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The Daily Sheet - January to March 2021
« on: January 11, 2021, 05:23:28 PM »


Tuesday, January 12th, 2021



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Final Scene of A Teacher


The finale of FX on Hulu’s provocative limited series “A Teacher” begins 10 years after the penultimate episode, in which it became clear that both Eric (Nick Robinson) and Claire (Kate Mara) were broken in the aftermath of their illegal sexual relationship, when Eric was Claire’s student. During a conversation for Variety‘s inaugural FYC Fest, the show’s creator, Hannah Fidell, Mara and Robinson discussed the finale, and its riveting final scene.

When the episode begins, Eric is a wilderness counselor for troubled young people, and Claire has a new husband, two kids and a Tesla. Coincidence has brought both Claire and Eric back to Austin, Texas — Eric for his high-school reunion, Claire for her father’s birthday — and they run into one another in a supermarket. “Who is that man?” Claire’s daughter asks as Nick rushes away. Not being able to find the words, Claire stumbles: “He’s an old friend.”

Showing the same destructive tendencies that led her to prey upon Eric in the first place, Claire texts him that night, and asks him to lunch. Their meeting is the last scene in the series.

After some awkward smalltalk, Eric tells a shocked Claire, “Our relationship fucking destroyed me.”

Mara said Claire is still “in denial” about what she did, even though it had landed her in prison. After all these years, she is still convinced it was consensual. So when Eric tells her how their relationship affected his life, Mara said, “It’s devastating and eye opening.”

Final Scene of A Teacher



Trump and LGBT Protections


With less than two weeks left in office, the administration of US President Donald Trump has finalized yet another rule rolling back nondiscrimination protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people seeking the services of health and welfare programs funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services.

Previously, a federal regulation expressly prohibited health and welfare programs receiving federal funding from discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. But the administration’s new rule, first proposed in 2019, erases this language. It also deletes a requirement that recipients recognize the marriages of same-sex couples, replacing it with a generic statement that the US Department of Health and Human Services will respect Supreme Court decisions.

The previous regulation was used to ensure adoption and foster care agencies who receive federal support serve all qualified parents, including same-sex couples. Rolling back existing nondiscrimination protections will harm those families, as well as the many kids awaiting placement in loving and supportive homes.

In 2019, Human Rights Watch argued that these changes threatened children’s rights as well as families’ freedom from discrimination and right to health. We’ve previously documented how these types of changes can function as a license to discriminate, shutting LGBT people out of health and welfare services that should be open to all.

Trump and LGBT Protections




"Liberal Lesbian" Turns In Family


An 18-year-old teenager from Massachusetts shamed her 'brainwashed' mother on social media for storming the Capitol riot on Wednesday, January 6, 2021. Reportedly, she claimed that her mother lied to her and told her she was going to visit an out-of-town doctor.

Helena Duke, a self proclaimed "liberal lesbian", took the Internet by storm on January 7, 2021, after posting a series of tweets and a video of a woman, she claimed was her mother, getting punched in the face during the violent pro-Donald Trump protests in Washington, DC. She wrote the caption: “Hi mom remember the time you told me I shouldn’t go to BLM protests bc they could get violent…this you?”

In the footage shared by Duke, a White woman can be seen trying to grab a Black female officer's phone, before getting punched right between her eyes. Duke followed up the tweet with another post comparing a picture of the bloody-faced woman in the video with a picture of her mom, saying “for those that don’t believe it’s my mother…”

The first tweet posted by Duke got shared more than 70,000 times. Duke said she only learned that her mom was participating in the violent uprising after seeing a footage online.

“She didn’t give me any more information about it, she was very vague… When I found out about the Capitol being stormed, I looked at her location sharing and it had been off for two days, so I assumed in that moment, I was like, ‘Oh my gosh, she might actually be there,'” Duke told The Post. “And then the next day, my cousin shared a video of her getting punched in the face… by police after harassing them.”

"Liberal Lesbian" Turns In Family





Maddie Hasson - "I'm Bisexual and Proud"


Maddie Hasson, the star of shows like The Finder, Twisted, and Impulse has come out as bisexual on social media.

Hasson was answering fan questions on Instagram when she posted an Instagram story announcing who she is. She was participating in the “show me a photo” challenge where fans ask to see a picture of the person with a specific thing.

In one request, she was asked to show something with a gay/bi video and took advantage of the opportunity. The 26 year-old posted a picture of herself looking directly in the camera and said “hi, I’m bi and proud.”

Hasson married composer Julian Brink in 2015.

Hasson got her first big acting break in the short lived 2012 spin-off of Bones, The Finder. For the past two years she’s starred in the YouTube series Impulse as Henrietta “Henry” Coles, a teen girl who realizes she has the power to teleport.


Maddie Hasson - "I'm Bisexual and Proud"




A First For RuPaul's Drag Race


"RuPaul's Drag Race" is known for pushing the bedazzled envelope. Where else can you find 13 seasons of scintillating outfits, eyebrow-raising gossip and unapologetic self-love from drag queens? (The current one airs Fridays, 8 EST/PST on VH1).

But when it comes to representation, fans have long hoped for the series to do better, and pushed back against narrow-mindedness from host RuPaul Charles about who can compete on the show. One question has lingered for several seasons: Why aren't there more transgender queens?

The new season features the show's first transgender male contestant, Gottmik, whose "Drag Race" debut in the Jan. 1 opener included her lip-sync win against Utica Queen.

"It was the best feeling of my life hearing RuPaul say my name," Gottmik, 24, also a makeup artist, tells USA TODAY. (She prefers female pronouns for an interview.)

Gottmik is the first transgender male contestant on "RuPaul's Drag Race."  Michelle Visage, a longtime judge on the series, says "the inclusion of Gottmik is wonderful for trans men out there who might think that they don't have a place on the show; they do."

Gottmik has emotions about being a trailblazer. "One day I'm so excited. One day, I'm more just honored and shocked and I feel like this heavy responsibility, which makes me spiral into an, 'Oh,I do have this responsibility, I need to say the perfect things and be this certain image of what I think a trans role model is,'" she says.

A First For RuPaul's Drag Race



What Is Cupiosexuality?


Let’s talk about sex, baby. Let’s talk cupiosexuality!

Beaming as its own bright light on the dazzling asexual spectrum, cupiosexuality, a term recently explored by Cosmopolitan, describes an asexual person who still craves sex, despite feeling little to no sexual attraction to others.

Whereas self-identifying asexuals (aces or a-specs) feel little to no sexual attraction nor a desire for sexual relationships with others, cupiosexuals still want to knock boots. Experiencing any sort of sexual attraction to their fellow boot-knocker, though? Not so much.

Breaking it down even further, the prefix “cupio” literally means “a desire” or “longing for” — a fun fact you can etch onto a sticky note in your brain to help remember the distinction between cupiosexuality and asexuality.

Contrary to popular misunderstanding, identifying as asexual — or any of its many unique subsets — does not necessarily limit a person to a life of celibacy or abstinence.

In fact, sexologist Tanya M. Bass, Ph.D. told Cosmo that cupiosexuals can be characterized as an asexual person that, “…simply does not feel sexual attraction, but may have sex for a host of reasons, including the physical pleasure of sex or the pleasure of their partner(s).”

What Is Cupiosexuality?



LGBTQ Advocates Want Trump Out


Despite the unrest that occurred on Wednesday afternoon after right-wing protesters overran the U.S. Capitol Building, congressional lawmakers ultimately certified the results of the 2020 election, setting the stage for President-elect Joe Biden to be sworn in on January 20. But the demonstration that sparked the riot, originally conceived as an opportunity for right-leaning Americans to protest on President Donald Trump’s behalf, came at a political cost to the commander-in-chief, resulting in calls for his removal from office.

Following several rallies designed to protest what Trump supporters believe were fraudulent votes cast during the 2020 election, thousands of demonstrators marched to the grounds of the U.S. Capitol and proceeded to push their way into the building. Throngs of people toppled largely unguarded barricades, clashed with Capitol Police officers, and entered the Capitol building. Once inside, they invaded members’ offices, posing for pictures, rifling through files, even absconding with trophies ranging from the speaker’s podium to stationery with Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s seal on it.

Capitol Police attempted to secure the building, and began evacuating high-level members while other lawmakers took refuge inside various offices throughout the Capitol complex. The disruption halted the debate over the certification of the election results in both chambers, delaying what should have been a routine procedural vote.

In the midst of the insurrection, a woman was shot in the throat by a police officer. A spokesperson for D.C. Fire and Emergency Medical Services said there had been “multiple injuries,” with the woman — later identified as Ashli Babbit, an Air Force veteran from San Diego — dying. By the end of the day three others — two men and a woman — had also died after suffering “separate medical emergencies” near the U.S. Capitol grounds. At least 52 people were arrested during the course of securing the building, according to The Hill.

LGBTQ Advocates Want Trump Out




Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - January to March 2021
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2021, 09:15:04 PM »


Tuesday, January 19th, 2021



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Remembering Heath


No one saw it coming. On January 22, 2008, Heath Ledger was found dead in his New York City apartment after an accidental overdose.

"There was a collective gasp of grief. His fans and loved ones were all completely shocked," a source recalls of the Aussie actor’s sudden passing at just 28 years old. "He was someone who, from the outside, appeared to have it all."

But things aren’t always what they seem. "Heath was a loving father and a very talented actor, but there was also a dark side to him that nobody really knew about," the source says of the handsome Oscar winner. "He suffered from terrible insomnia and reportedly relied on a cocktail of prescription medication to get through each day."

"His mind was always turning, like the sun rotating around the earth," the source continues. "Nothing ever seemed to quiet the racket."

Ledger was just 17 when he and a pal moved from his hometown of Perth, Australia, to Sydney to pursue a career in acting. And while he quickly found success, landing parts in local TV series like Sweat and Home and Away, it wasn’t until 1999's 10 Things I Hate About You that he became a bona fide movie star and heartthrob.

"Women loved him, but Heath was more than just a pretty face. He was all about taking chances and bravely went where few actors would go," the source says of the star, who followed up the classic teen flick with 2000's The Patriot opposite Mel Gibson and 2005's Brokeback Mountain, where he played a married cowboy who falls in love with another man.

Remembering Heath



Reacting to the Covid Vaccine Gay Rumor


A Rabbi claimed the COVID-19 vaccine makes you gay, now the internet wants to be vaccinated.

First, let’s set the record straight, there is zero evidence the Pfizer vaccine will make anybody gay. The much-anticipated vaccine will have many positive impacts on your social life. But altering who you’re attracted to is not one of them.

This didn’t stop Israeli Rabbi Daniel Asor taking to the internet last weekend to warn his listeners “any vaccine made using an embryonic substrate, and we have evidence of this, causes opposite tendencies.”

Asor’s assertions have no basis in fact.  The embryonic substrate is a protein used to program immune response in the body. It does not impact sexuality.

Newspaper Israel Hayom also reports that this isn’t the first time Asor has made outlandish claims about vaccines or COVID-19. His claims go directly against decrees from leading Rabbis around the world, who have all been encouraging the Jewish community to take all precautions against the virus.

The spread anti-vaccination propaganda, particularly propaganda that is homophobic is no laughing matter. However, if there’s one thing gay Twitter is good at, it’s making the best of a homophobic conspiracy.

Reacting to the Covid Vaccine Gay Rumor




Netflix Movies With Lesbian Characters


From Oscar-nominated period films to easy-to-watch rom-coms, Marie Claire has compiled a  list that is a must-watch for LBGTQ+ and allied viewers alike.

A good lesbian movie is hard to find, unfortunately. But as streaming services like Netflix become more and more popular, we’re seeing more films that feature lesbian, queer, and bisexual protagonists falling in love, breaking up, or just dancing and singing their way through a Midwestern high school prom. These films give audiences a chance to see characters, who have so often been left off-screen, just living their lives; these characters represent a slice of the population too often ignored by Hollywood.

According to GLAAD’s 2020 Studio Responsibility Index, more LGBTQ+ characters were prominently included in studio-backed feature films last year than any year previous. But lesbian and bisexual representation, specifically, decreased significantly. And the data also proved that the film industry has lengths to go in racial diversity and including queer characters with disabilities. So it’s more important than ever to stream lesbian-centric films, promote their numbers, and open up dialogues on the future of lesbian filmmaking—how it can be even better, more inclusive, and more thought-provoking.

To view the list of these 'must-see' lesbian movies currently streaming on Netflix, from Oscar-nominated period films to easy-to-watch rom-coms, click the link below.

Netflix Movies With Lesbian Characters





Barbie is Bisexual?


Among her many accomplishments, Barbie is now also gay.

Twitter has decided that Barbie is gay, specifically bisexual after a tweet went viral about Mattel giving her a girlfriend. The tweet contained a photo of Barbie and her girlfriend, wearing ‘love wins’ t-shirts.

As a bisexual, I bisexually rejoice when someone, even an iconic toy doll, is revealed to be bi. But, of course, I also wanted to investigate when exactly Barbie came out.

A bit of digging revealed that the photo was the result of a 2017 collaboration between Mattel and blogger/designer, Aimee Song. Song is the ‘girlfriend’ in the promotional image, but Barbie is supposedly in the photo as an ally.

However, the people of Twitter believe this was, in fact, Barbie’s official coming out. Fans were citing everything from Barbie’s haircut in the photo to portrayals of Barbie’s female frienships in the Barbie cinematic universe as evidence.

While many were quick to call Barbie a lesbian, bisexual Twitter was quick to remind people of Barbie’s other great love, Ken– making her bisexual.  After all, why can’t Barbie be a part of the LGBTQIA+ community? A woman so travelled and experienced, whose been around for just over 60 years– Is it so unbelievable that she would love a woman?

Barbie is Bisexual?




Transgender People and The Pandemic


Kyle Avery Jones had recently come out as transgender to her parents and friends when her final semester at the University of Connecticut began in January 2020. She wore androgynous clothes to school, sought out gender-neutral bathrooms, and limited her socializing to queer-friendly weekend gatherings off-campus.

“Everyone in my classes assumed I was a dude. I didn’t want to show up one day with a face full of makeup and a dress on. I was literally counting down to the end of the semester. I thought, ‘Once I finish college, I won’t have to do this anymore,’” said the 22-year-old Realtor from South Windsor.

Then COVID-19 struck, moving college online. Suddenly, Jones was staring herself in the face all day on a computer monitor, her anxiety rising with each class. “I was very distraught about having stubble on my face; it was an area of gender dysphoria for me. I would shave two or three times a day to make it extremely smooth. There was a lot of stress going on, and I just had to fight through it.”

She turned to feminizing hormone therapy to help light the way.

While COVID-19 has shuttered businesses and quarantined countless people in Connecticut and beyond, it has also motivated many transgender individuals such as Jones to begin gender-affirming hormone therapy, experts say. The reasons vary from the chance to transition away from gossiping co-workers, to realizing what’s important in life when the death count is daily news, to coming to terms with the self-image looking back during online work, school and socializing sessions.

Transgender People and The Pandemic



Limiting Surgeries on Intersex Infants


A new first-in-the nation bill would limit medically unnecessary surgeries on intersex children in California; that is, on babies born with anatomical differences in their genitalia.

Senate Bill 225 would require parents to wait until the child is six years old to have surgeries that would, for example, reduce a clitoris, move a working urinary opening or create a vagina.

Sen. Scott Wiener, D-San Francisco, who wrote the bill, said these types of surgeries can cause chronic pain, scarring, or worse.

"These surgeries can have significant side effects, like permanent sterilization or loss of sexual sensation," Wiener contended. "And the wrong gender can be assigned."

Opponents of the bill claimed government should not play a role in these types of decisions by parents and doctors. Supporters countered a six-year delay gives parents time to get to know their child before taking this type of action.

Hans Lindahl, director of communications for InterAct, a group that advocates for intersex youth, said no one is expecting a six-year-old to make a decision, but rather to be old enough to have some input.


Limiting Surgeries on Intersex Infants



LGBTQ Ally Judy Colbs Has Died


Judith Gettlin Colbs died on January 5th, 2021 at the age of 89. Judy was born in 1931 and grew up in Philadelphia, PA.

She was devoted to her family, and was known for her sharp wit, crazy fun-loving spirit, and ability to take charge and get things done. Judy never knew a stranger, and within a few minutes of meeting her, people were telling her their life story.

Judy touched the lives of many people with her deep friendships and support of those in need. The driving passion of her life's work was to serve others, and to reach out to those who have been marginalized or treated differently because of aspects of their lives that are not well understood. This work for others began in her career as a teacher, first in elementary education, then in special education.

After retirement, Judy shifted the focus of her service to community volunteer efforts. Her initial impetus toward this work was when her daughter, Sandy, came out to her as a lesbian. Judy quickly made connections with other parents of gay and lesbian people, and in the process, also met many members of the LGBTQ community. Her contacts within the community lead to her involvement in supporting the needs of those struggling with HIV/AIDS and she became a tireless activist and advocate for the LGTBQ community in Atlanta.

She served as the President of PFLAG Atlanta (Parents, Friends and Families of Lesbians and Gays) for almost 20 years and was honored twice as a grand marshal in the Atlanta Pride Parade, once in 2004 and again in 2016. Judy's work with PFLAG included counseling and supporting young gay and lesbian people and providing "mommy hugs" and surrogate parenting to those who were rejected by their families.

LGBTQ Ally Judy Colbs Has Died




Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

We count on you to send us your news items, questions, and nominations for posts of the day.
If you have items you’d like to see published, send them to CellarDweller115.

To subscribe to The Daily Sheet, click the “Notify” button at the top or bottom of the page.
When a new issue of TDS is posted, you will be notified by e-mail.

The Daily Sheet Archives
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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - January to March 2021
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2021, 09:43:52 AM »


Tuesday, January 26th, 2021



The Forum & SSL - Secure Socket Layer


Hello UBF members.  When the forum had a recent update, our server began using SSL - Secure Socket Layer.  SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) is the standard security technology for establishing an encrypted link between a web server and a browser. This link ensures that all data passed between the web server and browsers remain private and integral. SSL is an industry standard and is used by millions of websites in the protection of their online transactions with their customers.

It is easy to tell if a site you are using is on SSL.  A site without SSL will have an address that starts with http://.  A site that uses SSL will start with https://.

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Ang Lee & the Future of Film


Ang Lee won't reveal much about the new project he's developing, other than to say, "It has action in it." But he will divulge that he's still pursuing that elusive new mode of cinema his last two films — 2016's Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk and 2019's Gemini Man — have tried to achieve. Both films pushed the boundaries of filmmaking technology but were unsuccessful both with critics and at the box office.

"It's very difficult," says Lee, speaking to EW to mark the 20th anniversary of his film Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. "Right now, the challenge [for me] is challenging how we process images in different ways, challenging the medium itself."

The Brokeback Mountain director moved into a new phase of his career with 2012's Life of Pi, using 3-D and extensive digital effects to transform an "unfilmable" book into a visually stunning, rapturously-received triumph that earned Lee his second Oscar for Best Director (after Brokeback). He pushed even further into the digital frontier with Billy Lynn and Gemini Man, the first feature films ever shot in the ultra-high frame rate of 120 frames per second. (Movies are typically shot at 24 frames per second, a tradition stretching back to the start of the sound era.)

Lee sees these innovative devices as the future of filmmaking, not just in a technical sense but as a potential way to revitalize the importance of movie theaters. Like many directors of his pedigree, Lee is deeply invested in preserving the theatrical experience, a concern which has gained added urgency as the COVID-19 pandemic has threatened movie theaters' very existence and escalated the dominance of streaming.

Ang Lee & the Future of Film



Gay Seniors Tell Their Stories


In the 1950s, when Ray Cunningham was just 19, he served in the Navy as secretary to the personnel officer aboard the USS Ranger. He was responsible for preparing discharge and reassignment paperwork, and sometimes he would have to dishonorably discharge men for being gay.

“It was difficult,” Cunningham, now 82, told NBC News. “At that time I realized that I was gay, and it was just difficult to know that people were being discharged for the same thing that I was in my life.”

“What bothered me the most was having to talk to the guys that were being discharged, and they were not in a good state of wellness anyway, because at that time, it was illegal or considered mental problems to be gay,” he said.

Cunningham spent the next four decades in the closet until he and his partner of 30 years, Richard Prescott, 78, came out after retiring in their 50s.

The two men, who are now married, shared their stories as part of “Not Another Second,” a new multimedia art exhibit in Brooklyn, New York, that features 12 LGBTQ elders, many of whom spent most of their lives in the proverbial closet. Through video interviews and interactive augmented-reality technology, visitors can experience their stories.

The other elders featured in the exhibit include the Rev. Goddess Magora Kennedy, who participated in the Stonewall uprising, and Paul Barby, who ran for Congress as an openly gay man in 1996 and 1998. Alongside each portrait is the number of years the elder was closeted.

Gay Seniors Tell Their Stories




She Made Bernie's Mittens


Jen Ellis is the woman who designed Sen. Bernie Sanders mittens that stole the show at the inauguration this week.

She’s a 42-year-old second grade teacher and craft hobbyist who lives outside of Burlington, Vermont — where Sanders was mayor in the 1980s. Ellis, who identifies as a lesbian, resides in the town with her partner, Liz, and their 5-year-old daughter.

Sanders received the mittens in 2016. At the time, Ellis’ daughter was attending a preschool directed by Sanders’ daughter-in-law, Liza Driscoll. Ellis made mittens for all the teachers and gave an extra pair to Driscoll to give to Sanders. They’re made from reclaimed wool from old sweaters and fleece lining made with recycled plastic.

“He must really like them if he chose to wear them,” Ellis told Jewish Insider.

Inauguration Day was cold, and Sanders dressed for the occasion.

Socially distanced from other guests at the inauguration of President Joe Biden and Vice-President Kamala Harris, Sanders wore a blue surgical mask, gray Burton winter coat, and the oversized brown mittens. Shortly after Sanders was photographed in his mittens, the image went viral and memes were abundant.

She Made Bernie's Mittens





Vesta Lugg is Bisexual


Spanish musician and actress Vesta Lugg, who boasts over one million followers on Instagram, has come out as bisexual on her stories.

Taking part in the popular ‘assume something about me’ trend, which is when someone’s Instagram followers share their assumptions about them and they confirm whether they’re true or false, Lugg was asked whether she identified as bisexual.

Answering the user, she wrote: “True” with a rainbow emoji accompanying it.

She also elaborated further in her answer, explaining: “I think sexuality is fluid. And perhaps more as a child, from the information I had, I assumed that as I was always with men, therefore I was straight.”

Vesta’s words address a common misconception with bisexuals, in that their sexuality morphs to fit the gender of the person that they’re dating, when in fact, it remains bisexual.

She further explained that she had the “privilege” to be “able to treat these issues freely” and that she was in an environment where she could “say that I want to love who I want to love and deconstruct what I thought I had to be because of what they told me it meant to be a woman.”

Vesta Lugg is Bisexual




Dr. Rachel Levine's Appointment


Pennsylvania Health Secretary Dr. Rachel Levine has been nominated by President-elect Joe Biden to be assistant secretary for health in the department of Health and Human Services. It’s a move that could make Levine the first openly transgender federal official.

Levine, a Tulane University and Harvard Medical School grad and a former pediatrician, has been a Commonwealth health leader since 2015. As the Physician General, she tackled the opioid crisis. Over the past year, as Health Secretary, she was at the helm of the state’s coronavirus response. Throughout the pandemic, she urged residents to, “stay calm, stay home, and stay safe.”

Tesla Taliaferro heads up the Rainbow Rose LGBT Center in York County. Taliaferro is a trans man and says his first thought hearing the news Levine may serve in the Biden administration was, “there’s no one more deserving.”

“She’s a compassionate leader and a caring individual and she really understands people,” Taliaferro says.

Corrine Goodwin is also transgender had a similar first reaction. She runs the Eastern PA Trans Equity Project. She says her second thought was, “It’s about time.”

“Trans people are just as capable as anyone else in this country,” Goodwin says.

Dr. Rachel Levine's Appointment



Mr. Grim is Pansexual


American pro wrestler Mr. Grim aka “The Hitman for Hire” opened up about his sexuality in a heartfelt social media post.

We’ve all set New Year aspirations to live by, but it looks like Chris Lewis has gone a step further in embracing his truth.

Lewis, who goes by the wrestling moniker “Mr Grim”, publicly came out in a moving personal tweet on New Year’s Day.

His brave tweet read: “For years, I’ve struggled with my identity. Too worried about how others would feel or think about me. I’ve finally gained the courage to openly express that I’m Pansexual.”

Lewis ended his tweet thanking American actress and fellow professional wrestler Nyla Rose for her being his “inspiration” who offered “endless support” throughout the process.

Rose, a long standing supporting of Lewis, light-heartedly replied to the tweet encouraging the wrestler to buy a flag.

In 2019, Rose had history herself in becoming the first open transgender wrestler to sign with a major American promotion.

Mr. Grim is Pansexual



LGBTQ Ally Larry King


Larry King, the man with his colorful trademark suspenders and the signature gravely voice, who interviewed kings, presidents, newsmakers, celebrities, and everyday folk died Saturday age 87 at Cedars-Sinai hospital his production company tweeted this morning. King’s 21-year-old son Chance Armstrong King also confirmed the legendary broadcaster’s death CNN reported.

In a career spanning nearly 60 years King was noted for his easy style of interviewing and his uncanny ability to get the who’s who of nearly ever field of human endeavor on his chat show, in a couple of cases making history as was the case in 1995 when King presided over what was later termed a critical Middle East peace summit between PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat, King Hussein of Jordan and Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin.

According to the Associated Press, King conducted an estimated 50,000 on-air interviews in his signature nonconfrontational style. He welcomed everyone from the Dalai Lama to Elizabeth Taylor, from Mikhail Gorbachev to Barack Obama, Bill Gates to Lady Gaga.

After he relocated to Los Angeles from Washington D.C. where he had broadcast from since the middle 1980’s, his shows were frequently in the thick of breaking celebrity news, including Paris Hilton talking about her stint in jail in 2007 and Michael Jackson’s friends and family members talking about his death in 2009.

King was also a staunch LGBTQ ally. Larry King spoke at length about the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) rights movement in a candid discussion with Dave Rubin of The Rubin Report in 2016 the Huffington Post had reported.

LGBTQ Ally Larry King




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Re: The Daily Sheet - January to March 2021
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2021, 04:00:56 PM »


Tuesday, February 2nd, 2021



The Forum & SSL - Secure Socket Layer


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Michelle Williams is "Showing Up"


In what is turning into quite a successful partnership, Michelle Williams and Kelly Reichardt look to have found their next project together.  A24 has come on to Reichardt’s next film Showing Up with Williams attaching herself to star. The news was confirmed via a new episode of The A24 Podcast, which drops today, that features a conversation between Kenneth Lonergan and Kelly Reichardt. The project is mentioned at the top of the podcast. This will mark the fourth film, the two have worked on together, having previously collaborated on Wendy & Lucy, Meek’s Cutoff, and Certain Women.

Showing Up is set to go into production summer 2021. The script is written by Reichardt and her long-time writing partner, Jon Raymond. Neil Kopp, Anish Savjani, and Vincent Savino will produce. Scott Rudin and Eli Bush will serve as executive producers.

Reichardt’s latest film is a vibrant and sharply funny portrait of an artist on the verge of a career-changing exhibition. As she navigates family, friends, and colleagues in the lead up to her show, the chaos of life becomes the inspiration for great art.

This will mark a reunion for all following Reichardt’s most recent film First Cow, which was named 2020’s Best Picture from the New York Film Critics Circle, and is on over 225 top ten lists, more than any other film this year.

Michelle Williams is "Showing Up"



Gay Couple Lashed


Authorities in Indonesia’s Aceh province publicly flogged two gay men 77 times each on Thursday after a vigilante mob raided their apartment in November, allegedly caught them having sex, and handed them over to the police. The whipping—recognized as torture under international law—was punishment under the province’s Sharia (Islamic law) regulations, which forbid same-sex conduct.

The floggings are part of a longstanding pattern of targeted abuse by Acehnese authorities against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people.

In 2012, then-Banda Aceh deputy mayor Illiza Saaduddin announced a “special team” to make the public more aware of the “threat of LGBT," posting an image of herself on Instagram holding a handgun and vowing to flush gays out of Aceh. In October 2015, special Sharia police arrested two women, ages 18 and 19, on suspicion of being lesbians for embracing in public, and detained them for three nights before sending them to religious “rehab.” An episode nearly identical to this week's flogging happened in 2017 – including vigilantism, police involvement, prosecution under grossly discriminatory Sharia regulations, and public flogging.

The abuse also is part of a five-year anti-LGBT campaign driven by many of Indonesia’s national and local leaders with harmful rhetoric and repeated failure to punish abusers.

Gay Couple Lashed




Gold Star Lesbian


In the season three episode of LGBTQ+ drama The L Word, “Lone Star”, the women sit around chatting about the term “gold star” and exactly who qualifies. The term, meaning a lesbian who has only had sex with women, is a status some lesbians take pride in, but it’s one that’s become controversial as our ideas of sexuality and gender have evolved.

Maria Kindstedt, therapist at LGBTQ therapy service Pink Therapy, defines it as “a lesbian who has only had sex with other women,” believing that, while you could frame it as a lesbian who has never had sex with men, “lesbian sexuality can be defined perfectly well without the involvement of men.” It’s understandable that many lesbians, particularly ones who have trauma relating to men, would find comfort in their status as a gold star.

If you search for the term “gold star lesbian”, the results are overwhelmingly negative. Headlines like, “5 Reasons the Phrase Gold Star Lesbian Needs to Die” and “6 Reasons We Shouldn’t Say Gold Star Lesbian” indicate that people have less-than-positive feelings about it. But why is it so controversial? The term relies on notions of “purity” in abstaining from (cisgender) men, which means that it can be wielded as biphobia or transphobia, often leans on cissexist notions of gender, and it fails to take into account that many lesbians can be victims of compulsory heterosexuality or assault.

Really, it’s less about what someone wants to call themselves, and more about whether or not they use it to exclude potential partners. Kindstedt wants to reinforce that if someone wants to define themselves as a gold star, that’s OK, providing they don’t hold others to the same standard. “We need to be mindful that women’s sexuality has a history of being defined and controlled by men in a patriarchal society and be very careful to question women’s sexual self expression and negatively interpret the labels they choose for themselves,” she says, adding that stigmatising the term could stigmatise lesbian sexuality further. “If a ‘gold star’ would like to open up to date women with more diverse experiences than herself, exploration should always be supported.”

Gold Star Lesbian





Vesta Lugg is Bisexual


Spanish musician and actress Vesta Lugg, who boasts over one million followers on Instagram, has come out as bisexual on her stories.

Taking part in the popular ‘assume something about me’ trend, which is when someone’s Instagram followers share their assumptions about them and they confirm whether they’re true or false, Lugg was asked whether she identified as bisexual.

Answering the user, she wrote: “True” with a rainbow emoji accompanying it.

She also elaborated further in her answer, explaining: “I think sexuality is fluid. And perhaps more as a child, from the information I had, I assumed that as I was always with men, therefore I was straight.”

Vesta’s words address a common misconception with bisexuals, in that their sexuality morphs to fit the gender of the person that they’re dating, when in fact, it remains bisexual.

She further explained that she had the “privilege” to be “able to treat these issues freely” and that she was in an environment where she could “say that I want to love who I want to love and deconstruct what I thought I had to be because of what they told me it meant to be a woman.”

Vesta Lugg is Bisexual




Reversal of Transgender Ban


President Joe Biden this week reversed the federal transgender military ban implemented under former President Donald Trump’s administration. It’s another sea change in the lives of transgender Michiganders who’ve spent lifetimes reading shifting terrain. Blaire McIntyre is a Michigan Army National Guard specialist who fought against the ban in federal court.

“I felt like for the first time in a long time that I was actually seen, and I was actually noticed. And not just me, but my entire community, the entire LGBTQ community,” McIntyre said. McIntyre is a trans woman and previously served in active-duty combat in Afghanistan.

Despite her years of service, McIntyre says she was threatened with a discharge under the 2019 ban. That was the same year she came out as trans to her family and coworkers. While the military has a reputation for being a hypermasculine space, McIntyre says most of her coworkers supported her transition.

GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders (GLAD) and the National Center for Lesbian Rights (NCLR) filed a challenge to the ban on behalf of McIntyre. That court case is being dropped with news of the reversal. McIntyre says there’s been a weight lifted off her and other transgender service members’ shoulders.

“Anytime you ban a group of people or you keep a group of people out in the sense it feels like it dehumanizes you. And like I said, from all my friends that are transgender in service, it seems like it's pretty across the board. We're all feeling that there's a light on us again,that we're noticed,” McIntyre said.

Reversal of Transgender Ban



Mr. Grim is Pansexual


American pro wrestler Mr. Grim aka “The Hitman for Hire” opened up about his sexuality in a heartfelt social media post.

We’ve all set New Year aspirations to live by, but it looks like Chris Lewis has gone a step further in embracing his truth.

Lewis, who goes by the wrestling moniker “Mr Grim”, publicly came out in a moving personal tweet on New Year’s Day.

His brave tweet read: “For years, I’ve struggled with my identity. Too worried about how others would feel or think about me. I’ve finally gained the courage to openly express that I’m Pansexual.”

Lewis ended his tweet thanking American actress and fellow professional wrestler Nyla Rose for her being his “inspiration” who offered “endless support” throughout the process.

Rose, a long standing supporting of Lewis, light-heartedly replied to the tweet encouraging the wrestler to buy a flag.

In 2019, Rose had history herself in becoming the first open transgender wrestler to sign with a major American promotion.

Mr. Grim is Pansexual



Cloris Leachman, LGBTQ+ Ally


Cloris Leachman, the multi-award-winning actress who died Wednesday at age 94, was both an icon and ally to LGBTQ+ people.

She was beloved for her performances in The Mary Tyler Moore Show and other sitcoms, her dramatic turns in films such as The Last Picture Show (for which she won an Oscar), and her hilarious and campy portrayals in Mel Brooks movies. She also appeared multiple times at the GLAAD Media Awards, honoring fair, accurate, and inclusive depictions of LGBTQ+ people in film and television.

A native of Des Moines, Iowa, Leachman was a runner-up in the 1946 Miss America pageant, where she won a scholarship, and she studied acting at various schools, including the Actors Studio in New York City. In the late 1940s, she began a long and varied career that included supporting roles in film, bigger ones on TV, and even a costarring role with Katharine Hepburn in Shakespeare’s As You Like It on Broadway in 1950. She also understudied the lead role of Ensign Nellie Forbush in Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Broadway musical South Pacific and played it briefly in 1952.

But it was in the 1970s that she really began to make her mark. She played Ruth Popper, the unhappy wife of a small-town high school football coach, in Peter Bogdanovich’s 1971 film The Last Picture Show, based on a Larry McMurtry novel (who co-wrote Brokeback Mountain). Ruth ends up having an affair with a teenager, Sonny; the movie implies that her husband is gay, something conveyed more clearly in McMurtry’s book. Leachman won the Academy Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role.

Leachman was a longtime activist for animal rights, but she was interested in other causes as well, such as LGBTQ+ equality. Her appearances at the GLAAD Awards included a flirtatious turn with MTM costar Betty White in 2013.

Cloris Leachman, LGBTQ+ Ally




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Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

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Re: The Daily Sheet - January to March 2021
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2021, 01:28:51 PM »


Tuesday, February 9th, 2021



The Forum & SSL - Secure Socket Layer


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Knight of Legion of Honor


Renowned Taiwanese-American director Ang Lee on Wednesday was honored by the French government, which conferred on him the Knight of the Legion of Honor, the highest French order of merit, in recognition of his outstanding achievements and contributions to cinema and culture.

The honor was bestowed upon Lee by Jean-Francois Casabonne-Masonnave, who is director of the French Office in Taipei, which is the de facto embassy of France in Taiwan in the absence of formal diplomatic relations between the two countries.

In a news release, the office praised the filmmaker for having the ability to take on various film genres while always being able to evoke "humanism and elegance" in all of his works.

Born in Taiwan's Pingtung County, Lee's early successes included "Pushing Hands",  which earned him the Best Film award at the Asia-Pacific Film Festival in 1992, the French Office said in its statement.

It noted that Lee's next movie, "The Wedding Banquet," was one of the first Chinese-language films on homosexuality.

Lee is also known by the French audience for his other notable films -- "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon", "Brokeback Mountain" and "Life of Pi", the statement said.

Knight of Legion of Honor



A Signal To The World


Just over two decades ago, President Bill Clinton had to use a recess appointment to install the first openly gay U.S. ambassador over Republican senators' opposition. Now, on Tuesday, the State Department's new openly gay spokesperson will hold his first daily press briefing.

That the voice of the Biden administration on the world stage, whose words will be analyzed in foreign capitals and provide direction for U.S. diplomats overseas, will be a gay man is unremarkable, which is itself a remarkable thing.   It also sends a potent message to foreign LGBTQ activists, especially those fighting in countries where same-sex relationships are still criminalized.

"It's incredibly important for queer people in countries where homosexuality and queerness is a death sentence," said Innanoshe Richard Akuson, a Nigerian LGBT rights activist and writer.

Ned Price is a longtime national security hand who spent over a decade at the CIA, including three years serving as the National Security Council spokesperson under President Barack Obama. He left the agency in February 2017, resigning with a Washington Post op-ed that expressed alarm at President Donald Trump and his approach to U.S. intelligence. Throughout Trump's term, he was a frequent critic, appearing on cable news and leading policy and communications for National Security Action, a progressive advocacy group of former Obama administration officials.

A Signal To The World




Review - "Two of Us"


From the title alone, Two of Us  — or Deux, as it's called in its native France — seems to swell with romance. And it very much is one, though it would be a lot simpler for Madeleine (Martine Chevallier) and Nina (Barbara Sukowa) if à deux was all they had. Together for decades, the pair are finally ready to move to Rome and live out their golden years together — except Madeleine is also a widow with two grown children, terrified to tell them her truth. So to everyone they know they're merely friendly neighbors instead; two elderly women who share a common hallway.

When fate steps in and abruptly alters their plans, director Filippo Meneghetti's tender domestic drama (out today and just nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the Golden Globes) becomes a moving referendum on choice and chance and the extraordinary lengths people go to protect their most private selves — even if the movie never quite explains why, in approximately 2021, it would be so terrible not to.

The small cosmopolitan city the duo lives in hardly seems like the kind to burn lesbians on a pyre: a place of leafy parks and cafes where Madeleine has raised her family — daughter Anne (Léa Drucker) a harried hairdresser and single mom, and son Frédéric (Jérôme Varanfrain), who still holds on to some vague but surly idea that she was unfaithful to their late father.

All she needs to do is break the news to them at a birthday dinner, but her failure to work up the courage becomes a full-fledged betrayal when Nina finds out — and an actual disaster when serious illness strikes.  Suddenly Madeleine is out of reach to the person she's spent nearly every day and night with for decades, simply because their love can't (or won't) speak its name.

Review - "Two of Us"





"My Police"


You may have heard that Harry Styles is playing queer in an upcoming movie, now we know more.

Initially announced last year with Styles' name floated as only a possibility, the project is titled My Policeman. Now confirmed, Styles will play play Tom, a policeman in the 1950's who falls in love with a man, but marries a woman, Marion. Marion will be played by Emma Corrin, the British actress who just scored SAG and Golden Globe nominations for playing Princess Diana in The Crown.

According to Deadline, the movie will start in the late 90’s, “when the arrival of elderly invalid Patrick into Marion and Tom’s home triggers the exploration of seismic events from 40 years previous: the passionate relationship between Tom and Patrick at a time when homosexuality was illegal.”

The film is being directed by Tony and Olivier Award winner Michael Grandage, and featuring a script from Oscar and Emmy nominee Ron Nyswaner, adapted from the celebrated novel of the same name by Bethan Roberts. The film is being produced by Greg Berlanti, Robbie Rogers and Sarah Schecter of Berlanti-Schechter Films. It will premiere on Amazon Prime.

Styles has famous declined to label his sexuality.  Many fans have taken his stylistic sensibilities, as well as other hints that the performer is queer. Case in point: they look to his ardent support of the community, a few lyrics that might be read into, as well as visuals like his "Lights Up" video in which he appears in a mass of nearly-naked bodies being nuzzled by both genders. That said, he has only been publicly linked to women.

"My Police"




Transgender Homelessness in The South


Angelica Butler was tired of having to out herself as a transgender woman every time she applied for a job or tried to rent an apartment. Prospective landlords and employers rejected applications when her identity documents didn't match her gender, ultimately throwing her in-and-out of homelessness for seven years.

"I was at a place in my life where for me to have a home of my own is a big deal because I didn't want to be out on the streets," Butler said.

Now, Butler, 35, hopes to become the owner of a 400-square-feet tiny home with its own bedroom and kitchen in Memphis, Tennessee, as part of a landmark project started by grassroots organization My Sistah's House to help solve transgender homelessness. The effort broke ground in January and hopes to build 20 tiny homes in total, five of which will be completed this year.

Across the nation, homeownership rates are dismal among transgender Americans— and even worse for Black transgender Americans. To overcome centuries of discriminatory housing policies, including denying gender diverse people access to government-funded shelters, grassroots activists in the South, home to one in three LGBTQ people, are working to build housing for their community.

In New Orleans, a group of transgender activists are working to open a shelter for homeless transgender and gender nonbinary people known as House of Tulip. A similar project took root in Charlotte, North Carolina. A Dallas couple moved to Arkansas to build 32 tiny houses for LGBT people.

Transgender Homelessness in The South



Kyle Kennery's Journey of Acceptance


American pro wrestler Mr. Grim aka “The Hitman for Hire” opened up about his sexuality in a heartfelt social media post.

We’ve all set New Year aspirations to live by, but it looks like Chris Lewis has gone a step further in embracing his truth.

Lewis, who goes by the wrestling moniker “Mr Grim”, publicly came out in a moving personal tweet on New Year’s Day.

His brave tweet read: “For years, I’ve struggled with my identity. Too worried about how others would feel or think about me. I’ve finally gained the courage to openly express that I’m Pansexual.”

Lewis ended his tweet thanking American actress and fellow professional wrestler Nyla Rose for her being his “inspiration” who offered “endless support” throughout the process.

Rose, a long standing supporting of Lewis, light-heartedly replied to the tweet encouraging the wrestler to buy a flag.

In 2019, Rose had history herself in becoming the first open transgender wrestler to sign with a major American promotion.

Kyle Kennery's Journey of Acceptance



Cloris Leachman, LGBTQ+ Ally


Cloris Leachman, the multi-award-winning actress who died Wednesday at age 94, was both an icon and ally to LGBTQ+ people.

She was beloved for her performances in The Mary Tyler Moore Show and other sitcoms, her dramatic turns in films such as The Last Picture Show (for which she won an Oscar), and her hilarious and campy portrayals in Mel Brooks movies. She also appeared multiple times at the GLAAD Media Awards, honoring fair, accurate, and inclusive depictions of LGBTQ+ people in film and television.

A native of Des Moines, Iowa, Leachman was a runner-up in the 1946 Miss America pageant, where she won a scholarship, and she studied acting at various schools, including the Actors Studio in New York City. In the late 1940s, she began a long and varied career that included supporting roles in film, bigger ones on TV, and even a costarring role with Katharine Hepburn in Shakespeare’s As You Like It on Broadway in 1950. She also understudied the lead role of Ensign Nellie Forbush in Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Broadway musical South Pacific and played it briefly in 1952.

But it was in the 1970s that she really began to make her mark. She played Ruth Popper, the unhappy wife of a small-town high school football coach, in Peter Bogdanovich’s 1971 film The Last Picture Show, based on a Larry McMurtry novel (who co-wrote Brokeback Mountain). Ruth ends up having an affair with a teenager, Sonny; the movie implies that her husband is gay, something conveyed more clearly in McMurtry’s book. Leachman won the Academy Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role.

Leachman was a longtime activist for animal rights, but she was interested in other causes as well, such as LGBTQ+ equality. Her appearances at the GLAAD Awards included a flirtatious turn with MTM costar Betty White in 2013.

Cloris Leachman, LGBTQ+ Ally




Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Re: The Daily Sheet - January to March 2021
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2021, 10:07:53 AM »


Tuesday, February 16th, 2021



The Forum & SSL - Secure Socket Layer


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"Brokeback Mountain" and "Life of Pi"


Life of Pi and Brokeback Mountain are two of Ang Lee's best movies. And while they are completely different, they are often compared.

Brokeback Mountain and Life of Pi are two grand creations of the wildly acclaimed director Ang Lee. Both have been praised immensely by critics and audiences alike, while also being celebrated by major award shows, both being nominated and winning various accolades.

Of course, this has led fans to compare the two movies to decide which is better of the two. Indeed, this usually comes down to personal taste, but there is still a chance of objectivity when looking at the two movies separately.

So click the link below to see 5 ways Brokeback Mountain is better than Life Of Pi (& 5 ways Life Of Pi is better)

"Brokeback Mountain" and "Life of Pi"



From Movement, to Party


When coronavirus restrictions threatened the White Party, an annual circuit party held in Palm Springs, California, the organizer, Jeffrey Sanger, decided to move the festivities to Jalisco, Mexico.

Gay partygoers from around the world descended on the small coastal state for the New Year’s Eve bash. Stars from Ru Paul’s Drag Race made appearances, and even some doctors and nurses, fresh off their first COVID-19 vaccine doses, got in on the action.

The social media backlash was swift. Mexico, at that time, had one of the highest mortality rates – measured as deaths to cases – in the world. Others pointed out that the influx of tourists could strain existing hospital resources. Above all, the partygoers seemed to embody the arrogance, privilege and excess of people who prioritized a good time over a global health emergency.

While other gay events have also been occurring during the pandemic, this one particular party seemed to strike a nerve within the gay community.

For five years, my colleagues and I have been attending these circuit parties to interview attendees. We’ve sought to better understand the positive ways these parties influence gay culture, along with some of the problems they can present.

To me, Sanker’s decadent bash – held in the throes of the coronavirus pandemic – epitomized a growing divide in gay culture.

From Movement, to Party




"Love Tenderly" - Stories Told By Lesbian Nuns


I must know at least 1,000 nuns. (Though they are actually called “women religious” or “sisters.”) They taught me. I studied with them. We lived in the seminary with them. I’ve said Mass for several women congregations. We ministered together. I attended retreats given by them. They have been spiritual directors. I’ve written about them.

Yet, not once have I said to myself, “This nun is a lesbian.” And I think it’s because of my respect and reverence for them.

After reading two ground-breaking books about lesbian nuns, though, I think it’s the opposite. I had internalized the historic shame for same-sex feelings. Or, it simply does not matter.

The recently released “Love Tenderly” tells the story of 23 sisters coming to grips with their sexual orientation in the context of religious life. The contemporary work reflects a different milieu than the first ground-breaking, sensational “Lesbian Nuns: Breaking Silence,” published in 1985, which told 47 nuns’ stories. Jarring, it became an international hit because the words “lesbian” and “nun” had never been uttered in the same sentence in such a public way before. It also gave the curious a peek behind the convent walls that was not always flattering.

“Love Tenderly” oozes with tolerance and sensitivity, not only by the sisters telling their sometimes painful coming-out stories, but also of more accepting religious leadership in their communities.

"Love Tenderly" - Stories Told By Lesbian Nuns





On Bisexuality


During a play in middle school, Kaitlyn Venturina developed a crush on another cast-mate. It was her first identifiable crush on another girl and she asked herself, “What does this mean for me?”

After doing some research and personal exploration into bisexuality, she decided to let people know about her newfound identity with an Instagram post. But before coming out, she had a few concerns.  “If I do come out … ’Am I going to be loved or not?’ ‘Am I going to be enough or not?’” said Venturina, a sophomore film major.

Something Venturina did not initially question was whether or not people would believe her.

Bi-erasure, according to the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation, is “a pervasive problem in which the existence or legitimacy of bisexuality (either in general or in regard to an individual) is questioned or denied outright.”

There is a plethora of stereotypes surrounding bisexuality—from being hypersexual to not wanting to “pick a side.”

Jenn Lee, a graduate student in the English and Creative Writing Department’s nonfiction program, grew up in a very “openly queer” household, so coming out did not feel like “coming out” to her.

On Bisexuality




John Fillmore's Insulting Comment


An Arizona state representative is facing an ethics complaint after he compared transgender people to farm animals at a Wednesday committee hearing.

The hearing was for House Bill 2725, which would require state identification documents to contain only a male or female gender marker. The bill pre-emptively bans nonbinary people, who are neither exclusively male nor female, from using gender-neutral X markers on their IDs, even though Arizona law doesn’t currently permit that.

State Rep. John Fillmore, the bill’s sponsor, said during the hearing that he “proposed this bill just to give clarity in government documents and was hoping to avoid the whole gender identity issue on the gender dysphoria,” according to a video of the hearing.

"What’s going to happen when someday someone wakes up and they want to go to a far extreme and identify as a chicken or something, for crying out loud,” he added. “Where do we draw the line?”

Megan Mogan, who is the mom of a 15-year-old nonbinary child and testified against the bill Wednesday, said Fillmore’s comment was dehumanizing.

“I don't think you have to be the parent of a nonbinary person, you can just be the parent of anyone, and if someone dehumanizes your child, it's like one of the worst possible feelings you can have,” Mogan told NBC News on Friday.

She tweeted after the hearing, “Still shaking after an elected GOP state rep just compared my non-binary child to a barnyard animal.”

John Fillmore's Insulting Comment



Google Corrects Nonbinary Bias


Google’s advertising system allowed employers or landlords to discriminate against nonbinary and some transgender people, The Markup found.

Companies trying to run ads on YouTube or elsewhere on the web could direct Google not to show those ads to people of “unknown gender” — meaning people who have not identified themselves to Google as “male” or “female.” After being alerted to this by The Markup, Google pledged to crack down on the practice.

“We will be implementing an update to our policy and enforcement in the coming weeks to restrict advertisers from targeting or excluding users on the basis of the ‘gender unknown’ category,” Elijah Lawal, a spokesperson for Google said.

Google’s policies forbid ads targeting or excluding male or female people from jobs, housing, or financial products, in order to comply with federal anti-discrimination laws. But until The Markup alerted Google, the company gave advertisers the option of keeping their ads from being shown to people of “unknown gender” — effectively allowing employers and landlords to either inadvertently or purposefully discriminate against people who identify as nonbinary, transgender, or anything other than male or female.

The Markup found two such job ads on YouTube, which is owned by Google — one for jobs at FedEx and the other for Dewey Pest Control, a California-based chain. In both cases, Google’s ad targeting explanations, collected by New York University’s Ad Observer, indicated that the employer had targeted the ad based on gender but that the data did not specify which gender was targeted. In those cases, Lawal said, the advertiser had chosen to exclude people of unknown gender from seeing the ads. Upon further review, Lawal said, the company “identified approximately 100 advertisers out of many thousands” who had done the same for housing, credit, or job ads.

Google Corrects Nonbinary Bias



Ian Riccaboni Supports LGBT Community Center


A key product of LGBTQ pro wrestling’s expanding profile is a heightened focus on reaching out to and supporting LGBTQ communities outside of the industry. That process goes beyond the welcoming atmosphere cultivated by LGBTQ-focused events or the increased presentation of marginalized identities.

Those leading the charge are using their platform to invoke LGBTQ history and impact marginalized populations beyond those already interested in checking out the in-ring action. Like any movement, though, a coalition between community members and allies only helps to strengthen the house being built. Especially when an ally has the ability to reach audiences that don’t regularly interact with LGBTQ identities.

For Ring of Honor announcer Ian Riccaboni, being part of that coalition as an ally is requisite to his role as the voice of a major pro wrestling organization. He literally lent his voice to the cause in January when he committed all profits from his Cameo account between Jan. 13 (Riccaboni’s birthday) and April 1 (his wife’s birthday) to the Bradbury-Sullivan LGBT Community Center in his hometown of Allentown, PA.

Located in the heart of Allentown, the Bradbury-Sullivan LGBT Community Center serves LGBTQ populations throughout the Lehigh Valley through community advocacy campaigns and various arts, health, youth and pride programs.

According to Bradbury-Sullivan LGBT Community Center executive director Adrian Shanker, the Covid-19 pandemic pushed the center’s main focus to LGBTQ health advocacy. “We’ve engaged more strongly in health advocacy to ensure that the public health leaders in Pennsylvania that are making decisions throughout the pandemic are including LGBT people,” Shanker told Outsports.

Ian Riccaboni Supports LGBT Community Center




Your Laugh For The Day!










Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - January to March 2021
« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2021, 06:33:55 PM »


Tuesday, February 23rd, 2021



The Forum & SSL - Secure Socket Layer


Hello UBF members.  When the forum had a recent update, our server began using SSL - Secure Socket Layer.  SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) is the standard security technology for establishing an encrypted link between a web server and a browser. This link ensures that all data passed between the web server and browsers remain private and integral. SSL is an industry standard and is used by millions of websites in the protection of their online transactions with their customers.

It is easy to tell if a site you are using is on SSL.  A site without SSL will have an address that starts with http://.  A site that uses SSL will start with https://.

Why are we telling you this?  Because if you are posting pictures here, and the address you use doesn't have the "s" in it, the image will not show.  Anytime you post an image, you should make sure that it starts with https://





15 Year Flashback to The 2006 Oscars


There have been a few instances in Oscar’s illustrious history that have left film fans scratching their heads. One such occurrence happened on March 5, 2006, at the end of the 78th ceremony when the Best Picture was announced. It remains one of the most controversial wins in the history of the awards show. It was also a year in which there was no big winner – in fact, FOUR films tied with the most wins – at just three apiece! Also unusual for the Oscars, the awards for picture, director and all four acting awards went to different productions, and there were a few anomalies in the acting categories as well. The event, which was held a week later than normal due to the Winter Olympics, was hosted by Jon Stewart for the first time (he’d host again in 2008). His opening sketch featured former Oscar hosts Billy Crystal, Steve Martin, Chris Rock, Whoopi Goldberg and David Letterman hilariously turning down the gig.

This was one of the few ceremonies during the “five-movie- limit” years in which all the Best Picture and Best Director nominees aligned. Ang Lee was unsurprisingly named Best Director for “Brokeback Mountain,” becoming the first non-Caucasian winner in that category, and making it seem that “Brokeback” was a shoo-in for Best Picture. However, “Crash” swooped in with Jack Nicholson announcing the stunning news, becoming the first Best Picture winner since “Rocky” 29 years before to win only three awards in total; in fact, “Crash” and “Brokeback” each won three, including wins for their screenplays. “Crash” won Best Original Screenplay and Best Film Editing, while “Brokeback” won for Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Original Score


15 Year Flashback to The 2006 Oscars



Seeking Asylum During The Trump Administration


Liam first realized he liked men while watching the music video for Ricky Martin's "Livin' La Vida Loca" as a young child.

"I knew there was something wrong because everyone was talking about the girls, but I didn't find them attractive. I was just looking at Ricky Martin," he says.

Liam is not his real name. We're using it because exposing his sexuality could put his family in danger back home. Azerbaijan, where he grew up, is a small, predominantly Muslim country. It's a conservative, authoritarian state where honor killings still occur. Although homosexuality was legalized in 2000, LGBTQ advocacy group ILGA Europe has repeatedly rated it the worst country for gay people in Europe. In 2017 and 2019 Azerbaijani police carried out a series of anti-LGBTQ+ raids in the capital Baku.

Tamara Grigoryeva is a U.S.-based Azerbaijani journalist and former human rights activist who documented the raids.

"At any time, you can be exposed. At any time, someone you think is a friend can betray you, call the police or out you to the public," she says.

Liam suffered a lot as a child and adolescent. His father found personal messages exposing Liam's sexuality and threatened to kill him. By the time he graduated from high school, Liam felt he wouldn't survive if he stayed in Azerbaijan.

Seeking Asylum During The Trump Administration




Punished For Saying "I'm A Lesbian"


Local school district USD 251 banned a 13-year-old girl from riding the bus after saying she’s gay in front of other students.

Izzy Dieker is an eighth grader at Americus School in the North Lyon County District.

Every day Dieker rides the bus to school for 30 minutes from her small town. One day, in particular, has put her at the center of controversy and a cry for change from some teachers who decided to remain unnamed, all for saying ‘I’m a lesbian’.

The bus driver heard her say this and wrote her up for inappropriate language.

“Once I got home my dad told me he got a call from the school that I was kicked off for saying ‘I’m a lesbian’,” said Dieker.

Her parents were told that she also did not listen to the bus driver’s orders. “I am openly a lesbian and my whole class knows it,” said Dieker.

The district superintendent said he can’t discuss the details of the case.

Punished For Saying "I'm A Lesbian"





Ryan Russell On His Coming Out


Ryan Russell is an NFL player who came out as bisexual in 2019.  The former Dallas Cowboys, Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Buffalo Bills player had fought with his own sexual identity for years, until a shoulder injury sidelined him from American football in 2018.

It was during this time that he wrote an essay for ESPN, in which he publicly came out as bisexual.  He has been out of the league since then, meaning that in the year 2021 the NFL has yet to see an openly gay or bisexual player take to the field.

Speaking to the BBC, he described the process of deciding to come out as "daunting and paralysing," but said he's "got to keep moving forward - I want to be the first, but never the last."

Growing up in Texas, religion and football were the most important things for Russell and everyone in his community. But after moving away to college in Indiana, Russell had his first relationship with a man.

"In college, I thought, 'Am I turning gay?' I know now that you don't turn gay," he said.

Russell explained that he felt it would have been selfish to come out as gay, as he had reached a point in his career where he was finally able to provide for his mother, and didn't want create any distractions.

Ryan Russell On His Coming Out




Banning Transgender Athletes


One of President Joe Biden’s early priorities in office has been reversing ex-President Donald Trump’s anti-transgender policies. In response, conservative state legislators are introducing their own anti-trans bills, seeking to limit transgender and nonbinary people’s access to healthcare, restrooms, and perhaps most notably, sports.

Some of them are already beginning to pass.

On Biden’s first day in the White House, he signed an executive order mandating transgender students be able to learn without facing sex discrimination. Later, he nullified the Trump administration’s ban on transgender military service. By the end of January, lawmakers in six states introduced bills aimed at limiting participation for transgender athletes. Last year, 20 such measures were presented.

Currently, there are eight bills across seven states aimed at curbing transgender rights, according to the ACLU.

Last week, lawmakers in North Dakota’s House passed a bill that would prohibit public schools from allowing students to participate on sports teams that don’t correspond with their biological sex. Nearly 1,500 miles south, the Mississippi State Senate passed legislation that would bar transgender athletes from competing in girls’ or women’s sports in the state’s schools and universities.

Despite the national fervor surrounding the issue, Idaho is the only state that’s successfully enacted a law banning transgender athletes from female sports, and it’s currently being litigated in federal court. Last August, a judge issued a temporary injunction to suspend the edict.

Banning Transgender Athletes



Gender Pronouns


Pronouns are words that people use to refer to others. They are a useful way to replace nouns such as names. Some examples include:

Sally went to the shops to buy herself some snacks.  Fred went to the shops to buy himself some snacks.   Ash went to the shops to buy themself some snacks.

Pronouns are useful tools, but it is important to remember that some people may use different pronouns in different situations, and some may not use pronouns at all.  People will be less likely to make assumptions and mistakes about another person’s pronouns if they ask which pronouns they should use and share their own when introducing themselves.

Pronouns are important because, by using a person’s pronouns correctly, other people are showing them respect and forming an inclusive environment.  It is important to never assume a person’s pronouns. By assuming a person’s pronouns, it is possible to send an unintended message that people must look a certain way to be able to use their pronouns.

Using the wrong pronouns can be offensive or even harmful. Ignoring a person’s pronouns can also imply that people who are under the transgender umbrella — such as those who are transgender, nonbinary, or gender non-conforming — do not exist.

By using a person’s pronouns correctly, people can reduce the adverse effects of social oppression.

One 2016 study found that affirming a person’s pronouns — and, in extension, their gender — lowers depression and raises self-esteem. A person affirming another’s pronoun use can help others feel comfortable with their external appearance and their gender identity.

Gender Pronouns



Ian Riccaboni Supports LGBT Community Center


A key product of LGBTQ pro wrestling’s expanding profile is a heightened focus on reaching out to and supporting LGBTQ communities outside of the industry. That process goes beyond the welcoming atmosphere cultivated by LGBTQ-focused events or the increased presentation of marginalized identities.

Those leading the charge are using their platform to invoke LGBTQ history and impact marginalized populations beyond those already interested in checking out the in-ring action. Like any movement, though, a coalition between community members and allies only helps to strengthen the house being built. Especially when an ally has the ability to reach audiences that don’t regularly interact with LGBTQ identities.

For Ring of Honor announcer Ian Riccaboni, being part of that coalition as an ally is requisite to his role as the voice of a major pro wrestling organization. He literally lent his voice to the cause in January when he committed all profits from his Cameo account between Jan. 13 (Riccaboni’s birthday) and April 1 (his wife’s birthday) to the Bradbury-Sullivan LGBT Community Center in his hometown of Allentown, PA.

Located in the heart of Allentown, the Bradbury-Sullivan LGBT Community Center serves LGBTQ populations throughout the Lehigh Valley through community advocacy campaigns and various arts, health, youth and pride programs.

According to Bradbury-Sullivan LGBT Community Center executive director Adrian Shanker, the Covid-19 pandemic pushed the center’s main focus to LGBTQ health advocacy. “We’ve engaged more strongly in health advocacy to ensure that the public health leaders in Pennsylvania that are making decisions throughout the pandemic are including LGBT people,” Shanker told Outsports.

Ian Riccaboni Supports LGBT Community Center




Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

We count on you to send us your news items, questions, and nominations for posts of the day.
If you have items you’d like to see published, send them to CellarDweller115.

To subscribe to The Daily Sheet, click the “Notify” button at the top or bottom of the page.
When a new issue of TDS is posted, you will be notified by e-mail.

The Daily Sheet Archives
Respond to The Daily Sheet