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Author Topic: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.  (Read 42739 times)

Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #1035 on: September 07, 2019, 09:11:31 AM »

Ok, this 30 second video made me laugh today.  If you've seen the movie "Dirty Dancing",  check this out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xR6HXL2kOcA

Offline killersmom

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #1036 on: September 07, 2019, 12:13:58 PM »
^^^^^^^  Too funny, Chuck. ;D
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Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #1037 on: September 07, 2019, 01:15:16 PM »
"Meowww."

 ;D  Now that was right up my alley!  Thanks, Chuck!

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #1038 on: September 07, 2019, 01:30:11 PM »

--Ladies of the Jury

Do you guys know who the actress Edna May Oliver is? She might be best known for her role in the 1939 film Drums Along the Mohawk, for which she received a supporting actress nomination. She had supporting roles in quite a few notable films from the 1930's including Little Women, David Copperfield, Romeo & Juliet, A Tale of Two Cities, a couple Shirley Temple movies and 1940's Pride and Prejudice.

She's a hoot and she always perks up a movie she appears in. A friend of mine alerted me to one he saw recently and so I rented it. She is the lead in a 1932 movie called Ladies of the Jury. She plays Mrs. Livingston Baldwin Crane, so you know what kind of woman she might be. She causes a lot of havoc when she becomes a jury member, confounding the lawyers and judge as well. It's a nice 65 minutes long and the only complaint about it I might offer is that it's an early sound movie and I did have some trouble hearing the dialogue at times, but it was really warm and I also had fans going and the windows open. What can ya do?

The jury also had some other amusing characters in it. There was one I noticed and thought was a man at first, but turned out to be a woman, in coat and tie and man's hat. She has a line of dialogue that subtly hints she's a lesbian. This was made in the pre-code days!

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #1039 on: September 07, 2019, 02:20:08 PM »

--The Glass Bottom Boat

I'd seen this once before, but people were talking about it on a movie site as it had been recently released in Blu-ray and commenting on how gorgeous it looked that I got interested in revisiting it again.

It truly is a gorgeous looking film in this iteration. The movie itself has it's rewards if one is patient or if one has an appreciation for those late 1950's, early to mid-sixties movies with the gigantic lavish sets (like living rooms that seem as big as airline hangars) and a raft of supporting players that people of a certain age would enjoy seeing pop up in a film.

This film stars Doris Day, Rod Taylor and Arthur Godfrey as Doris's father. The one line plot of this film is: After a series of misunderstandings, the head of an aerospace research laboratory (Rod Taylor) begins to suspect his new girlfriend (Doris Day) is a Russian spy.

A lot of 60's movies and TV episodes are obsessed with Russia and Russian spies. Even Gilligan's Island!  And I'm remembering they even inserted a Russian plot device into the film version of Bye Bye Birdie! Ugh! It tends to date them badly and for some it's ruinous. In this one it's more of a hoot.

However, the title of this movie is really misleading. It's not really about The Glass Bottom Boat which is a Catalina Island attraction and, in this film, Doris' father is the proprietor and lives on Catalina. It IS how Doris meets Rod Taylor in the beginning of the movie and the Catalina scenes are beautiful and do add to the film, but it is a bit incredulous to think Doris keeps hopping back and forth from Los Angeles to Catalina as often as she does to visit her father. Plus, most of the film takes place in Los Angeles at either Doris's or Rod's residence or at the aero-space company.

There's a lot of slapstick which can be amusing, but also the film effects of the time can limit the amusement because it looks fake to us a lot of the time.

Rod Taylor's home seems to be the size of a football field and there's a fascinating scene of Rod & Doris in his kitchen which is outfitted with all kinds of gadgets "of the future" which I wonder if people thought they looked "possible" back then, because they come off as very clunky and problematic to a modern eye! Someone should compile scenes of movie kitchens over the years, including this one and the wonderful one with Katharine Hepburn who spends a wonderful scene cooking in the film Woman of the Year, although it might be Adam's Rib.

A whole slew of character actors populate this film like Dick Martin, Paul Lynde, Dom DeLuise, John McGiver, Edward Andrews and Ellen Corby and all are given their due. There's also an actor in it named Eric Fleming and I just love his voice, which is a small plot point in the film. Doris's next door neighbors are played by George Tobias and Alice Pearce and might as well have been named Abner & Gladys! (The movie was released after two seasons of Bewitched had aired in the summer of 1966.)

Paul Lynde in particular is just what you'd want from him. He even has a lengthy portion of the film dressed in drag and an amusing joke with an homage to The Man from U.N.C.L.E.! To top it off he has a scene where he walks into a room where two men are in bed together (the way that happens is plausible) and Paul Lynde's reaction shots to that are priceless!

This film also has a couple scenes that I love in movies and have rarely, if at all, been done in films the past few decades. It's a scene when people are just hanging out with each other and they sing a song together for no reason, really. Some noir films do this when they're in a nightclub or at a party. This Gun for Hire, In a Lonely Place and The Man in the Vault come to mind. In this one, her father, father's girlfriend and Doris all sing at his place in Catalina late at night having some drinks. Along with a short medley they sing the title tune. Doris even sings a verse of Que Sera Sera. Later she does a whole song by herself on the outdoor terrace. All just for the pleasure of it.

(I recall in the 1991 movie The Rocketeer, Jennifer Connelly is a nightclub performer and they set up this lavish introduction of her on a nightclub stage with a dozen dancers and her entrance coming out of a giant clamshell. She starts singing and less than a verse later she's cut off.)

In conclusion (heh!) this film is kind of like a wind up toy that you wind up and it amuses you and it winds down and you have to keep winding it back up. But, as I said, there's lots of entertainment to be had if you're patient enough!

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #1040 on: September 08, 2019, 12:25:55 PM »

--The Big Knife

This film is about an actor who is tired of his job and doesn't want to sign a new contract that would keep him tied to the studio, he's tired of pursuing movie success over "art", but the studio boss has sway over him because of something in the actor's past the studio paved over and he's being threatened the story would come out. Complicating matters is the actor's wife, currently separated from the actor, pushing him to give up the contract so they and their young son can rebuild their relationship. There's some other stories wound around the main plotline.

The movie has many interesting actors in it: Jack Palance is the "actor" and his wife is played by Ida Lupino. The studio boss is played by Rod Steiger. Wendell Corey plays the studio boss's fixer. He usually plays nice guy roles and he's so stone cold in this it was jarring to me! The wife of Jack Palance's agent is played by Jean Hagen. I didn't even recognize Strother Martin in a brief walk-on part. And in a supporting role as a very disgruntled actress being used by the studio for more than acting, is Shelley Winters, billed in the credits as Miss Shelley Winters.

This movie should've been way more involving than it was. I felt like I was watching a crew of people I couldn't care less about. Their many problems weren't that compelling for some reason. I felt like I was watching a play with actors who were bored with doing it and just going through the motions. I say that knowing this film was actually based on a Broadway play written by Clifford Odets, but i have no idea if any of the people in the movie were actually in the play. The movie felt very much like a staged play which isn't a compliment. It felt constrained.

This movie came out around the same time as another movie based on a Clifford Odets play, The Country Girl. That movie starred Bing Crosby, William Holden and Grace Kelly. (William Holden mentions he's working on this movie in the famous I Love Lucy episode he appears in.) The Country Girl had eight Oscar nominations including Best Picture, Director, Actor (Crosby) and Grace Kelly, who famously won over Judy Garland that year. (She shouldn't have. but she put her hair up and she wore glasses to look plain and dowdy--now "that's" acting!) Anyway, I saw The Country Girl on VHS once and later at a film series and it is more entertaining than The Big Knife, but after both times I've seen it, it doesn't take long for me to forget it and not remember much about it. The same thing has happened already with The Big Knife...starting to forget all about it! The Big Knife was not nominated for anything.

I wonder what Odets' plays are like on stage? I know Golden Boy was also a Clifford Odets play made into a film that I also feel the same way about. So if there's other movies out there based on his work, I'll be wary of them!





Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #1041 on: September 08, 2019, 06:10:00 PM »
--Ladies of the Jury

Do you guys know who the actress Edna May Oliver is? She might be best known for her role in the 1939 film Drums Along the Mohawk, for which she received a supporting actress nomination. She had supporting roles in quite a few notable films from the 1930's including Little Women, David Copperfield, Romeo & Juliet, A Tale of Two Cities, a couple Shirley Temple movies and 1940's Pride and Prejudice.

She's a hoot and she always perks up a movie she appears in. A friend of mine alerted me to one he saw recently and so I rented it. She is the lead in a 1932 movie called Ladies of the Jury. She plays Mrs. Livingston Baldwin Crane, so you know what kind of woman she might be. She causes a lot of havoc when she becomes a jury member, confounding the lawyers and judge as well. It's a nice 65 minutes long and the only complaint about it I might offer is that it's an early sound movie and I did have some trouble hearing the dialogue at times, but it was really warm and I also had fans going and the windows open. What can ya do?

The jury also had some other amusing characters in it. There was one I noticed and thought was a man at first, but turned out to be a woman, in coat and tie and man's hat. She has a line of dialogue that subtly hints she's a lesbian. This was made in the pre-code days!

[Raises hand] I know her! First and mainly from Drums Along the Mohawk. I'm writing this without double checking, but apparently she also made a few movies where she played the same character, an amateur detective who, of course, was better than the police at solving murders. I saw them on TCM. She was a real hoot.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #1042 on: September 08, 2019, 06:26:17 PM »
--The Glass Bottom Boat

Saw that one once, a long time ago.


Quote
This film stars Doris Day, Rod Taylor and Arthur Godfrey as Doris's father.

I've always thought Rod Taylor was hunky. He's one of the pleasures of Hitchcock's The Birds.


Quote
A lot of 60's movies and TV episodes are obsessed with Russia and Russian spies.

That was a plot point of the TV series Project Blue Book. I could have done without it. I think the Russians were trying to find out what was up with Project Blue Book.


Quote
A whole slew of character actors populate this film like Dick Martin, Paul Lynde, Dom DeLuise, John McGiver, Edward Andrews and Ellen Corby and all are given their due. There's also an actor in it named Eric Fleming and I just love his voice, which is a small plot point in the film. Doris's next door neighbors are played by George Tobias and Alice Pearce and might as well have been named Abner & Gladys! (The movie was released after two seasons of Bewitched had aired in the summer of 1966.)

I guess they don't write roles like that anymore--and I guess they don't have actors to play them anymore. I guess Eric Fleming is mostly remembered, if he's remembered at all, for Rawhide, the TV show that I suppose more or less launched Clint Eastwood's career.


Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #1043 on: September 08, 2019, 06:52:58 PM »
Saturday must have been English History Day on HBO. In the early evening they ran The Favorite, and then they followed up at 8 p.m. with Mary, Queen of Scots.

I saw only the last hour of The Favorite, and what I did see I didn't much care for.  At least, I don't feel a need to see the whole film. I'll give it this much though: The score was fantastic. If it wasn't all genuine Baroque, somebody did a damn good job composing in the Baroque style, because the music was wonderful.

I was pleasantly surprised by Mary, Queen of Scots. I expected not to like it, but in fact I really did! Saoirse Ronan was very good as Mary, and Margot Robbie made a good Elizabeth. A minor point, perhaps, but I was impressed that they made up Robbie to look like she had smallpox scars on her face. Elizabeth really did; that's one reason she started wearing that awful heavy white make-up, to hide the scars. Jack Lowdon, who played Henry, Lord Darnley, Mary's second husband, was pretty easy on the eyes, too.

One thing about any movie about Mary and Elizabeth that always gets me is they all have to have a scene where Mary and Elizabeth meet. They never did. It bothers me because I think a lot of people will take that for history when it didn't actually happen.

The other thing that bothers me about this film in particular was the scene where Elizabeth was depicted as signing Mary's death warrant in the presence of her entire privy council. It was probably dramatically necessary, but that didn't happen that way either. It was actually a put-up job, or I'm very suspicious that it was, anyway.

Here's your history lesson for the day: Mary was tried, convicted, and sentenced. Elizabeth had to sign the death warrant, and she dithered about it. She had already been the object of a number of assassination plots, and she was almost superstitiously afraid of causing the execution of another anointed queen. The privy council wanted the execution carried out, so they sent the council secretary to Elizabeth to with a number of papers to sign, and the death warrant was slipped in among them. Elizabeth signed the warrant, and the council sent it off to be carried out before Elizabeth could stop it. When she found out, she went into one of her towering rages, and the secretary spent some time in the Tower, but I can't escape the suspicion that it was all a put-up job, that Elizabeth was in on it from the start. It gave her plausible deniability, and the secretary took the fall.

Offline morrobay

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #1044 on: September 10, 2019, 05:21:18 PM »
A Raisin in the Sun is on tonight.  I love this movie and haven't thought about it in a long time.  The performances by the actors are really wonderful.

TCMHD - 64 Tue, 9/10, 7:00 PM 2 hrs 15 min
1961, Drama, Social Topic
An extended African-American family living in a small apartment on the South Side of Chicago struggles to make ends meet, but when they unexpectedly receive a large sum of money each of them has a different idea of how to use the funds.
Credits: Sidney Poitier (Actor), Claudia McNeil (Actor), Ruby Dee (Actor), Diana Sands (Actor), Ivan Dixon (Actor), John Fiedler (Actor)
“Leave the gun.  Take the cannoli.”

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #1045 on: September 11, 2019, 08:06:46 AM »
A Raisin in the Sun is on tonight.  I love this movie and haven't thought about it in a long time.  The performances by the actors are really wonderful.

That is a great film!

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #1046 on: September 11, 2019, 12:56:45 PM »

Haven't seen that one in a long time.

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #1047 on: September 11, 2019, 03:36:15 PM »

--The Best of Everything

This is a film I wish was just a little bit better! It has the elements of a classic, but it needs to be a little tighter everywhere. But if it was faster, it might feel crazy with all the stuff that happens. I think they wanted to make a film that’s respectful of its subject/heroines.

It's a got a huge cast headlined, in a supporting role, by Joan Crawford, with Hope Lange, Stephen Boyd, Suzy Parker, Martha Hyer, Dianne Baker, Brian Aherne, Robert Evans and Louis Jourdan. It's an expose of the lives and loves of Madison Avenue working girls and the higher ups, the men, they work for.

This is one of those late 50's, early '60's color wide-screen movies that take place in New York City, like Desk Set, Designing Women and The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit, among others. In the last scene of this movie, when those large yellow NYC taxi's are flowing down the street, you half expect The Best of Everything to segue right into Breakfast at Tiffany's.

A friend of mine that I watched the movie with, wrote me this morning and mentioned, about this film, this: "I feel like the Stephen Boyd character is actually gay, hence the drinking and halfhearted pursuit of Hope Lange. And that in the end she’s resigned to being his beard. Because it just seems like it was only a great friendship. But that’s me in 2019 looking at it."

I began wondering if, in the novel by Rona Jaffe, that it's based on, if perhaps this character was gay in the book. After searching for quite awhile I came across this paragraph in a review written in 2011 for The Guardian:

"...the novel is replete with five o'clock Martinis in sepulchral bars, but you feel, too, the steady thrum of its characters' most private anxieties: about money, about contraception, about promotion. Some of Jaffe's twists were considered shocking in 1958 (a backstreet abortion, a character who is secretly gay). But others feel strikingly timeless. How to deal with the sexist dolt who is your boss? When he puts his hand drunkenly on your thigh, do you knee him in the groin, or smile beatifically and pray for a raise?"

Most of the book reviews I waded through don't mention much of the male characters, as the book is primarily concerned with the ladies, as is the film. This review quote doesn't mention the actual character, but I think my friend is on to something with the revelation that one of the novel's characters is indeed gay!

Interestingly, this quote also mentions a backstreet abortion. It comes to mind this was also changed in the film. Hope Lange has gotten pregnant by a playboy character played by Robert Evans. He is driving her, unbeknownst to her at first, to get an abortion as he wants nothing to do with children and thinks she'll just accept this. She doesn't and after arguing with him she wants to get out of the car. He doesn't stop to let her so she, rather stupidly to me, jumps out of the moving car and, of course, she loses the baby, so I'm guessing this is how they handled it from book to screen.

A couple other trivia items I learned this morning:

--After we watched the film, we watched the movie trailer that was an extra on the Blu-Ray and at one point I asked...did we see that scene? I wondered if I'd dozed off or missed something. Then I read this today: "According to cast member Diane Baker, Crawford's role was cut before filming and cut even further before release, causing the removal of a show-stopping drunk scene by Crawford. Bits of this scene are in the trailer included on the DVD and Blu-Ray release."

--In 1970, ABC produced a daytime serial with the same title, based on this book. It lasted less than a year. (!)

--And a gay reference on hindsight: "In the scene where Caroline and April are meeting Gregg for lunch, they cross what is apparently Christopher Street where the original Stonewall Inn was located. The sign can be half seen in the background in red lights. This was about 10 years prior to the Stonewall riots of 1969. At the time this was filmed, it was called Bonnie's Stonewall Inn, and it was a bar and restaurant for general clientele. It did not become a gay bar until 1966.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #1048 on: September 12, 2019, 08:01:13 AM »
A Raisin in the Sun is on tonight.

I'm really annoyed now that I missed it. When I'm going to be home, I always check the schedule for TCM. I have no idea why I didn't check it on Tuesday.  >:(

Offline Paul029

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Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #1049 on: September 13, 2019, 11:19:18 AM »
...

A friend of mine that I watched the movie with, wrote me this morning and mentioned, about this film, this: "I feel like the Stephen Boyd character is actually gay, hence the drinking and halfhearted pursuit of Hope Lange. And that in the end she’s resigned to being his beard. Because it just seems like it was only a great friendship. But that’s me in 2019 looking at it."

I began wondering if, in the novel by Rona Jaffe, that it's based on, if perhaps this character was gay in the book. After searching for quite a while I came across this paragraph in a review written in 2011 for The Guardian:

"...the novel is replete with five o'clock Martinis in sepulchral bars, but you feel, too, the steady thrum of its characters' most private anxieties: about money, about contraception, about promotion. Some of Jaffe's twists were considered shocking in 1958 (a backstreet abortion, a character who is secretly gay).

If it's the Stephen Boyd character, Lyle, it might be similar, according to Gore Vidal, Ben Hur’s screenwriter, to how Boyd played his character, and without Heston’s knowledge?
...there was no real scent, only the memory of it, the imagined power of Brokeback Mountain...