The Ultimate Brokeback Forum

Author Topic: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.  (Read 290117 times)

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

  • Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 24500
Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #3360 on: September 21, 2022, 11:39:55 AM »
--The Cobweb

This is an MGM movie from 1955 when color widescreen films were trying to draw audiences away from their TV sets. It was based on a book and directed by Vincente Minnelli.

It's a potboiler with a notable cast, like Peyton Place, but it falls short in the plot department. It's about a man who becomes the director of a psychiatric institution and has to deal with the people running it as well as the patients who seem to be there voluntarily. Movies dealing with psychiatry and/or mental illness never seem to age well as people's ideas about that, both the average person and professionals alike, change pretty rapidly. I remember seeing a screening of Montgomery Clift's film Freud and a few scenes were greeted with laughter.

However, the reason to see this film is that it has a fascinating cast of a dozen people or so: Richard Widmark, Lauren Bacall, Lillian Gish, John Kerr, Tommy Rettig (Lassie TV series), Susan Strasberg, Oscar Levant, Charles Boyer, Gloria Grahame, Adele Jergens, Mabel Albertson and Fay Wray. All in one film!

After the main credits, there's a scrawl that appears that says: "The trouble began..." and when the picture concludes another scrawl appears: "The trouble was over..."  I didn't feel it was! Heh!

Offline gattaca

  • Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 2848
  • How do you hide when you are running from yourself
Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #3361 on: Yesterday at 06:38:08 AM »
Needed a ++ film for a change of perspective.  I stumbled across "Forever Strong (2008)" starring Gary Coleman, Sean Austin, and Neil McDonough and a few others I did not immediately recognize.   BLUF: The film follows the path a young man takes to redeem himself and his father.  While the film is predictable at times, it remains a good, positive story - based on a solid, proven coaching and life truths.  Worthy of watch is you enjoy "based on true events" sports films which resonate. This one was engaging for me but it certainly will not be everyone's cup of tea.   YMMV. 

Rotten Critics were not kind but the audience sees the film in a different light at 29/75 -> https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/10010155-forever_strong
Some IMDB audience reviews -> https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0840322/reviews
IMDB -> https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0840322/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1

Free to watch (at least in US) on YT -> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFjnK5Nx-II

One of the coache's line:  "Don't spend another minute on being angry about yesterday.  Free him and free yourself."   It's hard to explain to people who tend to hold grudges or want to "get even" the power in that line.  I have to remind myself of that one sometimes - especially at work when you deal with that sort of petty thing almost weekly.    Later, V.

Offline Lyle (Mooska)

  • Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 24500
Re: What Movie Did You Watch This Weekend? The Third.
« Reply #3362 on: Yesterday at 11:16:34 AM »
I don't think I've heard of this movie, either, Vincent. In the days of Video Stores, and when I got to meet some celebrities at VSDA* trade shows, I met Sean Astin at one of those in Las Vegas. This was pre-LOTR and such, in the '90s. I asked him a question about the Memphis Belle film, wondering what it was like to have flown in an actual B-17. In person he was very charming and good natured, didn't mind talking to people. (You can tell some at those kind of things don't particularly like it.) He saw my VSDA ID hanging around my neck indicating I was from West Hollywood and he mentioned that. Then he says, "My cousin just opened a hair salon in West Hollywood" at such and such address and he told me I should go to that place and tell them he sent me there and he wrote down the address on a card. Heh!

I don't remember what project he was promoting at the time, but I do have an autographed 8x10 of him in whatever that film was. Perhaps I should look it up sometime.

Speaking of Memphis Belle, I do like that film and bought one back in the day on DVD, when it came out in a cardboard kinda packaging and it was a two-sided disc with content on both sides of the disc. No one does that now, no customer likes it, so I actually just ordered a Blu-Ray version of the film. Now I'll be even more interested in revisiting it.

*Video Software Dealers Association

One of the coach's lines:  "Don't spend another minute on being angry about yesterday.  Free him and free yourself."   It's hard to explain to people who tend to hold grudges or want to "get even" the power in that line.  I have to remind myself of that one sometimes - especially at work when you deal with that sort of petty thing almost weekly.    Later, V.

I love that quote, Vincent. It's a good one to keep handy and contemplate once in awhile. Especially if one has some anger about something that comes up.

I remember a motivational speaker saying that many now are always looking for something to be offended about and as sure as anything, if you're looking for that you will definitely find it.  (What you seek you will find, so to speak.) And this was before the current state of our politics. The internet has made it that much easier to find things to be offended about. Just look at the comments on youtube videos. (Or any comment section.)

Which reminds me of a Lily Tomlin quote: "Man learned to talk because of his deep inner need to complain." Heh!

AS to your comments about the discrepancy in the reviews from critics and audience -- have you noticed that many critics just don't like movies with "sentimental" aspects, and I noticed in those negative reviews many using that word in various contexts. If you notice, even the best reviewed romantic comedies or romantic dramas, which rely on sentiment to varying degrees, the best reviewed ones are often pretty evenly split between those who give them thumbs up or down with even the thumbs up making a complaint or two about sentimentality. I'm guessing many male critics feel sentiment is a weakness of some kind because it shows vulnerability, I don't know, but I have noticed these.