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Author Topic: Classic TV  (Read 232318 times)

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: Classic TV
« Reply #2145 on: May 18, 2020, 04:17:15 PM »
I just read the "Eddie Haskell" (Ken Osmond), of Leave It to Beaver fame, has died at age 76.

Offline B.W.

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Re: Classic TV
« Reply #2146 on: May 18, 2020, 06:41:30 PM »
I just read the "Eddie Haskell" (Ken Osmond), of Leave It to Beaver fame, has died at age 76.



I'm sorry to hear that.  Ken was a good actor, but Eddie was the kind of goofball that you wouldn't want your kids to hang out with.  Eddie was always so full of crap with his fake compliments, and June Cleaver knew it.  Ken Osmond appeared in the theatrical film version of "Leave it to Beaver" in 1997 as the dad of Eddie Haskell, at least I believe he played the dad.

Offline B.W.

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Re: Classic TV
« Reply #2147 on: May 18, 2020, 06:43:02 PM »
Sheesh. Michael Landon looks about 12.



Michael Landon was a great actor and very handsome.  I always loved him as Charles "Pa" Ingalls in "Little House on the Prairie" (1974-1983) .

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: Classic TV
« Reply #2148 on: May 19, 2020, 08:07:39 AM »


I'm sorry to hear that.  Ken was a good actor, but Eddie was the kind of goofball that you wouldn't want your kids to hang out with.  Eddie was always so full of crap with his fake compliments, and June Cleaver knew it.  Ken Osmond appeared in the theatrical film version of "Leave it to Beaver" in 1997 as the dad of Eddie Haskell, at least I believe he played the dad.

There was an appreciation of Ken Osmond on the Today show this morning. He went on to become a police officer in LA and got shot in the line of duty.

Offline oceansbetween

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Re: Classic TV
« Reply #2149 on: Yesterday at 06:08:17 AM »
Over the past few days on YouTube I've been watching Casey Jones. It was a railroad-themed Western that ran for a year in 1957-58 and had nothing whatsoever to do with the historical Casey Jones. It starred the Skipper himself, Alan Hale, Jr. I'd say it's primarily of interest to us train fans, but some of the train-related things I've found quite interesting.

Alan Hale Jr. appeared in an episode of The Wild Wild West: The Night of the Sabatini Death (1969). From IMDb: The payoff for Gilligan fans is in the final minutes of the episode, as Agent Brown is leaving West's private train "The Wanderer". West asks what Brown has planned next. Brown (Hale) replies that he's going to take some time off from the Secret Service and pursue a long time dream of spending some time alone on a tropical island. As Hale exits the train, the iconic closing theme music from Gilligan's Island plays over the closing credits.


Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: Classic TV
« Reply #2150 on: Yesterday at 06:46:19 AM »
Alan Hale Jr. appeared in an episode of The Wild Wild West: The Night of the Sabatini Death (1969). From IMDb: The payoff for Gilligan fans is in the final minutes of the episode, as Agent Brown is leaving West's private train "The Wanderer". West asks what Brown has planned next. Brown (Hale) replies that he's going to take some time off from the Secret Service and pursue a long time dream of spending some time alone on a tropical island. As Hale exits the train, the iconic closing theme music from Gilligan's Island plays over the closing credits.



Wonderful!  :D

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: Classic TV
« Reply #2151 on: Yesterday at 01:43:20 PM »
^^^

Yes, love it, thanks for that info!

Co-incidentally, I happened to watch an episode of My Favorite Martian last night that guest-starred Alan Hale, Jr. He played a Texas oil-tycoon millionaire who used his money to build a rocket to be sent to Mars (we hadn't even been to the moon yet in 1964) and was having a contest for the one person who would pilot it. Of course, being stranded on earth, "Uncle Martin" wanted the position.

That episode was aired in May, 1964, and Gilligan's Island premiered in September. When he did the "Martian" episode he'd already filmed the Gilligan's Island pilot months earlier.

By the way, Sherwood Schwartz and his son (Elroy--heh! His boy Elroy...) were partially involved in aspects of My Favorite Martian, including some scripts. It's been noted that My Favorite Martian has similarities to Gilligan's Island...a character stranded on a...planet...trying to find a way to repair his ship (spaceship) to get off and back home.

Over the past few days on YouTube I've been watching Casey Jones. It was a railroad-themed Western [...] I'd say it's primarily of interest to us train fans, but some of the train-related things I've found quite interesting.

If you're a train fan, you must also have liked the Dale Robertson western series The Iron Horse.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: Classic TV
« Reply #2152 on: Yesterday at 08:01:01 PM »
If you're a train fan, you must also have liked the Dale Robertson western series The Iron Horse.

I don't recall seeing that as kid. I haven't checked, but I think it didn't last too long. It may have been on after my childhood bedtime, or opposite something else we watched.

A few years ago a friend made me a set of DVDs off some nostalgia channel or other, including the pilot movie, Scalplock, so I've seen almost all of it now. The name Scalplock came from the name of Dale Robertson's fictional railroad, the Buffalo Pass, Scalplock, and Defiance. Gary Collins costarred in the TV series.

As with almost all Westerns with trains back then (including the train in Casey Jones), the Iron Horse was the Sierra Railroad's locomotive #3. She is best known as the Hooterville Cannonball of Petticoat Junction fame, but she was also the train that arrived at noon in High Noon.

In the mid 1960s the Tyco Company got the license to put out some HO train sets based on both Petticoat Junction and The Iron Horse--easy enough to do since they both featured the same locomotive. The Iron Horse set included a flatcar with two gunfighters shooting at each other around a large crate, a passenger-baggage combination coach, and a full passenger car that I think was supposed to represent Dale Robertson's private car. The flatcar is highly collectible. It's quite rare, as it appeared only in the Iron Horse sets. It's even rarer to find the car complete because the gunfighter figures were very delicate and easily broke off the car. It's even rarer still to find the flatcar complete and in its original box.

I have several of the Petticoat Junction and Iron Horse sets in my collection.

You can read all about #3 and other trains used in movies and TV shows in The Movie Railroads, by Larry Jensen (1981). The book includes lots of railroad themed movies that I'd never heard of and would love to see.

And that, I know, is far more information than you wanted!  :laugh: