockwork Orange

A Man For All Seasons

Anne of the Thousand Days

Babe

Splendour In The Grass

Honorable mention: About A Boy & Sideways

And anything Chaplin and Buster Keaton- And of Course Douglas Fairbanks (Sr) He was Hot!!!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on February 11, 2007, 12:27:06 PM
I come in this thread alot, but I swear I don't know if I have replied.  It is really hard to pick 10.

Tiffany you just reminded me of Babe, sooooooo

in no particular order:

Brokeback Mountain

Godfather I & II

Rocky

Yentl

Babe

Shawhank Redemption

Forrest Gump

Jerry Maguire  (I can't help myself)

Goodfellas

The Deerhunter

I could easily pick 100!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Tiffany Joan on February 11, 2007, 05:44:46 PM
I know what you mean Lola, there are probably a lot more I could add to that list, having just recently come to an appreciation of silent films its opened up a new world for me, so to speak. I hope others feel the same, it is a shame that some great works of art are not being appreciated or worst forgotten by people today.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: michaelflanagansf on February 18, 2007, 08:22:39 PM

The Passion Of Joan of Arc

Metropolis

2001 A Space Odyssey

A Clockwork Orange


Whoa!  These are all great films too!  A few of my favorites there.

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Always on February 19, 2007, 03:57:28 PM
1) Brokeback mountain
2) The hours
3) Farewell my concubine
4) Persona
5) Maurice
6) Gone with the wind
7) Madame Bovary

         :-*
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on February 19, 2007, 04:03:56 PM
Welcome to the board Always!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on February 19, 2007, 07:53:45 PM
What Lola said!  Welcome, "Always!" 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Saena on February 19, 2007, 09:53:15 PM
I just saw "The Hours" over winter break. Wonderful movie.  :D

Saena
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Brokeback_1 on February 20, 2007, 04:48:51 AM
new top 10 for today:
1-Brokeback Mountain
2-The Godfather
3-The Godfather 2
4-Casablanca
5-Pleasantville
6-To Have and Have Not
7-Key Largo
8-Gone With the Wind
9-Sleepers [NOT woody allen's one!]
10-The Front Page

in absolutely NO order execpt for 1 and 2
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: afhickman on May 02, 2007, 07:47:06 AM
Is anybody on this site tracking the American Film Institute Top 100 Films of all time?  I believe they will be announced sometime in June.  A recent check shows that BBM is an odds-on favorite with 98 hits.  The second favorite is "The Godfather," with only 43!  I don't know how this will affect the final voting, but wouldn't it be eerie if BBM actually won?  How will the AFI handle such an outcome?
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on May 02, 2007, 10:19:29 AM
AF, the votes on that site are just for fun...the real ballotting was done in February.  As an AFI member, I got to vote, though that is not as big a deal as it sounds, because all of the member's votes are tallied and cast as ONE vote, among the blue ribbon panel members who do the bulk of the voting.  Still, it would be nice if Brokeback was Number One.  But, I'll be happy just to see it included in the top 100!  
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: DEO on May 29, 2007, 03:53:42 AM
"Gay":


Westler: East of the Wall
Making Love
The Sum of Us
It's My Party
The Object of My Affection
The Talented Mr. Ripley
Urbania
Edge of Seventeen
Steam
Food of Love
Latter Days
Bedrooms & Hallways
Come Undone
For a Lost Soldier
Love! Valour! Compassion!
It's in the Water
La Cage Aux Folles
Torch Song Trilogy
The Celluloid Closet
Under the Tuscan Sun
Far From Heaven
A Home at the End of the World
The Deep End
His Secret Life
Yossi & Jagger
The Trip
Eating Out
Happy Endings
Testosterone
Defying Gravity
The Times of Harvey Milk
Brokeback Mountain


----------


"Non-gay":

2001: A Space Odyssey
The Firm
Of Mice and Men
The Unbearable Lightness of Being
Midnight Express
Apollo 13


(In no order, except roughly chronological.)
Title: Top 100 movies
Post by: Lola on June 21, 2007, 01:30:51 PM
As alot of you already know, AFI came out with their revised (updated) list of the top 100 movies of all time last night. 

Here is their list and I thought it would be fun if we could do a cut and paste and come up with our own lists;


1. "Citizen Kane," 1941.

2. "The Godfather," 1972.

3. "Casablanca," 1942.

4. "Raging Bull," 1980.

5. "Singin' in the Rain," 1952.

6. "Gone With the Wind," 1939.

7. "Lawrence of Arabia," 1962.

8. "Schindler's List," 1993.

9. "Vertigo," 1958.

10. "The Wizard of Oz," 1939.

11. "City Lights," 1931.

12. "The Searchers," 1956.

13. "Star Wars," 1977.

14. "Psycho," 1960.

15. "2001: A Space Odyssey," 1968.

16. "Sunset Blvd.", 1950.

17. "The Graduate," 1967.

18. "The General," 1927.

19. "On the Waterfront," 1954.

20. "It's a Wonderful Life," 1946.

21. "Chinatown," 1974.

22. "Some Like It Hot," 1959.

23. "The Grapes of Wrath," 1940.

24. "E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial," 1982.

25. "To Kill a Mockingbird," 1962.

26. "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington," 1939.

27. "High Noon," 1952.

28. "All About Eve," 1950.

29. "Double Indemnity," 1944.

30. "Apocalypse Now," 1979.

31. "The Maltese Falcon," 1941.

32. "The Godfather Part II," 1974.

33. "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," 1975.

34. "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," 1937.

35. "Annie Hall," 1977.

36. "The Bridge on the River Kwai," 1957.

37. "The Best Years of Our Lives," 1946.

38. "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre," 1948.

39. "Dr. Strangelove," 1964.

40. "The Sound of Music," 1965.

41. "King Kong," 1933.

42. "Bonnie and Clyde," 1967.

43. "Midnight Cowboy," 1969.

44. "The Philadelphia Story," 1940.

45. "Shane," 1953.

46. "It Happened One Night," 1934.

47. "A Streetcar Named Desire," 1951.

48. "Rear Window," 1954.

49. "Intolerance," 1916.

50. "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring," 2001.

51. "West Side Story," 1961.

52. "Taxi Driver," 1976.

53. "The Deer Hunter," 1978.

54. "M-A-S-H," 1970.

55. "North by Northwest," 1959.

56. "Jaws," 1975.

57. "Rocky," 1976.

58. "The Gold Rush," 1925.

59. "Nashville," 1975.

60. "Duck Soup," 1933.

61. "Sullivan's Travels," 1941.

62. "American Graffiti," 1973.

63. "Cabaret," 1972.

64. "Network," 1976.

65. "The African Queen," 1951.

66. "Raiders of the Lost Ark," 1981.

67. "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?", 1966.

68. "Unforgiven," 1992.

69. "Tootsie," 1982.

70. "A Clockwork Orange," 1971.

71. "Saving Private Ryan," 1998.

72. "The Shawshank Redemption," 1994.

73. "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," 1969.

74. "The Silence of the Lambs," 1991.

75. "In the Heat of the Night," 1967.

76. "Forrest Gump," 1994.

77. "All the President's Men," 1976.

78. "Modern Times," 1936.

79. "The Wild Bunch," 1969.

80. "The Apartment, 1960.

81. "Spartacus," 1960.

82. "Sunrise," 1927.

83. "Titanic," 1997.

84. "Easy Rider," 1969.

85. "A Night at the Opera," 1935.

86. "Platoon," 1986.

87. "12 Angry Men," 1957.

88. "Bringing Up Baby," 1938.

89. "The Sixth Sense," 1999.

90. "Swing Time," 1936.

91. "Sophie's Choice," 1982.

92. "Goodfellas," 1990.

93. "The French Connection," 1971.

94. "Pulp Fiction," 1994.

95. "The Last Picture Show," 1971.

96. "Do the Right Thing," 1989.

97. "Blade Runner," 1982.

98. "Yankee Doodle Dandy," 1942.

99. "Toy Story," 1995.

100. "Ben-Hur," 1959.

Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: CellarDweller115 on June 21, 2007, 06:23:28 PM
As alot of you already know, AFI came out with their revised (updated) list of the top 100 movies of all time last night. 

Here is their list and I thought it would be fun if we could do a cut and paste and come up with our own lists.


I actually have a list of my "Top 20 Movies", because this topic came up at work as a result of the AFI show last night.

Here is my list, with a brief summary of each movie, in case you aren't familiar with them.





#20.  Sleeping With The Enemy
Julia Roberts, Patrick Bergin

Laura and Martin have been married for four years. They seem to be the perfect, happiest and most successful couple. The reality of their house- hold, however, is very different. Martin is an abusive and brutally obsessed husband. Laura is living her life in constant fear and waits for a chance to escape. She finally stages her own death, and flees to a new town and new identity. But when Martin finds out that his wife is not dead he will stop at nothing to find and kill her.

#19.  Arsenic and Old Lace
Cary Grant, Josephine Hull

Mortimer Bruster is a newspaperman and author known for his diatribes against marriage. We watch him being married at city hall in the opening scene. Now all that is required is a quick trip home to tell Mortimer's two maiden aunts. While trying to break the news, he finds out his aunts' hobby; killing lonely old men and burying them in the cellar.

#18.  Adventures of Priscilla, Queen Of The Desert
Terrance Stamp, Hugo Weaving

Two drag-queens (Anthony/Mitzi and Adam/Felicia) and a transexual (Bernadette) contract to perform a drag show at a resort in Alice Springs, a resort town in the remote Australian desert. They head west from Sydney aboard their lavender bus, Priscilla. En route, it is discovered that the woman they've contracted with is Anthony's wife. Their bus breaks down, and is repaired by Bob, who travels on with them.

#17.  Ice Castles
Robby Benson, Holly Lynn Johnson

A young girl is on top of the world until a tragic accident dashes her hopes and dreams of becoming a world-class figure skater. Only with the help of those who love her can she prove to the world -- and herself -- that she still has the potential to realize her dreams.

#16.  Agnes Of God
Jane Fonda, Anne Bancroft

When a dead newborn is found, wrapped in bloody sheets, in the bedroom wastebasket of a young novitiate, psychiatrist Martha Livingston (Fonda) is called in to determine if the seemingly innocent novice (Tilly), who knows nothing of sex or birth, is competent enough to stand trial for the murder of the baby. While searching for the answer that her supervisors want, Dr. Livingston finds herself inevitably drawn into searching for the truth about the baby's conception and death. Despite the lack of cooperation that she receives from her own organization and the church, itself, she eventually discovers more than she may have bargained for.

#15.  The Others
Nicole Kidman, Fionnula Flanagan

A woman named Grace retires with her two children to a mansion on Jersey, towards the end of the Second World War, where she's waiting for her husband to come back from battle. The children have a disease which means they cannot be touched by direct sunlight without being hurt in some way. They will live alone there with oppressive, strange and almost religious rules, until she needs to hire a group of servants for them. Their arrival will accidentally begin to break the rules with unexpected consequences.

#14.  Close Encounters Of The 3rd Kind
Richard Dreyfus, Terri Garr

Roy Neary sets out to investigate a power outage when his truck stalls and he is bathed in light from above. After this, strange visions and five musical notes keep running through his mind. Will he find the meaning of the visions, and who - or what - placed them in his mind ?

#13.  Star Wars
Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford

Star Wars: opens with a rebel ship being boarded by the tyrannical Darth Vader. The plot then follows the life of a simple farmboy, Luke Skywalker, as he and his newly met allies (Han Solo, Chewbacca, Ben Kenobi, C-3PO, R2-D2) attempt to rescue a rebel leader, Princess Leia, from the clutches of the Empire. The conclusion is culminated as the Rebels, including Skywalker and flying ace Wedge Antilles make an attack on the Empires most powerful and ominous weapon, the Death Star.

#12.  Silence Of The Lambs
Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins

Young FBI agent Clarice Starling is assigned to help find a missing woman to save her from a psychopathic serial killer who skins his victims. Clarice attempts to gain a better insight into the twisted mind of the killer by talking to another psychopath Hannibal Lecter, who used to be a respected psychiatrist.

#11.  Hello Dolly
Barbara Streisand, Walter Matthau

A matchmaker named Dolly Levi takes a trip to Yonkers, New York to see the "well-known unmarried half-a-millionaire," Horace Vandergelder. While there, she convinces him, his two stock clerks and his niece and her beau to go to New York City. In New York, she fixes Vandergelder's clerks up with the woman Vandergelder had been courting, and her shop assistant (Dolly has designs of her own on Mr. Vandergelder, you see).

#10.  Dirty Dancing
Patrick Swayze, Jennifer Grey

Set in the 1960s, Frances 'Baby' Houseman, a sweet daddy's girl, goes to a very respectable summer camp in the Catskills. Baby has grown up in privileged surrounds with her doctor father and all expect her to go on to college, join the Peace Corps and save the world before marrying a doctor, just like her father. Unexpectedly, Baby becomes infatuated with the camp's dance instructor, Johnny, a man whose background is vastly different to her own. Attempting to impress him, Baby borrows money from her father to pay for an illegal abortion for Johnny's dance partner. She then fills in as Johnny's dance partner and it is during the rigorous training that they fall in love.

#09.  The Changling
George C. Scott, Trish Van Devere

It was the perfect family vacation for composer John Russell and his family when a freak automobile accident claims the lives of his wife and daughter. Consumed by grief, John, at the request of friends, rents an old turn of the century house. Mammoth in size, the house seems all the room that John needs to write music and reflect. He does not realize that he is not alone in the house. He shares it with the spirit of a murdered child who has homed in on John's despair and uses him to uncover decades of silence and deceit.


#08.  Wizard Of Oz
Judy Garland

Dorothy lives on a farm in Kansas until a cyclone arrives, and picks her, her house, and her dog up and deposits them in the land of Oz. Things in Oz are strange and beautiful, but Dorothy just wants to get back home.

#07.  Ghost
Patrick Swayze, Demi Moore

Sam and Molly are a very happy couple and deeply in love. Walking back to their new apartment after a night out at the theatre, they encounter a thief in a dark alley, and Sam is murdered. He finds himself trapped as a ghost and realises that his death was no accident. He must warn Molly about the danger that she is in.

#06.  Night Of The Living Dead
Duane Jones, Judith O’Dea

The radiation from a fallen satellite might have caused the recently deceased to rise from the grave and seek the living to use as food. This is the situation that a group of people penned up in an old farmhouse must deal with.

#05.  Breakfast Club
Judd Nelson, Molly Ringwald, Emilio Estevas

When five students are thrown together by Saturday morning detention, each begins to see the others apart from their stereotypes. Andrew, the jock; Brian, the geek; John, the wastoid; Claire, the popular Prom Queen; and Allison, the psycho girl; each finds qualities about the others that make the Saturday morning change their lives.

#04.  Wedding Crashers
Owen Wilson, Vince Vaughn

John and Jeremy, single in their mid-30s, mediate divorces in D.C.; their summer social life consists of crashing weddings (always with a back story) to meet young women for a one-night stand. As John thinks about growing up, Jeremy convinces him to go to one more, for the daughter of the Treasury Secretary. Each catches the eye of a daughter of the host. Jeremy scores with Gloria, who proves to be a psycho clinger; John wants real romance with Claire, but she has a boyfriend, a privileged hound.

#03.  TransAmerica
Felicity Huffman, Kevin Zegers

One week before having the sex-change operation to become a woman, Bree receives a call from a 17-year-old identifying himself as her son from a college liaison. Bree's psychiatrist won't approve the surgery until Bree deals with this relationship, so Bree flies to New York City, bails the youth out of juvenile detention, and offers him a ride back to Los Angeles without disclosing that she is his father.

#02.  Grease
John Travolta, Olivia Newton-John

When wholesome good girl Sandy and greaser renegade Danny fall in love over the summer, they never expect to see each other again. But when they both discover that they're now attending the same high school, social differences challenge their romance.

#01.  Brokeback Mountain
Heath Ledger, Jake Gyllenhaal

In the Summer of 1963 Wyoming, two young men, Ennis a ranch hand and Jack an aspiring rodeo bull rider, are sent to work together herding sheep on Brokeback Mountain, and what had otherwise been anticipated to be a rather uneventful venture, will soon turn into an affair of love, of lust, and complications that will spand through 19 years of their lives. Through marriage, through children, and through the mighty grip of societal confines and the expectations of what it is to be a man.
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Lola on June 21, 2007, 08:30:45 PM
Oh I love your list Chuck!


Okay top 20 and in no particular order, that would require too much thought;


1.  Godfather

2.  Godftather II

3.  Forrest Gump

4.  Shawshank Redemption

5.  The Deer Hunter

6.   Brokeback Mountain

7.   Rocky

8.   Platoon

9.   Gone with the Wind

10.  Wizard of Oz


Now I get crazy



11.  Don Juan DeMarco

12.  Titanic

13.   Prince of Tides

14.   Jerry McGuire

15.   Mambo Kings

16.   Cinderella Man

17.    Yentl

18.    Water

19.    Saturday Night Fever

20.    Bridget Jones Diary

Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: paintedshoes on June 21, 2007, 09:14:03 PM
Chuck, you really did a job on that list of yours. I know I could not ever list the movies I love ...in order...because with few exceptions, that (the order) changes with my mood...hmmm

1.  Brokeback Mountain  (duh!)

2. The Lord of the Rings (the whole series, which I think of as one film)

3. The Age of Innocence

4.  Casablanca

5.  Rebecca

6. The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938)

7.  Singing in the Rain

8.  The Searchers

9.  The Wizard of Oz

10. It's a Wonderful Life

11. To Kill a Mockingbird

12. The Three Godfathers

13. King Kong (1933)

14. Star Wars

15. Raiders of the Lost Ark

16. The Red Violin

17. The Mummy Returns

18. Somewhere in Time

19. Jesus of Montreal

20.Billy Elliott


Again, these change, with few exceptions, with my mood...but for now, at least, this is my top 20!
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Lola on June 22, 2007, 07:03:30 AM
12. The Three Godfathers

 :D  Okay with that reasoning, I can add 2 more to my list!

I agree, they can change a bit with mood.  But the old tried and trues always make the list.


Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: paintedshoes on June 22, 2007, 08:28:04 AM
Hi, Lola...I didn't mean the 3 "Godfather" movies...I mean the movie titled  "The 3 Godfathers:" 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0040064/

 :D :D :D
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Lola on June 22, 2007, 08:44:28 AM
 :D :D  Sorry about that!!

I feel like John Wayne is stalking me the last few days, we were flicking through the movie stations last night and there was a John Wayne film on, I can't remember what one it was though.   ???
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: freetraveller on June 24, 2007, 11:10:22 AM
Here's my list:

1.   Brokeback Mountain
2.   Annie Hall
3.   Before Sunrise
4.   Casablanca
5.   Sixth Sense
6.   Babel
7.   Buena Vista Social Club
8.   Broken Flowers
9.   All the President's Men
10.   Lost in Translation
11.   Eat Drink Man Woman (dir. Ang Lee)
12.   North by Northwest
13.   Thelma & Louise
14.   When Harry Met Sally
15.   Conte d'automne / Autumn Tale
16.   Hannah & Her Sisters
17.   United 93
18.   Marius et Jeannette
19.   The Dancer Upstairs / Pasos de baile
20.   High Heels / Tacones lejanos
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sinne on June 24, 2007, 12:53:06 PM
AF, the votes on that site are just for fun...the real ballotting was done in February.  As an AFI member, I got to vote, though that is not as big a deal as it sounds, because all of the member's votes are tallied and cast as ONE vote, among the blue ribbon panel members who do the bulk of the voting.  Still, it would be nice if Brokeback was Number One.  But, I'll be happy just to see it included in the top 100!  

I'm not sure where this is being discussed on the forum, but I am absolutel DISGUSTED with the results from the AFI and emailed them the following:

<<< I used to have a lot of respect for the AFI, but no longer.  Your show last week was a farce.  I know "Brokeback Mountain" won the fan poll, so why wasn't it on the list?  Below is a link to all the awards it has won to date.  The fact that it didn't make your list is a disgrace and shows how meaningless the whole process is.  Shame on you.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0388795/awards  >>>

If I should post this somewhere else, please let me know where.  Thanks.

Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Lola on June 24, 2007, 07:27:05 PM
Hey you have some good ones and you have quite a few I haven't seen yet.   I need to make a few notes.

I think you can tell alot about people by the movies they love!  ;D

You know it is funny, When Harry Met Sally was such a great movie.  I could totally see that making the top 100.  I never get tired of that one.  And who can ever forget the resturant scene?   :D


Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on June 24, 2007, 09:51:17 PM
Sinne, this is the most recent page of "Awards Aftermath" which discussed the AFI awards...I can't go there anymore, myself...too painful.

http://www.davecullen.com/forum/index.php?topic=22797.9225
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Katiebre on June 25, 2007, 02:47:43 AM
I don't think I'd be able to really put these into a final order of preference, and the more I'm going to think about movies the more movies I'm going to come up with, but fwiw here's a list of my favourites:

Brokeback Mountain
Blues Brothers
The Piano
Some Like it Hot
Thelma & Louise
One, Two, Three
Amadeus
The Lives of Others
La vie est une longue fleuve tranquille (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0096386/)
Cinema Paradiso
Bringing Up Baby
Three colours: Blue
Au revoir, les enfants (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0092593/)
The Full Monty
The Commitments (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0101605/)
Barfuss (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0405743/)
The Field (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0099566/)
Four Weddings and a Funeral
Le fabuleux destin d'Amélie Poulain (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0211915/)
Babette's Feast (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0092603/)


Chuck, glad to see "Transamerica" on your list - we watched it recently and I was most impressed, a really good movie!
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: ingmarnicebbmt on June 25, 2007, 03:38:59 AM

No preference order, no all-time hitlist, but the 20 movies that come into my mind
here and now:

Brokeback Mountain
Babel
The Tempest (Paul Mazursky)
Felicia's Journey (Atom Egoyan)
The Sweet Hereafter (Atom Egoyan)
Jesus Christ Superstar (Norman Jewison)
The Hours
Far From Heaven (Todd Haynes)
Mon oncle d'Amérique (Alain Resnais)
Lili Marleen (Fassbinder)
Fontane Effi Briest (Fassbinder)
Eat Drink Man Woman (Lee)
The Ice Storm (Lee)
The Wedding Banquet (Lee)
A Star Is Born (the Streisand/Kristofferson version)
Moulin Rouge (Luhmann version)
In The Mood For Love & 2046 (Wong Kar Wai)
Plein Soleil (René Clément)
Mister Ripley (Minghella)
Wilde (with Stephen Fry and Jude Law)
Strangers On A Train (Hitchcock)

...these are 21!...

...to be continued...







Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: paintedshoes on June 25, 2007, 07:59:20 AM
Katie, I love that you include "The Commitments" in your list.  A small jewel of a film.

And IngSir:  Eat Drink Man Woman.  Another jewel.
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Katiebre on June 25, 2007, 09:12:21 AM
Katie, I love that you include "The Commitments" in your list.  A small jewel of a film.

Don't get me started, Jackie....  :D :D

I love the film - really great music, Jimmy senior performig "falling in love" with that bottle of brown sauce (and did you notice that picture of Elvis hanging above the pope's picture?), Jimmy junior conducting all those interviews, Joey "The Lips" Fagan ("God sent him" - "on a fuckin' Suzuki??"), the horse in the elevator, that prolly but incredibly gifted singer, and so many views of my beloved Dublin!

Do you know the other two movies from that trilogy? The Snapper and The Van? Both of them are very good, too.

And of course Roddy Doyle's books on which the films are based. So enjoyable. (And so Dub!)

Edit: And the language - those background girls rehearsing "Ride, Sally, ride", which comes out as "Roid, Sally, roid"  :D
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: ingmarnicebbmt on June 25, 2007, 09:37:37 AM
And IngSir:  Eat Drink Man Woman.  Another jewel.

Jewel - that's the word. (*sighs with pleasure*)

Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Lola on June 25, 2007, 09:44:07 AM
Four Weddings and a Funeral was a good movie,  but then I am a big fan of Hugh Grant!  ;D


Jesus Christ Superstar could easily make my top 10, what an amazing movie!   And A Star is Born is one I don't have on DVD and should.  I LOVE that movie.

There are just so many wonderful movies out there, past and present.
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: ingmarnicebbmt on June 25, 2007, 09:49:27 AM
Jesus Christ Superstar could easily make my top 10, what an amazing movie!   And A Star is Born is one I don't have on DVD and should.  I LOVE that movie.

Lola, I'm so glad that you share my unconditional love for these two movies - most people I know believe that's kinda odd for me to be fond of JCS and ASIB.

I just can't get enough of those two!

 ;)
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: ingmarnicebbmt on June 25, 2007, 12:22:57 PM
Additions to my own list from this morning:

Brokeback Mountain
Babel
The Tempest (Paul Mazursky)
Felicia's Journey (Atom Egoyan)
The Sweet Hereafter (Atom Egoyan)
Jesus Christ Superstar (Norman Jewison)
The Hours
Far From Heaven (Todd Haynes)
Mon oncle d'Amérique (Alain Resnais)
Lili Marleen (Fassbinder)
Fontane Effi Briest (Fassbinder)
Eat Drink Man Woman (Lee)
The Ice Storm (Lee)
The Wedding Banquet (Lee)
A Star Is Born (the Streisand/Kristofferson version)
Moulin Rouge (Luhmann version)
In The Mood For Love & 2046 (Wong Kar Wai)
Plein Soleil (René Clément, with Alain Delon)
Mister Ripley (Minghella)
Wilde (with Stephen Fry and Jude Law)
Strangers On A Train (Hitchcock)
Short Cuts (Altman)
Gosford Park (Altman)
A Prairie Home Companion (Altman)
Before Night Falls (with Javier Bardem, by Julian Schnabel)
Mare Adentro (with Javier Bardem)
The Color Purple (Spielberg)
A Foreign Affair (Billy Wilder)
Avanti (Billy Wilder)
Morocco (Sternberg)
La Storia di Piera (Marco Ferreri, with Hanna Schygulla)
Doctor Shivago (David Lean)
The Go-Between (Joseph Losey)
The Last Flood (Peter Weir)
Picnic At Hanging Rock (Peter Weir)
Dance With A Stranger (with Miranda Richardson & Rupert Everett)
Diva (J.-J. Beineix)
Carmen (Carlos Saura)
Volver (Almodovar)
Hable con ella (Almodovar)
Atame (Almodovar)
La ley del deso (Almodovar)
Que he hecho yo para merecer esto (Almodovar)
Matador (Almodovar)
Bridges Of Madison County (Eastwood & Streep)
One From The Heart (with Nastassja Kinski)
Crimes Of The Heart (with Diane Keaton, Jessica Lange, Sissy Spacek)


...to be continued...

Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Lola on June 25, 2007, 12:25:37 PM
Jesus Christ Superstar could easily make my top 10, what an amazing movie!   And A Star is Born is one I don't have on DVD and should.  I LOVE that movie.

Lola, I'm so glad that you share my unconditional love for these two movies - most people I know believe that's kinda odd for me to be fond of JCS and ASIB.

I just can't get enough of those two!

 ;)

Me neither!! 

Oh and I like some of your additions!

I thought The Color Purple was a wonderful book and a movie, I would love to see a live production.

Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: freetraveller on June 25, 2007, 03:06:37 PM
Thanks, Lola.
Maybe it's too soon, but I might be adding Zodiac as movie no. 21
I was really engrossed with it, and it reminded me a lot of All the President's Men, one of my all time favourites.
 :)

Hey you have some good ones and you have quite a few I haven't seen yet.   I need to make a few notes.

I think you can tell alot about people by the movies they love!  ;D

You know it is funny, When Harry Met Sally was such a great movie.  I could totally see that making the top 100.  I never get tired of that one.  And who can ever forget the resturant scene?   :D


Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: freetraveller on June 25, 2007, 03:10:19 PM
Paintedshoes, I had it too! I loved Eat Drink Man Woman, and it introduced me to Ang Lee  ;)
Only regret, I had to watch it in dubbed in Italian... only many years later I saw it on TV in original with subtitling.


And IngSir:  Eat Drink Man Woman.  Another jewel.

Jewel - that's the word. (*sighs with pleasure*)


Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Lola on June 25, 2007, 04:47:55 PM
"Eat Drink Man Woman" is a film of sheer delight. It tells the story of a master chef who has lost his ability to taste and his three daughters who are, in their own way, dissatisifed with their lives.


Be warned. If you haven't eaten before seeing this film, you will be craving Chinese food, for the film's director, Ang Lee, made the wise decision to shoot the meal preparation scenes as delicately and deliciously as though it were a love scene. I have never seen food in a film before being made with such tenderness and mouth-watering delight that you wil be running to the nearest Asian restaurant as soon as the film is over.


They are the most erotic scenes in the film and anyone with an appetite and an appreciation of fine cooking will most certainly be aroused. Throughout the course of the film, which runs at a brisk pace, each character finds his or her own way, sometimes in ways the characters, and the audience, aren't always expecting. Love and sex seem to be brewing under the surface the entire time and eventually manifests theirselves out of the dark and into the light with the characters, and viewers, utterly charmed.


"Eat Drink Man Woman" doesn't take any wrong turns. It's as though Mr. Lee and his screenwriters painstakingly made sure that the film never veered off course and everyone succeeded marvelously. This is a film that should not be missed.



I have never seen it!  :(
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: BayCityJohn on June 25, 2007, 06:22:40 PM
I don't know how some of these films got on my top 20 list.
It's just how I feel today.
I'd have a totally different list tomorrow.


1. Brokeback Mountain
2. To Kill A Mockingbird
3. Meet Me In St. Louis
4. Inside Daisy Clover
5. I Remember Mama
6. 42nd Street
7. All About Eve
8. The Wizard Of Oz
9. Billy Elliott
10. Bye Bye Birdie
11. Grease
12. Suddenly Last Summer
13. Jesus Christ Superstar
14. American Grafitti
15. Singing In The Rain
16. Somewhere In Time
17. Superman
18. The Competition
19. About Mrs. Leslie
20. Come Back, Little Sheba
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: BayCityJohn on June 25, 2007, 06:27:23 PM
AFI has this listed as #18??????


 "The General," 1927


WTF?????????

It was a good movie for 1927, but WTF are they smoking?
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Lola on June 25, 2007, 06:40:44 PM
http://www.filmsite.org/gene.html

I had to go look it up.  A silent film (Buster Keaton) ummm no not for me!

Grease is a great movie, I mean who doesn't love Grease?  I have it on VHS & DVD, the screenplay and the soundtrack!



Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: AHappyMan on June 25, 2007, 06:43:08 PM
Like John, most of these fluctuate in order. Ask me tomorrow and I'd probably have a different list.
These are all movies I love and admire for various reasons. But the ones in bold are permanent.....

1.) Brokeback Mountain
2.) The Exorcist
3.) The Poseidon Adventure (1972)
4.) Looking for Mr. Goodbar
5.) Superman (1978)
6.) Jaws
7.) 2001: A Space Odyssey
8.) A Clockwork Orange
9.) Alien
10.) Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolff?
11.) The Last Picture Show
12.) The Conversation
13.) Star Wars
14.) The Empire Strikes Back
15.) Raiders of the Lost Ark
16.) Network
17.) The Omen (1976)
18.) The Best Years of Our Lives
19.) Dawn of the Dead (1978)
20.) The War of the Roses

(And Spielberg's "War of the Worlds" would be damn near perfect if it weren't for that ending....)
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: graylockV on June 25, 2007, 06:43:58 PM
I don't know how some of these films got on my top 20 list.
It's just how I feel today.
I'd have a totally different list tomorrow.


1. Brokeback Mountain
2. To Kill A Mockingbird
3. Meet Me In St. Louis
4. Inside Daisy Clover
5. I Remember Mama
6. 42nd Street
7. All About Eve
8. The Wizard Of Oz
9. Billy Elliott
10. Bye Bye Birdie
11. Grease
12. Suddenly Last Summer
13. Jesus Christ Superstar
14. American Grafitti
15. Singing In The Rain
16. Somewhere In Time
17. Superman
18. The Competition
19. About Mrs. Leslie
20. Come Back, Little Sheba


Hi BCJ - you are definitely a romantic - not a single action - shoot 'em up flick, or sci-fi  bolckbuster on your list!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sinne on June 25, 2007, 10:27:55 PM
Sinne, this is the most recent page of "Awards Aftermath" which discussed the AFI awards...I can't go there anymore, myself...too painful.

http://www.davecullen.com/forum/index.php?topic=22797.9225

Thanks!  I know what you mean.....   I'll post it there, but I don't have the stomach to stay there for long.  It never ends eh?

Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: BayCityJohn on June 26, 2007, 12:03:09 AM
http://www.filmsite.org/gene.html

I had to go look it up.  A silent film (Buster Keaton) ummm no not for me!

It's actually a pretty good movie. We showed it at the State Theatre a couple of years ago with an original piano accompaniment by Kevin Cole. But having on the top 100 list is a bit of a stretch.
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: ingmarnicebbmt on June 26, 2007, 01:15:14 AM

I love this new thread!!

Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Katiebre on June 26, 2007, 01:48:59 AM

I love this new thread!!

So do I!

I was thinking about movies and browsing through our videos and DVDs to think of more movies I like.
There's so many of them, and it's so hard to decide which are the best best ones, and in which order...  :o
I think I don't even start to try...

I might amend my list later...
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: ingmarnicebbmt on June 26, 2007, 02:17:38 AM

I guess I'll update my list quite often, that's the only way do handle it.

Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Katiebre on June 26, 2007, 02:29:13 AM
But is it what this thread is for?
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: ingmarnicebbmt on June 26, 2007, 02:53:47 AM

In a way I think yes, because once you've composed your 100 movies definitely, you'll match the thread title.  :D

Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Katiebre on June 26, 2007, 04:46:51 AM
Hmm, true, it does say "100 movies"  ;D

So here's an updated list...

Brokeback Mountain
Blues Brothers
The Piano
Local Hero
Some Like it Hot
One, Two, Three
Amadeus
Out of Africa
The Lives of Others
Kleine Haie
Irma La Douce
La vie est une longue fleuve tranquille
Männer
Cinema Paradiso
Thelma & Louise
Bringing Up Baby
Das Wunder von Bern
Notorious
Au revoir, les enfants
The Full Monty
The Commitments
A Fish called Wanda
Barfuss
The Field
Four Weddings and a Funeral
Papa ante portas
Missing (1982 with Jack Lemmon and Sissy Spacek)
The Hallelujah Trail (with a young Burt Lancaster!!  ;D)
The Hotel New Hampshire
Le fabuleux destin d'Amélie Poulain
Three colours: Blue
To Be or Not To Be (1942, Ernst Lubitsch)
Fried Green Tomatoes...
Harold and Maude
Babette's Feast
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: ingmarnicebbmt on June 26, 2007, 05:03:27 AM

MISSING, definitely!

But MÄNNER ? .... ewwww... dullest Doris Dörrie dummbatz...

Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Katiebre on June 26, 2007, 05:04:56 AM

MISSING, definitely!

But MÄNNER ? .... ewwww... dullest Doris Dörrie dummbatz...

Hmm, so you don't like it?
I've always enjoyed it.
(And I love "When I was young", but I admit that's not a reason to like the film.)
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Lola on June 26, 2007, 08:27:01 AM
Thanks, Lola.
Maybe it's too soon, but I might be adding Zodiac as movie no. 21
I was really engrossed with it, and it reminded me a lot of All the President's Men, one of my all time favourites.
 :)


I haven't seen it, but I remember watching Summer of Sam quite a few times and really enjoying that one.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0162677/
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Lola on June 26, 2007, 08:28:01 AM
http://www.filmsite.org/gene.html

I had to go look it up.  A silent film (Buster Keaton) ummm no not for me!

It's actually a pretty good movie. We showed it at the State Theatre a couple of years ago with an original piano accompaniment by Kevin Cole. But having on the top 100 list is a bit of a stretch.

I guess they are just trying to cover all eras and I suppose to the movie buffs, the silent film era is important!
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Lola on June 26, 2007, 08:31:16 AM
Like John, most of these fluctuate in order. Ask me tomorrow and I'd probably have a different list.
These are all movies I love and admire for various reasons. But the ones in bold are permanent.....

1.) Brokeback Mountain
2.) The Exorcist
3.) The Poseidon Adventure (1972)
4.) Looking for Mr. Goodbar
5.) Superman (1978)
6.) Jaws
7.) 2001: A Space Odyssey
8.) A Clockwork Orange
9.) Alien
10.) Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolff?
11.) The Last Picture Show
12.) The Conversation
13.) Star Wars
14.) The Empire Strikes Back
15.) Raiders of the Lost Ark
16.) Network
17.) The Omen (1976)
18.) The Best Years of Our Lives
19.) Dawn of the Dead (1978)
20.) The War of the Roses

(And Spielberg's "War of the Worlds" would be damn near perfect if it weren't for that ending....)

You have some good pics as well.

I am mesmerized by The Last Picture show, it comes on TV alot and I always seem to be watching it.   And is that War of the Roses with Michael Douglas?   
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Lola on June 26, 2007, 09:14:28 AM
Good idea guys, we can try taking our lists to 100!

1.  Godfather

2.  Godftather II

3.  Forrest Gump

4.  Shawshank Redemption

5.  The Deer Hunter

6.   Brokeback Mountain

7.   Rocky

8.   Platoon

9.   Gone with the Wind

10.  Wizard of Oz


Now I get crazy



11.  Don Juan DeMarco

12.  Titanic

13.   Prince of Tides

14.   Jerry McGuire

15.   Mambo Kings

16.   Cinderella Man

17.    Yentl

18.    Water

19.    Saturday Night Fever

20.    Bridget Jones Diary




21.    Fried Green Tomatoes

22.    Corrina Corrina

23.    Jesus Christ Superstar

24.    A Star is Born

25.    Heat

26.    The Notebook

27.     Dog Day Afternoon

28.     A Few Good Men

29.     As Good As it Gets

30.      Love Actually

31.     About a Boy

32.     Chicago

33.     King Kong (the original)

34.     King Kong (the remake)

35.     Dangerous Liasons

36.     Pride & Prejudice (A&E version)

37.     Analyze This

38.     The Whole Nine Yards

39.      Ghost Busters I

40.      Ghost Busters II



I'll be back!!    Actually I could add Terminator  :D  As you can see some of mine will never make the AFI list.
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: paintedshoes on June 26, 2007, 10:44:30 AM
Oh, Lord, I should NOT have come here before having to leave for work!  I could add sooooo many movies to my list!!!!!!!  Some are on the lists others have presented.  But, I don't have time to go over them right now!!!!!!!!  *wails in pain*  I really LOVE talking about movies!  *sigh*  Later, all!!!!!!!!!!   ;D
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: AHappyMan on June 26, 2007, 11:11:13 AM
And is that War of the Roses with Michael Douglas?   

The very same. Co-starring Kathleen Turner and Danny Devito. Directed by Devito. Hilarious and black as pitch.
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Katiebre on June 26, 2007, 11:32:05 AM
Oh, Lord, I should NOT have come here before having to leave for work!  I could add sooooo many movies to my list!!!!!!!  Some are on the lists others have presented.  But, I don't have time to go over them right now!!!!!!!!  *wails in pain*  I really LOVE talking about movies!  *sigh*  Later, all!!!!!!!!!!   ;D

I agree, Jackie, looking at other people's lists is quite inspiring.

Some favourites I noticed on the other lists are

As Good As it Gets
Billy Elliot
Bridget Jones Diary (Well, I think I actually liked the book better, SO hilarious!)
Forrest Gump
The Color Purple
Vertigo
The Graduate
Arsenic and Old Lace (we staged that as a play when I was in school, good fun, even though I didn't get to play a part  :-\. But I had a major crush on the guy who played Teddy so I was happy enough being around and just doing the props ::))

Anybody for Belle Epoque?
I thought it was brilliant when I first saw it but wasn't as impressed anymore when I saw it the second time.
I'm a bit unsure what to make of that...

And "Diva" (which Ingmar mentioned) is one that I've never seen but somehow always felt I should/wanted to see.
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Lola on June 26, 2007, 11:42:44 AM
And is that War of the Roses with Michael Douglas?   

The very same. Co-starring Kathleen Turner and Danny Devito. Directed by Devito. Hilarious and black as pitch.

Loved it, those three were perfect together.  They teamed up later in Romancing the Stone, which was a little less.........violent! lol
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Lola on June 26, 2007, 11:44:02 AM
Anybody for Belle Epoque?
I thought it was brilliant when I first saw it but wasn't as impressed anymore when I saw it the second time.
I'm a bit unsure what to make of that...

And "Diva" (which Ingmar mentioned) is one that I've never seen but somehow always felt I should/wanted to see.

I haven't seen either of those.  I know there are so many films I have never seen.

Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: HR on June 26, 2007, 08:59:44 PM
Friends,
    Does anyone know the criteria for being on the AFI list? Do the movies need to be English speaking? Made only by American companies? If not, the list is comical. Ang Lee seems to be in good company. They forgot Eisenstein, Kurosawa and Bergman, to name but a few. And, with one exception, they don't like Lerner, Loew, Rogers, Hart or Hammerstein.
    If they must be "American", why is "Lord of the Rings" on the list?
   Okay, so I've vented a little. Here's my list (made up of only those that were not on their list) of movies that I think were better than Tootsie, The Sound of Music, and Pulp Fiction (at least). Pardon my attempt at renewing my pseudo-intellectual merit badge. This is one of my few chances, as I don't get out much:

Brokeback Mountain

Gallipoli

Z

Chariots of Fire

Field of Dreams

Oklahoma

Kagemusha

Doctor Zhivago

Fried Green Tomatoes

Driving Miss Daisy

Stand by Me

Das Boot

Scrooge (this is the finest thing that anyone's ever done for me...)

Henry V (Branagh version)

The Heart is a Lonely Hunter

Diva

Fantasia

Cool Hand Luke

The Sand Pebbles

The Reivers

The Great Escape

The Sting

The Killing Fields

    There are others that I'll think of, eventually. My taste, as it is, doesn't seem to correspond to theirs. And, yes, most of my movie going was 20 years ago.
        HR
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: paintedshoes on June 26, 2007, 11:22:44 PM
So...it is nearly 1 am, and I am home from work and looking at the recent posts...

IngSir:  Morocco!  The final scene of Dietrich taking off her shoes and what followed thrills me, to this day...and, damn, the young Gary Cooper was a fine looking man!   ;)


Freetraveller:  Buena Vista Social Club!  A masterpiece of filmmaking, presenting the fabulous musicians in their element.

Katie:  Cinema Paradiso!  The sheer joy of this film makes me weep when I hear the music, which, in itself, is brilliant...which reminds me....how many of you love Film Scores?   I can hear a few notes of an original score and be immediately transported to the entire film.  *sigh*

And your updated list with Notorious!!!!!!!!!!!!!  Ingrid and Cary were never better! 

BCJohn:  Meet Me in St. Louis!  Judy Garland singing "Have yourself a Merry Little Christmas."  Margaret O'Brien. 

Lola:  Grease!  WhenI first heard of Grease, it was at the Tony Awards.  I thought it was about the country, til I saw who got up to accept the award...I swear!   ;D ;D ;D  "Grease is the Word!"

And your updated list:  Mambo Kings!  I had been in love with Armand Assante since he was on one of my soaps.   ;)  And I had seen every one of Almodovar's films, (yes, Ing, I love them, too!)   So Bandaras was a dream for me, in his first English language film..."Beautiful Maria, Of My Soul."

And you added Pride and Prejudice...Don Juan DeMarco...Love,Actually!!!!!!!! 

Rick (AHappyMan):  Alien!  Damn, that movie STILL scares the sh** out of me!  I watch "Aliens," own and love it, but the first one...I think it is the music from the first one that scared me to death!  Love the movie, but still watch it with my eyes half covered!   :D

HR:  I don't know the criteria....frustrating, isn't it?  Something to do with release by an American Studio, thus LOTR (by New Line.)  I will most heartily agree with Henry V (Branagh version) and Field of Dreams...

Funny thing is:  there are few films that any of you have named that I dislike.  And I will refrain from naming the ones I am not crazy about, cause we all have our own taste...

To add to my original list:

1.  Brokeback Mountain  (duh!)

2. The Lord of the Rings (the whole series, which I think of as one film)

3. The Age of Innocence

4.  Casablanca

5.  Rebecca

6. The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938)

7.  Singing in the Rain

8.  The Searchers

9.  The Wizard of Oz

10. It's a Wonderful Life

11. To Kill a Mockingbird

12. The Three Godfathers

13. King Kong (1933)

14. Star Wars

15. Raiders of the Lost Ark

16. The Red Violin

17. The Mummy Returns

18. Somewhere in Time

19. Jesus of Montreal

20.Billy Elliott

In no particular order, again:  (no, not true...alphabetical, from a list I have.    ;)  )

21.  An Affair to Remember

22. Big Night  (The love between the brothers is so lovely)

23.  The Big Country

24.  Captain Blood

25.  The Day the Earth Stood Still  (Gort, Klaatu barada nicto!)

26.   Dogma

27.  Forbidden Planet  (the first movie I saw on the big screen)

28.  Galaxy Quest

29.  Gunga Din  (Sgts Cutter, MacChesnie, and Ballentine!)

30.  A Knight's Tale  (Where I first fell in love with Heath!)

So, I shall stop for now...   long-winded, am I not?   ;D




Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Lola on June 27, 2007, 05:04:25 AM

Stand by Me

Scrooge (this is the finest thing that anyone's ever done for me...)

Henry V (Branagh version)


You have a few I really liked.  By Scrooge do you mean A Christmas Carol?  I like the Allister Sims version best.

I also liked the Kenneth Branagh version of Frankenstein!

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0109836/

Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: ingmarnicebbmt on June 27, 2007, 05:08:16 AM
IngSir:  Morocco!  The final scene of Dietrich taking off her shoes and what followed thrills me, to this day...and, damn, the young Gary Cooper was a fine looking man!   ;)

For me this is one of the first (hidden) gay movies in history! It's a hymn to male beauty AND to female androgynity!

Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: ingmarnicebbmt on June 27, 2007, 05:09:25 AM

Katie and Lola, "Diva" is a must-see, really - I'm sure both of you'd be mesmerized by it !!

I've seen it at last twenty times when it appeared (1983, I used to be a very young student in Berlin then), and twice on DVD lately.

Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Lola on June 27, 2007, 05:11:18 AM
And your updated list:  Mambo Kings!  I had been in love with Armand Assante since he was on one of my soaps.   ;)  And I had seen every one of Almodovar's films, (yes, Ing, I love them, too!)   So Bandaras was a dream for me, in his first English language film..."Beautiful Maria, Of My Soul."

And you added Pride and Prejudice...Don Juan DeMarco...Love,Actually!!!!!!!! 


Jackie I would love to sit and talk movies with you, we would have a blast!

Armand Assante...............sigh.    The first time I rented Mambo Kings (long before I bought it and watched it 80 times) I watched it to see Antonio (who was beautiful in the movie) but it ended up I couldn't take my eyes of Armand, he was amazing in that film.   And yes I have loved him ever since.

I also bought the soundtrack and still listen to it all the time.

Filling all my nights
Haunting all my days
Beautiful Maria of my soul


I love that you added A Knights Tale, what a great movie.  And I have to tell you I really loved Casinova as well.


Actually I just thought of some more for my list, I'll be back  :D

Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Lola on June 27, 2007, 05:12:52 AM

Katie and Lola, "Diva" is a must-see, really - I'm sure both of you'd be mesmerized by it !!

I've seen it at last twenty times when it appeared (1983, I used to be a very young student in Berlin then), and twice on DVD lately.



http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0082269/

I will be on the look out for it, our video store is terrible for getting things.
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Katiebre on June 27, 2007, 05:56:07 AM
Katie and Lola, "Diva" is a must-see, really - I'm sure both of you'd be mesmerized by it !!

I've seen it at last twenty times when it appeared (1983, I used to be a very young student in Berlin then), and twice on DVD lately.

I just read what it says on IMDB, sounds very interesting!

That movie caught my attention because if I remember correctly it ran in Hamburg for years in one cinema, I think they were playing nothing else. And that intrigued me, although for some reason I never went to see it.

... they don't have it in my Amazon rental  >:( >:( >:(
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: ingmarnicebbmt on June 27, 2007, 07:57:28 AM
... they don't have it in my Amazon rental  >:( >:( >:(

purchase it, then - es lohnt sich wirklich  ;)

Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: paintedshoes on June 27, 2007, 08:01:35 AM
Jackie I would love to sit and talk movies with you, we would have a blast!

Armand Assante...............sigh.    The first time I rented Mambo Kings (long before I bought it and watched it 80 times) I watched it to see Antonio (who was beautiful in the movie) but it ended up I couldn't take my eyes of Armand, he was amazing in that film.   And yes I have loved him ever since.

I also bought the soundtrack and still listen to it all the time.

Filling all my nights
Haunting all my days
Beautiful Maria of my soul


I love that you added A Knights Tale, what a great movie.  And I have to tell you I really loved Casinova as well.


Actually I just thought of some more for my list, I'll be back  :D


Lola, it is a date!  When  and where?   ;) 

Casanova I was not too crazy about, though I loved Heath and Oliver Pratt!  It seemed a little forced to me. 
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: paintedshoes on June 27, 2007, 08:04:52 AM
Ing, Morocco was indeed an early gay film, though I did not recognize it as such when I first saw it, as a teenager.  It took more maturity on my part to appreciate that aspect of it.

As for Diva, my daughter introduced me to that lovely film.  I can't say it is a favorite, but I do appreciate it.
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Katiebre on June 27, 2007, 12:50:46 PM
... they don't have it in my Amazon rental  >:( >:( >:(

purchase it, then - es lohnt sich wirklich  ;)

Found it after all!
It's at the top of my list now, but right now I'm waiting for Donnie Darko  ;)
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Katiebre on June 27, 2007, 01:34:15 PM
Katie:  Cinema Paradiso!  The sheer joy of this film makes me weep when I hear the music, which, in itself, is brilliant...which reminds me....how many of you love Film Scores?   I can hear a few notes of an original score and be immediately transported to the entire film.  *sigh*

And your updated list with Notorious!!!!!!!!!!!!!  Ingrid and Cary were never better! 

Glad you like "Notorious", Jackie!
I love both Ingrid Bergman (the word "beautiful" doesn't even begin to do her justice!) and Cary Grant.

As to film scores, I'm not too much into them, I must admit.
Altogether I only have 3 or 4 (Three colours: Blue (wonderful!!!), Thelma & Louise, Amadeus and The Commitments).


Generally, I have to confess my ignorance - there are so many movies all of you mentioned that I do not know.
And so many movies on my "want to see" list anyway...

Maybe we should compile parallel lists, like "10000 movies I've always wanted to see"  ;)
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Lola on June 27, 2007, 03:54:01 PM
Good idea guys, we can try taking our lists to 100!

1.  Godfather

2.  Godftather II

3.  Forrest Gump

4.  Shawshank Redemption

5.  The Deer Hunter

6.   Brokeback Mountain

7.   Rocky

8.   Platoon

9.   Gone with the Wind

10.  Wizard of Oz


Now I get crazy



11.  Don Juan DeMarco

12.  Titanic

13.   Prince of Tides

14.   Jerry McGuire

15.   Mambo Kings

16.   Cinderella Man

17.    Yentl

18.    Water

19.    Saturday Night Fever

20.    Bridget Jones Diary




21.    Fried Green Tomatoes

22.    Corrina Corrina

23.    Jesus Christ Superstar

24.    A Star is Born

25.    Heat

26.    The Notebook

27.     Dog Day Afternoon

28.     A Few Good Men

29.     As Good As it Gets

30.      Love Actually

31.     About a Boy

32.     Chicago

33.     King Kong (the original)

34.     King Kong (the remake)

35.     Dangerous Liasons

36.     Pride & Prejudice (A&E version)

37.     Analyze This

38.     The Whole Nine Yards

39.      Ghost Busters I

40.      Ghost Busters II



I'll be back!!    Actually I could add Terminator  :D  As you can see some of mine will never make the AFI list.


41.   Stand by Me

42.   The Sand Lot

44.   Moulin Rouge

45.   Mary Poppins

46.   The Little Mermaid  :P

47.    Good Will Hunting

48.    Scarface  :o

49.    Life is Beautiful

50.    All three LOTR movies

51.    Dick Tracey

52.    THE BIG EASY

53.     Sea of Love

54.     Casino

55.    The Untouchables

56.     Once Upon a Time in America

57.     Braveheart

58.     Gladiator

59.      Tin Cup

60.      Basic Instinct

61.      Malcom X

62.      The Big Chill

63.      Bull Durham

64.     The Witches of Eastwick

65.    Somethings Gotta Give

66.    Batman (the first one)

67.   Bridges of Maddison County

68.   Valmont

69.    Interview with a Vampire

70.    Meet Joe Black


I'll be back! lol
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Katiebre on July 01, 2007, 11:51:11 PM
And IngSir:  Eat Drink Man Woman.  Another jewel.

So, we watched Eat Drink Man Woman last night and really, really liked it!
It was The Wedding Banquet on Saturday night, also very good, but I'd say Eat Drink Man Woman was even better.
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: ingmarnicebbmt on July 02, 2007, 01:35:39 AM

Agree completely, Katie! EDMW was my Ang-Lee-favourite movie, until BBM of course.

But what I love in The Wed Banq is the humour and irony A.L. is capable of.

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: oilgun on July 02, 2007, 06:31:04 PM
It's funny, I tried registering on this site today and discovered I was already a member, lol!  Anyway, it's nice to be back, I noticed quite a few threads that interest me.

Here are my all-time favourite films, in no particular order.  The list does change and evolve of time and depending on my mood:

1-  Brokeback Mountain (natch!)

2-  Distant Voices, Still Lives

3-  The Umbrellas of Cherbourg

4-  Children of Paradise

5-  The Talented Mr. Ripley

6-  Gattaca

7-  Gilda

8-  Code Unknown

9-  In the Mood for Love

10- Ed Wood
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on July 02, 2007, 10:26:37 PM
Welcome again, oilgun...

I like your choices, esp "Ed Wood."  Johnny Depp was brilliant, and Vincent D'Onofrio, in a cameo as Orson Welles, was fantastic, not to mention Martin Landau, in his Oscar-winning performance as Bela Lugosi.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Ellen (tellyouwhat) on July 03, 2007, 08:43:11 PM
new top 10 for today:
1-Brokeback Mountain
2-The Godfather
3-The Godfather 2
4-Casablanca
5-Pleasantville
6-To Have and Have Not
7-Key Largo
8-Gone With the Wind
9-Sleepers [NOT woody allen's one!]
10-The Front Page

in absolutely NO order execpt for 1 and 2


LOL Brokeback_1 --- I read all your previous lists and you never before mentioned To Have and Have Not!  OMG Bogart and Bacall. AND Hoagy Carmichael and the real McCoy, can't think right now of the distinguished actor ...


And Key Largo, of course.  But that was on one of your earlier lists.!

After reading this thread I will have to check out Angels and Insects and TIM and -- what was the other one?  Pleasantville!

I have always liked GWTW, but the book is better....


Anybody up for Back to the Future

and The Buddy Holly Story?

um, but no really -- ALICE with Mia Farrow (yes, a Woody Allen movie) I own it, finally.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on July 03, 2007, 08:45:10 PM
I loved The Buddy Holly Story, I haven't seen that in years!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Ellen (tellyouwhat) on July 03, 2007, 08:50:08 PM
I loved The Buddy Holly Story, I haven't seen that in years!

LOL -- somehow I missed it when it first came out -- then about ten years later I saw it on tape (1990 or so) and I went through a whole Buddy Holly obsession with only my daughter to support me!

like, I missed the first cultural experience in 1958 because I was only two years old when he died --

then I missed the second one because I was too busy with my new baby--

then me and the baby (at that time ten or eleven) went into full-on Buddy Holly obsession, listening to records, etc.  ;D


I just found out my husband (who was a teenager when Buddy Holly died) missed seeing the movie, and my second child is now old enough.  So it's time to re-visit BH this summer.  ;) :D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lola on July 03, 2007, 08:59:55 PM
LOL I must be the same!   I didn't go through the Buddy Holly experience until much later, long after the movie was released in theatres.  I can't believe it came out in 78!!


http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0077280/

  And then I cried thinking of the waste of that life.  My son also went through a Buddy Holly stage (thanks in large part to that movie)   I think he is one of those artists who's music is timeless.   And Gary Busey just captured his essence perfectly.

He was nominated for an Oscar!

I am actually just reading about Buddy now (thanks ALOT  LOL) he was born in 36, died in 59!   :-\ 


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddy_Holly

Okay I need to go buy or rent that movie, preferably BUY!!



Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: AHappyMan on July 03, 2007, 10:58:53 PM
and The Buddy Holly Story?

Buddy Holly Story is great. Gary Busey is great. Love the music, love the story.
"I think I'll 'what'. Would you like to 'what' with me?"

um, but no really -- ALICE with Mia Farrow (yes, a Woody Allen movie) I own it, finally.

ALICE is terrific! That scene where Mia has to "come on" to Joe Mantegna is priceless....
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: sinne on July 06, 2007, 04:53:32 PM
and The Buddy Holly Story?

Buddy Holly Story is great. Gary Busey is great. Love the music, love the story.
"I think I'll 'what'. Would you like to 'what' with me?"

um, but no really -- ALICE with Mia Farrow (yes, a Woody Allen movie) I own it, finally.

ALICE is terrific! That scene where Mia has to "come on" to Joe Mantegna is priceless....

I LOVE "Alice" - and that scene is a hoot!  So is the one where she's high on opium.  I have lent that movie to so many people who never heard of it and now love it too.
Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Katiebre on July 09, 2007, 02:02:11 AM
Katie and Lola, "Diva" is a must-see, really - I'm sure both of you'd be mesmerized by it !!

So, we watched Diva this weekend - very good!

The music it is about is simply divine, and the film is also a visual delight.
The story was interesting, too, and I think I'll want to watch it again in order to take a better note of this and that.

This one gangster, the one with the sunglasses and that unique squeezed face, is that the same actor who also was in Delicatessen?

Edit: It is, it's Dominique Pinon.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on July 22, 2007, 07:10:32 PM
I was reminded tonight of a film that I adore, one I have not seen in ages.  I have it on tape, must get it out.

Brief Encounter with Trevor Howard and Celia Johnson.  *sigh*

http://imdb.com/name/nm0002145/

I was reminded by this incredibly atmosheric picture of an English night posted in the Photo thread by Trigger Hippie.  I don't think he'll mind if I borrow it for here.

(http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e267/nickjadegreen//misc/IMG_5541.jpg)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: BRAD1963 on August 09, 2007, 10:49:32 AM

1.    Brokeback Mountain (2005) dir: Ang Lee
2.    Norma Rae (1979) dir: Martin Ritt
3.    Network (1976) dir: Sidney Lumet
4.    Amelie (Fabuleux destin d'Amélie Poulain, Le) (2001) dir:Jean-Pierre Jeunet
5.    2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) dir: Stanley Kubrick
6.    Sullivan's Travels (1941) dir: Preston Sturges
7.    Hud (1963) dir: Martin Ritt
8.    Cinema Paradiso (1989) dir:Giuseppe Tornatore   
9.    The Bourne Films (2002, 2004, 2007) dir: Doug Liman, Paul Greengrass
10.  The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek (1944) dir: Preston Sturges
11.  Nashville (1975) dir: Robert Altman
12.  Parting Glances (1986) dir: Bill Sheerwood
13.  I am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang (1932) dir: Mervyn Leroy
14.  City Lights (1931) dir: Charlie Chaplin
15.  Touch of Evil (1958) dir: Orson Welles
16.  Rear Window (1954) dir: Alfred Hitchcock
17.  Pride & Prejudice (2005) dir: Joe Wright
18.  The Birds (1963) dir: Alfred Hitchcock
19.  East of Eden (1955) dir: Elia Kazan
20.  GoodFellas (1990) dir: Martin Scorsese
21.  Le Samouraï (1967) dir: Jean-Pierre Melville
22.  Out of Sight (1998) dir: Steven Soderberg
23.  The Bad and the Beautiful (1952) dir: Vincent Minnelli
24.  The Way We Were (1973) dir: Sydney Pollack
25   Bad Education Mala educación, La (2004) dir: Pedro Almodóvar
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Rosewood on August 09, 2007, 12:23:21 PM
I mentioned ANGELS AND INSECTS a while back and FINALLY, someone else on here has heard
of it or seen it or means to see it....My work is done.  ;D

This is one of the most beautiful and yet, paradoxically, one of the ugliest films of all time.
The emotional wallop is pitiless.
And yet you are dazzled by the richness of the entire enterprise.
If ever a film could be said to appear to 'ripen' before your eyes, this would be it.
The eroticism on display both intrigues and repulses.

But there is no one character to fall in love with.
Even the children have a sinister aura.
This film glorifies basic human weakness and defies you
to think otherwise.

It is a true work of art, though it fails to delight.
(Except for the GORGEOUS costumes which are mind-bogglingly
beautiful beyond belief.)

See this film!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Nikki on August 09, 2007, 04:02:26 PM
I was reminded tonight of a film that I adore, one I have not seen in ages.  I have it on tape, must get it out.

Brief Encounter with Trevor Howard and Celia Johnson.  *sigh*

http://imdb.com/name/nm0002145/

I was reminded by this incredibly atmosheric picture of an English night posted in the Photo thread by Trigger Hippie.  I don't think he'll mind if I borrow it for here.

(http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e267/nickjadegreen//misc/IMG_5541.jpg)


Jackie, I had to comment on your post, even though I hadn't planned to list my all-time favs --  too many!!!  Getting back to 'Brief Encounter.'  Not too many people have seen/know about it.  I saw it on TV -- think it was BBC on local TV.  The perfect romantic tale IMO -- the black and white cinematography makes it start and melancholy.  I think that's when I fell in love with Noel Coward.  Trevor and Celia were perfect -- I haven't read the link you posted yet -- I was too anxious to comment and tell you how much I agree with you.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: paintedshoes on August 09, 2007, 05:17:46 PM
Thanks, Nikki.  I watched it again after making that post...it is as lovely and poignant as I had remembered.  *sigh*
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: oilgun on August 10, 2007, 07:17:28 AM
I mentioned ANGELS AND INSECTS a while back and FINALLY, someone else on here has heard
of it or seen it or means to see it....My work is done.  ;D

This is one of the most beautiful and yet, paradoxically, one of the ugliest films of all time.
The emotional wallop is pitiless.
And yet you are dazzled by the richness of the entire enterprise.
If ever a film could be said to appear to 'ripen' before your eyes, this would be it.
The eroticism on display both intrigues and repulses.



Wow, great description!  I also have seen and loved Angels and Insects when it first came out.  I have a copy on VHS but should really get the DVD, it's so good.  What a twisted story and I loved the costumes.  Now you've made me want to watch it again! 

Title: Re: Top 100 movies
Post by: Rosewood on August 10, 2007, 01:27:51 PM
Katie and Lola, "Diva" is a must-see, really - I'm sure both of you'd be mesmerized by it !!

So, we watched Diva this weekend - very good!

The music it is about is simply divine, and the film is also a visual delight.
The story was interesting, too, and I think I'll want to watch it again in order to take a better note of this and that.

This one gangster, the one with the sunglasses and that unique squeezed face, is that the same actor who also was in Delicatessen?

Edit: It is, it's Dominique Pinon.

Pinon is also in AMELIE and one of the ALIEN films as well.

Guys, DIVA is one of my all time favorite movies! So happy someone else on here as seen
it as well. I've lost track of how many times I've actually seen this. It never grows old for me.

There are actually three stories in one in this film, so sometimes it is hard to keep track.
But I look at it basically as a love story with crime underpinnings. Didn't you love love love
the 'unique' apartment the hero lives in?? The splashy murals and the auto detritus?
As well as the loft that that other guy lives in - the enigmatic Zen guy. LOVE the scene in
the kitchen with him wearing the snorkle headgear. I mean, talk about eccentric!!
AND the scene with the two Citroens!!!

And above it all, the music! That sublime aria, La Walley, sung so beautifully by, geez, I always forget
her name...Kathleen Wiggins-Fernandez? Something like that. SO gorgeous.

As you can tell, though my memory is faulty, I LOVE this film!!!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Rosewood on August 10, 2007, 01:34:12 PM
I mentioned ANGELS AND INSECTS a while back and FINALLY, someone else on here has heard
of it or seen it or means to see it....My work is done.  ;D

This is one of the most beautiful and yet, paradoxically, one of the ugliest films of all time.
The emotional wallop is pitiless.
And yet you are dazzled by the richness of the entire enterprise.
If ever a film could be said to appear to 'ripen' before your eyes, this would be it.
The eroticism on display both intrigues and repulses.



Wow, great description!  I also have seen and loved Angels and Insects when it first came out.  I have a copy on VHS but should really get the DVD, it's so good.  What a twisted story and I loved the costumes.  Now you've made me want to watch it again! 



Thanks, OG. My copy too is VHS, though it's worn well. One of these days I have to get the DVD.
My player plays both so I can watch either/or.
This isn't the sort of film you want to see over and over, but it is the kind of film you'd like to see once
in awhile to refresh your memory. Yes, it is twisted, but in such an over the top way that you kind of view
it as an opera without the music.

And by the way, wouldn't THIS make a terrific opera??
Surprised no one's done it.

Remember the scene at the picnic with all the kids and nannnies and the hero sitting around
drawing ants? What is it about this scene that is so vaguely unsettling????

Remember the mother as human Queen Bee, I mean she just about ferments before our eyes.
What a film.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Dave Cullen on September 21, 2007, 09:34:32 PM
I saw Half Nelson a few weeks back, and it was my favorite from last year. It has stuck with me, and deserves to be added to my list, I think.

So here's my current list--not in order, except the first two, which are tied (and i'm sure i forgot some):

Moulin Rouge, Wild at Heart, Hope & Glory, Trust, Harold & Maude, Eternal Sunshine, 42 Up, A Streetcar Named Desire, Billy Elliot, Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon, My Own Private Idaho, Brokeback Mountain, The Grifters, Before Sunset, Living Out Loud (mostly for Holly Hunter's moment of ecstasy on the dancefloor), Manny & Lo, Life of Brian, Sammy & Rosie Get Laid, The Big Sleep, Manhattan, Half Nelson.

i used to have Heathers on that list. not sure if it belongs there. i look back on all these so fondly. Three Kings is kinda close. and The Unbelievable Truth should maybe go, but i think of it so closely to Trust, which obscures it. i wonder if i should add Raiders of the Lost Ark. it thrilled me when i was a young lad--now, i wonder if it would hold up. Arizona Dream almost makes it.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: CANSTANDIT on December 12, 2007, 08:50:51 AM
I'm not sure I listed mine, but here goes a revised list, but the order changes depending on mood:
Top 30, for no good reason:
1)Brokeback Mountain
2)Out of Africa
3)America Graffitti
4)Raiders of the Lost Ark
5)Star Wars
6) The Trip To Bountiful
7)Sweet Sixteen
8)Wizard of OZ
9)Angels With Dirty Faces
10)Sand Pebbles
11)Star Trek: The Wrath of Kahn
12) Close Encounters of the Third Kind
13)StakeOut
14)Jaws
(you can tell I love Richard Dreyfuss movies..)
15)All The President's Men
16)The Godfather
17)Love Me or Leave Me
18)The Magnificent Seven
19)The Conversation
20)Bonnie and Clyde
(I'm a Gene Hackman fan, too)
21)Die Hard
22) Aliens 2
23)My Life As A Dog
24)La Cage Aux Folles
25)National Lampoon's Vacation
26)Fast Times At Ridgemont High
27)Papillon
28)The Graduate
29)Silence of the Lambs
30)The Shining


Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: garyd on December 13, 2007, 11:07:56 AM
I have been avoiding this one.  It is too damn difficult.  Then I was sitting on the tarmac the other day FOREVER and decided to use the following criteria.
1. Have I already seen it at least twice AND
2. Given the opportunity would I give up sex to watch it again this evening.

The subsequent list was VERY short.  So I revised criteria to:
1. Have I already seen it at least twice AND
2. Given the opportunity would I watch it again this evening.  (BBM and FACE OFF did not make the list based on this criteria).

Chinatown
Rear Window
All About Eve
Gone With the Wind
To Catch a Thief
The Third Man
Citizen Kane ( I know, I know but I really do like it)
The Godfather (one and two or the combo or whatever)
High Society
High Noon
Star Wars (whatever the first one is now called)
Wizard of Oz
Lion In Winter
E.T.
The Graduate
Rebecca
A Streetcar Named Desire
Chicago
Philadelphia Story
Bull Durham
Close Encounters of the Third Kind
The Way We Were
Casablanca
Lawrence of Arabia
Meet Me in St.Louis
Nashville
Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Much Ado About Nothing
Moonstruck
The Last Picture Show
Everyone Says I Love You

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Adrian on December 13, 2007, 12:13:15 PM
K, I wanna do that as well - movies I have seen more than once (35 of them) that I'd watch again...and again...;

All the "Star Wars" films
Raiders of the Lost Ark
Grease
Breakfast At Tiffany's
Psycho (the new one and the original)
The Exorcist (revised one and the original)
Brokeback Mountain
National Treasure
Day After Tomorrow
Titanic
Alien 1 & 2
Home Alone 1 & 2
Pitch Black
Adventures in Babysitting
Halloween
A Nightmare on Elm Street
Scream 1 & 2
Twister
E.T.
The Mummy
The Mummy Returns
Casino Royale
The Bourne Identity, Supremacy, Ultimatum
The Talented Mr. Ripley
Jurassic Park 1 & 2
Fatal Attraction
Forrest Gump
Philadelphia
It's My Party
Top Gun
All About Eve
Jaws
Silence of the Lambs
Die Hard
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: CANSTANDIT on December 13, 2007, 03:53:01 PM
Chinatown
Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf

gary, I totally forgot those..those are two of my faves, as well!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: CANSTANDIT on December 13, 2007, 03:53:51 PM
Adrian,
You reminded me of Jurassik Park, too. Loved that. The book is great, too.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: garyd on December 13, 2007, 04:46:00 PM
THE BIG CHILL

lord yes, that certainly meets my criteria.  Seen it several times and would do so again.
All those self absorbed beautiful people,
that soundtrack,
dialog: "do bears jack off in the woods?"
Glenn Close shower scene,
yup, I 'm there.

"Xanadu"? well, I think that may be an acquired taste  8)  However, we saw the stage musical version a few weeks ago and I'll be damned if it isn't a true hoot.  Just shows to go ya.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Rosewood on December 13, 2007, 05:10:09 PM

So many films.
So many memories.

Some films I've seen over and over again and will continue
to watch over and over and over again until the end of time:
Not so much GREAT films (though some of them are)
but films that, for whatever reason speak to me.

BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN, of course.
Though this is a great film in a class of its own, so really I think
of it as separate from all the others.

Jean Cocteau's BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (In French with subtitles, no dubbed-in
mishmash for me.)
THE BLACK STALLION
ROOM WITH A VIEW
THE LAST OF THE MOHICANS
ANGELS AND INSECTS
DIVA (Only in French with subtitles.)
The three BOURNE films: Identitiy, Supremacy and Ultimatum.
CASINO ROYALE
EVIL UNDER THE SUN (The one with Peter Ustinov)
Hitchcock's THE LADY VANISHES
Hitchcock's THE THIRTY NINE STEPS
ARSENIC AND OLD LACE
IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT
BRINGING UP BABY
Val Lewton's CAT PEOPLE
THE GAY DIVORCEE
SON OF FRANKENSTEIN (In fact, anything with Basil Rathbone)
ABOVE SUSPICION (With Fred MacMurray, Joan Crawford AND Basil as the evil Nazi)
SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE VOICE OF DOOM
CAPTAIN BLOOD
KING SOLOMON'S MINES (The original with Stewart Granger.)
THE PIRATE (My favorite Judy Garland/Gene Kelly film.)
EAST OF EDEN
WITHOUT A CLUE
THE FUGITIVE
AIR FORCE ONE
THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER
ENEMY OF THE STATE
STAR WARS (Only the first three.)
STAR TREK (The one with the whales.)
WAR OF THE WORLDS (The original with Gene Barry)
JURASSIC PARK
THE THING (The b/w original)
CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON
E.T.
MASTER AND COMMANDER
PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN
DAY AFTER TOMORROW
MOONSTRUCK
LAWRENCE OF ARABIA
MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING (The one with Denzel and Emma Thompson and Branagh and the
rest of 'em.) LOVE, LOVE, LOVE the opening sequence!
THE BIG COUNTRY
MAGNIFICENT SEVEN
SUPERMAN (The first one.)
PETER PAN
TOY STORY II
HOUSE OF FLYING DAGGERS

All I can think of (with prompting from some of you guys), at the moment.

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: garyd on December 13, 2007, 05:11:29 PM
Chinatown
Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf

gary, I totally forgot those..those are two of my faves, as well!
I know Jo, Chinatown, close to my all time favorite.  All that
mythological 1930's LA basin atmosphere.
The score with that horn.
AND
"Come on, Jake, it's Chinatown".   Shivers

And of course, good old George and Martha.  Who and how in the world pulled that performance out of Elizabeth Taylor?
However, I never saw the original stage production and all of the subsequent ones have been pretty much a copy of Nichols interpretation in the film but
if you ever get a chance to see the revival stage version (I don't know if it was filmed or not) with Kathleen Turner and Bill Irwin, don't hesitate to see it. 
It brings out all the great humor that Albee says he always intended instead of just an all night drunken slug fest.  Turner's "if you actually existed, I'd divorce you" brings down the house.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: garyd on December 13, 2007, 05:15:32 PM
I know, Rosie, the opening to Much Ado is in and of itself, worth the price of admission.  AND the final sequence makes you
just want to climb in a big feather bed and make love all day long.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Rosewood on December 13, 2007, 05:36:31 PM
I know, Rosie, the opening to Much Ado is in and of itself, worth the price of admission.  AND the final sequence makes you
just want to climb in a big feather bed and make love all day long.

That line from VIRGINIA WOOLF was echoed in another film and damn if I can remember
which one. The wife says to the husband: If you were a man I'd divorce you.
Oh, got it. EVIL UNDER THE SUN.
Sylvia Miles to James Mason.
You have to see Miles to appreciate her in this one.
She is hideously wonderful.

Yes, the opening of MUCH ADO is SPECTACULAR!!!
I mean it just gives me goose-bumps.
This is when film is at its absolute best, when it makes you want to
jump into the frame and join the characters and you grieve because you can't.
 I watch it over and over sometimes, when I'm in a mood. ;D
The ending, too, is as you say, Gary.
Gorgeous.

This is my very favorite Shakespeare fillm besides, I think, Henry V (?) one of the Henrys.
The "We few, we happy few..." one. I LOVE THAT SPEECH!!!!
Kenneth Branagh is perfection. And Emma Thompson doing a turn as a French princess with
a GORGEOUS accent. Who knew? I should have added this to the list.

Oh, and NOTTING HILL.



Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: garyd on December 13, 2007, 05:58:59 PM
Sylvia Miles, god bless her.  Forgot she was in EUTS.  (Let's all move to Mallorca ...I may be late, trouble with my piffle valve) 
Remember her in "Midnight Cowboy"?  Now there is a performance.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Rosewood on December 13, 2007, 06:17:29 PM
Sylvia Miles, god bless her.  Forgot she was in EUTS.  (Let's all move to Mallorca ...I may be late, trouble with my piffle valve) 
Remember her in "Midnight Cowboy"?  Now there is a performance.

Gary, don't you wish, don't you just wish that a place like that ACTUALLY existed?
The castle on the island in the film, I mean.
And Maggie Smith the proprietor, armfuls of plastic bracelets and all. :D
Given to her by a minor king to keep her quiet about his peccadillos. HA!
And the wonderful Gershwin soundtrack!!
Remember the beach track shot near the begining - an expressionist
painting come to life. Peter Ustinov played Poirot almost like a buffoon, but I always forgave him.

Sad to say, I've never seen MIDNIGHT COWBOY. I always mean to rent it, but somehow,
I never have.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: CANSTANDIT on December 13, 2007, 09:34:39 PM
Chinatown
Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf

gary, I totally forgot those..those are two of my faves, as well!
I know Jo, Chinatown, close to my all time favorite.  All that
mythological 1930's LA basin atmosphere.
The score with that horn.
AND
"Come on, Jake, it's Chinatown".   Shivers

And of course, good old George and Martha.  Who and how in the world pulled that performance out of Elizabeth Taylor?
However, I never saw the original stage production and all of the subsequent ones have been pretty much a copy of Nichols interpretation in the film but
if you ever get a chance to see the revival stage version (I don't know if it was filmed or not) with Kathleen Turner and Bill Irwin, don't hesitate to see it. 
It brings out all the great humor that Albee says he always intended instead of just an all night drunken slug fest.  Turner's "if you actually existed, I'd divorce you" brings down the house.


George:
"...the apple of our three eyes, Martha being a cyclops." Richard Burton had a way with a line.....I never had a chance to see it on stage-maybe someday. And don't you either love or hate Sandy Dennis's infernal whine??
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Flyboy on December 13, 2007, 09:40:42 PM
THE BIG CHILL

lord yes, that certainly meets my criteria.  Seen it several times and would do so again.
All those self absorbed beautiful people,
that soundtrack,
dialog: "do bears jack off in the woods?"
Glenn Close shower scene,
yup, I 'm there.

"Xanadu"? well, I think that may be an acquired taste  8)  However, we saw the stage musical version a few weeks ago and I'll be damned if it isn't a true hoot.  Just shows to go ya.
I agree, The Big Chill, I still don't quite know why I'm addicted to that film, maybe just the perfect ensemble cast, right chemistry between all of them? Don't know, usually I cannot stand Jeff Goldblum, but even he was tolerable in that film, Meg Tilly didn't really 'fit' with the rest of the cast, but somehow she made that role work........Mary Kay Place and Jobeth Williams, LOVE those women, IMHO they are two of the most under used and appreciated Actors in the business...............
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Adrian on December 13, 2007, 09:47:09 PM
OK, I have no idea about all of these people you guys are talking about, so, I'd like to   ;D

Sylvia Miles?  Jobeth Willams?  MaryKay (not as in cosmetics right?), Sandy Dennis?  Richard Burton?  Indulge me.   :D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Flyboy on December 13, 2007, 10:00:36 PM
OK, I have no idea about all of these people you guys are talking about, so, I'd like to   ;D

Sylvia Miles?  Jobeth Willams?  MaryKay (not as in cosmetics right?), Sandy Dennis?  Richard Burton?  Indulge me.   :D
Good grief! Me trying to 'educate' a soon-to-be Doctor? LOL........ ::) ;D
Okay, here's my best shot, (and I am sooooo enjoying this!)
Sylvia Myles = Two Mules for Sister Sarah
Jobeth Williams = the Mother of CarrolAnn in Poltergiest
Mary Kay Place = The Big Chill, also a great Stage Actress
Sandy Dennis = Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf
Richard Burton = drunkard, 2 time Hubby of Liz Taylor, also in WAoVW.....

Does that help you at all???  ;D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: afhickman on December 13, 2007, 11:34:29 PM
Sylvia Miles in "Two Mules"?  You're not thinking of "The Great Scout and Cathouse Thursday" by any chance?  She was also great in "Funhouse" and "Evil Under the Sun."
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: CANSTANDIT on December 14, 2007, 08:53:56 AM
Oh, I forgot about Sylvia Miles-what a great actress.


I see Dave mentioned The Grifters- a hard movie to watch, and amazingly well-acted. Its one of the few films I can stand Anjelica Houston in....

Can't forget the great Body Heat, either-'You're not too bright; I like that in a man.' (Kathleen Turner)

I keep coming up with films; it just never ends.

Thinking about James Cagney:

Foolight Parade-great old Cagney/Keeler flick, great dancing;
Torrid Zone-some great one-liners between Cagney, Pat O'Brien and Ann Sheridan-another one ahead of her time;
Roaring Twenties-a gangster heart-breaker, with Cagney, Bogart and Prisicalla Lane
City for Conquest-another Cagney/Sheridan flick-you're gonna cry, I'm telling ya
One, Two, Three-a farcical early 60's number, directed by Billy Wilder-some really funny moments.
Man of A Thousand Faces-sad back story about Lon Chaney and his wife
Ragtime-good for Cagney's late career cameos; he still had 'it'.

I share the same birthday with the late great Mr. Cagney, so he also holds a soft spot in my heart-not to mention he was an Irish New Yorker, like moi. :D :D ;D

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Rosewood on December 14, 2007, 11:00:35 AM
OK, I have no idea about all of these people you guys are talking about, so, I'd like to   ;D

Sylvia Miles?  Jobeth Willams?  MaryKay (not as in cosmetics right?), Sandy Dennis?  Richard Burton?  Indulge me.   :D
Good grief! Me trying to 'educate' a soon-to-be Doctor? LOL........ ::) ;D
Okay, here's my best shot, (and I am sooooo enjoying this!)
Sylvia Myles = Two Mules for Sister Sarah
Jobeth Williams = the Mother of CarrolAnn in Poltergiest
Mary Kay Place = The Big Chill, also a great Stage Actress
Sandy Dennis = Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf
Richard Burton = drunkard, 2 time Hubby of Liz Taylor, also in WAoVW.....

Does that help you at all???  ;D


Sylvia Miles:
MIDNIGHT COWBOY, EVIL UNDER THE SUN, also
an art and fashion fixture on the NY scene for many years,
something to do with Andy Warhol's mob as well.

Jobeth Williams:
Fabulous (!) in AMERICAN DREAMER as well as other films.

Mary Kay Place:
Still working, you see her occasionally in TV, she was also,
to my mind essential in that old series on tv with the two names - anyone remember?
Mary something or other!, Mary something or other! Quite groundbreaking in its time.
Remember '...condos for Christ'? It starred an actress who was with Woody Allen
at the time. Was it? - MARY HARTMAN!, MARY HARTMAN!....something like that
Or is that the woman from Entertainment Tonight?
I'm foundering here...What was the name of that damned show??
It was shot on tape.

Sandy Dennis:
Starred in an iconic gay film, THE FOX.
Also great stage actress. Made many films in the 70's and, I think, into the
80's. Passed away a few years ago.

Richard Burton:
One of the greatest stage actors of his generation. Sometimes considered to have
sold out for a big (though mediocre) screen career. Starred in the infamous CLEOPATRA
with Liz Taylor. Wonderful in THE ROBE with Jean Simmons. Also in THE SPY WHO CAME
IN FROM THE COLD, if I remember correctly. Many other films as well.

I was lucky enough to meet him in the mid-sixties for an unforgettable few moments.
And I can tell you that unique voice of his was just as spendid in real life as it was on film.
I was especially priviledged to see him on stage in HAMLET. Amazing, unforgettable
performance. This guy could have been a MAJOR super star, but, in my opinion,
drink and fame eroded his talents.

Richard Burton (actually, Sir Richard Francis Burton) was also the name of a famed 19th century
explorer who traveled far and wide through India and Africa (traverersed the Nile with Speke)
and other exotic lands. He was the first white man to travel to Mecca undetected.
(An offense punishable by instant death.)
An enigmatic man who always seemed to be absorbed into the cultures he explored.
He also, if I'm not mistaken, was the first to translate the tales of the Arabian Nights.
A fascinating man, quite independent of the actor Richard Burton.
Just thought I'd mention him as well. ;D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Nikki on December 14, 2007, 11:16:31 AM


I've seen and loved many of the films you guys listed here -- won't repeat them all!!  BUT --- is it me, or did no one list Casablanca -- one of my all time favorites; I could watch over and over -- and have done.  Oh yeah, Dracula (with Bela as the count -- "no thanik you, I do not drink wine!"), and The Wolfman (Lon Chaney,Jr.).
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: garyd on December 14, 2007, 12:12:28 PM


I've seen and loved many of the films you guys listed here -- won't repeat them all!!  BUT --- is it me, or did no one list Casablanca -- one of my all time favorites; I could watch over and over -- and have done.  Oh yeah, Dracula (with Bela as the count -- "no thanik you, I do not drink wine!"), and The Wolfman (Lon Chaney,Jr.).

No, take another look, I think "Casablanca" is on just about everybody's list.  Almost impossible not to include it, such a classic love story, AND even most guys will admit to liking it. 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: garyd on December 14, 2007, 12:37:06 PM
OK, I have no idea about all of these people you guys are talking about, so, I'd like to   ;D

Sylvia Miles?  Jobeth Willams?  MaryKay (not as in cosmetics right?), Sandy Dennis?  Richard Burton?  Indulge me.   :D

Adrian, Adrian, Adrian....my niece, also a medical student, is in the same boat.  She is interning or residenting , or whatever it is called these days, just outside of New York and whenever I am there she insists we get together for dinner and  movie or a play.   Great fun for both of us. My youngest son, the computer engineer, was subjected to all of this his entire life and claims that he may be the only guy in his development group that can even spell Sondheim much less be able to discuss most of his work. 
My point is, it seems so many people these days are so caught up in their very demanding education that there is no time for literature, film, theatre, music.  I can certainly understand why.  Medicine, engineering, finance...they require such intense, all encompassing attention that there is little time for anything else.
Anyway, aren't you on the East Coast.?  Perhaps you would like to join us sometime.

Rent the DVD of a movie entitled "Sweet November"  It has been re-made recently.  Don't get the remake.  Get the original.  It stars Sandy Dennis.  She is great though some found her mannerisms annoying.  Sylvia Miles....rent "Midnight Cowboy"..  Richard Burton..."Virginia Woolf" (Sandy Dennis is in it also and at her very best)   "Beckett",, "Ann of A Thousand Days", "The Sandpiper"(which is the one he made to pay for one of Taylors' diamonds) and for a real hoot, find the original Broadway cast recording of "Camelot".  He plays King Arthur. 
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: CANSTANDIT on December 14, 2007, 01:35:09 PM
Sandy D is also excellent in Up the Down Staircase; for some fluff see Richard Burton in Exorcist II: The Heretic. Dig the ka-zu-zu!!

 ;D ;D ;D

and for Sandy at her comic best, try The Out of Towners with Jack Lemmon-between the two of them, you'll be laughing ALOT.
Its a classic New York against the visitors flick.....

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Nikki on December 14, 2007, 02:04:32 PM


I've seen and loved many of the films you guys listed here -- won't repeat them all!!  BUT --- is it me, or did no one list Casablanca -- one of my all time favorites; I could watch over and over -- and have done.  Oh yeah, Dracula (with Bela as the count -- "no thanik you, I do not drink wine!"), and The Wolfman (Lon Chaney,Jr.).

No, take another look, I think "Casablanca" is on just about everybody's list.  Almost impossible not to include it, such a classic love story, AND even most guys will admit to liking it. 

OK thanks -- must have overlooked it in my haste!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Rosewood on December 14, 2007, 02:20:37 PM


I've seen and loved many of the films you guys listed here -- won't repeat them all!!  BUT --- is it me, or did no one list Casablanca -- one of my all time favorites; I could watch over and over -- and have done.  Oh yeah, Dracula (with Bela as the count -- "no thanik you, I do not drink wine!"), and The Wolfman (Lon Chaney,Jr.).

No, take another look, I think "Casablanca" is on just about everybody's list.  Almost impossible not to include it, such a classic love story, AND even most guys will admit to liking it. 

OK thanks -- must have overlooked it in my haste!

I am a heretic.
Having seen CASABLANCA over and over in my earlier years, I somehow seem to have been weaned of
the need to see it again. Possibly because I am not neither the world's biggest Bogart or Bergman fan.
And Paul Henreid always gave me the utter creeps.

I did LOVE Bergman in the Hitchcock film she made with Cary Grant. The one in which she infiltrates a family
of Nazi sympathizers in South America. The ending is unbearable for its tension. (Forgot the title.)

My favorite Bogart film is the almost impossible to locate: ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Nikki on December 14, 2007, 03:48:45 PM


I've seen and loved many of the films you guys listed here -- won't repeat them all!!  BUT --- is it me, or did no one list Casablanca -- one of my all time favorites; I could watch over and over -- and have done.  Oh yeah, Dracula (with Bela as the count -- "no thanik you, I do not drink wine!"), and The Wolfman (Lon Chaney,Jr.).

No, take another look, I think "Casablanca" is on just about everybody's list.  Almost impossible not to include it, such a classic love story, AND even most guys will admit to liking it. 

OK thanks -- must have overlooked it in my haste!

I am a heretic.
Having seen CASABLANCA over and over in my earlier years, I somehow seem to have been weaned of
the need to see it again. Possibly because I am not neither the world's biggest Bogart or Bergman fan.
And Paul Henreid always gave me the utter creeps.

I did LOVE Bergman in the Hitchcock film she made with Cary Grant. The one in which she infiltrates a family
of Nazi sympathizers in South America. The ending is unbearable for its tension. (Forgot the title.)

My favorite Bogart film is the almost impossible to locate: ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT.

Oh Rosewood, I loved Paul Henreid -- especially in 'Now, Voyager' --  remember when he lit the two cigarettes?  -- forgot to mention that as favorite film!

The Nazi film with Bergman/Grant was 'Notorious' -- great kiss between Grant/Bergman - loved it!

That's why I didin't post on here -- too many favorites!

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: garyd on December 14, 2007, 06:02:33 PM


I've seen and loved many of the films you guys listed here -- won't repeat them all!!  BUT --- is it me, or did no one list Casablanca -- one of my all time favorites; I could watch over and over -- and have done.  Oh yeah, Dracula (with Bela as the count -- "no thanik you, I do not drink wine!"), and The Wolfman (Lon Chaney,Jr.).

No, take another look, I think "Casablanca" is on just about everybody's list.  Almost impossible not to include it, such a classic love story, AND even most guys will admit to liking it. 

OK thanks -- must have overlooked it in my haste!

I am a heretic.
Having seen CASABLANCA over and over in my earlier years, I somehow seem to have been weaned of
the need to see it again. Possibly because I am not neither the world's biggest Bogart or Bergman fan.
And Paul Henreid always gave me the utter creeps.

I did LOVE Bergman in the Hitchcock film she made with Cary Grant. The one in which she infiltrates a family
of Nazi sympathizers in South America. The ending is unbearable for its tension. (Forgot the title.)

My favorite Bogart film is the almost impossible to locate: ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT.

I think you are thinking of "Notorious".
I can still watch  "Casablanca" just for the atmosphere perhaps.
I always had trouble with the timeline.  Anyone else?
Just how long has Rick been in Casablanca when Ingrid shows up?
Long enuf to open the nightclub and establish himself prety well.
But where have Ingrid and creepy PH been since the fall of Paris?   
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: oilgun on December 14, 2007, 06:20:38 PM
Sandy D is also excellent in Up the Down Staircase; for some fluff see Richard Burton in Exorcist II: The Heretic. Dig the ka-zu-zu!!

 ;D ;D ;D

and for Sandy at her comic best, try The Out of Towners with Jack Lemmon-between the two of them, you'll be laughing ALOT.
Its a classic New York against the visitors flick.....



I LOVED Sandy Dennis in Come Back to the Five & Dime Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean!  What a glorious camp fest that movie is:  Cher, Karen Black, Sandy D with all her wonderfully bizarre tics and muh-muh-muh-mannerisms, Kathy Bates in western gear!  And James Dean's love child!  I can't believe I don't own a copy!

(http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w197/oilgun/JimmyDean.jpg)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: daannzzz on December 15, 2007, 09:14:33 AM
Sandy D is also excellent in Up the Down Staircase; for some fluff see Richard Burton in Exorcist II: The Heretic. Dig the ka-zu-zu!!

 ;D ;D ;D

and for Sandy at her comic best, try The Out of Towners with Jack Lemmon-between the two of them, you'll be laughing ALOT.
Its a classic New York against the visitors flick.....





I LOVED Sandy Dennis in Come Back to the Five & Dime Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean!  What a glorious camp fest that movie is:  Cher, Karen Black, Sandy D with all her wonderfully bizarre tics and muh-muh-muh-mannerisms, Kathy Bates in western gear!  And James Dean's love child!  I can't believe I don't own a copy!

(http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w197/oilgun/JimmyDean.jpg)

I have seen this a few times and really loved it. Have watched it with a ocuple different people who hated it, i think mainly because it is all talk and now action. :(  The performances are all excellent and being as dense as I am I had no idea what was coming!  Sudi Bond was wonderful.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: graylockV on December 16, 2007, 04:48:17 PM
I love Ingrid Bergman. 

Remember her in Gaslight - the one where Charles Boyer plays her husband who tries to drive her nuts?  (And take note of a very young Angela Lansbury as the maid with the cockney accent.)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: CANSTANDIT on January 04, 2008, 08:28:39 PM
I just rememberd Kiss of the Spider Woman.....what an ending! Two beautiful actors doing so tenderly what it took another 20 or so years for Heath and Jack to do on screen.....did we all just forget about this movie? I can still remember seeing it with my sis and the two of us in tears at the end.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Rosewood on January 05, 2008, 02:04:57 PM
Oh yes, CSI, KISS OF THE SPIDER WOMAN.
I saw it in theater with my ex (when he wasn't my ex), and even he had to admit
it was a great film. I miss Raoul Julia.

Wanted to add BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES and LAURA to the mix.
The only two films in which Dana Andrews doesn't make me gag.
Though Clifton Webb in LAURA, is laughable as any kind of possible beau to
the beautifully icy Gene Tierney. For that matter, so is Vincent Price equally laughable in
the rejected fiance role. It's funny because Dana Andrews is so obviously meant
to be the only Real Man in the film and it is implied that this is only because he is not
an intellectual and he might, actually, sweat. Funny.
Still, it is a great film.

Also don't know if I mentioned CAT PEOPLE earlier. I mean, I could watch this over
and over and over again and it still gives me the creeps. And most of it is only IMPLIED
creeps. So much of Val Lewton's film is done with shadow and sound and innuendo.
GREAT film making.

The scene in the cafe where the woman with the wide set eyes
talks in a foreign language to the 'heroine'. The woman, never seen again in this film,
is SO cat like. WITHOUT makeup. Just the natural configuration of her face.
The mystery of the unfamiliar language.
The sad menace and recognition in her eyes.
So freakin' brilliant.

Then the scene at the swimming pool.
Honestly. We see LITTLE but we FEEL everything.

The frantic scene in the park just before the bus shows up in the knick of time.

Great, GREAT film-making!



Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: CANSTANDIT on January 05, 2008, 08:36:23 PM
'The only two films in which Dana Andrews doesn't make me gag.' ;D


I agree, he is quite the irrant most of the time...


Cat People-been a long time...I remember mostly shadows and light, for some reason...

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Adrian on January 06, 2008, 03:45:21 PM
New poll for favorite movie from 2000-2007 is now active - go and let your vote count!

http://www.davecullen.com/forum/index.php?topic=23279.msg1129493#msg1129493
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: afhickman on January 09, 2008, 07:50:12 AM
Dana Andrews is also good in The Ox-Bow Incident and My Foolish Heart (with Susan Hayward).  I also like Fritz Lang's While the City Sleeps--what a supporting cast!  George Saunders, Vincent Price, Ida Lupino, Mae Marsh, and John Drew Barrymore, to name a few.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Rosewood on January 09, 2008, 02:00:37 PM
Dana Andrews is also good in The Ox-Bow Incident and My Foolish Heart (with Susan Hayward).  I also like Fritz Lang's While the City Sleeps--what a supporting cast!  George Saunders, Vincent Price, Ida Lupino, Mae Marsh, and John Drew Barrymore, to name a few.

Ah, yes, THE OXBOW INCIDENT.
Even now, I can't watch this without wanting to run out in the street and blow
something up. HA! Haven't seen it in years precisely because of the visceral nature of my
reaction. It is just such a heartbreakingly cruel film.






Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Adrian on January 10, 2008, 03:57:48 PM
Results from the movie poll are located in FanFair - The Forums favorite movies of all time;

http://www.davecullen.com/forum/index.php?topic=23279.msg1134623#msg1134623

A new poll is now up - vote for your favorite Hollywood pairings, on/offscreen of all time;

http://www.davecullen.com/forum/index.php?topic=23279.msg1134723#msg1134723
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Marz on February 16, 2008, 07:43:46 AM
not including BBM my fave films of all time are

Mary Poppins
all the 'pirates' films
clueless
the breakfast club
who framed roger rabbit
romy and michelles high school reunion
a knights tale
legally blonde 1 and 2
cruel intentions
Donnie Darko
my best friends wedding


thats all i can think of at the mo
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: BookJunkie on March 12, 2008, 01:53:14 PM
Brokeback Mountain
Before Sunrise / Before Sunset
The Big Lebowski
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: CellarDweller115 on October 27, 2011, 06:41:45 PM
Well, since it's October, and a few days before Halloween, I'm going to jumpstart this thread with some of my favorite scary movies.

Halloween

Night Of the Living Dead

The Others

The Changling

Exorcist

Shining

Carrie

'Salem's Lot
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on October 27, 2011, 06:46:24 PM
AMPAS is having a screening of THE EXORCIST on November 9th to
celebrate one of this year's Governor's Award nominees, Dick Smith,
who did the make-up for that film.

They're also having a screening of one of my favorite films:

Academy to Celebrate 40th Anniversary of "The Last Picture Show"

http://www.oscars.org/press/pressreleases/2011/20111027.html
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: brokebacktom on October 28, 2011, 08:36:43 AM
Well, since it's October, and a few days before Halloween, I'm going to jumpstart this thread with some of my favorite scary movies.


Mine are

Halloween
Exorcist
'Salem's Lot (TV Version)
Let the right one in (Swedish Version)
Devil's Backbone (Spain)
Carrie
The Thing (1982 version)
Alien/Aliens
Night of the Living Dead

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Marz on October 28, 2011, 03:19:31 PM


Scream
Scream 2
Scream 4
Hocus Pocus (Dead man's toe Dead Mans toe)
The Lost Boys
The Others
Sleepy Hollow
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Nikki on October 28, 2011, 05:08:41 PM

'Salem's Lot
Dracula
The Omen -- the first one
Nosferatu
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: oilgun on October 29, 2011, 10:50:05 AM
(http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w197/oilgun/ABC%20Movies/burnt_offerings-01.jpg)

In no particular order:

Rosemary's Baby (1968)
Burnt Offerings (1976, pictured)
The Sentinel (1977)
30 Days of Night (2007)
The Shining (1980)
The Cave (2005)
The Exorcist (1973)
Alien (1979)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: CellarDweller115 on October 29, 2011, 02:20:33 PM
Oh yeah, Burnt Offerings is creepy!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: oilgun on October 29, 2011, 03:20:03 PM
Oh yeah, Burnt Offerings is creepy!


And it stars the fabulous Karen Black!

(http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w197/oilgun/People/burnt-offerings-02.jpg)

That brief scene with the smiling chauffeur gave me nightmares.  The twisted part is that it also kind of turned me on sexually.  :-\
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: gnash on January 18, 2012, 04:55:23 AM
LOL. i haven't been on this thread since feb of 2007, and when i check it out, it's karen black.

now i know it's gonna be a wonderful day.

haven't seen burnt offerings... yet. :D


one of my all time favorite films, at least from childhood, is chitty chitty bang bang. the chauffer from burnt offerings reminds me of the creepy toymaker in chitty chitty that lured the children to their doom.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: CellarDweller115 on March 25, 2012, 03:17:39 PM
Ok, we've all heard "Christmas in July", so how about Halloween in March?

Linda (KillersMom) shared with me a link to a website that counted down the 50 Scariest Movies of all time.  I will link to the site at the end of the post, but here are the entries.  Just so you know, if you visit the site, it doesn't give the list on one page, each movie gets its own page, so you click through each page to advance on.

Do you agree with what's on the list?  Do you disagree with the placements?  Are there movies you feel should be on?


50. Silent Night, Bloody Night (1974)

Memorable quote: “I have wandered in bitterness until all seasons have become as one. And that is a season of vengeance.”

Scare factor: The movie that birthed the modern slasher flick. This forgotten classic - which takes place in Arlington, of all places - features the creepy atmosphere, disturbing backstory, and out-of-the shadows violence that have become staples of the slasher films of the '80s and '90s. Some mansions are best left deserted.


49. Fire in the Sky (1993)

Memorable quote: “Get back in the truck, Travis!”

Scare factor: One of the most realistic alien abduction scenes (if you believe in that sort of thing) ever put to film. While pop culture pokes fun at alien “probes,” you won’t be laughing during this one. Instead, you may just be giving a second glance to that blinking star in the sky or that slow-moving airplane. Is that an airplane?


48. When a Stranger Calls (1979)

Memorable quote: “Have you checked the children?”

Scare factor: This slow-moving thriller is sure to be scariest to babysitters. It will send chills down the spine of anyone who has put the kids to sleep and waited anxiously for mom and dad to return with your $20. You may need to spend it on therapy.


47. The Amityville Horror (1979)

Memorable quote: “Get out - get out!”

Scare factor: This movie uses a staple of effective scares: based on “true events.” Whether or not you believe the Lutz family’s account of what happened in the Long Island manse, it's hard not to jump at the bumps in the night. The lesson here: Never move into a house where a murder occurred. We know, seems like common sense.


46. Dawn of the Dead (2004)

Memorable quote: “I know that there are some things worse than death. And one of them is sitting here waiting to die.”

Scare factor: Some of the scariest scenes come in the opening moments of the film, when a zombie outbreak is just beginning to spread, and a little girl — well, we won’t spoil it for you. While the film is technically a remake of George Romero’s 1978 zombie epic, it’s different enough to be enjoyed as an original.


45. The Mothman Prophecies (2002)

Memorable quote: “Are they trying to warn me?”

Scare factor: It’s bad enough when you start getting predictions of doom from a strange-sounding, shadowy figure who looks like he could be one of Satan’s minions. It’s worse when those predictions start coming true. Let’s not even mention the fact that this movie is based on a book chronicling supposedly true events from the late '60s. What horrible prophecies will come next? Here’s one: you, frightened.


44. Evil Dead II (1987)

Memorable quote: “That’s right... who’s laughing now? Who’s laughing now?!”

Scare factor: This is the movie that made Bruce Campbell a B-movie icon and won Sam Raimi a whole lot more directing gigs. This films has equal parts humor and gore, but when the frights happen, they happen on a grand scale. Ever wondered what it would be like to fight your own hand? You won't have to wonder anymore after watching this movie.


43. Paranormal Activity (2007)

Memorable quote: “I feel it. I feel it breathing on me.”

Scare factor: This low-budget, single-camera movie, shot in the first-person style popularized by "The Blair Witch Project," is simple and effective. It eschews story and visual effects for the slow build, and unlike so many similar films, all that building tension really pays off.


42. The People Under the Stairs (1991)

Memorable quote: “She’s been feeding that thing between the walls again.”

Scare factor: If, for some reason, you have ever been inclined to burglarize someone’s house, this movie should serve as a proper deterrent. While there are a few light moments in this Wes Craven classic, the scares still satisfy. An insane couple and a seemingly inescapable house drive the thrills. The movie also features the effective use of a “gimp suit” a la "Pulp Fiction."


41. Session 9 (2001)

Memorable quote: “I live in the weak and the wounded.”

Scare factor: An old abandoned mental hospital (hello, Danvers!) provides the creepy location, as strange things start happening - and people start disappearing - when an asbestos removal crew starts taking apart the floors and ceilings. Scary scene of note: One worker trying to outrun the lights in a long tunnel as the generator powers down. Plus, the film employs the best use of an ice pick this side of "Basic Instinct."


40. A Tale of Two Sisters (2003)

Memorable quote: “That woman is strange. And so is this house.”

Scare factor: This Korean chiller follows a family with an unexplained past and a ghost that seems to pop up and scare the stuffing out of everyone watching. The odd behavior of some of the characters, and silent and shameful expressions on others, make you wonder if you’re getting the whole story. In one scene, your mind may be turned into a pretzel trying to follow along. Just go with it.


39. Suspiria (1977)

Memorable quote: “Bad luck isn’t brought by broken mirrors, but by broken minds.”

Scare factor: It’s a stylish, sometimes gory movie from Italy’s Dario Argento, and a most unlikely location for a horror film: a ballet school in Germany. The frights come in waves and start as an unassuming student slowly learns who is actually running the school — and what their motivations are. For those squeamish around bugs, there’s a scene involving maggots falling from the ceiling that will have your skin crawling.


38. Signs (2002)

Memorable quote: “Swing away, Merrill.”

Scare factor: "Night of the Living Dead" meets "War of the Worlds." While not all of the scares here are what you’d call original, they are incredibly effective. The rural setting and slow build up to the reveal of the bad guys really make the finale pay off. Yes, there are some scientifically curious things going on that defy explanation, but who’s got time to be rational when you’re hiding your eyes behind a couch pillow?


37. The Beyond (1981)

Memorable quote: “Woe be unto him who opens one of the seven gateways to hell, because through that gateway, evil -- evil will invade the world.”

Scare factor: Aside from the fact that Italian goremeister Lucio Fulci likes to push the envelope with his violent scenes, he masterfully builds in the waiting -- the suspense before the prolonged periods of over-the-top bloodshed -- that makes those payoffs so cringe-worthy (in a good way). This movie should also make any owner of a turn-of-the-century fixer-upper think twice before undertaking a major renovation.


36. Cujo (1983)

Memorable quote: “Don’t worry ‘bout it m’aam, Cujo won’t hurt him.”

Scare factor: Rabies, rabies, rabies. This ain’t "Old Yeller" we’re talking about here. Anyone who has even a slight fear of dogs will not want to watch this one alone. This film, based on a Stephen King book, makes a compelling argument for tighter leash laws.


35. The Crazies (2010)

Memorable quote: “I’m not right, am I?”

Scare factor: This is one of many recent remakes of '70s and '80s horror movies, but one of the few to actually improve on its predecessor. This remake of the George Romero’s 1973 original will make you fear your neighbors, distrust the government, and question whether your water supply is contaminated. Oh, and there’s a scene in a car wash that will get your heart racing.


34. The Omen (1976)

Memorable quote: “Look at me, Damien! It’s all for you!”

Scare factor: Forget all the stories about bad luck befalling the cast and crew during the movie’s production: this Gregory Peck-helmed thriller is scary enough as merely a film. Remember: Never secretly adopt someone else’s child without meeting the kid’s parents first — or at least seeing a picture. If creepy children scare you, then young Damien will be sure to burrow a hole in your brain and come out in your nightmares. Oh, and by the way, if decapitation scenes get your blood pumping, this one has one of the all-time greatest.


33. The Hills Have Eyes (2006)

Memorable quote: “Mister, will you play with us?“

Scare factor: This remake of the horror classic actually packs in a few more scares — and a lot more gore. It doesn’t hurt that the makeup department spared no expense to make the bad guys as revolting as possible (no offense to Michael Berryman). And there are just enough disturbing scenes to make you never, ever look for off-the-highway shortcuts when traveling through the deserts of the western United States.


32. 28 Days Later (2002)

Memorable quote: “Plans are pointless. Staying alive's as good as it gets.”

Scare factor: Many movies have tried to recreate what a major city could look like after an apocalypse, but not many do it as hauntingly well as Danny Boyle's "28 Days Later." The terrifyingly fast zombie-like creatures roaming the landscape proved to be so effectively scary that the movie spawned a wave of movies featuring fast-paced zombies.


31. The Changeling (1980)

Memorable quote: “Whatever it is, it’s trying desperately to communicate.”

Scare factor: This is a standard-setter for haunted house scares. If you’ve ever slept in an old house or heard some creaking pipes, you may have been gripping the sheets just a little tighter thanks to this movie. Also, never has a wheelchair been used to more terrifying effect.


30. The Sixth Sense (1999)

Memorable quote: “I see dead people.”

Scare factor: There’s something very unnerving about being put in the shoes of a young child who experiences the supernatural. It’s even scarier when said child is played as effectively as young Haley Joel Osment. And the scene where he encounters the little girl — aye carumba.


29. In the Mouth of Madness (1994)

Memorable quotes: “What scares me about Cane’s work is what might happen if reality shared his point of view.”
“The thing I can’t remember is what came first: us or the book.”

Scare factor: An evil creepiness seeps through the whole movie and continues building throughout, which sets the stage for an inordinate amount of legitimately scary jump-out-of-your-seat moments. Add in a healthy dose of grotesque monsters and you have the recipe for an all-time scare fest. If you ever felt guilty about not reading enough books, this film will make you feel better. Sort of.


28. The Brood (1979)

Memorable quote: “No belly button?! The thing has no belly button?!”

Scare factor: Something's off about those kids. You know, the ones who hide in the shadows and attack people who get near them. What's their deal? Could it be somehow related to that woman being treated by that strange psychiatrist? Or are those odd kids just lost, hungry trick-or-treaters? So many questions.


27. Hellraiser (1987)

Memorable quote: “We’ll tear your soul apart!”

Scare factor: You’d think a skinless man living in his girlfriend’s attic trying to get her to commit unspeakable acts to help him become whole again would be disturbing enough. But then you get a glimpse at the gang of demons that is chasing the skinless man. Bad guys don’t get much scarier looking than they look in this flick.


26. The Devil’s Backbone (2001)

Memorable quote: “What is a ghost? A tragedy condemned to repeat itself time and again? An instant of pain, perhaps. Something dead which still seems to be alive. An emotion suspended in time. Like a blurred photograph. Like an insect trapped in amber. ”

Scare factor: Before "Hellboy" and "Pan’s Labrynth," Guillermo del Toro was crafting this chilling ghost story about an early 19th-century Spanish orphanage. There aren’t many movie character who deserve more sympathy than Carlos, who struggles to fit in and is harassed by bullies and paranoid caretakers. Throw in the ghost of a boy whom Carlos keeps spotting, and you feel the hair stand up on the back of your neck with each passing moment.


25. Pet Sematary (1989)

Memorable quote: “Sometimes dead is better.”

Scare factor: Do you remember that heartbreaking day during your childhood when your beloved pet died? Remember how you would have done anything in the world to bring the pet back, even if it was just for a day? Remember how crushing it was to realize that such fantasies of reunion were never going to happen? If so, here’s a good movie to help you get over it. It's another film based on a Stephen King book and the author makes an appearance as the preacher.


24. The Descent (2005)

Memorable quote: “Hey, there's something down here.”

Scare factor: This movie will terrify you if:
1) You’re claustrophobic.
2) You’re scared of the dark.
3) You have a fear of being trapped under the earth.
4) You have a fear of being trapped under the earth with creatures that can see you but you can’t see them.
Yeah, it’s scary for all those types of people.

23. Friday the 13th (1980)

Memorable quote: “Look what you did to him -- look what you did to him!”

Scare factor: It may be a cliched setup now, but this movie can still provide a hefty dose of terror. And don’t blame the original for the pile of mediocre-to-awful sequels that followed. There are real scares here, even if they take a bit to materialize. And try not thinking of this movie if you’re ever alone, floating in a canoe, in the middle of a lake.


22. 1408 (2007)

Memorable quote: “Hotel rooms are a naturally creepy place, don’t you think? How many people have slept in that bed before you? How many of them were sick? How many of them lost their minds? How many of them -- died?”

Scare factor: Ever felt uneasy staying in an unfamiliar hotel room? This Stephen King-inspired tale will make you never want to set foot in one again. This underrated gem has John Cusack as a writer who specializes in haunted hotels, while not really believing any of the stuff he writes about. That is, until he checks in to a certain room in a New York hotel. He’s about to become a believer.


21. Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)

Memorable quote: “Whatever you do: Don’t. Fall. Asleep.”

Scare factor: As if insomniacs need another thing weighing on their minds every night. Before Freddy Krueger became a quipster who occasionally dabbles in scares, he was the burned-face murderer with knives for fingernails who killed teenagers in their dreams. Oh, but they wouldn’t just die in their sleep. No, the gore would follow them into the real world. Sweet dreams! “One, two, Freddy's coming for you...”


20. Dawn of the Dead (1978)

Memorable quote: “When there's no more room in hell, the dead will walk the earth.”

Scare factor: What’s scarier than watching one of the remaining humans slowly transform into a zombie? Realizing that the zombie-in-progress is one of the only people who can fly the helicopter to get you out of there. George Romero’s epic-scale zombie apocalypse movie is really the only film featuring the living dead that really captures the pure hopelessness of a global zombie apocalypse. It has spawned sequels and knock-offs and inspired video games, but nothing beats the original.


19. Deliverance (1972)

Memorable quote: “Squeal like a pig! Wheeee!”

Scare factor: It’s why so many city slickers are terrified of the the South. There has likely been no greater enemy to the tourism industry in rural Georgia than this film. If anything, it teaches us two things: Whenever you’re a visitor somewhere, don’t anger the locals. And it’s probably best if you keep your canoe trips to the Charles River.


18. Saw (2004)

Memorable quote: “Live or die, make your choice. “

Scare factor: Before this movie franchise became a sad parody of itself, it brought legitimate shock and terror to a new era, giving birth to a sub-genre in the process. As unsettling as the predicaments of the characters are, it forces each viewer to answer the question: What horrible things could I withstand doing in order to save my life?



17. Salem’s Lot (1979)

Memorable quote: “The house was a monument to evil sitting there all these years holding the essence of evil in its smoldering bones.”

Scare factor: These aren’t your kids’ vampires, all modern and emo, falling in love with the living and fostering a rivalry with werewolves. No, these have gnarly teeth and glowing eyes and conjure nothing but pure terror. So, get out your crucifix and holy water and enjoy.


16. The Mist (2007)

Memorable quote: “I don’t know what this mist is, but there are things in it, and they’re dangerous.”

Scare factor: The quote kind of sums it up. But not completely. Without giving too much away, there are things in the mist that I guarantee you wouldn’t think of just by reading the movie’s back-cover description. And the shocking ending just may be the ultimate nightmare scenario.


15. Psycho (1960)

Memorable quote: “She just goes a little mad sometimes. We all go a little mad sometimes.”

Scare factor: There’s a reason women are wary of guys with mommy issues. And that reason is this movie. Thank you, Norman Bates. Janet Leigh's iconic shower scene has become imprinted on the American psyche due to this Alfred Hitchcock classic.


14. Silence of the Lambs (1991)

Memorable quote: “It puts the lotion on its skin.”

Scare factor: An incredibly disturbing serial killer is on the loose, and the FBI seeks the assistance of an even more disturbing — yet somehow very charming — serial killer in a maximum security prison. Unlike most horror movies, the conversations here are scarier than the gore. But fear not, the gore doesn’t disappoint.


13. Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978)

Memorable quote: “I keep seeing these people, all recognizing each other. Something is passing between them all, some secret. It's a conspiracy, I know it.”

Scare factor: Honestly, the wide-open mouths, extended fingers, and high-pitched screeching should be enough to keep you locked in your house for at least a week.


12. Rec (2007)

Memorable quote: “The police won't let us leave and are giving us no explanations.”

Scare factor: This instant classic has some serious grip-your-armrests and hold-your-breath scares in it (and it’s better than its American remake, "Quarantine"). If you live in a multi-unit apartment building, you’ll be planning your escape routes after watching this film. And go ahead, try maintaining complete silence in the grip of total panic. It’s not so easy, is it?


11. The Shining (1980)

Memorable quote (three-way tie):
“Heeeeeeere’s Johnny!”
“Redrum! Redrum!”
“All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.”

Scare factor: From your little boy seeing horrifying visions to your well-adjusted husband slowly descending into madness and becoming a homicidal maniac, there’s plenty to frighten you in this classic, another Stephen King-inspired thriller.


10. The Ring (2002)

Memorable quote: “Before you die, you see the ring...”

Scare factor: Beautifully ominous settings, a creepy soundtrack, and a good, if somewhat gimmicky, plot device to drive the scares. "The Ring" — based upon the Japanese film "Ringu" — did successfully carve its own path, and let disturbing visuals and an impending sense of doom ride to good effect. You may indeed be scared to death.


9. Alien (1979)

Memorable quote: “I admire its purity. A survivor, unclouded by conscience, remorse, or delusions of morality.”

Scare factor: Maybe it’s just a little indigestion. Yeah, that must be it. Oh wait, what’s that bulge violently erupting from my torso? If serving as the incubator for a killing machine from outer space doesn’t scare you, then just wait until it grows up, and hides in the shadows of your spaceship, and picks off your crew one-by-one. Luckily, you have a cyborg on your side. Right?


8. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)

Memorable quote: “Hit ’er, grandpa, hit ’er.”

Scare factor: Frankly, there’s not much to not be scared about in this movie. Even before the bodies hit the meat hooks, the movie is simply unnerving. Once Leatherface makes his entrance, get ready for a full hour of psychological terror. If you ever complained about your in-laws, watch this movie and thank your lucky stars.

7. Halloween (1978)

Memorable quote: “I realized what was living behind that boy's eyes was purely and simply evil.”

Scare factor: It isn’t just that Michael Myers is a homicidal maniac. He’s a homicidal maniac who wears a mask that carries an expression of pure blankness, as if killing is boring. This film set the standard for all supernatural serial killer films to follow. And it stars a very young Jamie Lee Curtis.


6. Night of the Living Dead (1968)

Memorable quote: “They’re coming to get you, Barbara! They’re coming for you! Look, there's one of them now!”

Scare factor: Not only did George Romero’s movie essentially spawn a whole genre with this zombie classic, it also set the standard for the barricade-yourself-in-the-house survival tactic. Admit it: You have assessed your dwelling’s defensive strengths and weaknesses because of this film.


5. Ju-on (2002)

Memorable quote: “Eeeeeeeooooooooooow.”

Scare factor: There is perhaps no movie in history with creepier children than this classic Japanese haunted house/ghost story. The one that stands there, frozen-faced, mouth-agape, while meowing will keep you up at night. Add in a creepy low-key soundtrack and some legitimately striking visual scares and you have a recipe for instant nightmares. Oh, and don't forget the single scariest scene involving a staircase in cinematic history.


4. Poltergeist (1982)

Memorable quote: “They're heeeeeere.”

Scare factor: From white-noise on the TV to empty in-ground pools to ancient Indian burial grounds, the scares are almost too numerous to count. This movie would make anyone want to know as much as humanly possible about the history of a house before buying it. It's the ultimate haunted house movie.


3. The Exorcist (1973)

Memorable quote: “The power of Christ compels you! The power of Christ compels you!”

Scare factor: No child should ever be that foul-mouthed and that convincingly scary in a movie. Linda Blair’s seminal performance is almost enough to make you believe in demons (that is, if you didn’t believe in them already). If you haven’t watched this in a while, do yourself a favor and check out the director’s cut, then go ahead and try sleeping afterward. Good luck with that.


2. Jaws (1975)

Memorable quote: “You’re gonna need a bigger boat.”

Scare factor: Be honest, every time you hear news reports of great white sightings off the coast of Cape Cod, you think of "Jaws" (which was actually filmed on Martha's Vineyard). Due to this movie, millions of people think twice anytime they set foot in the ocean. If you have ever freaked out when something has brushed against your leg in the water, thank Steven Spielberg.


1. The Thing (1982)

Memorable quote: “Somebody in this camp ain't what he appears to be. ”

Scare factor: What makes this the top fright fest? Could it be the fear of complete isolation in the face of disaster? Or the invisible enemy in sub-zero temperatures? How about the terrifying feeling of not knowing which of your supposed friends and colleagues are who they say they are, and not a shape-shifting alien? Yeah, all those things


http://www.boston.com/ae/movies/gallery/top_50_scary_movies/
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on April 01, 2012, 12:23:29 PM
so how about Halloween in March?

(http://img3387.imagevenue.com/images/loc530/138127125_Ann_Miller_B_1_1000_122_530lo.jpg)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on April 03, 2012, 08:07:06 PM
(http://img3387.imagevenue.com/images/loc530/138127125_Ann_Miller_B_1_1000_122_530lo.jpg)

Ann Miller! Love her!  :-*
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: B.W. on July 14, 2013, 06:24:40 PM
I have too many to name.  I do like that someone on here mentioned " Paranormal Activity". It's not a favorite of mine but it was a fun movie to watch.  I love horror movies.  I have not seen any of the sequels to " Paranormal Activity".  The original film reminded me of " The Blair Witch Project".  That movie did a good job I thought on creating a spooky atmosphere without any special effects really. It was successful at the box office for an independent horror film. It is a bit freaky in some ways.  I personally think TBWP is better than PA. Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2 was a fun film but is highly flawed.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Heath4Ever on July 16, 2013, 02:06:40 PM
Coming up with my favourite movies has been very difficult.  Before Brokeback came along, I didn't have a favourite!  Anyway, if I had a gun at my head and had to issue a shortlist, here it is:

1.  THE PIANO (dir. Jane Campion)
2.  LAWRENCE OF ARABIA (dir. David Lean)
3.  TERMS OF ENDEARMENT (dir. James L. Brooks)
4.  THE COLOR PURPLE (dir. Steven Spielberg)
5.  THE MISSION (dir. Roland Joffé)
6.  LOLITA (dir. Adrian Lyne)
7.  OUT OF AFRICA (dir. Sydney Pollack)
8.  TOOTSIE (dir. Sydney Pollack)
9.  GUESS WHO'S COMING TO DINNER? (dir. Stanley Kramer)
10. ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST (dir. Milos Forman)

Best movie I have seen since Brokeback?  DRIVE (dir. Nicolas Winding Refn)



Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Heath4Ever on July 16, 2013, 02:08:58 PM
In hindsight, I think a psychiatrist would have a field day with my list.  I seem to favour miserable storylines and screwed-up characters!!!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: suelyblu on July 16, 2013, 04:59:42 PM
Besides Brokeback Mountain.......I have only four films I could watch over and over again:

1) The Third Man.

2) A Town Called Alice.

3) The Sundowners.

4)Bridges of Maddison County.

There are others I would watch now and then ......but these four ....I could watch anytime.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Flyboy on July 18, 2013, 08:27:03 PM
I don't think I've ever posted in this thread!! haha..My favs/

1. The Owl and the Pussycat! : I'm a Streisand fan, and besides Funny Girl, I loved this film, very underrated performance by Babs and George Segal...

2. The Big Chill: don't know why I got hooked on this film, but I did, l loved Jobeth Williams in this.....and Mary Kay Place, she always GREAT whatever she's in!

3. Ordinary People: a classic IMHO, loved everyone in it, and the storyline too.....great film........

4. Tootsie!! Impossible NOT to like this film.......

there's more, of course, but I'll have to dwell on the selections........
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on July 19, 2013, 09:26:32 AM
2. The Big Chill: don't know why I got hooked on this film, but I did, l loved Jobeth Williams in this.....and Mary Kay Place, she always GREAT whatever she's in!

It has a great score, too--and I loved Tom Berenger's parody of Tom Selleck in Magnum, P.I.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: CellarDweller115 on August 08, 2013, 06:02:42 PM
And it stars the fabulous Karen Black!

(http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w197/oilgun/People/burnt-offerings-02.jpg)

That brief scene with the smiling chauffeur gave me nightmares.  The twisted part is that it also kind of turned me on sexually.  :-\


Bumping up this quote for this.




Karen Black, "Five Easy Pieces" star, dead at 74


Karen Black, who appeared in more than 100 movies and was featured in such counterculture favorites as "Easy Rider," "Five Easy Pieces" and "Nashville," has died.

Black's husband, Stephen Eckelberry, says the actress died Wednesday from complications from cancer. She was 74.


http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-207_162-57597691/karen-black-five-easy-pieces-star-dead-at-74/
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: oilgun on August 08, 2013, 08:07:48 PM

Bumping up this quote for this.




Karen Black, "Five Easy Pieces" star, dead at 74


Karen Black, who appeared in more than 100 movies and was featured in such counterculture favorites as "Easy Rider," "Five Easy Pieces" and "Nashville," has died.

Black's husband, Stephen Eckelberry, says the actress died Wednesday from complications from cancer. She was 74.


http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-207_162-57597691/karen-black-five-easy-pieces-star-dead-at-74/

OMG!  RIP Karen Black!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Nikki on August 12, 2013, 09:46:07 AM

The September issue of Vanity Fair lists some of the most romantic movies of all time -- not rom coms, ugh, but classical romantic films like Casablanca, Brief Encounter, The Age of Innocence, Now, Voyager and more.  Among this list is Brokeback Mountain and I quote,  " It's testament to our increasing enlightenment that this movie about the secret love affair between two cowboys ranks 12th among the highest-grossing romantic dramas of all time. It's a heartbreaker."  Glad to see it listed among the classical greats.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: suelyblu on August 12, 2013, 05:20:06 PM
                                                                         ^^^^^

This is wonderful that "BBM" was included. Thanks Nikki  :)
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: B.W. on August 13, 2013, 07:27:01 PM
                                                                         ^^^^^

This is wonderful that "BBM" was included. Thanks Nikki  :)

Finally!  BBM deserves to be recognized for the romantic film that it is.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: doodler on August 13, 2013, 09:04:30 PM
this movie about the secret love affair between two cowboys ranks 12th among the highest-grossing romantic dramas of all time.

They're talking money here.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Willowey on October 30, 2013, 01:45:17 PM
My favourite movie of all time is definitely Titanic. I'm sure it always will be. Others include almost every movie musical ever made (except Moulan Rouge and The Phantom of the Opera). I also love Muriel's Wedding...It's pretty much the story of my life. And most recently, Brokeback Mountain gets put number three on my list.

1. Titanic
2. Muriel's Wedding
3. Brokeback Mountain
4. Rent
5. Grease

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: bubba on October 30, 2013, 05:27:20 PM
My favourite movie of all time is definitely Titanic. I'm sure it always will be. Others include almost every movie musical ever made (except Moulan Rouge and The Phantom of the Opera). I also love Muriel's Wedding...It's pretty much the story of my life. And most recently, Brokeback Mountain gets put number three on my list.

1. Titanic
2. Muriel's Wedding
3. Brokeback Mountain
4. Rent
5. Grease




Hello Willow, I like your list!


I never seem to put Titanic on my top 10 and I don't know why.  I loved the movie and I never get tired of watching it, I don't know how many times I have seen it, I have lost count.  I should move it up the list.


And I have never seen Muriel's Wedding, but have heard so much about it.  If it is on Netflix, I will check it out!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Willowey on October 30, 2013, 08:13:02 PM
Please watch it Bubba. It's really good. Kind of like a comedy/drama. Sometimes it's really funny and other times it's really depressing and you just want to cry. Really worth watching, if you agree. I nice coming of age movie.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: bubba on October 30, 2013, 09:13:09 PM
I just checked Netflix and it isn't on there!!  >:D

I swear half the movies I look for on there, they don't have them.  Don't worry I will find it someplace!  ;D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: ronanronan on August 27, 2015, 12:58:01 AM
my favorite films are:
1- the brave heart
2- the legend of the fall
3- V for vendetta
4- titanic
5- the lord of the rings
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: bubba on August 27, 2015, 11:39:50 AM
my favorite films are:
1- the brave heart
2- the legend of the fall
3- V for vendetta
4- titanic
5- the lord of the rings


Good pics (forgot about this thread)   Lord of the Rings is both my son's top #1 movie for sure.


How beautiful was Brad Pitt in Legends of the Fall?   :-*
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: BlueJeanJeannie on August 27, 2015, 02:24:04 PM
my favorite films are:
1- the brave heart
2- the legend of the fall
3- V for vendetta
4- titanic
5- the lord of the rings

No Brokeback?  ;)  :D

Let's see... 1. Brokeback  2. Into the Wild  3. The Shawshank Redemption  4. Cast away  5. a million other movies.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: bubba on August 27, 2015, 02:47:32 PM
Shawshank would make my list for sure....not sure Castaway would, but I loved it..........WILSON!!  :D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: suelyblu on August 27, 2015, 04:28:15 PM
Sooo many films that I love....but here are just a few (10) !
Some are from way back...but never the less ...to me....great films.

1) BBM

2) Candy.

3)A Town Called Alice

4)Days of Wine and Roses.

5)Spring and Port Wine.

6)The Sundowners.

7) Hotel Paradisio.

8)Third Man

9)The Apartment.

10)The Graduate .


Can I give a quick mention to :Wonderful Life.....Scrooge(Alister Sim)......Now Voyager........and many many more :) !!!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: bubba on August 27, 2015, 06:49:50 PM
I have only saw one of yours, Brokeback!  :D

But do love Scrooge (A Christmas Carol) with Alastair, is a favourite.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: suelyblu on August 27, 2015, 06:54:26 PM
I have only saw one of yours, Brokeback!  :D


I thought they may be a bit obscure for some of you.......and I'm not that old either !  :D   
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: BlueJeanJeannie on August 28, 2015, 07:04:53 AM
I've seen 'Candy' and 'The Graduate' as well  :)

Mind you, I've excluded any specific Jake Gyllenhaal films from my list  ;)  Some of those can be found under "5. a million other movies", I guess.

Sometimes I watch an old movie I used to like, and suddenly it's not as good as I had remembered... or too slow, or far too long ('Titanic', anyone?)  I used to like a lot of music fims (Grease, Footloose, Flashdance, Dirty Dancing) and I have them all on DVD, but I rarely watch them anymore. Suppose I've watched them too often in the past.

I once saw an 80s film on Dutch TV, late at night, that had Aidan Quinn in it. I had videotaped the last hour or so, but my video messed up the ending and the credits... After a while I couldn't remember the title or who the female lead was - but I couldn't get that film out of my head. I only remembered Aidan Quinn - he was well known back then for being in 'Desperately Seeking Susan' with Madonna. In this one, he reminded me a lot of James Dean in 'Rebel without a Cause'.

Anyway, it took me years and years to find out what the film was called. This was waaaay before the internet, folks!  :)  I came across it a couple of years ago when I was reading YouTube comments about a song that features in the film ('Kids in America' by Kim Wilde).  Yaaaaaaaay! The film was called 'Reckless'.

But... no region 2 DVDs to be found anywhere. I don't think the film was ever officially released in Europe. I managed to find a bootleg on eBay after a while, so you can imagine how happy I was! Hadn't seen the film in over 25 years.

Well, it arrived and I played it... and it was mediocre at best  :D  Such a typical 80s teen movie! It does have its fine moments - but in the DVD version they edited out some great sex scenes and nudity, so that was a disappointment  ::)  ;D  No way it's in my all-time favorite list anymore! I still love it for old times' sake, though.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: dejavu on August 28, 2015, 09:08:35 AM
The Graduate was a great one, Suely, and I DID see it in the cinema when it was first out....with my parents, in fact.   :D


I can't remember ever seeing The Days of Wine and Roses, but I loved that theme song.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: suelyblu on August 28, 2015, 12:20:49 PM
The Graduate was a great one, Suely, and I DID see it in the cinema when it was first out....with my parents, in fact.   :D


I can't remember ever seeing The Days of Wine and Roses, but I loved that theme song.

"Days of Wine and Roses" starred Jack Lemon and Lee Remick (sp?)
Jack in one of his few serious rolls....and does he do it justice ?? By a mile.
It's a film dealing with alcoholism. So very sad. You need to be in the mood for it....but so worth it.

                                                                    ****


Sometimes when you watch a film ....it can be....... the people you go to see it with ....the occasion....that makes it stay in your memory as a favorite film.
eg: A funny film can seem even funnier when you giggle and laugh at just the simplest silly little things when you are out with friends ....but... later on ....if you buy the DVD ...or watch it on TV....on your own....some how it just isn't as funny or good.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: dejavu on August 28, 2015, 01:17:35 PM
Thanks, Suely.  Now I know I never saw "Days of Wine and Roses" but it sounds good....and sad, probably tragic.

As for "The Graduate," with "Mrs. Robinson," that's the film that got me started listening to (and buying) all of Simon & Garfunkel's albums.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: suelyblu on August 28, 2015, 01:53:03 PM
                                                               ^^^^

I know where you are coming from ! They are superb.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: bubba on August 28, 2015, 04:35:19 PM
I have tons of DVD's (actually got rid of a lot of them) but I am the same, don't even think of putting them on, but then they come on TV and I start watching!

My favourites I don't tire of really - but there are old movies I put on and they seem dated.   


I remember going to the theatre with friends and seeing Desperado when it came out.


 http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0112851/


Not exactly in my top 10, but we sure enjoyed it that night, had so much fun, I think because there was a bunch of us!


I also never tire of anything involving Hugh Grant, don't ask me why!  :D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: dejavu on August 28, 2015, 05:57:43 PM
I think it would be fun to try to come up with a real all-time favorite list (I think I did it once here, but that list mostly included movies that were fairly recent at the time).

Memory fades, but by searching online for top movies of each year 1965-2014, that would bring up a lot of old goodies to choose between.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: dejavu on August 28, 2015, 08:11:07 PM
In looking through old movie titles, I found about 30 that I wanted to include.  So I tried to eliminate movies that I saw with family or friends, which were more "special" to one of the other people than they were to me.  This would include movies like "The Odd Couple," "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," "The Last Picture Show," "Blazing Saddles," "Amadeus" and (pick one of the baseball films) "Field of Dreams" or "Bull Durham."   

And I tried to eliminate movies which primarily had "important" themes, such as "Guess Who's Coming To Dinner" and "Milk" and "Philadelphia."

Here are 10 of my remaining favorites of all-time, listed by Year of Release:

1939:  The Wizard of Oz

1967:  Camelot

1967:  The Graduate

1969:  Midnight Cowboy

1969:  Women in Love

1987:  Moonstruck

2001:  A Beautiful Mind

2005:  Brokeback Mountain

2013:  Nebraska

2014:  The Grand Budapest Hotel

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: suelyblu on August 29, 2015, 05:54:19 AM
                                                               ^^

Just give me some time!!! I'll be back later !!!  ;D
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: bubba on August 29, 2015, 10:05:39 AM
We can scan back in this post and see what we picked!

I watched the Rodger Ebert documentary last night (very good) and was checking his site afterwards (and links) and he listed favourite movies by year, that would be fun to do.


Moonstruck is also a favourite of mine!
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: gnash on February 05, 2017, 03:09:21 AM
beautiful thing
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: gattaca on May 13, 2018, 08:42:56 AM

Short, worthy read..  --> http://www.slashfilm.com/anne-v-coates-dead/
V.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 29, 2018, 10:06:35 AM
Apparently Turner Classics was airing all "war movies" yesterday. In the morning I happily stumbled on the broadcast of Friendly Persuasion; the Civil War plays an important part in the plot that centers on a Quaker family living in southern Indiana in 1862.

Gary Cooper really was the stereotypical "strong, silent type" (maybe the stereotype was created with reference to him?), but he could also play dryly humorous.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 13, 2018, 11:06:26 AM
When I looked at TV Guide this morning, the listing for TCM for tonight is Yankee Doodle Dandy, and I haven't the foggiest notion why they would be showing it tonight. They usually show it at the Fourth of July, and it's been my go-to Fourth of July movie for, literally, decades. It is, indeed, one of my all-time favorites. I love Jimmy Cagney in it. Whenever I hear or read Cagney's name, it's the first movie that comes to my mind.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on June 13, 2018, 04:26:37 PM
When I looked at TV Guide this morning, the listing for TCM for tonight is Yankee Doodle Dandy, and I haven't the foggiest notion why they would be showing it tonight. They usually show it at the Fourth of July, and it's been my go-to Fourth of July movie for, literally, decades. It is, indeed, one of my all-time favorites. I love Jimmy Cagney in it. Whenever I hear or read Cagney's name, it's the first movie that comes to my mind.

I have been messed up as to day of the week all this week. TCM has Yankee Doodle Dandy scheduled for tomorrow/Thursday--which makes sense because it's Flag Day in the U.S.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Lyle (Mooska) on June 14, 2018, 10:37:30 AM

   :laugh:

Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: CellarDweller115 on May 01, 2021, 02:31:11 PM
Olympia Dukakis, Oscar Winner for 'Moonstruck,' Dies at 89

5/1/2021 by Duane Byrge , Mike Barnes


Olympia Dukakis, the dignified actress who received a supporting Oscar for her performance as Cher's nitpicking Brooklyn mother in Moonstruck, has died. She was 89.

Dukakis died Saturday in New York, her brother Apollo wrote on Facebook. "After many months of failing health she is finally at peace and with her [husband] Louis."

The late-blooming star also was known for her turn as Clairee Belcher, a woman of fiber and the elegant widowed friend of Ouiser Boudreaux (Shirley MacLaine), in Herbert Ross' Steel Magnolias (1989), and she portrayed a personnel director in Working Girl (1988) and a principal in Mr. Holland's Opus (1995).

Away from the big screen, Dukakis taught drama at NYU for more than 15 years and was a founding member of two regional theaters: The Charles Playhouse in Boston and the Whole Theater in Montclair, New Jersey.

Her husband of 55 years, stage and character actor Louis Zorich (Paul Reiser's father Mad About You), died in January 2018 at age 93.

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/olympia-dukakis-dead-moonstruck-oscar-winning-actress-89-1085431
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 01, 2021, 04:22:48 PM
Sad news. She was wonderful in everything she was in.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: B.W. on May 01, 2021, 08:28:44 PM
Olympia Dukakis, Oscar Winner for 'Moonstruck,' Dies at 89

5/1/2021 by Duane Byrge , Mike Barnes


Olympia Dukakis, the dignified actress who received a supporting Oscar for her performance as Cher's nitpicking Brooklyn mother in Moonstruck, has died. She was 89.

Dukakis died Saturday in New York, her brother Apollo wrote on Facebook. "After many months of failing health she is finally at peace and with her [husband] Louis."

The late-blooming star also was known for her turn as Clairee Belcher, a woman of fiber and the elegant widowed friend of Ouiser Boudreaux (Shirley MacLaine), in Herbert Ross' Steel Magnolias (1989), and she portrayed a personnel director in Working Girl (1988) and a principal in Mr. Holland's Opus (1995).

Away from the big screen, Dukakis taught drama at NYU for more than 15 years and was a founding member of two regional theaters: The Charles Playhouse in Boston and the Whole Theater in Montclair, New Jersey.

Her husband of 55 years, stage and character actor Louis Zorich (Paul Reiser's father Mad About You), died in January 2018 at age 93.

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/olympia-dukakis-dead-moonstruck-oscar-winning-actress-89-1085431




I'm sorry to hear of Olympia Dukakis's passing.  She was great in "STEEL MAGNOLIAS" (1989).  She would later go on to co-star with fellow "STEEL MAGNOLIAS" cast member, Shirley MacLaine, in the Canadian TV miniseries "JOAN OF ARC" (1999) which starred Leelee Sobieski as Joan of Arc, Neil Patrick Harris, Jacqueline Bissett, and Peter O'Toole.  The 1999 "JOAN OF ARC" miniseries originally aired on the CBS network channel in North America.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: B.W. on May 01, 2021, 08:31:46 PM
The fact that Olympia Dukakis and her husband were married for 55 years, and that she had such a longstanding career is amazing.  Its interesting to know that she taught drama classes at New York University for 15 years, and that she helped to found two theater houses.  I hope she had a mostly happy, fulfilling life.  May she rest in peace.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: ingmarnicebbmt on May 02, 2021, 04:52:33 AM

Wonderful woman and actress. I liked her a lot.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: Jeff Wrangler on May 02, 2021, 09:13:42 AM
She would later go on to co-star with fellow "STEEL MAGNOLIAS" cast member, Shirley MacLaine, in the Canadian TV miniseries "JOAN OF ARC" (1999) which starred Leelee Sobieski as Joan of Arc, Neil Patrick Harris, Jacqueline Bissett, and Peter O'Toole.  The 1999 "JOAN OF ARC" miniseries originally aired on the CBS network channel in North America.

I remember seeing that.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: B.W. on May 02, 2021, 11:09:50 PM
I remember seeing that.




Yeah, I liked the "JOAN OF ARC" (1999) TV miniseries.  It wasn't a masterpiece, but it wasn't that bad.  Luc Besson's theatrical film "THE MESSENGER: THE STORY OF JOAN OF ARC" (1999) with Milla Jovovich, John Malkovich, Faye Dunaway and Dustin Hoffman was good, at least I liked it.  I don't think it is as bad as what many movie critics thought it was.
Title: Re: All-Time Favorite Films
Post by: B.W. on May 02, 2021, 11:12:21 PM
 Now that I think of it, the acclaimed silent film "THE PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC" is a well-made telling of the Joan of Arc story, specifically dealing with the court trials she was subjected to by the English after being captured by the Burgundians.  RKO Radio Pictures' film "JOAN OF ARC" with Ingrid Bergman is just okay.