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Offline CellarDweller115

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The Daily Sheet April - June 2020
« on: April 06, 2020, 05:52:32 PM »


Tuesday, April 7th, 2020



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'The Last of Us’ and Gustavo Santaolalla


The Last of Us is a 2013 action-adventure game developed by Naughty Dog and published by Sony Computer Entertainment. Players control Joel, a smuggler tasked with escorting a teenage girl, Ellie, across a post-apocalyptic United States. The Last of Us is played from a third-person perspective. Players use firearms and improvised weapons, and can use stealth to defend against hostile humans and cannibalistic creatures infected by a mutated strain of the Cordyceps fungus. In the online multiplayer mode, up to eight players engage in cooperative and competitive gameplay.

The forthcoming TV adaptation of The Last of Us for HBO will be scored by the same composer behind the music for both The Last of Us and The Last of Us Part 2.

Gustavo Santaolalla, who composed and performed the original score for both games in The Last of Us franchise, will join Naughty Dog’s Neil Druckmann as senior creatives working on both the video games and the HBO series. Druckmann, the game’s director and writer, is a co-writer and co-executive producer of the TV show. He announced Wednesday that Santaolalla had joined the project.

Santaolalla is a two-time Academy Award winner, for Best Original Score, taking Oscars in 2006 and 2007 for Brokeback Mountain and Babel, respectively. The Last of Us, its expansion Left Behind, and The Last of Us Part 2 are his only video game scores. Santaolalla’s career as a composer for TV and film dates back to 2000, and most recently includes work for Netflix’s Narcos: Mexico and the true crime documentary Making a Murderer.

'The Last of Us’ and Gustavo Santaolalla



Sports Announcer is Narrating Everyday Activities


Like many people, Nick Heath has a lot more time on his hands as every major sporting event around the world has been cancelled or suspended. Heath, an out sports commentator and journalist, covers athletes and sports events around the world and hosts the rugby podcast Cue Commentator.  Now, he has had to find a new outlet for his love of sports, and thankfully for us, he did – a series of videos he bills as #LifeCommentary/#LiveCommentary.

In the videos, Heath translates his talents for energetically describing actions happening on the field into describing commoner’s activities, such as dogs chasing each other, or a woman crossing the street.  Now, with over 97,000 followers on Twitter – 82,000 more than one week ago – and 20,000 on Instagram, it’s definitely catching on.

Heath, based out of London, relayed in a recent interview that after local sporting events were shut down – but daily life in the U.K. remained pretty normal – he saw “a chance for me to go out and have a bit of fun.”

“I’ve sort of referred to it a little bit as almost being the placebo for real sports because sport for me is as much about the sound of it, the look of it, the feel of it as the action itself,” he explained to USA Today Sports. “So I think if you can embody the sound of it to a degree, then you’re almost scratching the itch for some people.”

Sports Announcer is Narrating Everyday Activities



An Activist Before Harvey Milk


Forty-six years ago, on April 2, 1974, out lesbian Kathy Kozachenko was elected to the Ann Arbor City Council in Michigan — becoming the first openly gay person elected to political office in the United States. Then a 21-year-old University of Michigan student campaigning under the local (and now defunct) Human Rights Party, Kozachenko beat her lone Democratic opponent by 52 votes to little fanfare.

“Not a lot of people know about me,” Kozachenko, 67, told NBC News. The accolade of “first elected openly gay official” is often misattributed to Harvey Milk, the boisterous gay icon who was elected to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors in 1977. In fact, Milk was hardly the first LGBTQ person to be elected to political office. Less than a year after Kozachenko was elected, out lesbian Elaine Noble was elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives.

Kozachenko speculated that there are a few reasons she’s been overlooked by history. Aside from being a woman, she never made her sexuality central to her campaign — a decision that sets her apart from many of her more well-known successors.

“Harvey Milk was a very strong and vibrant gay activist,” Kozachenko said, adding that Milk, who was assassinated a year after his election, was a hero and a martyr. “I was and am a social justice advocate, of which LGBTQ rights comes in.”

An Activist Before Harvey Milk




Bisexual Cast Members on 'Love Is Blind'


The first season of Love Is Blind featured a surprise sexual orientation revelation, but that likely will not happen in Season 2 because producers are reportedly asking potential cast members that personal question during the casting process. The show is casting in the Chicago area after the first season focused on residents in Atlanta. Love Is Blind was picked up for two more seasons, along with Netflix's other hit reality show The Circle.

The casting questionnaire includes several personal questions, including if they consider themselves straight, gay, bisexual or other, reports TMZ. Other questions are standard ones, including age, hair color, eye color, ethnicity, hobbies, jobs and dating status. They are also asked about deal-breakers, including religion, ethnicity and other cultural differences. Potential cast members are also asked about cigarette and alcohol use, designed physical traits and descriptions of their dating history.

Producers are also asking potential cast members for portraits and full body photos, even though the whole point of the show is to test cast members' ability to fall in love without seeing potential partners. Cast members only see their partner after they get engaged, and the rest of the show follows their attempts to get to know one another more before they get married.

Season 1 eventually focused on just six couples, with two of them getting married, two breaking up at the altar and one breaking up after getting engaged. Diamond Jack and Carlton Morton were engaged when Morton surprised Jack by revealing he is bisexual. The two broke up in Mexico, where the couples were taken for a brief vacation before returning to Atlanta. The decision to ask potential cast members about their sexuality during the casting process could keep an explosive break-up like Jack and Morton's from happening again.

Bisexual Cast Members on 'Love Is Blind'




Hungary and Legal Gender Recognition


On March 31, the Hungarian government submitted a bill to parliament that, among other things, would  make it impossible for transgender people to legally change their gender. It was unclear when parliament might debate and vote on the bill.

The proposed amendment to the Registry Act would include a clarification regarding the word “nem,” which in Hungarian can mean both “sex” and “gender,” to specifically refer to the sex at birth (“szuletesi nem”) as “biological sex based on primary sex characteristics and chromosomes.” According to the draft bill, the birth sex, once recorded, cannot be amended.

This attack on a vulnerable minority group comes amid the COVID-19 pandemic, when, instead of focusing on ways to protect public health from the virus, the government used the crisis as a pretext to grab unlimited and indefinite power by proclaiming a state of emergency, enabling it to rule by decree.

This show of contempt for the rights of the transgender community flies in the face of the European Convention on Human Rights case-law. In a 2002 case involving a trans person in the United Kingdom, the court held that refusal to change identification documents and legal identities could amount to discrimination and violate the right to respect for private lives. In another case in 2003, the court found that Germany had failed to respect an applicant’s “freedom to define herself as a female person, one of the most basic essentials of self-determination.”


Hungary and Legal Gender Recognition



Accepting My Asexual Identity


“You’re going to make someone very happy one day,” a friend said often, so often that this empty sentiment that says we are only on this earth to be in fairy tale-ending relationships started bleeding into my subconscious.  I now know that this anonymous someone I’m supposed to make very happy is, and always should be me.

My path to happiness, otherwise known as my journey through understanding my asexuality or, as my close friends have nicknamed it—my sexual hermit life—began in the sixth grade. I had an epiphany during the school nurse’s request for permission to teach me sex education. Our parents were supposed to sign a form, giving the okay to let their children learn about sex. Then and there, I instructed my mom to select “no,” having no interest in the act.

Something within said, “Oh no, sex is not for this body of mine.” Yes, I had minor fleeting crushes (mostly on unattainable celebrities), and I was comfortable in the somewhat romantic desire to become a famous artist and writer, hoping to share my art the way one shares their body with a lover. But there was never a desire for sex. During that time, my 12-year-old body changed tremendously: long-lined stretchmarks began covering some 60 percent of my hyperpigmented brown skin, telling stories in these rhythmic yellow-white strips, skipping over my face, neck, shoulders, hands, forearms, stomach, and feet. They seemed ugly to me, uncomfortable secrets beneath the layers of baggy clothes, secrets that were mine alone.

Men on the streets brusquely assaulted my body, screaming indecent insinuations from their cars, following my daily walks, interrupting my reading at the library. If I rejected them, they turned malicious and vengeful, their “pet names” becoming foul insults. No place seemed safe. Furthermore, women were trying to nudge me in their direction, mistaking my adamant refusals of heteronormative relationships as a form of misandry and a preference for women.

Accepting My Asexual Identity



Being an LGBT Ally While In Lockdown


Jade Thirlwall, member of the music group Little Mix, has shared her top tips for being an LGBT+ ally while self-isolating.

Thirlwall told Glamour magazine that it’s important to still be an LGBT+ ally during the coronavirus lockdown – especially when some LGBT+ people will be stuck in homes with people who might not be supportive of who they are.

"We’re all in self isolation and some LGBT+ people might be in a home or a family environment where they’re not very supportive of being who they are,” she said.  “So, if you know anybody who is in that circumstance, reach out to them, message them, show them how much you support and love them – there’s many ways you can be doing that whilst being indoors.”

Thirlwall also shared that she’s “still learning” how to be an ally to trans people, how to use people’s pronouns and how to “practice what you preach”.

“I’m still learning what the right pronouns are or how to speak to someone and make sure you don’t offend someone or be an ally in the right way and making sure it doesn’t look like you are using to your advantage or for your benefit."

Being an LGBT Ally While In Lockdown




Your Laugh For The Day!









Contributors: KillersMom, CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet April - June 2020
« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2020, 10:02:37 PM »


Tuesday, April 14th, 2020



The Forum & SSL - Secure Socket Layer


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Heath's Refusal to Attend The 2007 Oscars


Actor Jake Gyllenhaal revealed in a recent interview that Heath Ledger, his co-star in “Brokeback Mountain,” refused to appear at the 2007 Academy Awards ceremony over an opening monologue joke about their critically acclaimed movie at the Oscars the year before.

Based on a 1997 award-winning short story of the same name, “Brokeback Mountain” depicts the intense decades-long relationship between cowboy Ennis Del Mar (Ledger) and farmhand Jack Twist (Gyllenhaal), who fall in love in the mountains of Wyoming in 1963 while tending sheep. The film received eight nominations and won three Oscars at the 2006 awards ceremony.

Gyllenhaal and Ledger, who were both nominated (neither won), were asked to present at the ceremony the following year, but a joke written into the opening monologue about the same-sex love story dissuaded Ledger from attending, according to Gyllenhaal.

“I remember they wanted to do an opening for the Academy Awards that year that was sort of joking about it,” Gyllenhaal told the fashion magazine Another Man. “And Heath refused. I was sort of at the time, ‘Oh, OK … whatever.’ I’m always like, ‘It’s all in good fun.’ And Heath said, ‘It’s not a joke to me — I don’t want to make any jokes about it.’”

“That’s the thing I loved about Heath. He would never joke,” Gyllenhaal added. “Someone wanted to make a joke about the story or whatever, he was like: ‘No. This is about love. Like, that’s it, man. Like, no.’”

Heath's Refusal to Attend The 2007 Oscars



'Modern Family' and Gay Families on TV


When “Modern Family” premiered in 2009, the mockumentary-style family sitcom was an instant hit, one that would forever alter the fabric of the television landscape. At the time, it seemed water cooler discussion of primetime television had gone the way of the radio, but — much like that other medium — it came roaring back. While Sofia Vergara’s Gloria waltzed her way into the hearts of gay men and lesbians for wildly different reasons, it was Cameron and Mitchell’s loving relationship that made LGBTQ viewers feel truly seen and represented.

Played by Jesse Tyler Ferguson and Eric Stonestreet, seeing a loving (and bickering) gay couple on primetime was a revelation. Without downplaying the strides made by “Will & Grace,” “Modern Family” was the first time a major network had shown a long-term, committed queer relationship — and with two of its leading characters. That the show was funny, smart, and inclusive in other ways was the cherry on top.

To fully grasp the monumental nature of this milestone, it’s imperative to remember that 2009 was the year California’s hateful Prop 8 was passed. Marriage equality would not become the law of the land for another 6 years, with the Supreme Court’s historic Obergefell v. Hodges decision in 2015. At the time of the first season of “Modern Family,” LGBTQ characters accounted for just three percent — 18 total — of all primetime scripted broadcast series regulars. Compare that to the 90 LGBTQ primetime series regulars of 2020, and the power of “Modern Family” is clear.

'Modern Family' and Gay Families on TV



Phyllis Lyon Dies at 95


Activist Phyllis Lyon, who spent more than 50 years fighting for LGBTQ rights, died of natural causes. She was 95.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom shared the news of Lyon's death in a post on Twitter on Thursday, calling her a "dear friend." "Phyllis—it was the honor of a lifetime to marry you & Del," Newsom wrote in the tweet, which was accompanied by a video of the two of them. "Your courage changed the course of history."   When Newsom served as mayor of San Francisco, he officiated the wedding between Lyon and her late partner Del Martin in 2008.

In 2004, San Francisco officials allowed gay couples in the city to wed, prompting a flood of applicants to the City Hall clerk's office. The officials chose Lyon, then 80, and Martin, then 83, to take the first vows.

Those unions were voided by California's Supreme Court, until 2008 when it struck down the state's ban on same-sex marriage. The ruling paved the way for same-sex couples to marry in the state -- and Lyon and Martin chose to get remarried.

Lyon and Martin, who passed away in 2008, first met back in 1950. Together, they were pioneers in fighting for same-sex marriage in California.  The couple founded the Daughters of Bilitis -- the first lesbian rights organization in the US -- in 1955.  Both are considered champions of the LGBTQ rights movement.

Phyllis Lyon Dies at 95




'Moana' Star Comes Out as Bisexual


With so much time on our hands during isolation, what better time to start a TikTok? While most are learning fun dances and sharing wild isolation videos, Auli’i Cravalho used her new account to send a big message. The Moana star came out as bisexual in a TikTok video.

19-year-old Auli'i posted a video to her TikTok of her mouthing along to Eminem lyrics, seeming to comment on her sexuality. Auli'i specifically emphasized the "she said" parts of the following lyrics: "Seriously though, jokes aside, how you doin’? You straight? She said: 'No, I’m bi.' She said: 'Are you drunk?' I said: 'No, I’m high. I’m checkin’ out the chick,' she said: 'So am I.'"

Ok, we've all sang lyrics that don't apply to us. It could've just been a random post, right? Well, Auli'i confirmed she was making a statement via Twitter. When a fan asked her "do u like girls?" Auli'i directed them to her TikTok video.

While Eminem lyrics are perhaps an odd choice for a coming out video, we're happy that Auli'i is comfortable sharing her sexuality. Judging by fan reactions, it seems we're not alone.


'Moana' Star Comes Out as Bisexual




Transgender Icon Henrietta Robinson Dies at 79


Henrietta Robinson, one of the first transgender people to live openly in South Florida, died Friday of complications from COVID-19.

It is believed she contracted the deadly virus while in the hospital for hernia surgery. Known variously as the Mother of Miami Beach, the Grand Lady of South Beach, the Queen of South Beach, and more by friends and admirers, Robinson had played an instrumental role in the development of the area’s LGBTQ nightlife and drag scene since 1959. She was 79.

“Henrietta was a pioneer in the LGBTQ+ community,” Miami Beach Pride said on Facebook. “One of the first Transgender individuals to live her life in Miami Beach. She was beacon of light in the Transgender movement and a mentor to so many who struggled through the years.”

With her signature blond bouffant hairstyle and retro ’60s fashion choices, Robinson was instantly recognizable around town and a regular in South Beach gay bars. She considered Twist nightclub a second home, as she had a seat on reserve and her fellow patrons treated her like royalty.

Robinson was born in Akron, Ohio, in 1941. She later moved to Milton, Mass., before settling in South Beach in 1959. Robinson immediately set about to make an impact. Her drag performances were legendary before they were even legal.


Transgender Icon Henrietta Robinson Dies at 79



GenderQueer: A story From Another Closet


GenderQueer: A Story From Another Closet by Allan D. Hunter is a treacherous and often realistic tale that’s packed with frustration, desperation and yearning. Hunter does an amazing job of captivating the raw emotions of a person seeking their own truths in a world where everyone else seems to know who they are and what their place is in the world.

The story is about an “ identity that is not gay, bisexual, lesbian, or transgender, but isn’t cisgender and heterosexual either.” Gender invert, Derek Turner, is on a journey of self discovery. He grew up valuing individuality over conformity, but it often resulted in him being picked on, harassed and straight up violently bullied. He has to make the tough decision of conformity to the masses to fit in while also keeping his own identity intact.

The story follows Derek from age 8 into his 20s. We get to see how he struggles with loneliness, addiction, heartbreak and bullying, alongside family problems, college and platonic influences in his life. Derek spends the majority of the book trying to uncover the truths about himself such as why he was ostractized, why no girl seemed to want him, and why others thought he was gay.

The tone of the book is a dark and mellow one. We see Derek from a very young age get picked on and beat up. He tries time and time again not to let the bullies get into his head, but it proves more and more difficult. All the while he starts to believe the things they say about him. He seeks out answers in both healthy and unhealthy ways, often getting him in all sorts of trouble.

GenderQueer: A story From Another Closet



Being an LGBT Ally While In Lockdown


Jade Thirlwall, member of the music group Little Mix, has shared her top tips for being an LGBT+ ally while self-isolating.

Thirlwall told Glamour magazine that it’s important to still be an LGBT+ ally during the coronavirus lockdown – especially when some LGBT+ people will be stuck in homes with people who might not be supportive of who they are.

"We’re all in self isolation and some LGBT+ people might be in a home or a family environment where they’re not very supportive of being who they are,” she said.  “So, if you know anybody who is in that circumstance, reach out to them, message them, show them how much you support and love them – there’s many ways you can be doing that whilst being indoors.”

Thirlwall also shared that she’s “still learning” how to be an ally to trans people, how to use people’s pronouns and how to “practice what you preach”.

“I’m still learning what the right pronouns are or how to speak to someone and make sure you don’t offend someone or be an ally in the right way and making sure it doesn’t look like you are using to your advantage or for your benefit."

Being an LGBT Ally While In Lockdown




Your Laugh For The Day!









Contributors: KillersMom, CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

We count on you to send us your news items, questions, and nominations for posts of the day.
If you have items you’d like to see published, send them to CellarDweller115.

To subscribe to The Daily Sheet, click the “Notify” button at the top or bottom of the page.
When a new issue of TDS is posted, you will be notified by e-mail.

The Daily Sheet Archives
Respond to The Daily Sheet

Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet April - June 2020
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2020, 02:40:54 PM »


Tuesday, April 21st, 2020



The Forum & SSL - Secure Socket Layer


Hello UBF members.  When the forum had a recent update, our server began using SSL - Secure Socket Layer.  SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) is the standard security technology for establishing an encrypted link between a web server and a browser. This link ensures that all data passed between the web server and browsers remain private and integral. SSL is an industry standard and is used by millions of websites in the protection of their online transactions with their customers.

It is easy to tell if a site you are using is on SSL.  A site without SSL will have an address that starts with http://.  A site that uses SSL will start with https://.

Why are we telling you this?  Because if you are posting pictures here, and the address you use doesn't have the "s" in it, the image will not show.  Anytime you post an image, you should make sure that it starts with https://




A Changed Man


Jake Gyllenhaal will spend a fair amount of the time we spend together today trying to explain how he’s changed. He’ll come at this from all kinds of directions. One moment he might mention how “there’s a preciousness that went away”. Another, he’ll detail how he’s been trying “to take some time, and moments, listen to my own feelings”. Or he’ll compare how he is now to how he was when we last met like this, ten years ago: “All I can say to you is I feel so good where I am in my life. I was so unresolved in so many different ways, searching for things outside of myself, and when we last met I think that was what was happening. Now I’m sort of like: this is who I am, in a lot of ways. This is who I’m gonna be.”

At least part of this relates to an evolution in how Gyllenhaal approaches his acting. He had become known, particularly over the last decade, for roles involving intense preparation often coupled with some kind of notable physical transformation but he now talks of this almost as if it may have been some kind of phase he passed through. It’s not that he’s disavowing what he has done, or even saying that those instincts aren’t still alive within him – “I am super-specific, I am obsessive sometimes when I’m creating things,” he reaffirms – but he is acknowledging how the creative process he embraced may nonetheless, cumulatively, have also amounted to some kind of avoidance.

“I think I’ve hidden a lot,” he says. “Like, ‘I’m gonna hide, and then I’ll create these characters and I’ll tinker in the corner with these ideas...’ I hid in my idea of what I thought an actor was supposed to be, what they’re supposed to do. And I’m kind of like: ‘Fuck it, I’m not like that at all.’”

In truth, conversation with Jake Gyllenhaal is not always the most linear process. There are plenty more explanations and thoughts to come about who he is and who he was, and plenty of other stories and discussions that will offer evidence both corroboratory and contradictory, maybe sometimes even when he doesn’t mean them to, but they don’t always arrive in the most ordered fashion. At one point, in the middle of a stream of broken, half-finished sentences, he apologises, explaining that “this interviewing muscle, talking about myself, has not been used in a while”.

A Changed Man



Literature and Gay Love


The world is sick.  It is easy to think that when the COVID-19 death "tally" increases every day and reports suggest that as much as a third of the global population is currently living in some form of lock-down.

Here in Australia we are experiencing unprecedented limitations on how we can move about and who we can see. Some of us are lucky to be in a long-term relationship and intimacy is only a look or a joke away. Others are having a much more challenging time: not being able to see who they want, when they want, how they want, and why they want. Has love become even harder?

This week, while eating a homemade omelette for lunch (packed with mushrooms and feta), I decided to take my mind off the current troubles by watching a short film in which French philosopher Alain Badiou spoke about love being "a risky adventure".

Towards the end of the film, Badiou said two things that resonated with me: "Love creates a perspective and an existence in the world from the point of view of two, not one", which he described as a "revolutionary act"; and, evidently paraphrasing Spinoza, "All that is true and rare are difficult", which is a statement that reached right into my belly."  All that is true and rare are difficult.

Yes, that is love: wonderful, beautiful, messy, contradictory, infuriating, exciting, banal; and, in this challenging and sometimes unbearably heavy year, necessary.

Literature and Gay Love



Lesbian Judge Sanctioned


A lesbian judge in Texas has been sanctioned for displaying a rainbow flag in her courtroom, after a lawyer complained that it was a “symbol of sexuality” and comparable to a swastika.

Bexar County Judge Rosie Speedlin Gonzalez is appealing a decision by the Texas Commission on Judicial Conduct, which told her in a private sanction that the rainbow flag — which flew alongside the U.S. flag and Texas state flag — was a breach of impartiality rules, Texas Lawyer reports.

Gonzalez made history in 2018 by becoming the first openly gay judge to be elected in Bexar County, and argued that the flag represented equality in her courtroom.

“Everyone is welcome into this courtroom,” she said. “That was the symbolism behind that flag.”

But lawyer Flavio Hernandez, who submitted a complaint against Gonzalez, said that the flag was one of the “symbols of sexuality,” and that he would be similarly offended by a judge displaying a swastika or confederate flag.

“I think a judge bringing in symbols of sexuality — regardless of what kind of sexuality — I think that has no place in the courtroom,” Hernandez told Texas Lawyer.

Lesbian Judge Sanctioned




Liam Payne Issues Apology


“It was a very confusing time for me when I was making that album.”   That is part of the heartfelt apology that former One Direction member Liam Payne offered to those he offended with his controversial “bisexual anthem”.

Both Ways, which was included on his debut album LP1, attracted a lot of criticism from fans over the sexualisation of bisexual women, and the feeding of the trope that bisexual people are only around for threesomes.

In the song, Liam sings: “Lovin’ the way that she’s turning you on, switching the lanes like a Bugatti Sport. Nothing but luck that she got me involved, yeah. Flipping that body, go head, I go tails. Sharing that body like it’s our last meal.”

It lead to the hashtag #LiamPayneIsOverParty to trend on Twitter.  In a new interview with Daily Star, Liam said it wasn’t a “deliberate move” to make insensitive and over-sexualised music.

“It was a very confusing time for me when I was making that album. I was going through a lot of personal things that I didn’t speak about a lot; with song writing, stage fright and being scared of the future,” he admitted.


Liam Payne Issues Apology




Transgender People and The Grey Market


Evelyn was growing nervous as she watched her supply of spironolactone dwindle while the city of Boston, where she lives, started its coronavirus lockdown in mid-March.

Evelyn, 21, takes spiro as part of her hormone-replacement therapy to treat gender dysphoria, which happens when a person feels their body doesn't match their gender identity. She's had a steady routine since starting on hormones last September; every three months she goes to Planned Parenthood for a checkup and a new prescription.  But by March 15 she was getting increasingly anxious. She's found it hard to find a good doctor who treats transgender patients, let alone one accustomed to video visits.

Evelyn started to worry about withdrawal symptoms from her HRT, like fat redistribution, hair growth, and mood swings.  A week and a half after lockdown, she was out of spiro and, with her appointments cancelled indefinitely, she had no idea when she would next be able to fill her prescription.  "It was rough," Evelyn said. "It's always anxiety-inducing to run out of a medication that you know has very significant effects on your body."  With few options and no time, Evelyn turned to a friend for help.  "It's a beggars-can't-be-choosers thing right now," Evelyn said. "I'll take what I can get."

Her friend had an access supply of spironolactone she was willing to part with. It was expired and a lower dosage but Evelyn said she could make it work until she could schedule an appointment with her doctor.

Evelyn was eventually able to schedule a video appointment four days later with her doctor, who wired her hormone prescription to her pharmacy. But for many transgender and nonbinary people, unofficial pathways to obtaining hormones like friends, community social-media pages, and unregulated grey-market pharmacies have become the only options during the pandemic.

Transgender People and The Grey Market



Non-Binary CoronaVirus Victim


A 37-year-old non-binary person who passed away from coronavirus this week kept a heartbreaking online journal of their experience.  PJ McClelland from Florida, who died on April 11, had gained hundreds of followers as they shared their experience of having COVID-19 through daily Facebook posts.

They were originally screened for coronavirus on March 23 and sent to be tested the next day. A few days later they found out they had a positive test result. They had no underlying health conditions other than a recent diagnosis of sleep apnea.

Their update that day read:  "I'm getting sicker by the day.  I feel like I have a migraine, bronchitis, and the flu all at once....Don't worry about me, I am relatively young and healthy.  Worry about the people who are EXTREMELY high risk!"

They later began to develop severe chest pain and were taken to hospital by ambulance, then admitted in isolation.  McClelland wrote: “I was their first confirmed case, and I am REALLY f**king worried. NO ONE had proper PPE. They had zero N95 masks.”  However, after their oxygen levels increased to 94 per cent, they were sent home with an inhaler.

By day 10, their symptoms were still worsening, and they wrote: “I’m only sharing this because I think people need to know that not everyone has ‘minor cold symptoms for a few days’."

On day 16, McClelland’s symptoms took an even scarier turn. They wrote: “For the last three days I’ve been coughing ridiculously often… but s**t got REAL early this morning."

Non-Binary CoronaVirus Victim



Being an LGBT Ally While In Lockdown


Jade Thirlwall, member of the music group Little Mix, has shared her top tips for being an LGBT+ ally while self-isolating.

Thirlwall told Glamour magazine that it’s important to still be an LGBT+ ally during the coronavirus lockdown – especially when some LGBT+ people will be stuck in homes with people who might not be supportive of who they are.

"We’re all in self isolation and some LGBT+ people might be in a home or a family environment where they’re not very supportive of being who they are,” she said.  “So, if you know anybody who is in that circumstance, reach out to them, message them, show them how much you support and love them – there’s many ways you can be doing that whilst being indoors.”

Thirlwall also shared that she’s “still learning” how to be an ally to trans people, how to use people’s pronouns and how to “practice what you preach”.

“I’m still learning what the right pronouns are or how to speak to someone and make sure you don’t offend someone or be an ally in the right way and making sure it doesn’t look like you are using to your advantage or for your benefit."

Being an LGBT Ally While In Lockdown




Your Laugh For The Day!









Contributors: KillersMom, CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

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Re: The Daily Sheet April - June 2020
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2020, 12:42:55 PM »


Tuesday, April 28th, 2020



The Forum & SSL - Secure Socket Layer


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'Barkskins' Gets to TV


'Barkskins' is the forthcoming American TV show based on Annie Proulx’s novel of the same name to debut at the National Geographic on 25 May 2020.  On 6 January 2016, during the annual winter press tour of the Television Critics Association, it was announced that National Geographic had partnered with Scott Rudin Productions to opt for the screening rights to the then-coming 'Barkskins' novel of Annie Proulx.

On 3 December 2018, the production was commissioned by National Geographic for the first season consisting of ten episodes. It was produced by Elwood Reid, who, along with Scott Rudin, Eli Bush, and Garrett Basch, was expected to make. Fox 21 Television Studios were supposed to be other production companies involved in the show. On 10 February 2019, David Slade was revealed to be the leading producer of the pilot episode of the show.

'Barkskins' investigates the enigmatic settler massacre of the 1690’s New France in the vast and forgiving wild, threatening to plunge the country into a total war. Other suspects probably abound—the English, the Hudson’s Bay Company, and a band from Iroquois, possibly in league with the British who want to force French people out of the territory.

The latest eight-part limited series by National Geographic, 'Barkskins' produced by Elwood Reid and based on Annie Proulx’ bestselling novel of the same name, takes audiences to the wild border of the late 17th century.

'Barkskins' Gets to TV



Gay, Homeless, and Covid-19


Anyone can experience homelessness, but certain populations are disproportionately represented.  For example, while only 7% of youth in the United States identify as LGBTQ, up to 40% of homeless youth in the United States identify as LGBTQ.  These findings are consistent with research that has found that LGBTQ young people, ages 18 to 25, are 120% more likely to experience homelessness than young people that do not identify as LGBTQ.  The homeless have a unique set of challenges when it comes to protecting themselves from COVID-19. Furthermore, there are some people groups that are over-represented in the homeless population LGBT youth and young people among them.

The impact of COVID-19 on the homeless community may not have crossed your mind. But it is important to understand that the homeless are a vulnerable population when it comes to COVID-19, in part because they are often required to receive shelter and services in places that make social distancing exceedingly difficult if not impossible.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has issued guidance for people experiencing homelessness during the COVID-19 pandemic. A brief and partial view of this guidance can be found at the link below:

Gay, Homeless, and Covid-19



Custody Case in China


A Chinese lesbian couple's landmark court battle over the custody of their two children has stirred debate over LGBTQ rights and put a spotlight on a legal vacuum created by the absence of a same-sex marriage law.

Shanghai resident Zhang Peiyi split up with her partner last year. The partner has since broken off communication and taken their two toddlers away to an unknown location.  So Zhang has turned to the courts, filing a case in the eastern province of Zhejiang this month, to fight for custody of one of the children, the one she gave birth to, and visitation rights to the other.   A court has accepted the case but hearings have yet to begin.

"Even if I can find them, I won't be able to see them," Zhang told Reuters. "I thought who else can help me? I could only find a lawyer."

The case is the first of its kind in China and has attracted media attention. It is likely to be complicated by the fact that Zhang and her partner are women and not legally married, at least not in China, where marriage is defined as a union between a man and a woman.  More LGBTQ couples are choosing to have families but many find themselves pushing up against the limits of the law if the relationship ends, said Yang Yi, a program officer at LGBT Rights Advocacy China.

"There are more than 100 assistive reproductive companies that target gay couples," said Yang.  Yang said there have been custody battles between same-sex couples before but they were settled out of court.

Custody Case in China




Proud Bisexual Dad


Finding out you are about to be a dad is as exciting as it is terrifying. The joy of having a child is an incredible gift. However you’re also responsible for keeping the child safe and raising them into a decent human being.   There is no off switch. There is no reset button. And that’s why, with my fiancée pregnant, I’ve spent the last few weeks thinking about what sort of father I’m going to be.

We aren’t used to LGBT+ people announcing they are going to become parents. It’s still pretty rare in our community.  As someone who is largely defined by the work I do in campaigning on bisexuality, one of the big questions I’ve asked myself, is will my sexuality impact my parenting style?   One thing is clear, having a child is not going to send me back into the closet.

My opposite-sex relationship and child will add to the bi erasure. Outsiders already assume I’m straight. I’m determined to fight that.   That’s not a decision I take lightly, it’s selfish if it means my child becomes more of a target for bullying as they grow up.   One of the most surprising things about being bisexual isn’t the way people treat me but the way they treat my fiancée.

Strangers who’ve never met me have told her to leave me before I cheat, that she’ll never be enough for me, that I’ll give her STIs. My fiancée became a target for dating me, I don’t want that for my child.  Luckily, I do have hope this won’t be the case. That hope comes in the guise of my 11-year-old stepson.

Since I came in to his life four years ago, I’ve been very honest about being bisexual and that I had a boyfriend before meeting his mummy. He doesn’t think it’s weird. And to my knowledge he’s never been picked-on because of it.

Proud Bisexual Dad




Transgender Women Murdered in Puerto Rico


The bodies of two transgender women were found burned to death inside a vehicle this week in Puerto Rico, according to activists, raising alarm about the killings of several transgender people on the island in the last two months.

According to police, two people were found severely burned early Wednesday in Humacao, a coastal city in eastern Puerto Rico.  A spokesperson for the department told CBS News on Friday that they're awaiting results from forensic tests and have not yet released the names of the victims. The Broad Committee for the Search for Equity, a local LGBTQ group, identified them as 32-year-old Serena Angelique Velázquez Ramos and 21-year-old Layla Pelaez Sánchez.

Velázquez Ramos' sister, Francheska Alvarado, told CBS News she logged onto Facebook Wednesday and saw posts saying,"I'm sorry for what happened" and "We are going to miss you" on her sibling's page. She didn't think much of it until their mutual friends began to text her, asking her to check up on Velázquez, who she hadn't spoken to in over a week.

She texted her sister, but never got a text back.  She later learned of her death through a phone call. "I was in complete shock and disbelief because my sister was a great person," Alvarado said. "She was never in the streets. She was just herself."

Transgender Women Murdered in Puerto Rico



Lesser Known Orientations


Sexuality can be a big part of your identity. It can encompass nearly every aspect of your being - your actions, your attitude, your behaviors, your feelings - it can impact the way you experience sexual attraction (if you do) and it can alter your preferences around sexual and romantic relationships.

Why is sexuality thought of as a spectrum?   A spectrum, in this context, is a tool that can help us better understand the fluidity of sexuality, amongst other things. The Kinsey Scale, perhaps one of the most well-known spectrum scales, was created in 1948 by Alfred Kinsey (founder of the Kinsey Institute).

The scale, in short, allows people at "zero" to report as exclusively heterosexual, and people at the opposite end (six) to report as exclusively homosexual - with ratings 1-5 being people who report varying levels of attraction or sexual activity with either sex. There is also a "category X" designated for those who report no sexual reactions or relations.

Over time, we have learned more and more about the sexuality spectrum and it's become more and more normalized to place yourself really anywhere along the spectrum. It's safe to say we have come a very long way since the 1940s when the Kinsey Scale was first created.

Sexuality is fluid, it is ever-changing and extremely personal - defining your own sexuality is what's important, not placing these labels on others for them. It's also extremely normal to be overwhelmed by all the different words we now have to describe various sexual and romantic orientations, attractions, and behaviors.

Lesser Known Orientations



Being an LGBT Ally While In Lockdown


Jade Thirlwall, member of the music group Little Mix, has shared her top tips for being an LGBT+ ally while self-isolating.

Thirlwall told Glamour magazine that it’s important to still be an LGBT+ ally during the coronavirus lockdown – especially when some LGBT+ people will be stuck in homes with people who might not be supportive of who they are.

"We’re all in self isolation and some LGBT+ people might be in a home or a family environment where they’re not very supportive of being who they are,” she said.  “So, if you know anybody who is in that circumstance, reach out to them, message them, show them how much you support and love them – there’s many ways you can be doing that whilst being indoors.”

Thirlwall also shared that she’s “still learning” how to be an ally to trans people, how to use people’s pronouns and how to “practice what you preach”.

“I’m still learning what the right pronouns are or how to speak to someone and make sure you don’t offend someone or be an ally in the right way and making sure it doesn’t look like you are using to your advantage or for your benefit."

Being an LGBT Ally While In Lockdown




Your Laugh For The Day!









Contributors: KillersMom, CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet April - June 2020
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2020, 05:54:20 PM »


Tuesday, May 5th, 2020



The Forum & SSL - Secure Socket Layer


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Anne Hathaway Reflects...


Anne Hathaway’s filmography includes two major Christopher Nolan tentpoles, “The Dark Knight Rises” and “Interstellar,” and her relationship with the Oscar-nominated filmmaker began with an initial meeting for Catwoman that didn’t go quite as expected.  Hathaway recalls the “initial meet” with Nolan in a recently-published video interview with BBC Radio 1.  The interview is from last year but was just published to BBC Radio 1’s YouTube page, where it’s now gaining traction for Hathaway’s story about walking into her Catwoman audition thinking it was a meeting for Harley Quinn.

“I came in and I had this lovely Vivian Westwood kind of beautiful but mad-tailoring top with stripes going everywhere,” Hathaway said. “And I wore these flat Joker-y looking shoes. And I was trying to give Chris these crazy little smiles. About an hour into the meeting he said, ‘Well, I’m sure I don’t have to tell you this, but it’s Catwoman.’ And I was like shifting into a different gear, thinking, ‘Now ok, we’re slinky. We’re slinky. And I hate my shirt. I love my shirt, but I hate it right now. We’re slinky.’”

The mix-up either wasn’t noticeable or didn’t matter for Nolan, who cast Hathaway as Selina Kyle opposite Christian Bale’s Bruce Wayne in “The Dark Knight Rises.”   Hathaway earned rave reviews for her supporting performance and the tentpole was a box office hit with over $1 billion at the worldwide box office. Hathaway had big shoes to fill considering the iconic stature of Michelle Pfeiffer’s Catwoman performance in Tim Burton’s “Batman Returns.” The role is now being handed over to Zoe Kravitz, who is set to appear as Catwoman in Matt Reeves’ “The Batman,” starring Robert Pattinson as the Caped Crusader.

Anne Hathaway Reflects...



Apology For Canada's Gay Purge


Todd Ross was a naval combat information operator on the HMCS Saskatchewan in 1989 when he was called out over the public address system, escorted off the destroyer by officers and told he was the subject of an espionage probe.

Over the next 18 months, Ross was given six polygraph tests and interrogated about his sexual orientation and loyalty to Canada.  Eventually, he broke down. Facing a two-way mirror, he admitted to a stranger what he had not yet told some close confidants.  “Yes,” Ross said. “I’m gay.”

The 21-year-old seaman was given an ultimatum: Accept an honorable discharge or lose his security clearance, effectively extinguishing any prospect of career advancement. He chose the discharge and returned home to New Brunswick, where only a few years earlier he’d been named the province’s top army cadet.

Ross was one of thousands who lost careers in the armed forces, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and other government agencies during the country’s notorious “gay purge” from the 1950s to the 1990s. A legal challenge brought the policy to an end in 1992. Now its victims are gaining greater recognition.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has formally apologized to Ross and others whose dreams of serving their country were destroyed by the “state-sponsored, systematic oppression and rejection.” Now, officials and advocates are building a national monument to memorialize them in Ottawa.

Apology For Canada's Gay Purge



'A Secret Love'


It's a love story more than 70 years in the making.

Pat Henschel and Terry Donahue met in 1947. Henschel, then 18, was a long-distance phone operator, and Donahue, 22, a baseball player for the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. (She was part of the team that inspired 1992's "A League of Their Own" and consulted on the film.)   For decades, the women lived in the Chicago area and worked at the same interior design company, telling people they were "cousins" or "roommates" who lived together to split the rent. They eventually came out as gay to their families in 2009, six decades after they first got together.

Their enduring, enviable romance is the subject of Netflix documentary "A Secret Love" (now streaming), directed by Donahue's great nephew Chris Bolan.

After coming out, "the floodgates opened up and they became like giddy little schoolgirls telling us these stories (about their life together)," Bolan says. "I had never heard a love story like this between two women and knew at that moment I wanted to make a film."

The documentary, produced by Ryan Murphy (Netflix's "Circus of Books"), flashes between the past and present, as Donahue and Henschel navigate old age, declining health and the decision to get married. It chronicles the early years of their clandestine relationship when they would meet in hotel rooms and churches after hours, just so they could steal a hug or kiss in private.

'A Secret Love'




Ownership Of The Bisexual Pride Flag


The bisexual flag has become a familiar sight at LGBTQ pride events with its stripes of pink, purple, and blue.

While it's now widely used, one group attempted to claim legal ownership of it on Twitter, causing all bisexual hell to break loose.  On Wednesday, a group called BiNet USA tweeted that it was the "copyright" owner of the bisexual pride flag, sparking instant fury. BiNet is a nonprofit that advocates for people who are bisexual, pansexual, fluid, or otherwise attracted to more than one gender.

In a series of now-deleted tweets, BiNet called out retailers that used the bisexual flag and claimed that its permission was required for the design's use.

The bisexual pride flag was created in 1998 by activist Michael Page. As many have pointed out, a now-defunct webpage created by Page said the flag is "the only bisexual symbol not patented, trademarked or service marked."

But that's not so, according to the tweets from BiNet.

The account provided no proof of its claim. Simple geometric designs, like the bisexual pride flag, are generally not eligible for copyright protection. BuzzFeed News was also unable to locate the flag in a database of US trademarks, although registering in that database is voluntary.

Ownership Of The Bisexual Pride Flag




Two Arrested in Transgender Murders


Two men have been arrested in Puerto Rico in the shooting death of two transgender women whose bodies were found last week in a burned-out car.

The two suspects, Juan Carlos Pagán Bonilla, 21 and Jose Díaz De Léon, 19, were arrested Wednesday, according to the Negociado de la Policía de Puerto Rico, the island’s state-level police force.

El Vocero reported that the two men were tracked down through fingerprint evidence found at the scene and cellphone tracing. The newspaper said FBI had assisted in the investigation. The bureau declined to confirm or deny that, "to protect the integrity of any possible investigative effort."

The two victims, Serena Angelique Velázquez, 32, and Layla Peláez Sánchez, 21, were found dead in a car in Humacao, a town on the island’s east coast, early on April 22. The women had been shot, and the vehicle burned.

According to local news site Primera Hora, Capt. Teddy Morales of the Criminal Investigation Corps of Humacao said that the motive was “revenge” and that the killings were being investigated as a hate crime.

Two Arrested in Transgender Murders



Judge's Decision on Lawsuit


A Brooklyn Supreme Court judge dismissed a lawsuit against the Brooklyn Democratic Party by six gender non-binary candidates for local offices on April 29, citing procedural issues and arguing that the aspiring politicians filed their case too late in the current election cycle.

Justice Edgar Walker declined to rule on whether the gender parity rules by the party and state election law inflicted on the Constitutional and human rights of the candidates — who identify across a spectrum of gender non-conforming identities, including non-binary, genderfluid, genderqueer, or transgender.

The six political hopefuls filed ballot applications to run for County Committee membership, the lowest rung of elected office representing a handful of blocks known as election districts, in the June 23 election.

The rules of the Kings County Democratic County Committee (the official name of the Brooklyn Democratic Party) require that candidates file to run as either “Male Member” or “Female Member,” in order to adhere with the state election law’s gender parity rules originally intended to bring more women into the political sphere.

The candidates refused to choose either male or female positions, because it did not align with their gender identity, which caused the city’s Board of Elections to invalidate their ballot petitions.

Judge's Decision on Lawsuit



Was Prince A Gay Ally?


On the cover of Prince’s third album, Dirty Mind (released in 1980), the singer stares seductively down the barrel of the lens, nude but for a biker jacket, high-waisted briefs and a pair of thigh-high stockings cropped just out of shot.

Today, he’d probably be accused of appropriating a queer aesthetic, but at the time his look was boundary-breaking, especially for a Black man.  The image set the tone for the record and for what Prince would come to stand for in the years that followed.  Like his British contemporaries David Bowie and Boy George, he was becoming a symbol of androgyny and sexual fluidity.

He titillated with apparent references to his own preferences when he sang about a rough break-up on “When You Were Mine”, lamenting: “I never was the kind to make a fuss / When he was there, sleeping in-between the two of us.”

For a while Prince dodged questions about his own identity, asking: “Am I Black or white / Am I straight or gay?” on the title track to Controversy (1981), but not offering any answers.  On “I Would Die 4 U”, from 1984’s Purple Rain, he’d make an apparent reference to gender fluidity, with the lyrics: “I’m not a woman, I’m not a man / I am something that you’ll never understand”, even dropping his name for an unpronounceable symbol comprised of the symbols for male and female in 1993.

Was Prince A Gay Ally?




Your Laugh For The Day!









Contributors: KillersMom, CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Re: The Daily Sheet April - June 2020
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2020, 05:21:07 PM »


Tuesday, May 12th, 2020



The Forum & SSL - Secure Socket Layer


Hello UBF members.  When the forum had a recent update, our server began using SSL - Secure Socket Layer.  SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) is the standard security technology for establishing an encrypted link between a web server and a browser. This link ensures that all data passed between the web server and browsers remain private and integral. SSL is an industry standard and is used by millions of websites in the protection of their online transactions with their customers.

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Best Quotes From Brokeback Mountain


When it was released in 2005, Brokeback Mountain was one of the most talked-about films of the year.  More than a decade later, Ang Lee's epic romance drama is viewing as a stunning achievement and a ground-breaking film in mainstream Hollywood.

Brokeback Mountain would go on to win multiple awards, and much critical acclaim.  It has also become part of Oscar lore as a film that was denied the win of the award for Best Picture.  So much so, that Paul Haggis (the director of eventual Best Picture winner, Crash) went on to say: “Was it the best film of the year? I don’t think so.   There were great films that year. Good Night, and Good Luck – amazing film. Capote – terrific film. Ang Lee’s Brokeback Mountain, great film. And Spielberg’s Munich. I mean please, what a year."

Brokeback Mountain stars Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal as two men who fall in love while working as sheepherders in the 1960s. The movie is a beautiful and moving story about a love that is deemed unacceptable in their society. It makes for an unforgettable movie to experience.

Like any great movie, quotes from the script will slip into the vocabulary of the fans, and into the conscious of the general public as well.  There have been fans that refer to quotes from Brokeback as 'Brokie-isms". 

 Here are some of the best quotes from Brokeback Mountain.

Best Quotes From Brokeback Mountain



Mourning a Fallen Officer


Police from Victoria and NSW lined the side of the road to salute their fallen colleague Constable Glen Humphris in an impromptu, solemn and emotional display of unity and respect, as he was driven past the border to his final resting place on Saturday.

Constable Humphris, not long out of the police academy, was one of four police officers killed in last month's truck crash on the Eastern Freeway, along with Leading Senior Constable Lynette Taylor, Senior Constable Kevin King and Constable Josh Prestney.

Victoria Police Deputy Commissioner Rick Nugent held Constable Humphris' police hat and a flag in front of the hearse, which was escorted from Melbourne by two police cars and police motorbikes on Saturday.  Police stood on the side of the road along Victorian freeways to salute their fallen colleague in a gesture that Chief Commissioner of Victoria Police, Graham Ashton, described as "humbling".

Constable Humphris' grieving partner, Todd Robinson, farewelled his "bubbly, outgoing and loving" soulmate at the small ceremony in Melbourne on Friday, dressed in full army regalia and delivering a final salute before the hearse left the venue.

Mourning a Fallen Officer



Lesbian Bars & Covid-19


Brooklyn’s last remaining lesbian bar, Ginger’s, sits on a busy avenue that cuts through the borough’s gentrified Park Slope neighborhood.  Over the past two decades, it has endured 9/11, the Great Recession and skyrocketing rent, but owner Sheila Frayne is unsure it will survive COVID-19.

“Realistically, I'm saying maybe this is the end,” Frayne, 53, told NBC News.

In compliance with citywide guidelines for nonessential businesses, Frayne locked the doors of Ginger’s on March 15, two days before St. Patrick’s Day and what would have been the bar’s 20th anniversary. Through the darkened windows, she peered at the shamrock decorations that still hung on the walls and started to cry.

“It’s really sad, because women-owned businesses are hard anyhow, and women-owned bars are unheard of,” Frayne said. “Usually, they have somebody backing them or something like that, but I did do it by myself, and it's just blood, sweat and tears to get where I did and keep surviving.”

Ginger’s Bar is one of three lesbian bars still standing in New York City, and one of just a handful left in the entire country.  With most, if not all, of these establishments forced to temporarily shutter due to the coronavirus pandemic, their future is uncertain, with several facing the potential of permanent closure.


Lesbian Bars & Covid-19




Leader of Bisexual Org. to Step Down


BiNet USA has announced a change in leadership.

Faith Cheltenham will step down as president, to be succeeded by Juba Kalamka January 21 of next year. Cheltenham, also known as “thefayth,” wrote in a blog post on Keeping the Fayth of asking Kalamka to assume the presidency, and he accepted.

Cheltenham was “the most active board member, volunteer and staff member of BiNet USA from 2004-2018,” according to a separate post on BiNet’s site.

The change comes as BiNet is involved in controversy over rights to the Bi Pride flag. Last week the group tweeted that for-profit enterprises selling the flag needed to enter into a licensing agreement with BiNet. It received much criticism for the move, with some people saying it was unfairly targeting small businesses.

In a blog post last Friday, the BiNet board shared a statement regarding its position. “The bisexual pride flag is intended for bisexual community use,” the statement said in part. “The community has long been able to utilize it for the creation of gifts and goods to help benefit ourselves and each other. BiNet USA continues to support the independent bisexual seller and is working to bring more bisexual products into market. We are currently advocating for bisexual sellers to have direct licensing relationships with corporations selling bisexual pride merchandise. We want to be clear: we are a nonprofit organization. We frequently donate our time and energy and promote others’ work without the aim to make any money personally.” It also called for businesses to remove any items that use the bi flag alongside Confederate symbols.

Leader of Bisexual Org. to Step Down




Egyptian Actor and His Transgender Son


Last Sunday, Hisham Selim took viewers by surprise when he spoke openly about 26-year-old Nour's step - a rare occurrence in the conservative country.  Two days later, Selim was again interviewed on TV, this time accompanied by Nour - previously Noura.  It prompted a wave of support, with LGBT activists seeing it as a boost.

In Egypt, a religiously conservative society, the LGBT community is widely stigmatised.  Transgenders, however, are comparatively more accepted by society and government in Egypt than homosexuals.

Although homosexuality is not explicitly criminalised under Egyptian law, LGBT people are periodically subjected to crackdowns and arrests on the grounds of "debauchery".

In the first interview, on the privately-owned channel Al-Qahira Wa al-Nas, Selim revealed how his son - then aged 18 - first told him about feeling uncomfortable with the gender he was assigned at birth.

"I am living in a body other than my own," he recalled Nour as saying.

"I was not surprised... because from the day [he] was born I felt [his] body was a boy's body. I always suspected this," Selim said.

Egyptian Actor and His Transgender Son



Judge's Decision on Lawsuit


A Brooklyn Supreme Court judge dismissed a lawsuit against the Brooklyn Democratic Party by six gender non-binary candidates for local offices on April 29, citing procedural issues and arguing that the aspiring politicians filed their case too late in the current election cycle.

Justice Edgar Walker declined to rule on whether the gender parity rules by the party and state election law inflicted on the Constitutional and human rights of the candidates — who identify across a spectrum of gender non-conforming identities, including non-binary, genderfluid, genderqueer, or transgender.

The six political hopefuls filed ballot applications to run for County Committee membership, the lowest rung of elected office representing a handful of blocks known as election districts, in the June 23 election.

The rules of the Kings County Democratic County Committee (the official name of the Brooklyn Democratic Party) require that candidates file to run as either “Male Member” or “Female Member,” in order to adhere with the state election law’s gender parity rules originally intended to bring more women into the political sphere.

The candidates refused to choose either male or female positions, because it did not align with their gender identity, which caused the city’s Board of Elections to invalidate their ballot petitions.

Judge's Decision on Lawsuit



Melissa Barrera on Being an LGBTQ Ally


The final season of the game-changing series Vida premiered in late April. Now Melissa Barrera, who plays the free-spirited Lyn, once referred to by her type-A sister, Emma, as a “full-on agent of chaos,” weighs in on the show’s influence on Latinx and queer pop culture moving forward and the importance of LGBTQ allies.

“I feel like Vida, in a lot of ways, took the experience [of being Latinx and/or LGBTQ] 10 steps further in authenticity and bravery because our show was doing things that no other show was doing and talking about things that no other show was talking about,” Barrera tells The Advocate.

“I’m very proud because I see the influence of Vida in other shows that are coming out, and I feel like that’s the whole point,” she says. "We passed the baton and there are more shows that are coming out. Hopefully, we get more, and we get this domino effect. That’s what we want. We don’t want to be one of five [shows with visibility for marginalized communities]. We want to be one of 50 or one of 100.”

Melissa Barrera on Being an LGBTQ Ally




Your Laugh For The Day!









Contributors: brian, KillersMom, CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet April - June 2020
« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2020, 11:11:31 AM »


Tuesday, May 19th, 2020



The Forum & SSL - Secure Socket Layer


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Larry McMurtry Wins Award


Saddle Up for the Summer of Lonesome Dove!

Does living through a pandemic make you long for simpler times? How about 35 years ago, when Larry McMurtry published Lonesome Dove? Or maybe the West of the late 1870s, the setting for McMurtry's epic book that follows two Texas Rangers on a cattle drive from this country's southernmost border to the wilds of Montana?

The months ahead may look like the summer of uncertainty, but it will also be the Summer of Lonesome Dove. And as part of the festivities, the Lakewood-based Mountain & Plains Independent Booksellers Association has selected McMurtry for its 2020 Spirit of the West Literary Achievement Award.

The award is not an annual honor; since the MPIBA founded the Reading the West Book Awards program, it's given the Spirit of the West award when MPIBA members feel that an author is particularly deserving. Previous Spirit of the West honorees include Kent Haruf, Linda Hogan, Sandra Cisneros, Jim Harrison and Terry Tempest Williams.

Bookstores around the country are planning events throughout the Summer of Lonesome Dove to encourage people to read (or re-read) McMurtry's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, which provided the inspiration for three more books in the series (not to mention a great four-part television movie). McMurtry has written more than thirty books (including 29 novels), and the Summer of Lonesome Dove is sponsored by his longtime publisher, Simon & Schuster.

Larry McMurtry Wins Award



Where It’s Illegal To Be Gay


It's still illegal to be LGBT+ in 70 countries, and you could be given the death penalty in 12, as the world marks 30 years since “homosexuality” was declassified as a disease.

International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia (IDAHOBIT), May 17 marks the day the World Health Organisation (WHO) declassified “homosexuality” as a mental disorder.  As the world reaches 30 years since being gay was no longer an internationally designated disease, a map by an international LGBT organization shows it remains illegal to be gay in 70 countries.

The map by the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association shows that only 65% of those living in UN countries around the world can now be, legally, in consensual same-sex relationships.  But 70 countries in the world still criminalise LGBT+ sexual acts between adults.

Additionally, being LGBT is illegal in Gaza (Palestine), the Cook Islands and some provinces in Indonesia. While in several other countries, are still seeing cases of de facto criminalization.

LGBT+ people are being killed in 12 countries who have the death penalty for consensual same-sex sexual acts between adults.

In Iran, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Sudan this death penalty is regularly imposed across the county. You can also be punished by death in some provinces of Somalia and Nigeria.

Where It’s Illegal To Be Gay



The Lesbian Stonewall


Popular history tells the story of the Stonewall Uprising with men as the star protagonists, the trans community limited to Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnson, and lesbian activists like me as background actors. But lesbians were rebels, too, fighting for women-oriented alternatives to oppressive Mafia-run clubs like the Stonewall Inn.

In the late 1960s, our social life revolved around Kooky’s, which was the only lesbian bar in New York’s Greenwich Village. Kooky’s was allegedly run by the Genovese crime family and fronted by a middle-aged woman named Kooky, who patrolled the bar in stiff crinoline dresses, an outmoded beehive hairdo, and ever-present cigarette, which she used to terrorize some of the patrons who weren’t disposing of the watered-down beverages fast enough for her liking.

The place was a death trap: the fire exit was padlocked to prevent women from sneaking in without paying the cover charge. Straight male friends of the bouncer would occasionally jerk off through their trousers as women slow-danced. Red lights placed around the small dance floor flashed to alert us when the police raided the bar or came for a payoff. Same-sex dancing was illegal, as was serving a drink to a “disorderly” person, such as a lesbian, so the threat of public arrest, bribes and organized crime were all part of the deal.

But the most humiliating ordeal of this clandestine socializing was the guard outside the single-seater restrooms who issued each woman two squares of toilet paper on her way in — we degenerates could not be trusted to go to the bathroom without supervision and apparently didn’t know how much toilet paper was required.

The only other social opportunities for us back then were private parties and the potlucks sponsored by the pre-Stonewall lesbian group, Daughters of Bilitis (DOB). The DOB cohort was mostly older than I was and their goal of assimilation into the mainstream seemed dated to many younger women by 1969.

The Lesbian Stonewall




Bisexual Author Samantha Irby


There is no greater truth teller out there these days than Samantha Irby, the bisexual writer behind the blog, Bitches Gotta Eat.

The author of four books, including the newly released Wow, No Thank You, Irby made it to the New York Times bestseller list for We Are Never Meeting in Real Life. Her first memoir, Meaty, is being adapted into a television show by writer Jessi Klein and comedian Abbi Jacobson.

The Kalamazoo, Mich., (by way of New York City) author writes about intersectionality in a way that’s never dogmatic or academic, but unselfconsciously real. From race (she’s Black) to weight (she’s fat) to homophobia (she’s bi) to disability (she has Crohn’s disease and degenerative arthritis), Irby’s personal writing gets at the heart of our daily interactions with life’s most irritating people — like reacting to that friend who loses 20 pounds on Whole30 and now thinks she’s an expert on nutrition with a signature: “Holy shit, shut up girl.”

Blogging since the MySpace days, the 40-year-old laid out the classic adult bisexual coming out experience in her last collection of essays, We Are Never Meeting in Real Life, describing how after years of dating men, she has sex with a woman.

Bisexual Author Samantha Irby




Transgender Sailor to Serve Openly


For the first time, the U.S. Navy has granted a waiver to allow a transgender sailor to continue her military service despite the president’s ban on transgender people serving openly in the armed forces.

Attorneys for the sailor and a spokesperson for Navy Secretary James E. McPherson confirmed earlier this week that senior government officials had approved the waiver. Navy spokesperson Lt. Brittany Stephens said the sailor, known only as "Jane Doe" in media reports and court documents, “requested a waiver to serve in their preferred gender” and will be “allowed to adhere to standards associated with their preferred gender, such as uniforms and grooming,” according to CNN, which was the first to report on the waiver.

SPART*A, an organization that advocates for transgender service members, said in a statement that the organization is “ecstatic” about the Navy’s announcement, hoping it could pave the way for more transgender people to serve openly in the armed forces.

“I am hopeful that this is the first of many,” said SPART*A President Emma Shinn, “but the fight is far from over.”

It has been a long fight for advocacy groups to reach even this milestone. Jane Doe's request has been the only one of its kind granted since President Donald Trump announced in July 2017 that he intended to prohibit transgender troops from serving openly in the military, reversing a year-old policy from the prior administration. Although the ban was initially blocked in a series of federal court rulings, the Supreme Court eventually lifted those injunctions.

Transgender Sailor to Serve Openly



Ace And Aro People


It’s always interesting to me when queer allos confidently make the claim that asexuals and aromantics are simply hetero-oriented people who don’t date or have sex. It’s also frustrating and headache-inducing—as it demonstrates a continued willful ignorance and commitment to misunderstanding asexuality and aromanticism—but mostly, it’s interesting.

I’m fascinated by the cognitive dissonance of it, more than anything else. This claim carries so many implications that are antithetical to queerness. Not to mention that lumping all of us together as “straight” doesn’t account for the reality of split attraction. It erases biromantic asexuals, aromantic gays, asexual lesbians, aromantic pansexuals, homoromantic asexuals, and more.

Asexual people are asexual.  Aromantic people are aromantic.   Straight people are straight.   These are all vastly different things.

It’s a very simple concept, and yet people act as though it’s impossible to grasp. Being straight means to experience sexual and romantic attraction exclusively for another gender—what cisnormative rhetoric refers to as “the opposite sex.” Neither asexuality nor aromanticism meet this criteria because they are both defined by a lack of sexual or romantic attraction.   Said another way: Straight people experience both sexual and romantic attractions to a specific gender. Ace and aro people do not. Perhaps allos would recognize the flaw in their logic if they weren’t so busy trying to gatekeep queerness.


Ace And Aro People



Muslim LGBT ‘Allies’ Silent


There’s a new slur trending in Turkey these days aimed at the LGBTQ population: “#YallahHollandaya” or “Go to Holland.” The expression reflects the Netherlands’ longstanding acceptance of homosexuality, having been the first country to legalize gay marriage.

But tell that to gay people in Holland, or at least those who venture into certain neighborhoods of Amsterdam where, in early April, two men walking hand in hand were attacked verbally and physically by Muslim youths. Calling the couple “kankerhomos” (“cancer gays”), the boys shoved the men before spitting in their faces — a particularly dangerous assault during the coronavirus pandemic.

That at least one of the boys was of Turkish heritage, however, would seem to have been welcome news to Turkey’s leadership and its official religious arm, the Diyanet. Only days after the Amsterdam incident, Religious Affairs Chairman Ali Erbas declared that Islam condemns adultery and “curses homosexuality,” which, he asserted, “causes illnesses and withers the generation.”

His statement was quickly supported by Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Both these incidents took place around the same time that Sofia Taloni, a transsexual Moroccan woman now living in Turkey, began outing gay Moroccan men on her popular Instagram channel, which boasts over 600,000 followers. Homosexuality is illegal in Morocco.

Muslim LGBT ‘Allies’ Silent




Your Laugh For The Day!









Contributors: KillersMom, CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

We count on you to send us your news items, questions, and nominations for posts of the day.
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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet April - June 2020
« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2020, 04:36:16 PM »


Tuesday, May 26th, 2020



The Forum & SSL - Secure Socket Layer


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"Barkskins" and the Emmys


With “Genius: Aretha” (and everything else) forced to halt production in March, National Geographic moved the premiere of “Barkskins” up six months in their schedule to take its place as their big scripted push for the 2020 Emmys. The historical fiction drama series adapts the first 100 pages of the 2016 Annie Proulx novel of the same name across its eight-episode first season that will now air with back-to-back hour-long episodes over four Mondays in May and June, starting with Memorial Day. Nat Geo is shrewdly entering the show in the Best Limited Series race to capitalize on their momentum from “Genius” in the race.

The network broke into the major categories at the Emmys for the anthology’s 2017 debut starring Geoffrey Rush as Albert Einstein. He received a Best Movie/Limited Actor nomination, alongside nominations in Best Movie/Limited Directing for Ron Howard, Best Limited Series and seven categories below the line for a total of 10 nominations. The second season actually won two Emmys from seven nominations, including Best Limited Series again and a bid in Best Movie/Limited Actor for Antonio Banderas‘ portrayal of Pablo Picasso.

“Genius” missed 2019 as it retooled the third season to focus on Cynthia Erivo as Aretha Franklin instead of Mary Shelley, but Nat Geo ran “The Hot Zone” starring Julianna Margulies instead in its plum spring time slot. “The Hot Zone” got unlucky, as it was overshadowed at the Emmys by “Chernobyl,” the decade’s most awarded miniseries, which also dramatized crucial containment efforts in the late 1980s over five hours. “The Hot Zone” nonetheless drew generally favorable reviews from critics and record viewership ratings for Nat Geo.

“Barkskins” is positioned to best even those numbers, thanks to Disney’s acquisition of Fox that moved jointly-owned outlets like Hulu and Nat Geo under the same umbrella.

"Barkskins" and the Emmys



‘Out’ Features Animation Studio’s First Gay Lead


For a studio that recently weathered barbs for shifting the “Love, Simon” spinoff from Disney+ to Hulu, Disney has just made a forward leap in terms of representation with the latest Pixar animated short “Out.” It’s now streaming on Disney+. This quirky and surprisingly moving short film comes from director Steven Clay Hunter, making his debut after decades as an animator on Pixar films.


“Out” centers on a young gay man, Greg, who’s not out to his parents and is (naturally) about to move into the big city to live with his boyfriend, Manuel. Unexpectedly, Greg’s buoyant parents show up unannounced with a tray of pizza casserole to lend a helping hand in the move. Which finds Greg suddenly needing to scramble to cover up evidence of his sexuality, and his relationship, which includes a framed photo of the happy couple, and a calendar of sexy firemen.


What follows is a kind of “Freaky Friday”-esque, body-swapping plot where Greg and his dog Jim suddenly switch places, and Greg as Jim has to resort to all sorts of rascally bad-dog techniques to keep his mother’s prying hands off that framed photo. To his eventual surprise, it turns out that Greg’s mother is more intuitive than he ever realized.

‘Out’ Features Animation Studio’s First Gay Lead



The Smartest Lesbian on TV


Rachel Maddow is one of The Advocate's Women of the Year.   There’s never a bad time to watch Rachel Maddow — or to read her.

The lesbian MSNBC host is especially essential in an election year. If you watch her ask the candidates incisive questions or deliver insightful commentary on the latest developments, you’ll understand why Maddow’s been called the smartest person on TV. Lisa Rogak’s new book, Rachel Maddow: A Biography, also reminds us why.

Maddow’s eponymous, Emmy Award-winning show has been going strong since 2008, when it was MSNBC’s most successful launch to date, and she’s also a fixture of debate and primary nights, when her analysis is always a highlight of the cable channel’s postmortems.

Additionally, Maddow is an accomplished author, and her latest reminds us that White House scandals and outrageous rhetoric didn’t start with Donald Trump.

In Bag Man: The Wild Crimes, Audacious Cover-Up, and Spectacular Downfall of a Brazen Crook in the White House, she and coauthor Michael Yarvitz note that Watergate wasn’t the only scandal of Richard Nixon’s administration — Vice President Spiro Agnew was engaging in bribery and extortion, and he denounced the investigation into his crimes as a “witch hunt.” Sound familiar?

The Smartest Lesbian on TV




Brown (and Bisexual)


There’s a moment in Mindy Kaling’s new teen dramedy “Never Have I Ever” when protagonist Devi Vishwakumar attends a Hindu religious ritual and is confronted by her own Indian-ness, or lack thereof. Most immigrant children can relate to her experience and have probably asked — or will ask at some point in their lives — these two questions: “Am I too American?” and “Am I not American enough?”

My older sister was born in India and lived there for the first few years of her life, enough that her Hindi is quite good and almost sounds native. She is Indian. She loves ’90s Bollywood movies, eats our mother’s Indian vegetarian cooking without complaint and converses fluidly with our older cousins.

Comparatively, I was born in California and have lived in the same Bay Area city my entire life. I do not like older Bollywood movies (or even newer ones), I fuss about my mom’s food and talking to our older cousins is out of the question. I always felt alienated from my culture and extended family during our frequent summers in India.

But over time, that changed. There wasn’t a certain point when I decided that I wanted to be more Indian — it just happened. I asked more questions about my family history and conversed more with my paternal grandfather. I tried — and mostly failed — to be more diverse with my Indian eating choices. I took a Hindu mythology class and a South Asian history class at UC Berkeley and loved them both. And my Hindi is getting better; it’s becoming more fluent and less accented, though I still occasionally fumble with sentences and phrases, amusing my family.

Brown (and Bisexual)




Transgender People In Hungary Lose Right To Gender Recognition


Transgender people in Hungary have lost legal recognition, as the country makes it impossible for people to legally change gender.

In the earth-shattering move for the transgender community by Viktor Orbán’s parliament, who are currently ruling by decree due to emergency COVID-19 laws, a massive omnibus bill has just passed.  Amendments designed to protect transgender people have been rejected, ILGA-Europe confirms.

Global and European LGBT+ rights organisations have been denouncing the plans, that was, despite protests to ‘Drop 33’, all but expected to pass into law today.  Until this new law passed, identity documents could be changed in Hungary by law, but Article 33’s approval today, will only confirm the fear created by a suspension on changing gender in that way, in place for two years already.

All references of "sex" will now instead refer to "sex assigned at birth" in the national registry and on identity documents.  The Hungarian reasoning behind the move is that "completely changing one's biological sex is impossible" and that is why "it is necessary to lay it down in law that it cannot be changed in the civil registry either."


Transgender People In Hungary Lose Right To Gender Recognition



Passport Issues For Intersex, Nonbinary Navy Vet


The U.S. State Department was ordered by a federal court of appeals to reconsider its decision of denying a passport to Navy veteran Dana Zzyym.

Dana Zzyym, who’s intersex and identifies as gender non-binary, applied for a passport in 2014. Since they don’t identify as either male or female — and the passport application form didn’t provide any other gender marker — they simply couldn’t get one.

In October, 2015 Lambda Legal filed a lawsuit on behalf of Zzyym asserting that the State Department “violated the due process and equal protection components of the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, as well as the federal Administrative Procedure Act” when it denied to issue them a passport that accurately reflected their gender.    The court ruled in favor of Zzyym in 2016 and then again in 2018, but the State Department appealed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit.

The latest ruling was announced Tuesday.   Even though the federal appeals court didn’t uphold the 2018 ruling upright, it rejected three of the five reasons given by the State Department to deny Zzyym an accurate passport, and ordered it to reconsider their passport application.

Passport Issues For Intersex, Nonbinary Navy Vet



Muslim LGBT ‘Allies’ Silent


There’s a new slur trending in Turkey these days aimed at the LGBTQ population: “#YallahHollandaya” or “Go to Holland.” The expression reflects the Netherlands’ longstanding acceptance of homosexuality, having been the first country to legalize gay marriage.

But tell that to gay people in Holland, or at least those who venture into certain neighborhoods of Amsterdam where, in early April, two men walking hand in hand were attacked verbally and physically by Muslim youths. Calling the couple “kankerhomos” (“cancer gays”), the boys shoved the men before spitting in their faces — a particularly dangerous assault during the coronavirus pandemic.

That at least one of the boys was of Turkish heritage, however, would seem to have been welcome news to Turkey’s leadership and its official religious arm, the Diyanet. Only days after the Amsterdam incident, Religious Affairs Chairman Ali Erbas declared that Islam condemns adultery and “curses homosexuality,” which, he asserted, “causes illnesses and withers the generation.”

His statement was quickly supported by Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Both these incidents took place around the same time that Sofia Taloni, a transsexual Moroccan woman now living in Turkey, began outing gay Moroccan men on her popular Instagram channel, which boasts over 600,000 followers. Homosexuality is illegal in Morocco.

Muslim LGBT ‘Allies’ Silent




Your Laugh For The Day!









Contributors: KillersMom, CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

We count on you to send us your news items, questions, and nominations for posts of the day.
If you have items you’d like to see published, send them to CellarDweller115.

To subscribe to The Daily Sheet, click the “Notify” button at the top or bottom of the page.
When a new issue of TDS is posted, you will be notified by e-mail.

The Daily Sheet Archives
Respond to The Daily Sheet

Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet April - June 2020
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2020, 03:47:42 PM »


Tuesday, June 2nd, 2020



The Forum & SSL - Secure Socket Layer


Hello UBF members.  When the forum had a recent update, our server began using SSL - Secure Socket Layer.  SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) is the standard security technology for establishing an encrypted link between a web server and a browser. This link ensures that all data passed between the web server and browsers remain private and integral. SSL is an industry standard and is used by millions of websites in the protection of their online transactions with their customers.

It is easy to tell if a site you are using is on SSL.  A site without SSL will have an address that starts with http://.  A site that uses SSL will start with https://.

Why are we telling you this?  Because if you are posting pictures here, and the address you use doesn't have the "s" in it, the image will not show.  Anytime you post an image, you should make sure that it starts with https://




Appreciation Of Linda Cardellini


Whenever I think of Linda Cardellini, I think of a quote from Community. To be fair, I am often thinking of Linda Cardellini and Community quotes, so it was inevitable that they would cross paths. Anyway, it’s from the season three episode “Regional Holiday Music” when Britta makes an unexpected appearance as the Mouse King (not a mute tree) in Greendale’s Christmas pageant. Upon seeing Britta, Dean Pelton looks down at his playbill, and with a disgusted tone in his voice, asks, “Oh, Britta’s in this?” That’s me with Linda Cardellini, except with a joyful, more thrilled spin. “Oh! Linda Cardellini’s in this!”

I am never not excited to see Cardellini in a television show or movie, and it’s often a surprise. The actress is not, to use a recent example, the reason I watched Capone (Tom Hardy was), but she’s the one who gives the most humane performance in the otherwise-mediocre film. Cardellini exists somewhere between an A-list lead and a steady character actor (she’s not Cate Blanchett, but she’s not Stephen Root, either), and she’s almost always the best thing in every project she’s in, for over 20 years. Let’s take a look at some of Linda Cardellini’s more notable roles, dating back to my favorite movie named after a fictional burger chain based on a Nickelodeon sketch series.

Appreciation Of Linda Cardellini



Harlequin's New LGBTQ Line of Romance Books


Harlequin romance novels are a big business but they haven't always been a terribly inclusive one.   That is something author Philip William Stover is trying to correct with his new book The Hideaway Inn.   The novel is one of the first two to be published by Harlequin under its new Carina Adores line, which is dedicated to LGBTQ romance. Stover told As It Happens host Carol Off that being able to tell love tales from his own perspective is "very empowering."   The story is a "very traditional romance in many aspects," he said. It tells the journey of a man who returns to his home town and discovers that the person he's had a crush on since childhood is "exactly the same person he thought he was."  Here is part of their conversation, more to be seen at the link below.

You have been a successful writer for some time. But you were writing books mostly for teenage girls. How different is this?

In some ways their stories are very similar. People always want to be accepted. They always want to be loved. They always have miscommunication with the people they love.   But they're different in that these are stories that I really connect to, and that I really understand, and that I really think are important to be told.

How satisfying is that for you?

You know, I grew up reading romance and as a young gay boy reading romance, I would have to rip off the covers as soon as I got the books home.   Then once I ripped off the covers, I got another book — I think it was like a Star Wars book — and I put that in front of the book I was reading because, if I didn't do that, I'd get the book kicked out of my hand or something worse. I found all these ways to sort of hide what I was doing.

Harlequin's New LGBTQ Line of Romance Books



Costa Rica's First Same-Sex Spouses


Daritza Araya Arguedas and Alexandra Quirós Castillo became the first same-sex couple in Costa Rica to wed early Tuesday, the first day gay marriage became legal in the country, according to local news reports and the advocacy group Sí, Acepto.

In San Isidro de Heredia, a town outside the capital, San Jose, Ana Cecilia Castro Calzada officiated at the ceremony, wearing a red coronavirus mask as the lesbian couple wore white dresses and a livestream carried the sounds of chirping nighttime wildlife.

“You have begun in law what has existed in love,” Calzada said. “We celebrate and honor this journey that you have made together as life companions in hope of a day like today: historic for you two and for Costa Rica.”

Eight minutes after midnight, as 10,000 watched live on Facebook, Castillo, 29, a university student, and Araya, 24, a judicial technician, signed their marriage license, exchanged vows, rings and their first married kiss before a small crowd. Their wedding was also broadcast on national television, according to the BBC.

Larger gatherings and celebrations to mark the start of same-sex marriage in Costa Rica were canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Costa Rica's First Same-Sex Spouses




Willow From "Buffy The Vampire Slayer"


Buffy The Vampire Slayer was one of my favourite TV shows growing up, and still is to this day. I was only five when Buffy first hit our screens, so naturally I got into the show much later. But I still recall around nine years old watching the newer seasons on BBC Two, even if I didn’t know exactly what was going on.

Horror is one of my favourite genres so to have a show that was also full of comedy, wit and teenage drama was so wonderful to see. One of my favourite characters is Willow Rosenberg (played by Alyson Hannigan). Going from the shy, awkward, nerdy girl crushing on her dork of a best friend Xander to becoming a hugely powerful witch was incredible growth.

However there was one element of Willow that subconsciously affected me in quite a negative way – her sexuality.  In earlier seasons, Willow was attracted to Xander, a man.  She then had a long term relationship with Oz, another man.  From what we could see, Willow appeared to be a straight woman.

However, this changed in season four when she started showing attraction to Tara, another woman. From that point on, she would identify as gay, despite continuing to have lingering feelings for men. So why didn’t the show explicitly say she was bisexual?  In 2002 and while Buffy was still on air, the show’s creator Joss Whedon said: ‘We can’t have Willow say, “Oh, cured now, I can go back to c*ck!” Willow is not going to be straddling that particular fence. She will just be gay.’

Willow From "Buffy The Vampire Slayer"




Betsy DeVos Tells Connecticut: Ban Transgender Athletes


Allowing transgender girls to compete in school sports with girls who are not transgender is a violation of federal law, and if it’s not stopped in 20 days, Connecticut risks losing federal education funding. That’s the ruling by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights, made public Thursday in a report by the Associated Press.

Wrong, says the American Civil Liberties Union; one of its most fierce defenders of transgender Americans called the ruling nothing more than another example of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’s politically-driven agenda of discrimination, specifically targeting trans girls, and trampling on their rights.

“Today’s finding, which is not a legal ruling, represents another attack from the Trump administration on transgender students,” said Chase Strangio Thursday in a statement. He’s the deputy director for trans justice, with the ACLU LGBT & HIV Project. “Since 2017, DeVos’ Department of Education has taken consistent aim at transgender students. Once again, the administration is wrong on the law and we will continue to defend transgender students under Title IX and the Constitution. Trans students belong in our schools, including on sports teams, and we will not back down from this fight.”

What’s Title IX?  Title IX, the 1972 federal civil rights law that prohibits discrimination based on sex in schools that receive federal funding, is cited by both sides in this ongoing battle. And because of that, it can be confusing for parents and school officials to know what this ruling really means for the children who, afterall, only want to play sports, and for those events to be fair.

Betsy DeVos Tells Connecticut: Ban Transgender Athletes



Nonbinary Drag Artists The Darlings


With theatres, galleries, stores, and restaurants shuttered to flatten the COVID-19 curve, the Isolation Diaries reach out to Vancouver’s creative sector to find out what they’re watching, how they’re coping, and where they’re finding inspiration.

The Darlings are a multidisciplinary, nonbinary drag performance collective based in Vancouver, BC. Their work challenges the boundaries of conventional drag, and explores genderqueer, nonbinary, and transgender experience through the use of movement, poetry, performance art, theatre, and immersive/interactive installation. The Darlings are: Continental Breakfast (Chris Reed), PM (Desi Rekrut), Rose Butch (Rae Takei), and Maiden China (Kendell Yan). As an emerging collective, they have mounted four full-length installations in September 2018, October 2018, and April 2019 as well as features at 2018's Here For Now Volume 2 dance showcase, the 2019 PuSh International Performing Arts Festiva), and full-length feature at the Transform Cabaret Festival. They created two quarantine-specific, digital shows during the 2020 COVID-19 social distancing measures, which has garnered more than 10,000 views to date; you can find those via Facebook and Vimeo.

In this interview with this performance troupe, we find out what is getting them through the pandemic,  what they are watching, listening to, favorite comfort foods, and other information.


Nonbinary Drag Artists The Darlings



Proud Allies for All


NYX Professional Makeup today announced the launch of the "Proud Allies for All" Pride initiative, which aims to educate audiences about what it means to be an ally to the LGBT community.

With states mandating stay-at-home orders and social distancing in place, NYX Professional Makeup will turn what would have been a mix of offline and online activities into a virtual celebration of Pride. The campaign comes to life with a first-of-its-kind virtual Pride march and a digital educational resource platform developed in partnership with the Los Angeles LGBT Center.

On June 1st, NYX Professional Makeup plans to launch "I March for," a virtual Pride march. Consumers are encouraged to participate in the virtual march by downloading and posting an image of themselves with a custom "Proud Allies" Instagram filter—available on the @nyxcosmetics Instagram—sharing who they march for, and nominating someone to "join the march" by doing the same. The brand plans to post all "Proud Allies" images across social platforms to celebrate the virtual march throughout the month of June.

In partnership with the Los Angeles LGBT Center, NYX Professional Makeup will also launch a digital educational resource platform on nyxcosmetics.com/proudallies, which will feature a series of video training sessions. The video training curriculum includes a breakdown of understanding basics about the LGBT community: formally defining the L, the G, the B, and beyond; how to use correct pronouns when addressing members of the LGBT community; relevant information about LGBTQ+ resources; and how to be an active advocate and ally to the community.

Proud Allies for All




Your Laugh For The Day!









Contributors: FritzKep, KillersMom, CellarDweller115





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