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Offline CellarDweller115

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The Daily Sheet - October to December 2021
« on: October 04, 2021, 06:23:25 PM »


Tuesday, October 5th, 2021




Honoring Larry McMurtry


Writers from across the country will gather in Archer City Oct. 9 at the site of the Royal Theater, setting for Larry McMurtry's novel, "The Last Picture Show."

"Nationally recognized writers will speak about the influence of McMurtry’s works and work ethic on their writing lives through their experiences of reading his books, their interactions with him, or how his love of books fed their own love of books," according to a press release from Midwestern State University.

The Royal Theater will also celebrate the 50th anniversary of the release of "The Last Picture Show"  movie, the Peter Bogdanovich film based on McMurtry’s book, with an outdoor screening. The movie was filmed at locations in Archer City and Wichita Falls.

Authors scheduled to speak include Carol Flake Chapman, Geoff Dyer, W.K. Stratton and Sherry Kafka Wagner. Several local writers are also on the program.

McMurtry wrote of 29 novels, including the Pulitzer-Prize winning Lonesome Dove. His screenplays include "Brokeback Mountain," for which he won an Academy Award. Other movies bases on his works included "Hud," "Lovin' Molly," "Terms of Endearment" and "Texasville."


Honoring Larry McMurtry




Harassment At Google


A senior manager on Google's global security team crudely joked about a company security guard in text messages, part of a pattern of workplace harassment against the gay, Black employee, according to a lawsuit filed by the employee this week.

David Brown, who according to the lawsuit is jointly employed by the Alphabet Inc unit and security company Allied Universal, is seeking unspecified monetary damages for alleged physical and emotional harassment at Google's Los Angeles offices based on his sexual orientation and race, which it says took place between 2014 and last year.

Google and Allied Universal did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Many major companies including Google last year stepped up efforts to create more inclusive worksites after social protests calling attention to racism. Some workers at Google, including over 2,000 who signed an open letter on the issue in April, have said the company does not sufficiently hold perpetrators accountable.

Brown's supervisor accounted for much of the alleged problematic behavior, including "grabbing him on the buttocks, kicking him in the groin, throwing him through a window head first and brutally grabbing his nipples," according to the lawsuit, which was filed in a state court in Los Angeles.

Harassment At Google




Employee Fired for Being Lesbian


A new lawsuit has been filed in federal court after a lesbian employee at Ramsey Solutions felt forced to resign from her position due to the company "not recognizing homosexuality."

Former employee Julie Anne Stamps, who lives in Rutherford County, came out as a lesbian while working in the customer care department, according to the complaint filed Sept. 29 in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee. When she was hired, Stamps was married to a man and presented as straight.

But last spring, the lawsuit says Stamps came to terms with her sexuality, which she had questioned since middle school. She and her husband divorced in May 2020.

Stamps was encouraged to speak with her supervisor and confide in her during this time, the lawsuit says. She eventually opened up to her supervisor about the root of her divorce and shared her sexuality. The supervisor encouraged Stamps to see a Christian counselor who "saved" another person from homosexuality, the suit says.

Stamps later asked her supervisor about coming out to her coworkers and asked what would happen to her employment, according to the lawsuit. Stamps claims that her supervisor informed her that she wouldn't be permitted to bring a woman partner to any company outings, nor could she share her sexuality on social media. Ramsey Solutions, owned by financial titan Dave Ramsey, is known for a culture of conservative Christian beliefs.

Employee Fired for Being Lesbian





It's Not A Phase


Conversations about sexual identity are evolving faster than many ever thought possible, with terms like “demisexual,” “pansexual” and “sexually fluid” increasingly making their way into the mainstream. But one term, "bisexual," has been around for ages, and yet many who claim it say they're still fighting for validation.

It's one of the reasons behind Bi Visibility Day, observed every year on Sept. 23.

First launched in 1999 as a way to raise awareness about bisexuality and to challenge the misconceptions bi people face, it’s since become a day to celebrate bisexual individuals and their intersectionality across all genders, identities and other forms of expression.

According to a recent Gallup, 5.6 percent of U.S. adults identify as LGBTQ; among them, a majority — 54.6 percent — identify as bisexual. That includes celebrities such as Ronen Rubinstein, Nico Tortorella, Tinashe, Janelle Monae, Demi Lovato, Lady Gaga, Keiynan Lonsdale, Tyler Blackburn and Alan Cumming.

And still, systemic biases and misconceptions — that bi men are gay men in denial, that bi women only hook up with women to attract straight men, for example — continue to fuel misconceptions about the identity.

Bisexual men, in particular, say they feel the pressures of judgment and invisibility from both straight and LGBTQ people.

It's Not A Phase




Texas Parents Fighting Legislation


Karen Krajcer and Linzy Foster are two friends familiar with the hallways of the Texas Capitol. 
During this year’s regular legislative session and two subsequent special sessions that followed, the two mothers have shown up with a handful of other parents to advocate for their children who have been caught in the crosshairs of a slew of bills that target young transgender Texans.

Now, with the Legislature’s third special session underway, the two friends are enduring another round of visits and demonstrations as legislators again debate a top Republican legislative priority: restricting transgender youth from playing on sports teams that are consistent with their gender identity.

“It just keeps on happening, it’s ridiculous,” Krajcer, a mother to a 9-year-old, said about the amount of bills filed during sessions that have targeted LGBTQ Texans. “This is the fourth round this year. … Why are we still having to do this?”

So far, the Texas Senate has passed a bill limiting transgender participation in youth sports four separate times. The first three times, the bills stalled out and failed. Last week, Senate Bill 3, authored by Lubbock Republican state Sen. Charles Perry, was approved by a 19-12 Senate vote, with all but one Democrat voting no.

It has now moved to the House and on Monday was referred to the House Public Education Committee, where last time state Rep. Harold Dutton, D-Houston, blocked similar legislation from reaching the House floor. During an interview at The Texas Tribune Festival on Friday, House Speaker Dade Phelan said the House would have the votes to pass the legislation should it head to the House floor.

Texas Parents Fighting Legislation



Non Binary Tik Tok Creators


While up-and-coming gender-fluid and non-binary designers like Harris Reed and Ella Boucht have begun to make their mark, it's also no secret that the fashion establishment hasn't made much of an effort to design for non-binary people -- at least that's if the collection after collection of drab, supposedly "gender-fluid" beige hoodies and graphic tees is to judge by.

And while gender non-conforming, trans and non-binary people have existed forever, social media means that they have a new visibility and means of making their voices heard (including sharing memes roasting each subpar unisex capsule collection). However, in the past year or so, TikTok has becomes the grounds for a thriving style community, where non-binary content creators swap gender-affirming fashion tips or simply -- but no less importantly -- freely express their style.

"Fashion is a vehicle for expression," said Kate Sabatine, who uses the handle @k8sabz, in an email interview. "Every day I wake up and ask myself, 'What gender do I want to express myself as?"

Sabatine has racked up over 948,000 followers on TikTok with an eclectic mix of videos that includes queer-focused fashion advice (as well as roleplaying a range of hyper-specific lesbian characters), For them, fashion has been an important aspect of having their gender and identity affirmed.

"I think that over the years, I've gotten quite good at this form of expression," they said. "People tell me, 'I could tell you're gay by your outfit' or will often ask me for my pronouns because they don't want to assume based on my appearance."

Non Binary Tik Tok Creators



Photographer Is LGBTQ Ally


Tammy Faye Messner (formerly Bakker) was camp incarnate. With her wildly over-the-top makeup and garish animal-print ensembles, a penchant for singing Christian disco anthems despite her lack of voice training, and a sense of childlike wonder with which she preached her gospel, she made for compelling TV viewing.

Though the televangelist is remembered for all of those things and more (including her first husband, Jim Bakker, getting convicted for defrauding churchgoers out of more than $150 million), what endures is the seemingly sincere love she had for her gay fans.

Messner, who appeared on TV for nearly all of her adult life, could come off as artificial onscreen. But it was groundbreaking in 1985, when she interviewed a gay man living with AIDS and showed him compassion (amid some very personal questions about her interviewee's sex life). It was a departure from the norm to hear a person in her position -- half of an evangelical Christian couple -- support gay people, especially as evangelism became increasingly conservative. Messner spoke out about that, too.

"I think I have a lot in common with the gay population because they've been made fun of and put down and misunderstood and have really had a rough row to hoe in life," she told the South Florida Sun-Sentinel in 2002, ahead of a live show she performed for primarily gay audiences. "They identify with me and I certainly identify with what they're still going through."

Messner, who died from cancer in 2007, takes the stage again, this time portrayed by Jessica Chastain in the film "The Eyes of Tammy Faye," which shares a name with a 2000 documentary on the icon. In both films, Messner's support for gay people and people diagnosed with AIDS is amplified -- and by doing so, both films attempt to redeem her memory.

Photographer Is LGBTQ Ally



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by killersmom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - October to December 2021
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2021, 12:47:13 PM »


Tuesday, October 12th, 2021




Heath Ledger


It’s weird to hear news of artistic life in the midst of Covid. The Sydney Theatre Company has a new executive director, Anne Dunn, (who comes with a wealth of experience running the Sydney Dance Company) while the old one Patrick Mc-Intyre, goes on to run the National Film and Sound Archives. It’s odd the way the administrators continue to thrive and climb even as the performers wither on the vine. It’s not a process that can be stopped because there are no companies without the people who run them though you can sometimes wish all our administrators were as talented as the best of our performers.

And then, of course, there are the poignant reminders of the artists who have fallen by the wayside. The news came of a panel – including Jackie Weaver – appointed to judge the Heath Ledger Award and that Gregor Jordan has been made the patron. Jordan directed Heath Ledger in his Ned Kelly film and the announcement about the award is a reminder of what we lost when the boy from the West died so young.

There’s a lot of talk about Ledger in the Batman film The Dark Knight but the film history will remember most is Ang Lee’s Brokeback Mountain where we see Ledger doing that most difficult of things moving from youth into middle age and we become conscious in an almost incidental way that the guy from Perth who played Hamlet at high school and told Neil Armfield that he would like to do it on the Sydney stage was in fact a great actor. He had the looks, he had the voice, he had the widest possible range. Actors come in different shapes and sizes but Heath Ledger had the heroic equipment of a natural born star which makes it all the sadder that we never saw on stage his Hamlet or his Oedipus, his Stanley Kowalski or his Roo in Summer of the Seventeenth Doll.

Heath Ledger




Same-Sex Dance on "Strictly Come Dancing"


Strictly Come Dancing took fans to the movies tonight and the show had viewers in tears before the contestants had even taken to the floor as it debuted a stunning professional routine.

Week three of the BBC reality show opened, as usual, with a group number from the Strictly professional dancers, with Movie Week kicking off with a beautiful ballroom routine that appeared to be inspired by period dramas such as Bridgerton.

The dance opened with a clip of Johannes Radebe, acting as a duke, inviting guests to his upcoming ball, before we returned to the Strictly floor to see the other professional dancers twirling across the floor in male/female couples to an instrumental version of Taylor Swift's 'Love Story'.

Johannes then appeared at the top of the stairs, before new dancer Kai Widdrington headed over to him and offered his hand.  The couple then broke into a beautiful ballroom routine across the floor as the rest of the dancers stood aside and watched. The entire group then came together in exclusively same-sex couples to perform the end of the routine.

Same-Sex Dance on Strictly Come Dancing

YouTube Video of the Performance




Ultimate Frisbee Player Irene Zhou


Irene Zhou had two sports-related coming out experiences during her high school and college careers. And the common threads that tied them together were acceptance and support.

Zhou played on the women’s basketball team while enrolled at the Grier School, an all-female boarding school in central Pennsylvania. Then when she enrolled at Washington University in St. Louis, she joined the ultimate Frisbee squad.

In both instances, she found teammates who welcomed her for who she was.

Describing the atmosphere at Grier as “a kind of expensive private school so people [leaned] more toward the liberal side,” Grier didn’t even have to inform most of her teammates she was a lesbian.

“People just knew,” she said. “It’s like a small school. So I dated people in that school. So people knew.”

Because of this, Zhou didn’t notice any differences in how her teammates related to her after finding out she was a lesbian. Nor did she experience any noteworthy differences in her play on the court after coming out — albeit for an entirely different reason.

Ultimate Frisbee Player Irene Zhou





Bisexuality on Apple TV's "The Morning Show"


By the end of the most episode of "The Morning Show," Bradley (Reese Witherspoon) is so desperate to be a moderator of the upcoming presidential debate that she almost reveals to the network's president, Stella (Greta Lee), something she's only just realized about herself: that she's bisexual.

The almost-confession, an attempt to sell how she would bring the underrepresented, queer perspective to the debate, nearly comes out . . . but doesn't.

"I think I can offer a perspective that Alex doesn't and Eric doesn't, and this is something I barely acknowledge about myself because quite honestly I just don't know how I feel about it, but I want to be truthful," Bradley begins to tell Stella via anxious word vomit, "I'm, I'm from a Southern conservative family."

Stella, of course, is unmoved by this unremarkable confession, but the moment is eye-opening, both for Bradley herself and for audiences. The exchange is the cherry on top of this episode's refreshingly nuanced glimpse into the ways we perceive and wield what's often called "identity politics" in the modern era.

In the previous episode, Bradley realized her feelings and sexual attraction toward Laura Peterson (Julianna Margulies), a fellow UBA journalist who interviews Bradley and is told by UBA CEO Cory Ellison (Billy Crudup) to mentor her. Bradley doesn't initially seem conflicted or ashamed of this new, same-sex relationship, but is clear that she still doesn't know how to incorporate this newfound aspect of her identity into who she is at work or in any public arena. 

Bisexuality on Apple TV's "The Morning Show"




Minister Fighting In Texas


Texas mom Annaliese Cothron drove an hour and a half from her home in San Antonio to the state Capitol in Austin this year for a rally in support of transgender children, including her own child. It’s a drive she has made so many times that she has lost count.

Trans youths in the state have been the targets this year of more than 50 bills that would restrict their participation in sports or ban them from gaining access to certain health care, among other restrictions.

Cothron was leading the crowd in a chant, but she started to get tired. So she asked the Rev. Remington Johnson, a Presbyterian clergywoman and a fellow activist, to take the bullhorn.

Johnson, a trans woman who has testified almost a half-dozen times against anti-trans bills, had shown up that day riding a longboard, wearing hot pink shorts and carrying a huge trans flag, Cothron recalled. She took the bullhorn, and the first thing she said was: “Trans kids are magical.”

Cothron, who has an 8-year-old child who is nonbinary, said the moment has stuck with her.  “That, to me, was so powerful,” she said. “Nobody talks about my child like that, because they don’t have the same experience that a trans person has to know really how truly unique and magical and powerful transgender children are.”

Minister Fighting In Texas



Lithosexuality


Have you ever found yourself sexually attracted to someone but you didn’t want those feelings reciprocated? Have you ever had sexual feelings for someone then suddenly lost interest when you realized that they felt the same way?

While it may seem strange, these feelings are actually totally valid. In fact, there’s even a name for it — “lithosexual”. In this short guide, we tell you everything you need to know about what it means to be lithosexual.

Lithosexual (also called akoisexual or lithsexual) is a sexual orientation that falls under the asexual spectrum. Lithosexual is most commonly defined as a person who experiences sexual attraction for others, but may not necessarily want these sexual feelings reciprocated.

It should be noted that a lithosexual person can have another sexual orientation alongside lithsexuality. For example, you can be lithosexual and a lesbian — which means that when you do experience sexual attraction, it is only towards women.

Click the link below to see the 5 indicators that you may be lithosexual, or to help you better understand lithosexuality.


Lithosexuality



A Tribute to Allies


Years from now, someone (probably me) will write the definitive anthology of queer liberation with the historical perspective it deserves. And when that happens you’ll surely notice that many of the heroes weren’t even LGBTQ.

InsiderNJ’s 4th Annual OUT 100 Power List, a tribute to political influential LGBTQs in NJ politics, comes out October 20. In the meantime  here’s a tribute to some straight allies to whet your appetite.

Here we honor the straight allies who made our cause their cause too.

A Tribute to Allies



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: gwyllion, CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by killersmom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

We count on you to send us your news items, questions, and nominations for posts of the day.
If you have items you’d like to see published, send them to CellarDweller115.

To subscribe to The Daily Sheet, click the “Notify” button at the top or bottom of the page.
When a new issue of TDS is posted, you will be notified by e-mail.

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« Last Edit: October 11, 2021, 12:55:54 PM by CellarDweller115 »