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Author Topic: What good book have you read lately? (New or old)  (Read 775728 times)

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What good book have you read lately? (New or old)
« Reply #4050 on: November 04, 2021, 11:45:49 AM »
Another book I read once, around the time I was reading the first Donald Vining diary book was:

Jeb and Dash: A Diary of Gay Life, 1918-1945 by Ina Russell.



Jeb (a pseudonym) was Ina Russell's uncle and he turned over his 50 volumes of diaries he'd written and she edited them into this book. Jeb was quite a different person than Donald Vining. He was a gay government employee, living in Washington, D.C., and his life was much more closeted than Vining's. A lot of his writing concerned a mostly unrequited love he had for another man, Dash.

A couple of review quotes:

The torment and loneliness of homosexuality in a more repressive era is palpably evoked in this intense diary of Jeb Alexander, the pseudonym for Russell's uncle. Jeb, who was an editor in a government office in Washington, D.C.  Extending from the WW I armistice to the stock market crash to the defeat of fascism, this gracefully written diary includes myriad impressions of topical events and people like Will Rogers, Pola Negri, Thornton Wilder, Charles Lindbergh and others. But the unifying thread is Jeb's love affairs, including his long time relationship with C. C. Dasham, a state department employee. Readers are privy to Jeb's fears that he may be under police surveillance as a suspected "deviant" criminal, and to his distress over an unsympathetic society that allows him little happiness or peace of mind.
___

In 1965 Ina Russell inherited 50 volumes of diaries in a fireproof cabinet from her uncle Jeb Alexander (pseudonym). Unbeknownst to her was the treasure trove of American gay history they would yield. Upon reading the eloquently written memoirs, she discovered her uncle's tempestuous love affair with C.C. Dash Dasham (pseudonym) and life as a gay government employee in Washington. Russell winnowed the volumes into an engrossing narrative of gay life from 1918 to 1945. Reading Jeb's diaries is to walk beside him and relive the sights, sounds, and smells of the Roaring Twenties, Depression, and World War II. A door has been opened here to view gay life firsthand in bygone eras. In 1923 Jeb wrote prophetically concerning his diary, "I do want it to be read--there is no use in concealing the fact--by somebody who is like me, who would understand." A superlative insight into early 20th-century gay history.

I corresponded a couple times with Ina Russell after I read the book. She was very interested in my reaction to it and wrote some nice observations about my thoughts in a long letter that I still have somewhere. It's a treasure of a book, IMO.

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What good book have you read lately? (New or old)
« Reply #4051 on: November 04, 2021, 12:11:46 PM »
^^^

A sidebar related to this book...

In the book, Jeb writes about the night there was a fire at the White House while Hoover was President and it was on Christmas Eve in 1929 while the Hoovers were having a party. He describes hearing the sirens, wondering what's going on, finding out what's happening and going to see what he could.

In November of 2016, my friends Ken & Robert took a trip to Washington, D.C. for a couple weeks, while I spent the two weeks house and pet sitting for them. Every year the White House Historical Society puts out a special Christmas ornament that is somehow related to the location's history and in 2016 it was this one:



It's meticulously crafted and very beautiful. When they returned they gave me this as a gift. It made me quite happy and I told them this was very special because not only do I like it, but my dear gay friends gave me something that represents an event that I first heard about and became aware of from a gay man who wrote about it in his diaries while it was happening.

If one wants a little more info about that fire, with pictures, here's a link:
https://www.whitehousehistory.org/the-christmas-eve-west-wing-fire-of-1929

Offline gattaca

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Re: What good book have you read lately? (New or old)
« Reply #4052 on: November 04, 2021, 05:01:44 PM »
^^^ WOW!  Very nice provenance!   

Offline gattaca

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Re: What good book have you read lately? (New or old)
« Reply #4053 on: November 07, 2021, 10:30:03 AM »
Hi Lyle.. See the cut-ins from your earlier post.  I didn't want this to get eaten by the posting wizard..  See V>>>

Vincent, first, just wondering if you know that Man in an Orange Shirt was written by a novelist, but it was written for television? I knew it was a two-part television film, but the way they advertised it made it seem like it was from a novel. Just wondering.

V>>> Y/N. When I initially watched MIAOS, IDK at that time the story was written for TV by novelist Patrick Gale. I'd hoped Gale had written it as a novel and it had been adapted.  Only after watching a few YT interviews did I learn MIAOS was based on Gale's mother finding similar love letters from a male fried of her husband after WW II.   

Wingmen, by Ensan Case, was brought to my attention when I first read the gay history book Coming Out Under Fire by Allan Berube. In a chapter titled The Legacy of the War he writes about authors who started to write about their WWII experiences, both gay men and lesbians, and straight men who'd witnessed or come in contact with the subject.

V>>>  Wingmen continues to be one of my favorite novels which I re-read / kindle every few years.  The story is gripping, well conveyed, enticing, convincing and feels like Case is telling something very, very real - I feel as if I'm there.  I've spoken Mr. Case a few times over the years. He lives ~ 6-7 hours drive away. I've always wanted to visit - take him out to dinner for such a riveting work. Last we spoke his health was frail.

He has an interesting note about John Steinbeck, from his 1958 book Once There Was a War, which was a collection of articles he wrote while he was a special war correspondent for the New York Herald Tribune. Steinbeck acknowledged that "he and his colleagues had known about 'sex deviation" in the armed forces, but this was among the 'many things not mentioned' in their reports. They had felt a duty to 'protect the armed services from criticism' and to protect the home front 'from the whole account of what war was like'. Steinbeck believed that such protection had left the civilian public unprepared for the shock of reading fiction by ex-soldiers about the gritty realities of World War II."

V>>> Wow!  IDK that. Really confirms what I suspect that we have many more WWII true-to-life stories like MIAOS which are slowly slipping from our midst and being reclaimed by time.

FYI: If you're interested...
In his text and detailed notes, Berube lists some works of gay fiction detailing soldiers war time experiences. I've read some of those listed, like Wingmen, and some of it is surprisingly open, but there is also a lot of it that's written in the same coded language that gay men of the time learned to live with and navigate so that others weren't attuned to. This can frustrate a modern reader unfamiliar with those times who feels more like the Harry Hamlin character when he says to Michael Ontkean in Making Love, "Why don't you just say it?" But if one has an understanding of those times and why things were coded, it can be unusually enlightening.

V>>> Good point!! What's the line from CMBYN?... "we can never we speak of these things..."   

V>>> Lyle, of all the novels you've read below, which ones come closest to the writing style and story from Case's "Wingmen"?

So I'll list some of the writings dealing with the subject that Berube has mentioned or listed in the book:

Novels: (homosexuality the main theme)
The Invisible Glass by Loren Wahl (1950) hardcover only no kindle -> https://www.amazon.com/Invisible-Glass-Loren-Wahl/dp/B0006ASAJC
Quatrefoil by James Barr (1950) kindle -> https://www.amazon.com/Quatrefoil-Modern-Novel-James-Barr-ebook/dp/B01KUGU5OY
The Brick Foxhole by Richard Brooks (1945) kindle / no audible  -> https://www.amazon.com/Brick-Foxhole-Richard-Brooks-ebook/dp/B06XWN5LWL
Women's Barracks by Tereska Torrès, paperback (1950)
Ship's Company by Lonnie Coleman (1955)  kindle / no audible -> https://www.amazon.com/Ships-Company-Lonnie-Coleman-ebook/dp/B0875T6FKJ
Hold Tight by Christopher Bram (1988)  kindle / audible / Next Read -> https://www.amazon.com/Hold-Tight-Novel-Christopher-Bram-ebook/dp/B00COWLXZ8

Short Stories: (main theme)
The Prisoners by C. Hall Thompson (1945)  -> Not found...
Show Me the Way to Go Home by Donald Vining (1945) -> Not found..
(Notes say the above two stories are in Cross Section 1945 (New York: Book Find Club, 1945)
Queer Island by Jock Ember (1954) In American Aphrodite 4, No. 14
Rhymes of a PFC by Lincoln Kirstein (New York: New Directions, 1964) - includes several narrative poems about gay American soldiers in WWII

V>>> These all sound very interesting too!

Novels that introduce characters who were explicitly portrayed as homosexual officers and enlisted men, but usually as villains or victims:
Tales of the South Pacific by James Michener (1947)  hardcover/softcover no kindle
The Gallery by John Horne Burns (1947)  kindle / no audible -> https://www.amazon.com/Gallery-York-Review-Books-Classics-ebook/dp/B00FO5W7G6
Stranger in the Land by Ward Thomas (1949) hardcover only, no kindle, not reprinted -> https://www.amazon.com/Stranger-Land-Ward-Thomas/dp/B000EH4TSI
 
From Here to Eternity by James Jones (1951)  hardcover / kindle / audible -> https://www.amazon.com/Here-Eternity-World-Trilogy-Book-ebook/dp/B004UNGYK8
V>>> Yes Jones' work has been "restored" from the Amazon comments... seems like I've seen that cover somewhere before in another famous scene... ;)

The Captain by Russell Thacher (1951) hardcover only -> https://www.amazon.com/Captain-Russell-Thacher/dp/B000H06MHS
The Deep Six by Martin Dibner (1953) hard/soft covers only, no kindle, also a FILM by same name -> https://www.amazon.com/Deep-Six-Martin-Dibner/dp/B0006ATGBI

Non-war novels that had characters who had gay experiences during WWII:
The Fall of Valor by Charles Jackson (1946)  kindle, no audible -> https://www.amazon.com/Fall-Valor-Valancourt-Century-Classics-ebook/dp/B01J4ZCRLQ

V>>>  Vidal and Isherwood.. well known but I've not read them.
The City and the Pillar by Gore Vidal (1948) kindle, audible, HIGHLY regarded as his best work, NEXT -> https://www.amazon.com/City-Pillar-Novel-Vintage-International-ebook/dp/B07F5X95WD

V>>> You know - Gore Vidal played the "Director" from "Gattaca (1997)"... ;)

The World in the Evening by Christopher Isherwood (1952) kindle / no audible (not one of Isherwood's best) -> https://www.amazon.com/World-Evening-Novel-FSG-Classics/dp/0374533814
Advise and Consent by Allen Drury (1959) kindle/audible -> https://www.amazon.com/Advise-Consent-Allen-Drury-ebook/dp/B00HRHE2FS

Berube also notes these two on postwar gay and lesbian fiction:
Playing the Game: The Homosexual Novel in America by Roger Austen (Indianapolis/New York: Bobbs-Merrill, 1977)  hardcover only no kindle researchers mostly -> https://www.amazon.com/Playing-game-homosexual-novel-America/dp/0672523183

Sex Variant Women in Literature, 2d ed. by Jeannette Foster (Baltimore: Diana Press, 1975) hardcover / kindle / no audible -> https://www.amazon.com/Sex-Variant-Woman-Jeanette-Howard-ebook/dp/B0080K3GTE

After writing about the subject, Berube makes this observation that you also did Vincent:
"By contrast, few gay characters had populated American war fiction after World War I."

V>>> Absolutely. We have two more period wars to consider:  a) Korean  b) Vietnam. I know the latter must to have interesting true-to-life events.  My gut says being many of these men who lived them are aging but still alive with maybe lives lived other than they may have chosen in a different time and place.  Sadly, those stories will remain silent/buried.

On some things mentioned in the above post.

V>>> Quatrefoil sounds interesting!

--Quatrefoil by James Barr (1950)
I read this novel and found it quite a nice read. I remember in the preface of a revised edition it was mentioned that the main character was based on a fraternity brother whom the author had an affair with in college. I distinctly remember a passage in the introduction where the author talks about how some men deal with the sexuality they're dealt.

     "Phillip and I were fraternity brothers at our university before the war. We were both quietly, very discreetly, homosexual...but with one great difference. When dear Oscar's Love That Dare Not Speak Its Name smiled on Phillip, it turned him to stone. I, on the other hand, went prancing out to meet it."

V>>> The Brick Foxhole NICE! 
--The Brick Foxhole by Richard Brooks (1945)
Richard Brooks became a film director (In Cold Blood for example.) He wrote this novel from his own war experiences and it deals with some soldiers whose bad-tempered dispositions and homophobia cause them to murder a gay man. It's a pretty brutal read in the sense the characters have been through harsh experiences. A police detective tries to uncover the whodunit. This book was made into the Best Picture nominated film Crossfire from 1947. Considered a seminal film noir. However, they changed the murder victim's homosexual orientation to that of being Jewish, so that the motivation was anti-semitism, not homophobia. So this might be or could be ripe for a remake?

V>>> After reading reviews, just ++ to my "must read" listing... highly likely next.
--Hold Tight by Christopher Bram (1988)
I read this book, but I have no recollection of anything about it for some reason. I went to refresh my memory thinking it must still be in my bookcases somewhere, but I didn't find it. Which makes me wonder, did I read it? My recollection is that the story of the two men who fall for each other is interracial. If that's not correct, I really don't think I read it.

--Show Me the Way to Go Home by Donald Vining (1945)
I did not read this short story, but Donald Vining is the pseudonym for a gay man who kept a diary (diaries) his whole life, day by day, and in the late 70's the first of six (I believe) volumes of his diaries were published and available to buy.

--A Gay Diary 1933-1946 by Donald Vining (1945)
I first read this one and the chronicle of this gay man's life and loves etc. is fascinating. Not that it's sensational by most any means, but that it existed in a time where such things were hidden. He grows up in or around New York City and during World War II he goes to California and spends a couple years in Los Angeles/Hollywood. I found this all so interesting. For reasons I don't recall, he was not suitable for military service for some reason, but it wasn't because he was gay.

He volunteered in New York City at the Stage Door Canteen and when he was in L.A. he volunteered at the Hollywood Canteen. He was very much interested in theatre and pursuing a literary career. While in L.A. he had a job at Paramount Studios as a janitor. He liked to go downtown to Pershing Square across from the Biltmore Hotel and pick up servicemen whom he brought back to his one room apartment for many dalliances. From New York he knew an actress named Jeff (yes) Donnell who was in Hollywood and did several films. One I recall is In a Lonely Place with Humphrey Bogart.   
     Anyway, he talks about his daily life surrounded by the Hollywood and Los Angeles of the war years and it's very personal and compelling. I happened to see online several years ago a note from a woman who was writing a book about the Hollywood Canteen and she wanted to interview anyone who had actually spent time there in any capacity. I sent her an email telling her that I hadn't, but I recommended Donald Vining's DIary to her and quoted some of the paragraphs he wrote about his work at the canteen. She was especially interested because he had also compared the Hollywood Canteen to the Stage Door Canteen in NYC. She wrote me later on saying she'd gone to the place where Vining's diaries were kept to research things because they were unedited there. Her book came out about 5 years, maybe more, after that and in it she recounts Vining and another volunteer discussing one night about Van Johnson being gay. The name of the book she wrote is: "Dance Floor Democracy: The Social Geography of Memory at the Hollywood Canteen" by Sherrie Tucker.


V> I can see how this might not play well 
--From Here to Eternity by James Jones (1951)
This book is about the difficult life of soldiers in pre-wartime Hawaii and the book is very difficult to read if you're not in the mood for that. People know the movie. The book does detail some homosexual incidents, such as sailors who'd let gay men take them out to dinner because they'd pay for it and often would roll, or rob, the gay men afterwards outside, which led the gay guys to let someone in the restaurants hold their wallets while they were in there to avoid these things. In 2009, James Jones' daughter Kaylie revealed "a major gay sex story line was cut from James Jones's 1951 novel and he was told by his publisher Scribner to eliminate both expletives and that story line." In 2011 there was supposedly a digital edition of the book that restored those things.

V>>> Sadly, while my HS literary teachers pushed some boundaries, this was one they dared not cross. IDK how it was not assigned in college reading. I've never read Vidal... but this is on the list now.
--The City and the Pillar by Gore Vidal (1948)
If you like Vidal, you'll appreciate this novel. He was warned against writing it and having it published because of the content. Indeed, people were shocked and more. I guess there is a revised edition that Vidal supervised and added things in originally cut out.


--Advise and Consent by Allen Drury (1959)
I did not read this book, but did see the film, which has a plot about a man running for high political office that is discovered to be gay, or have had a same sex dalliance in the past and so is disqualified. I'm sure the book had more to say about it than the movie did.

V>>> This sounds interesting.. I found it on Amazon/Kindle!  But it has zero reviews!...

--Ship's Company by Lonnie Coleman (1955)
This is a book of short stories, all by Coleman. The thing that ties them together is that they are all about life on a troop transport ship, The USS Nellie Crocker, in World War II. Coleman, himself, served on such a ship. Two of the stories are gay themed, "The Theban Warriors" and "Bird of Paradise." Bird is a gay romance on board. Theban Warriors is a hoot. It's about this sailor who is transferred to the ship. He's a big giant brute and a boxer and as nelly as the name of the ship. A guy on the ship narrates the story and he begins describing the night this sailor (Montgomery) arrived on the ship. Montgomery asks where the bunks are and after he's told Montgomery replies, "Thank you. Now, would you be a dear and help me with my bag? Your mother's all tired out. Such a time I had finding this ship, I thought I'd never." When I first read this I was so surprised to find something like this in a book of a WWII ship's sea stories and wondered what average Joe's who read it when it came out must've thought.

V>>> This one "Mark" by Coleman surfaced when I was looking at Ship's Company -> https://www.amazon.com/Mark-Lonnie-Coleman-ebook/dp/B087BGTM96
V>>> I see several by Coleman...

There's another book by this author titled The Golden Vanity (1962) and it's listed in Gay studies lists of novels, but it's not one I'm familiar with. The listings describe it as "A Mister Roberts or Caine Mutiny story of two men fighting for command of a Navy cargo vessel during WWII." ? Or are they fighting for command of each other?
« Last Edit: November 08, 2021, 01:25:10 PM by gattaca »

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What good book have you read lately? (New or old)
« Reply #4054 on: November 08, 2021, 01:02:06 PM »
Vincent,

I love all the links you've supplied, will be a nice tool to use.

Quote
Lyle, of all the novels you've read below, which ones come closest to the writing style and story from Case's "Wingmen"?

I've thought about this a very long time and I'm just not sure I could point to one. At least not assuredly. I don't want to lead you astray with a choice, does that make sense? I am tempted to choose Quatrefoil as the answer, but it was written 25+ years earlier than Wingmen, which probably makes a big difference.
___

It's interesting that both you and I have communicated with an author or two about their writings and the authors have responded to us. Nice.
___

I looked up The Deep Six because you mentioned it had been made into a film. A person who'd read the book says the film really doesn't live up to the book, simplifying it too much. The Wiki page offers, about the book: The novel explores several themes, among them abuse of authority by officers; racial discrimination; the clinging of the regular navy early in the war to archaic customs and traditions which are detrimental to morale and the safety of a ship in combat; homosexual rape aboard ship; and the assignment of incompetent or marginally qualified regular officers to positions of trust and authority in an expanded wartime navy.

Yeah, it doesn't sound like Hollywood would want to tell that kind of story!  As for the "homosexual rape" element, the character in the novel that idea pertains to is this one, and his (laughable) name suggests danger, too:

Mike Edge -- Edge is an enlisted officer recently promoted from the ranks but ill-suited to the duties and responsibilities of being commissioned. Edge is a thickly built man in his early thirties, with "close set, cunning eyes." Bigoted, a martinet physically abusive of enlisted men, cowardly, and a sexual predator of young sailors, Edge is universally loathed but bluffs and bullies his way through the war until, like the captain, he is forced by events to confront his profound fears. Austen at first dismisses him as just another sailor with a coarse background, but comes to think of him as unholy and unclean.
___

I did not remember Gore Vidal as the Director in Gattaca!
___

Quote
V>>> Absolutely. We have two more period wars to consider:  a) Korean  b) Vietnam. [...] Sadly, those stories will remain silent/buried.


I wrote somewhere online once about something I came across on a website about a guy who served in Korea with another guy who was quite open about being gay. If I can find that post, I'll link it here.

I don't think Korea and the Korean war is that popular in the imagination to have much at all written about it. There seems to be little written about it in literature and few in the way of movies in any regard. The 1981 film Inchon, about the battle which is considered to be the turning point in the war, was a huge star-studded disaster, making less than $2 million in the U.S. and there probably hasn't been a movie made since about it.

It's interesting that Vietnam hadn't produced any literature that I'm aware of dealing with LGBT people. I knew a gay guy in the 80's who served in battle in Vietnam and another gay guy that was in Vietnam, but kept out of battle by a higher ranking person (gay) who used him as a secretary behind the lines! Maybe used isn't the right word. (He didn't mind.) Randy Shilts book about gays in the military, "Conduct Unbecoming", details stories of real life Vietnam participants, among the chapters, but literature and such I can't think of anything. Most of the films and such made out of Vietnam stories is political rather than human interest, because it was so unpopular.
___

There was a musical version of From Here to Eternity the last few years done in London that was also filmed as one of those events you could see in a movie theatre that contained some of those specific gay issues that were left out of the original novel. I have not seen this.
___

Interesting to me, but I've always been more interested in the gay history books and stories about people's experiences rather than novels about it for some reason. So I've gravitated to things like Berube's "Coming Out Under Fire" and those books from diaries that have appeared. I became aware of a series of letters that were written from a sailor on the hospital ship Solace that was in Pearl Harbor on December 7th, and they were written to his boyfriend serving somewhere else. They haven't been published, though, and the only way to read them is to go to San Francisco to the place they are housed, make an appointment etc. I inquired about how to go about it once as I had thought about going up there again, but it hasn't happened yet. (I love San Francisco besides!)
___

Seems like I might be reading some more things in the coming months, since you've inspired me Vincent!

Offline gattaca

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Re: What good book have you read lately? (New or old)
« Reply #4055 on: November 14, 2021, 04:46:01 PM »
I just finished reading this one from our working list above.

"Hold Tight" by Christopher Bram (1988)  kindle / audible / Read -> https://www.amazon.com/Hold-Tight-Novel-Christopher-Bram-ebook/dp/B00COWLXZ8

It was a "tougher read" given the racial stereotyping and all which encircles that.  The story held my attention and it was written by Bram.  Comparing it to "Wingmen" my gut says maybe not as "real-to-life" but touching.  I recommend it though if the racial items do not set you off/back.  V.

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What good book have you read lately? (New or old)
« Reply #4056 on: November 15, 2021, 10:46:05 AM »
^^^

I still haven't found that book that I had at one time, I know. Heh?

I do remember in the 80's reading several novels, Hold Tight was one of them, The Dreyfus Affair and The President's Son were two others, where the male couples were one white person and one black person. It made me wonder why that was so prevalent. Don't have an answer, but it was noticeable. Maybe it was just pushing boundaries, since the public thought two men together was pretty abhorrent anyway, so why not really push their buttons, I don't know. (Then again, the general public was probably not reading these books.)

The Dreyfus Affair: I attended a reading with the author of the book at the Different Light Bookstore (a book store?) back then and he was asked about it being a movie and he said a lot of studios were interested in it, but none of them were pushing the button to go ahead with it. For many reasons, this novel would not make a good movie any more, the biggest reason not being the subject matter, but a lot of the book is the two lead characters disappear out of sight for several weeks and cannot be found. Extremely hard to do that nowadays with technology being what it is.

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What good book have you read lately? (New or old)
« Reply #4057 on: November 15, 2021, 11:10:03 AM »
"Hold Tight" by Christopher Bram (1988)  kindle / audible / Read -> https://www.amazon.com/Hold-Tight-Novel-Christopher-Bram-ebook/dp/B00COWLXZ8

In looking up the link you provided--I was trying to see what the hard cover copy of the book looked like to possibly aid in my search--I discovered two other things:

1.) I'd forgotten that Christopher Bram wrote the book that the film Gods & Monsters was made from and I had been thinking about rewatching that film and possibly reading the book. The title of the book when published was The Father of Frankenstein. It has since been published under both of those titles. Have you (or anyone else?) read that one?

2.) On the link page's other recommendations, they have a novel that just came out in July of this past year:
"Lightning Wingman" by Thomas Willard   https://www.amazon.com/Lightning-Wingman-Thomas-Willard-ebook/dp/B099GDKFD7



From the site:
Historical fiction novel of friendship and romance between two P-38 fighter pilots stationed in England during WWII. Inspired by real events. This is the first in an intended ordered series of four books.

The author was born and raised on the northshore in Massachusetts, and is a life-long WWII aviation buff, an FAA licensed Airframe and Powerplant mechanic, a US Air Force veteran, a mechanical engineer, and a graduate of Northeastern University and MIT.

Offline gattaca

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Re: What good book have you read lately? (New or old)
« Reply #4058 on: November 15, 2021, 05:32:32 PM »
^^^OH WOW, "Lightening Wingmen".. hmm is that a coincidence?   Now on my maybe-read list... there are very few reviews and they are not gushing...  V.

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What good book have you read lately? (New or old)
« Reply #4059 on: November 16, 2021, 11:11:19 AM »
That is true about the reviews, but it also just came out 2-3 months ago.