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Offline CellarDweller115

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The Daily Sheet - October to December 2021
« on: October 04, 2021, 06:23:25 PM »


Tuesday, October 5th, 2021




Honoring Larry McMurtry


Writers from across the country will gather in Archer City Oct. 9 at the site of the Royal Theater, setting for Larry McMurtry's novel, "The Last Picture Show."

"Nationally recognized writers will speak about the influence of McMurtry’s works and work ethic on their writing lives through their experiences of reading his books, their interactions with him, or how his love of books fed their own love of books," according to a press release from Midwestern State University.

The Royal Theater will also celebrate the 50th anniversary of the release of "The Last Picture Show"  movie, the Peter Bogdanovich film based on McMurtry’s book, with an outdoor screening. The movie was filmed at locations in Archer City and Wichita Falls.

Authors scheduled to speak include Carol Flake Chapman, Geoff Dyer, W.K. Stratton and Sherry Kafka Wagner. Several local writers are also on the program.

McMurtry wrote of 29 novels, including the Pulitzer-Prize winning Lonesome Dove. His screenplays include "Brokeback Mountain," for which he won an Academy Award. Other movies bases on his works included "Hud," "Lovin' Molly," "Terms of Endearment" and "Texasville."


Honoring Larry McMurtry




Harassment At Google


A senior manager on Google's global security team crudely joked about a company security guard in text messages, part of a pattern of workplace harassment against the gay, Black employee, according to a lawsuit filed by the employee this week.

David Brown, who according to the lawsuit is jointly employed by the Alphabet Inc unit and security company Allied Universal, is seeking unspecified monetary damages for alleged physical and emotional harassment at Google's Los Angeles offices based on his sexual orientation and race, which it says took place between 2014 and last year.

Google and Allied Universal did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Many major companies including Google last year stepped up efforts to create more inclusive worksites after social protests calling attention to racism. Some workers at Google, including over 2,000 who signed an open letter on the issue in April, have said the company does not sufficiently hold perpetrators accountable.

Brown's supervisor accounted for much of the alleged problematic behavior, including "grabbing him on the buttocks, kicking him in the groin, throwing him through a window head first and brutally grabbing his nipples," according to the lawsuit, which was filed in a state court in Los Angeles.

Harassment At Google




Employee Fired for Being Lesbian


A new lawsuit has been filed in federal court after a lesbian employee at Ramsey Solutions felt forced to resign from her position due to the company "not recognizing homosexuality."

Former employee Julie Anne Stamps, who lives in Rutherford County, came out as a lesbian while working in the customer care department, according to the complaint filed Sept. 29 in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee. When she was hired, Stamps was married to a man and presented as straight.

But last spring, the lawsuit says Stamps came to terms with her sexuality, which she had questioned since middle school. She and her husband divorced in May 2020.

Stamps was encouraged to speak with her supervisor and confide in her during this time, the lawsuit says. She eventually opened up to her supervisor about the root of her divorce and shared her sexuality. The supervisor encouraged Stamps to see a Christian counselor who "saved" another person from homosexuality, the suit says.

Stamps later asked her supervisor about coming out to her coworkers and asked what would happen to her employment, according to the lawsuit. Stamps claims that her supervisor informed her that she wouldn't be permitted to bring a woman partner to any company outings, nor could she share her sexuality on social media. Ramsey Solutions, owned by financial titan Dave Ramsey, is known for a culture of conservative Christian beliefs.

Employee Fired for Being Lesbian





It's Not A Phase


Conversations about sexual identity are evolving faster than many ever thought possible, with terms like “demisexual,” “pansexual” and “sexually fluid” increasingly making their way into the mainstream. But one term, "bisexual," has been around for ages, and yet many who claim it say they're still fighting for validation.

It's one of the reasons behind Bi Visibility Day, observed every year on Sept. 23.

First launched in 1999 as a way to raise awareness about bisexuality and to challenge the misconceptions bi people face, it’s since become a day to celebrate bisexual individuals and their intersectionality across all genders, identities and other forms of expression.

According to a recent Gallup, 5.6 percent of U.S. adults identify as LGBTQ; among them, a majority — 54.6 percent — identify as bisexual. That includes celebrities such as Ronen Rubinstein, Nico Tortorella, Tinashe, Janelle Monae, Demi Lovato, Lady Gaga, Keiynan Lonsdale, Tyler Blackburn and Alan Cumming.

And still, systemic biases and misconceptions — that bi men are gay men in denial, that bi women only hook up with women to attract straight men, for example — continue to fuel misconceptions about the identity.

Bisexual men, in particular, say they feel the pressures of judgment and invisibility from both straight and LGBTQ people.

It's Not A Phase




Texas Parents Fighting Legislation


Karen Krajcer and Linzy Foster are two friends familiar with the hallways of the Texas Capitol. 
During this year’s regular legislative session and two subsequent special sessions that followed, the two mothers have shown up with a handful of other parents to advocate for their children who have been caught in the crosshairs of a slew of bills that target young transgender Texans.

Now, with the Legislature’s third special session underway, the two friends are enduring another round of visits and demonstrations as legislators again debate a top Republican legislative priority: restricting transgender youth from playing on sports teams that are consistent with their gender identity.

“It just keeps on happening, it’s ridiculous,” Krajcer, a mother to a 9-year-old, said about the amount of bills filed during sessions that have targeted LGBTQ Texans. “This is the fourth round this year. … Why are we still having to do this?”

So far, the Texas Senate has passed a bill limiting transgender participation in youth sports four separate times. The first three times, the bills stalled out and failed. Last week, Senate Bill 3, authored by Lubbock Republican state Sen. Charles Perry, was approved by a 19-12 Senate vote, with all but one Democrat voting no.

It has now moved to the House and on Monday was referred to the House Public Education Committee, where last time state Rep. Harold Dutton, D-Houston, blocked similar legislation from reaching the House floor. During an interview at The Texas Tribune Festival on Friday, House Speaker Dade Phelan said the House would have the votes to pass the legislation should it head to the House floor.

Texas Parents Fighting Legislation



Non Binary Tik Tok Creators


While up-and-coming gender-fluid and non-binary designers like Harris Reed and Ella Boucht have begun to make their mark, it's also no secret that the fashion establishment hasn't made much of an effort to design for non-binary people -- at least that's if the collection after collection of drab, supposedly "gender-fluid" beige hoodies and graphic tees is to judge by.

And while gender non-conforming, trans and non-binary people have existed forever, social media means that they have a new visibility and means of making their voices heard (including sharing memes roasting each subpar unisex capsule collection). However, in the past year or so, TikTok has becomes the grounds for a thriving style community, where non-binary content creators swap gender-affirming fashion tips or simply -- but no less importantly -- freely express their style.

"Fashion is a vehicle for expression," said Kate Sabatine, who uses the handle @k8sabz, in an email interview. "Every day I wake up and ask myself, 'What gender do I want to express myself as?"

Sabatine has racked up over 948,000 followers on TikTok with an eclectic mix of videos that includes queer-focused fashion advice (as well as roleplaying a range of hyper-specific lesbian characters), For them, fashion has been an important aspect of having their gender and identity affirmed.

"I think that over the years, I've gotten quite good at this form of expression," they said. "People tell me, 'I could tell you're gay by your outfit' or will often ask me for my pronouns because they don't want to assume based on my appearance."

Non Binary Tik Tok Creators



Photographer Is LGBTQ Ally


Tammy Faye Messner (formerly Bakker) was camp incarnate. With her wildly over-the-top makeup and garish animal-print ensembles, a penchant for singing Christian disco anthems despite her lack of voice training, and a sense of childlike wonder with which she preached her gospel, she made for compelling TV viewing.

Though the televangelist is remembered for all of those things and more (including her first husband, Jim Bakker, getting convicted for defrauding churchgoers out of more than $150 million), what endures is the seemingly sincere love she had for her gay fans.

Messner, who appeared on TV for nearly all of her adult life, could come off as artificial onscreen. But it was groundbreaking in 1985, when she interviewed a gay man living with AIDS and showed him compassion (amid some very personal questions about her interviewee's sex life). It was a departure from the norm to hear a person in her position -- half of an evangelical Christian couple -- support gay people, especially as evangelism became increasingly conservative. Messner spoke out about that, too.

"I think I have a lot in common with the gay population because they've been made fun of and put down and misunderstood and have really had a rough row to hoe in life," she told the South Florida Sun-Sentinel in 2002, ahead of a live show she performed for primarily gay audiences. "They identify with me and I certainly identify with what they're still going through."

Messner, who died from cancer in 2007, takes the stage again, this time portrayed by Jessica Chastain in the film "The Eyes of Tammy Faye," which shares a name with a 2000 documentary on the icon. In both films, Messner's support for gay people and people diagnosed with AIDS is amplified -- and by doing so, both films attempt to redeem her memory.

Photographer Is LGBTQ Ally



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by killersmom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - October to December 2021
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2021, 12:47:13 PM »


Tuesday, October 12th, 2021




Heath Ledger


It’s weird to hear news of artistic life in the midst of Covid. The Sydney Theatre Company has a new executive director, Anne Dunn, (who comes with a wealth of experience running the Sydney Dance Company) while the old one Patrick Mc-Intyre, goes on to run the National Film and Sound Archives. It’s odd the way the administrators continue to thrive and climb even as the performers wither on the vine. It’s not a process that can be stopped because there are no companies without the people who run them though you can sometimes wish all our administrators were as talented as the best of our performers.

And then, of course, there are the poignant reminders of the artists who have fallen by the wayside. The news came of a panel – including Jackie Weaver – appointed to judge the Heath Ledger Award and that Gregor Jordan has been made the patron. Jordan directed Heath Ledger in his Ned Kelly film and the announcement about the award is a reminder of what we lost when the boy from the West died so young.

There’s a lot of talk about Ledger in the Batman film The Dark Knight but the film history will remember most is Ang Lee’s Brokeback Mountain where we see Ledger doing that most difficult of things moving from youth into middle age and we become conscious in an almost incidental way that the guy from Perth who played Hamlet at high school and told Neil Armfield that he would like to do it on the Sydney stage was in fact a great actor. He had the looks, he had the voice, he had the widest possible range. Actors come in different shapes and sizes but Heath Ledger had the heroic equipment of a natural born star which makes it all the sadder that we never saw on stage his Hamlet or his Oedipus, his Stanley Kowalski or his Roo in Summer of the Seventeenth Doll.

Heath Ledger




Same-Sex Dance on "Strictly Come Dancing"


Strictly Come Dancing took fans to the movies tonight and the show had viewers in tears before the contestants had even taken to the floor as it debuted a stunning professional routine.

Week three of the BBC reality show opened, as usual, with a group number from the Strictly professional dancers, with Movie Week kicking off with a beautiful ballroom routine that appeared to be inspired by period dramas such as Bridgerton.

The dance opened with a clip of Johannes Radebe, acting as a duke, inviting guests to his upcoming ball, before we returned to the Strictly floor to see the other professional dancers twirling across the floor in male/female couples to an instrumental version of Taylor Swift's 'Love Story'.

Johannes then appeared at the top of the stairs, before new dancer Kai Widdrington headed over to him and offered his hand.  The couple then broke into a beautiful ballroom routine across the floor as the rest of the dancers stood aside and watched. The entire group then came together in exclusively same-sex couples to perform the end of the routine.

Same-Sex Dance on Strictly Come Dancing

YouTube Video of the Performance




Ultimate Frisbee Player Irene Zhou


Irene Zhou had two sports-related coming out experiences during her high school and college careers. And the common threads that tied them together were acceptance and support.

Zhou played on the women’s basketball team while enrolled at the Grier School, an all-female boarding school in central Pennsylvania. Then when she enrolled at Washington University in St. Louis, she joined the ultimate Frisbee squad.

In both instances, she found teammates who welcomed her for who she was.

Describing the atmosphere at Grier as “a kind of expensive private school so people [leaned] more toward the liberal side,” Grier didn’t even have to inform most of her teammates she was a lesbian.

“People just knew,” she said. “It’s like a small school. So I dated people in that school. So people knew.”

Because of this, Zhou didn’t notice any differences in how her teammates related to her after finding out she was a lesbian. Nor did she experience any noteworthy differences in her play on the court after coming out — albeit for an entirely different reason.

Ultimate Frisbee Player Irene Zhou





Bisexuality on Apple TV's "The Morning Show"


By the end of the most episode of "The Morning Show," Bradley (Reese Witherspoon) is so desperate to be a moderator of the upcoming presidential debate that she almost reveals to the network's president, Stella (Greta Lee), something she's only just realized about herself: that she's bisexual.

The almost-confession, an attempt to sell how she would bring the underrepresented, queer perspective to the debate, nearly comes out . . . but doesn't.

"I think I can offer a perspective that Alex doesn't and Eric doesn't, and this is something I barely acknowledge about myself because quite honestly I just don't know how I feel about it, but I want to be truthful," Bradley begins to tell Stella via anxious word vomit, "I'm, I'm from a Southern conservative family."

Stella, of course, is unmoved by this unremarkable confession, but the moment is eye-opening, both for Bradley herself and for audiences. The exchange is the cherry on top of this episode's refreshingly nuanced glimpse into the ways we perceive and wield what's often called "identity politics" in the modern era.

In the previous episode, Bradley realized her feelings and sexual attraction toward Laura Peterson (Julianna Margulies), a fellow UBA journalist who interviews Bradley and is told by UBA CEO Cory Ellison (Billy Crudup) to mentor her. Bradley doesn't initially seem conflicted or ashamed of this new, same-sex relationship, but is clear that she still doesn't know how to incorporate this newfound aspect of her identity into who she is at work or in any public arena. 

Bisexuality on Apple TV's "The Morning Show"




Minister Fighting In Texas


Texas mom Annaliese Cothron drove an hour and a half from her home in San Antonio to the state Capitol in Austin this year for a rally in support of transgender children, including her own child. It’s a drive she has made so many times that she has lost count.

Trans youths in the state have been the targets this year of more than 50 bills that would restrict their participation in sports or ban them from gaining access to certain health care, among other restrictions.

Cothron was leading the crowd in a chant, but she started to get tired. So she asked the Rev. Remington Johnson, a Presbyterian clergywoman and a fellow activist, to take the bullhorn.

Johnson, a trans woman who has testified almost a half-dozen times against anti-trans bills, had shown up that day riding a longboard, wearing hot pink shorts and carrying a huge trans flag, Cothron recalled. She took the bullhorn, and the first thing she said was: “Trans kids are magical.”

Cothron, who has an 8-year-old child who is nonbinary, said the moment has stuck with her.  “That, to me, was so powerful,” she said. “Nobody talks about my child like that, because they don’t have the same experience that a trans person has to know really how truly unique and magical and powerful transgender children are.”

Minister Fighting In Texas



Lithosexuality


Have you ever found yourself sexually attracted to someone but you didn’t want those feelings reciprocated? Have you ever had sexual feelings for someone then suddenly lost interest when you realized that they felt the same way?

While it may seem strange, these feelings are actually totally valid. In fact, there’s even a name for it — “lithosexual”. In this short guide, we tell you everything you need to know about what it means to be lithosexual.

Lithosexual (also called akoisexual or lithsexual) is a sexual orientation that falls under the asexual spectrum. Lithosexual is most commonly defined as a person who experiences sexual attraction for others, but may not necessarily want these sexual feelings reciprocated.

It should be noted that a lithosexual person can have another sexual orientation alongside lithsexuality. For example, you can be lithosexual and a lesbian — which means that when you do experience sexual attraction, it is only towards women.

Click the link below to see the 5 indicators that you may be lithosexual, or to help you better understand lithosexuality.


Lithosexuality



A Tribute to Allies


Years from now, someone (probably me) will write the definitive anthology of queer liberation with the historical perspective it deserves. And when that happens you’ll surely notice that many of the heroes weren’t even LGBTQ.

InsiderNJ’s 4th Annual OUT 100 Power List, a tribute to political influential LGBTQs in NJ politics, comes out October 20. In the meantime  here’s a tribute to some straight allies to whet your appetite.

Here we honor the straight allies who made our cause their cause too.

A Tribute to Allies



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: gwyllion, CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by killersmom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

We count on you to send us your news items, questions, and nominations for posts of the day.
If you have items you’d like to see published, send them to CellarDweller115.

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« Last Edit: October 11, 2021, 12:55:54 PM by CellarDweller115 »

Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - October to December 2021
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2021, 04:14:29 AM »


Tuesday, October 26th, 2021




Talking With Jake and Maggie


Maggie Gyllenhaal and Jake Gyllenhaal are not just related by blood anymore. This year, they’re also connected through streaming. The two siblings have both separately become members of the Netflix machine, delivering two very distinct pieces of art this year.

As director and producer, Maggie Gyllenhaal takes on the world of a woman, obsessed with the dynamic of a young mother and her daughter, which prompts early memories of her experiences in the psychological drama “The Lost Daughter.” And as actor and producer, Jake Gyllenhaal stars a police dispatcher who receives a shocking 9-1-1 call in the American remake of the Danish film, “The Guilty.” Both are for the streaming behemoth.

In separate interviews with Variety’s Awards Circuit podcast, the two discuss their own experiences working on their films and the prospect of working together in the future — with the big sister at the helm. Jake Gyllenhaal also reflects on his time working with his late co-star Heath Ledger, when they were both on the Oscar circuit for their turns as Ennis and Jack in Ang Lee’s “Brokeback Mountain” (for which Gyllenhaal won a BAFTA award). Maggie Gyllenhaal dishes about using her partner Peter Sarsgaard as her muse, and how even though many don’t agree, “there is such a thing as women filmmaking.”

With an Oscar nomination for supporting actress opposite Jeff Bridges in “Crazy Heart” (2009), Maggie Gyllenhaal has always known she was a director. She just didn’t believe it. Now, her new film “The Lost Daughter,” an adaptation of the Elena Ferrante novel of the same name, has received rave reviews after debuting at the Telluride and Venice Film Festivals. The acclaimed emotional drama, which stars Oscar winner Olivia Colman, Dakota Johnson, Jessie Buckley and Ed Harris, has put her in the conversation for three possible Oscar nominations (for picture, director and adapted screenplay).

Talking With Jake and Maggie




First Openly Gay Bond Character


James Bond is no doubt one of the most macho movie franchises of all time, but from the moment I saw Goldeneye as a little gay kid at a friend's house, I was hooked. The titular spy is usually a smooth-talking womanizer, a hot straight dude who beats people up and drives awesome cars. But Bond movies also feature badass and fabulous women, tons of drama and some serious emotional moments -- exactly what a little gay kid wants.

Daniel Craig's turn as Bond has shaken things up, seriously modernizing the franchise in terms of both style and story. No Time to Die is the 25th official Bond movie and Craig's last -- and it introduces the franchise's first out gay character in a moment that got me emotional.

About halfway through the film, Bond and Moneypenny (Naomie Harris) show up at Q's house unannounced to do some secret planning outside of MI6's purview. Before they arrive, we get a quick montage of Q (Ben Whishaw) preparing a romantic dinner for two while wearing an apron, and his visible excitement at the doorbell ringing turns to annoyance when he sees who's actually at the door.

When Bond and Moneypenny see the set table and cooked dinner, Q says, "He'll be here in 20 minutes," after implying that this is the first time he's had his date over. That "he" is what really got me. It's the first time ever in a James Bond movie that a character has been explicitly gay, and it's actually acknowledged out loud, no less. It's a bit of a throwaway line, and Bond and Moneypenny don't even react -- instead they start drinking Q's wine and making fun of his hairless cat.

First Openly Gay Bond Character





Woman Diagnosed as Homosexual


Alba Aragón did not shy away from sharing her sexual orientation during her first appointment with a gynecologist last week.

After all, Aragón is comfortable with her sexuality: She has been attracted to women since she was 15.

"I told him that I was gay because I thought it would be an important fact at the time of prescribing any treatment or determining the diagnosis," said Aragón, who lives in Murcia, a city in southeast Spain.

But before the consult ended at the Hospital General Universitario Reina Sofía, doctor Eugenio López handed her a document diagnosing her with an illness that had nothing to do with the irregular and painful periods for which Aragón had sought treatment.

Instead, it read in Spanish, "Current illness: Homosexual."

Aragón, 19, was taken aback when she reviewed the report.  "I thought it was incredible that up until this day, in the 21st century, these types of beliefs continue to exist," she told The Washington Post

Woman Diagnosed as Homosexual





The New Superman is Bisexual


Superman's done a lot since he first appeared in comic books 80 years ago, almost. He's saved the world more than a few times. He's died and come back to life. He dodged punches from Muhammad Ali and even faced off against White supremacists.

Until this year, though, every comic iteration of Superman has been besotted with longtime love Lois Lane. But in an upcoming issue of a new "Superman" series, the Man of Steel enters into a queer relationship.

The fifth issue of the DC comic series "Superman: Son of Kal-El" will confirm that the new Superman -- Jon Kent, child of Clark Kent and Lane -- is bisexual after falling for Jay Nakamura, a male reporter, DC announced this week.

The "Superman: Son of Kal-El" series follows Kent as he becomes Earth's new Superman and grapples with the immense weight of his new gig. Nakamura, a bespectacled writer with a bubble-gum pink mop, first appeared in the series' third issue as a shoulder for Kent to lean on when the business of being Superman gets too rough.

But in the forthcoming fifth issue, coming next month, Kent falls for the journalist -- he is his father's son -- after he "mentally and physically burns out from trying to save everyone that he can," according to DC.

The particulars of the issue's plot are to be revealed in November, but images from the comic show Kent and Nakamura sharing a kiss and sitting together atop a building, their legs dangling off the edge.

The New Superman is Bisexual




Texas Bill is Hateful


The Biden White House on Tuesday condemned a Texas bill that would restrict transgender student athletes’ participation in school sports, further hinting at a potential future fight with the state over legislation that opponents have called discriminatory and detrimental to transgender youth.

Matt Hill, a senior associate communications director with the White House, denounced House Bill 25, which would require student athletes in K-12 schools to participate on sports teams that align with the gender listed on their birth certificate at or near the time of birth. It was authored by state Rep. Valoree Swanson, R-Spring.

“Our message to young transgender people in Texas and across the country: these hateful bills are bullying disguised as legislation, and @POTUS and our Administration will always keep fighting for the full equality LGBTQ+ folks deserve,” he wrote in a tweet Tuesday.

White House press secretary Jen Psaki said in a briefing that the president supports transgender rights but did not say whether the Biden administration will take legal action against the bill, which has been approved by the Texas Legislature and sent to Gov. Greg Abbott’s desk.

“I’ll leave that to the Department of Justice to determine if they’re going to challenge that, but again our view — the president’s view — is that transgender rights are human rights, whether for adults [or] for kids, and that continues to be our policy,” Psaki said.

Texas Bill is Hateful



Oklahoma Birth Certificate


Gov. Kevin Stitt and GOP members of the Oklahoma Legislature want to prevent the State Health Department from issuing gender neutral birth certificates after the agency issued this month the state's first nonbinary birth marker.

Members of the LGBTQ community rejoiced after an Oregon resident who was born in Oklahoma successfully petitioned the State Health Department to reissue on Oct. 7 their birth certificate with their sex now identified as nonbinary.

Nonbinary people do not identify as strictly male or female.

Stitt responded, saying he will take any action necessary to protect "Oklahoma values and our way of life," comments that were met with near-immediate criticism from across the aisle.

"I believe that people are created by God to be male or female. Period," Stitt said in a statement. "There is no such thing as non-binary sex and I wholeheartedly condemn the purported OSDH court settlement that was entered into by rogue activists who acted without receiving proper approval or oversight."

Oklahoma Birth Certificate



What is Allyship


While LGBT History Month is a time to recognize and celebrate the LGBTQ+ community, it’s an important time for allies to reflect on their efforts in support of these individuals.

Being an ally is not a self-asserted identity, it is one that people within a community assign to others based on their efforts to combat and raise awareness for issues affected individuals face, says LGBTQ+ Services Director Michael Nunes ’16 ’18MA. Whether using “ally” or other related terms, these identities require action, which can be active or passive.

“To be an ally is to consistently and constantly go forward in your education and growth so you can actively advocate for the LGBTQ+ community,” he says. “To be an ally is to continuously work on yourself in the spaces and places [where] you can advocate for those who don’t have that ability and privilege.”

In the second installment of UCF’s three-part series in celebration of Pride Month, Nunesguides us through the importance of allyship, basic do’s and don’ts for providing support, and the need to continue educating yourself beyond this series.

What is Allyship



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: Killersmom, CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by killersmom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

We count on you to send us your news items, questions, and nominations for posts of the day.
If you have items you’d like to see published, send them to CellarDweller115.

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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - October to December 2021
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2021, 05:29:40 PM »


Tuesday, November 2nd, 2021




Second Chance for "Scary Movie"


A recent viral tweet about Anna Faris proclaimed that "girls just aren't doing it like her anymore," sparking an online conversation about how well the actress plays ditzy, charming characters. Known for comedic roles in films like the body-swapping Rob Schneider film, "The Hot Chick," the edible-fueled "Smiley Face," and for portraying the playmate-turned-house-mother in the sorority chick flick, "The House Bunny," Faris is one of the most recognizable film stars of the 2000s. Most recently, she starred as a single mother and recovering addict named Christy Plunkett on the CBS sitcom, "Mom."

However, Faris first achieved breakout success in 2000 with "Scary Movie," a horror-comedy directed by Keenen Ivory Wayans. Faris portrayed Cindy Campbell in the film, which parodies "Scream," "I Know What You Did Last Summer," and other popular slasher movies.

During their heyday, the "Scary Movie" films received consistently mixed-to-negative reviews (via Rotten Tomatoes). However, one of the franchise's installments is currently making the rounds once again on Netflix. Indeed, despite holding only a 35% Tomatometer score, 2006's "Scary Movie 4" is seeing a resurgence in popularity.

"Scary Movie 4" is an odd film. The 2006 comedy opens with Dr. Phil and Shaq stuck in the original trap from "Saw," sees the talk show host hacking off the wrong foot to free himself, and ends on Oprah Winfrey (Debra Wilson) getting attacked with a chair.

Second Chance for "Scary Movie"




Coming Out Later


A lot can be hidden behind a marriage. For Brad and Cyndi Marler, it was that they are both gay.  A few years after their wedding, they told each other their secret. Then, for more than three decades, they told no one else.

“We always said it was us against the world,” Brad said.

After living what they call “the all-American life” in the small Illinois towns of Smithton and Freeburg, the Marlers, now both in their late 50s, decided they need to “live authentically.” They’ve come out to their two adult children – a son and a daughter – and are navigating new lives in Chicago.

While research from the UCLA School of Law Williams Institute for Sexual Orientation Law and Public Policy shows that people in the U.S. are coming out at a younger age than previous generations, Brad and Cyndi are part of a segment of the LGBTQ community that waits until later in life.

“Society is still inhospitable. That’s not to deny so many amazing shifts in public attitudes, in laws, in policies, but it did not wash away a hundred years of homophobia in society,” said Ilan Meyer, a distinguished senior scholar of public policy with the Williams Institute.

Bob Mueller, 75, who grew up in suburban Chicago and now lives in Iowa, didn’t breathe a word of his sexual orientation to his family until he was 40, when he wanted them to meet his partner. And he still didn’t tell everyone.

Coming Out Later





Lesbian Vampires


Sexual fluidity has been one of the hallmarks of vampiric portrayals throughout history. But lesbian vampires, in particular, have enjoyed a certain popularity. Beginning with early film adaptations of 19th-century novels to a present-day small-screen resurgence, the subgenre has proved to have serious staying power.

"I think part of it is just the appeal of vampires in general," said lesbian romance novelist Evelyn Dar, who runs a popular YouTube channel dedicated to lesbian entertainment. "They’re mysterious and dark. It’s taboo and sexy."

That appeal, however, was a double-edged sword for lesbian representation. For decades, and particularly during the subgenre’s heyday of the 1960s and ‘70s, vampire narratives were a dominant means of getting lesbianism on-screen. And the associations between sapphic love and bloodthirsty villains stuck.

“They were evil. They were sexually deviant. They almost always had to die,” Dar said of those popular depictions.

“It had to do with the status anxiety that straight men must have felt during those years, between the rise of the second wave of the women’s movement and after Stonewall. There was a kind of fear about lesbians that could be articulated in the vampire film,” said Andrea Weiss, a film professor at the City College of New York and author of “Vampires and Violets: Lesbians in Film.” “And also quell that anxiety by having the vampire be destroyed or become heterosexual at the end.”

Lesbian Vampires





Bisexuality and Reality TV


Reality TV staple The Bachelor, and its various franchises, has been described as a “primetime harem fantasy” even though it ultimately presents a fairly conservative portrait of romance.

In its latest iteration, The Bachelorette Australia (Network 10 2021) is attempting to offer something refreshingly different through the casting of Brooke Blurton, a First Nations bisexual woman. Such casting necessitates a first for the franchise — casting both male and female contestants to vie for Blurton’s affections.

Having both male and female suitors was sold as a groundbreaking moment of representation. One contestant even says “we’re doing so much for our community” in the second episode. Is this indeed the case? The volume and quality of representation we have seen of LGBTIQ+ individuals, characters and communities has undoubtedly improved, though it is still rare enough for each one to be notable.

Of course, the stereotypes and issues surrounding representing bisexuality are different from, say, those surrounding gay men. And it is well established by decades of research that television representation plays a role in informing attitudes towards LGBTIQ+ individuals.

The Bachelorette is not the first series to present a bisexual individual on the small screen. 1990s bisexual representation on television was largely made up of ratings boosting kisses between a major female character and a non-recurring female character. In these cases, the major character’s interest in women was generally never mentioned again (think Ally McBeal, Picket Fences and even Friends). It was generally seen as a titillating or scandalous storyline, but not one that took representation or sexuality seriously.

Bisexuality and Reality TV




Another Trans Woman Killed


HRC is deeply saddened to learn of the death of Jessi Hart, a white 42-year-old transgender woman killed in Banks, Oregon. Her body was found on Oct. 17, 2021. Hart’s death is at least the 43rd violent killing of a transgender or gender non-conforming person in 2021. We say “at least'' because too often these deaths go unreported — or misreported.

According to the Washington County Sheriff’s Office, Hart’s body was found in the woods outside Banks, a small town about 25 miles west of Portland, Oregon. Detectives suspect foul play in her death and believe she had died about two weeks before authorities found her body. Hart had been part of a journalistic feature on Portlanders living in hotel rooms as a last resort before homelessness. Her own housing insecurity initiated when Hart transitioned in 2016. Shortly after the feature was published, Hart’s subsidized stay at a hotel had ended and she, along with her teenage son, Caleb, had been sleeping in her black Saab. Through the assistance of a local nonprofit, both Hart and her son had started living in another hotel in early July. What happened to Hart between July and her death is unknown. Her car was later covered by the Washington County Sheriff’s office, which said the car had been spray-painted white.

According to Willamette Week, Hart had lost her construction company and her house when she transitioned. Her relationship with her family was also strained. The article suggests that she and Caleb shared a special relationship. Hart’s girlfriend, Audrey Savage, stated that she’d “miss everything about her” and that she was “intelligent and thoughtful and caring.”

HRC recorded 44 deaths of transgender and gender non-conforming people in 2020, more than in any year since we began tracking this violence in 2013.

Another Trans Woman Killed



Intersex People Challenge Surgery


Bria Brown-King, 29, a Pennsylvania native, was raised as a girl. As Brown-King got older, however, they realized they were developing differently.

“I didn’t have the feminizing puberty that the other girls in my class had,” said Brown-King, who was born with an enlarged clitoris and started to develop masculine traits during puberty, including facial hair and larger muscles.

Brown-King, who has since come out as nonbinary and uses gender-neutral pronouns, was born with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, or CAH, a rare condition in which the body produces high levels of androgens — hormones that influence masculine characteristics. Those with CAH are considered intersex, an umbrella term used to describe individuals whose sex characteristics do not match strictly binary definitions of male or female. While rare, at least 1 in 2,000 people are born with a genital difference caused by an intersex trait, according to Human Rights Watch, an international research and advocacy group.

Though many children with CAH undergo “gender-normalizing surgery” to make the genitals look more typically female in infancy, Brown-King’s parents decided to wait until Brown-King was old enough to choose. But Brown-King said severe bullying over their appearance drove them to get the surgery at 13. Looking back, Brown-King, who now works for InterAct, an intersex advocacy group, said they would have made a different choice “had I known that it was OK to have the body that I had.”

These so-called gender-normalizing surgeries have been performed on intersex babies and toddlers since at least the 1950s — usually in secrecy, without ever telling the children when they get older. Until recently, doctors saw a genital difference as a “psychosocial emergency” and rushed to assign a gender and perform surgery, believing children would be psychologically harmed otherwise, according to Dr. Sue Stred, a retired pediatric endocrinologist who has worked with intersex youth for nearly three decades. Emergency surgery, however, is only necessary in rare cases —  if a child can’t urinate properly, for example, according to medical  experts who work with these children.

Intersex People Challenge Surgery



What is Allyship


While LGBT History Month is a time to recognize and celebrate the LGBTQ+ community, it’s an important time for allies to reflect on their efforts in support of these individuals.

Being an ally is not a self-asserted identity, it is one that people within a community assign to others based on their efforts to combat and raise awareness for issues affected individuals face, says LGBTQ+ Services Director Michael Nunes ’16 ’18MA. Whether using “ally” or other related terms, these identities require action, which can be active or passive.

“To be an ally is to consistently and constantly go forward in your education and growth so you can actively advocate for the LGBTQ+ community,” he says. “To be an ally is to continuously work on yourself in the spaces and places [where] you can advocate for those who don’t have that ability and privilege.”

In the second installment of UCF’s three-part series in celebration of Pride Month, Nunesguides us through the importance of allyship, basic do’s and don’ts for providing support, and the need to continue educating yourself beyond this series.

What is Allyship



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

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Re: The Daily Sheet - October to December 2021
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2021, 04:08:08 AM »


Tuesday, November 9th, 2021




Heath Ledger as Batman?


Casting doesn’t always turn out the way anyone initially expects. In the case of Christopher Nolan's Dark Knight Trilogy, it took some twists and turns that ended up changing the face of pop culture. Heath Ledger -- whose indelible performance as the Joker in 2008’s The Dark Knight earned him a posthumous Oscar -- was apparently on Nolan's mind very early in the process. According to a report from NME in 2012, Nolan approached the actor about starring in 2005’s Batman Begins as Bruce Wayne. From there the casting took on a life of its own.

Changing casting ideas is nothing new. James Cameron famously had Arnold Schwarzenegger in mind for the hero's role in the original Terminator before wisely deciding to cast him as the titular killbot. Similarly, as recounted in the Batman Begins Blu-ray extras, actors like Cillian Murphy originally auditioned for the Wayne role, only to “switch sides” when Nolan decided he was a much better fit for Jonathan Crane. In the Ledger situation, however, it had much less to do with the filmmaker changing their mind and more to do with the actor.

According to Nolan, Ledger was one of several whom he met when casting for the part of Bruce Wayne. His star was on the rise and he had earned a reputation as a serious actor in the likes of Monster's Ball. Nolan claims that Ledger shut him down immediately -- “quite gracious about it” according to NME -- but clearly having no interest in a superhero film.

Considering the state of the genre at the time, the actor had a reason for skepticism. While the Spider-Man and X-Men franchises were going strong, Batman had crashed and burned several years earlier with the disastrous Batman and Robin, while box office misfires like 2003's Daredevil didn't speak to a bright future. Even the hits were viewed as lightweight fare, and Ledger's ascent might have induced him to feel it was beneath him.

Heath Ledger as Batman?




Ship Named After Harvey Milk


A Navy ship named for slain gay rights leader Harvey Milk, who served four years in the Navy before being forced out, was christened and launched in San Diego Bay on Saturday.

The replenishment oiler USNS Harvey Milk slid down the shipyard ways after a bottle of champagne was smashed on the bow by former Navy officer Paula M. Neira, clinical program director for the John Hopkins Center for Transgender Health.

Milk’s nephew, Stuart Milk, and Navy Secretary Carlos Del Toro watched the traditional ceremony.

“The secretary of the Navy needed to be here today, not just to amend the wrongs of the past, but to give inspiration to all of our LGBTQ community leaders who served in the Navy, in uniform today and in the civilian workforce as well too, and to tell them that we’re committed to them in the future,” Del Toro said.

Del Toro said that, like many others, Milk had to “mask that very important part of his life” while he served in the Navy.

“For far too long, sailors like Lt. Milk were forced into the shadows or, worse yet, forced out of our beloved Navy,” Del Toro said. “That injustice is part of our Navy history, but so is the perseverance of all who continue to serve in the face of injustice.”

Ship Named After Harvey Milk



AIDS Patient Talks About Survival


Michael Stevens came home to Aotearoa believing he had only months to live. That was nearly 30 years ago. Now, he’s celebrating turning 60.

Stevens, who lives in Auckland’s Freemans Bay with his partner of more than four years, said although he spent his celebration in lockdown, he was “absfamolutely spoiled” – and never imagined he would live this long.

When Stevens was 27 years old and living abroad in Istanbul, Turkey in 1988, he received the news he had HIV.  The following years were filled with anger, sadness, sickness and acceptance, as he believed he had only a few years to live.

“I spent so long thinking about and planning my own death during those years, and although it didn’t happen, it was one of the most fulfilling projects of my life,” Stevens said.

In 1988, the HIV/Aids epidemic was sweeping the world. Stevens said many of his gay friends began to talk about it, and when his flatmate in Istanbul tested positive he decided he should get tested too.

Stevens travelled to London to receive his test. The doctor at the clinic told him he had HIV, and advised him to go home to New Zealand and prepare to die within the next two years.

AIDS Patient Talks About Survival






Judge Beth Robinson


The Senate met yesterday to vote on the nomination of Justice Beth Robinson to the Second U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Lawmakers confirmed her by a 51-45 vote, with four abstaining and two Republicans — Sens. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine — voting in favor. She will soon be the first openly LGBT woman to serve on any federal district court, according to the White House.

Robinson, 56, was among President Biden's sixth round of judicial nominees in August. She has been an associate justice on the Vermont Supreme Court since 2011 and is well-known in the state for her earlier work as a lawyer in the landmark case that effectively legalized same-sex marriage in the state.

Elected Vermont officials on both sides of the aisle overwhelmingly supported her nomination, Sen. Patrick Leahy said in a statement. He and Sen. Bernie Sanders both offered their praise and congratulations to Robinson after the vote.

"As an advocate, Beth Robinson has been rightfully hailed as a tireless champion for equal rights and equal justice," Leahy said. "But more importantly, her record as a Vermont Supreme Court Justice clearly demonstrates her fairness, impartiality, and loyalty to the rule of law, above all else."

Leahy went on to highlight some of Robinson's accomplishments prior to her time on the bench.

Judge Beth Robinson





Bisexuality and Reality TV


Reality TV staple The Bachelor, and its various franchises, has been described as a “primetime harem fantasy” even though it ultimately presents a fairly conservative portrait of romance.

In its latest iteration, The Bachelorette Australia (Network 10 2021) is attempting to offer something refreshingly different through the casting of Brooke Blurton, a First Nations bisexual woman. Such casting necessitates a first for the franchise — casting both male and female contestants to vie for Blurton’s affections.

Having both male and female suitors was sold as a groundbreaking moment of representation. One contestant even says “we’re doing so much for our community” in the second episode. Is this indeed the case? The volume and quality of representation we have seen of LGBTIQ+ individuals, characters and communities has undoubtedly improved, though it is still rare enough for each one to be notable.

Of course, the stereotypes and issues surrounding representing bisexuality are different from, say, those surrounding gay men. And it is well established by decades of research that television representation plays a role in informing attitudes towards LGBTIQ+ individuals.

The Bachelorette is not the first series to present a bisexual individual on the small screen. 1990s bisexual representation on television was largely made up of ratings boosting kisses between a major female character and a non-recurring female character. In these cases, the major character’s interest in women was generally never mentioned again (think Ally McBeal, Picket Fences and even Friends). It was generally seen as a titillating or scandalous storyline, but not one that took representation or sexuality seriously.

Bisexuality and Reality TV




Transgender Lawsuit in Tennessee


Civil rights groups on Thursday filed a lawsuit against a Tennessee law that restricts transgender students’ participation in sports, arguing that the law is discriminatory and unconstitutional.

The law, which took effect in March on the same day Republican Gov. Bill Lee signed it, requires student athletes and their parents to prove the sex they were assigned at birth, either through an “original” birth certificate or some other form of evidence. As a result, it bars transgender students from playing on sports teams that align with their gender identities.

Lambda Legal, the American Civil Liberties Union and the ACLU of Tennessee filed a lawsuit in the United States District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee on behalf of Luc Esquivel, a 14-year-old freshman at Farragut High School in Knoxville. Luc, a trans boy, said he was hoping to play on the boys’ golf team at Farragut, but the law will bar him from doing so.

“I was really looking forward to trying out for the boys’ golf team and, if I made it, training and competing with and learning from other boys and improving my game,” Luc said, according to a press release. “Then, to have the legislature pass a law that singled out me and kids like me to keep us from being part of a team, that crushed me, it hurt very much. I just want to play, like any other kid.”

Luc’s mother, Shelley Esquivel, said she is still angry over the law’s passage, because high school sports play an important role in helping kids thrive.

Transgender Lawsuit in Tennessee



Non Binary Elected Officials


Non-binary candidates were among those claiming wins Tuesday night as two contenders prevailed in local elections in Massachusetts and Pennsylvania.

In Massachusetts, Thu Nguyen won a race for a seat on the Worcester City Council, becoming the first non-binary person ever elected in the state. Thu came in fourth in a crowded race and won 10 percent of the vote, according to unofficial results, which was enough to claim one of the seats.

Thu’s victory is also significant because of the story of their family, which sought refuge in Worcester when they were an infant after their father was captured in Vietnam and held as a prisoner of war for six years. Thu now works at the Southeast Asian Coalition and addresses issues such as food insecurity, civic engagement and support for small businesses.

Annise Parker, CEO of LGBTQ Victory Fund, said in a statement Thu’s win “shattered a rainbow ceiling” and adds to the growing number of election wins for non-binary elected officials serving across the nation.

“Their victory proves voters look beyond gender identity and will elect leaders with the qualifications and drive to improve people’s lives,” Parker said. “Thu’s experiences – as a person of color, non-binary person and refugee – will bring a unique and critical perspective to the city council and it will lead to more inclusive legislation.”

Non Binary Elected Officials



What is Allyship


While LGBT History Month is a time to recognize and celebrate the LGBTQ+ community, it’s an important time for allies to reflect on their efforts in support of these individuals.

Being an ally is not a self-asserted identity, it is one that people within a community assign to others based on their efforts to combat and raise awareness for issues affected individuals face, says LGBTQ+ Services Director Michael Nunes ’16 ’18MA. Whether using “ally” or other related terms, these identities require action, which can be active or passive.

“To be an ally is to consistently and constantly go forward in your education and growth so you can actively advocate for the LGBTQ+ community,” he says. “To be an ally is to continuously work on yourself in the spaces and places [where] you can advocate for those who don’t have that ability and privilege.”

In the second installment of UCF’s three-part series in celebration of Pride Month, Nunesguides us through the importance of allyship, basic do’s and don’ts for providing support, and the need to continue educating yourself beyond this series.

What is Allyship



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: brian, fritzkep, CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by killersmom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Re: The Daily Sheet - October to December 2021
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2021, 12:46:33 PM »


Tuesday, November 16th, 2021




Gustavo's Track for "El Cid"


Gustavo Santaolalla is a hardworking man. He was 5 years old when he realized playing the guitar was his passion and has never looked back since. The now 70-year-old Oscar, Grammy, Golden Globe, and BAFTA winner has a long list of industry accomplishments, ranging from composing the scores to feature films such as Babel, Brokeback Mountain, and The Motorcycle Diaries to producing documentaries like Break It All: The History of Rock in Latin America. He has recently added to his repertoire composing the soundtrack to the Amazon Original series El Cid – which tells the story of the mysterious and complex Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar, a Castilian nobleman and war hero in medieval Spain.

Fans of Gustavo Santaolalla will be pleased to know that his unmatched and highly technical guitar work is on full display throughout the El Cid soundtrack. The score is richly orchestrated with instruments of the medieval period, providing an epic backdrop with an integral Spanish flair to the series.

Cinemacy is thrilled to premiere the title track from “El Cid: Themes and Inspirations” before its soundtrack release tomorrow, November 4th. Listen at the first link below.

El Cid: Themes and Inspirations

Gustavo's Track for "El Cid"




Gay Genes?


To many of us, the attractions of gay sex are pretty obvious. But some scientists continue to wonder why people do it. If gay sex isn’t reproductive, why hasn’t natural selection weeded out all the queers? Why, after all this evolutionary time, isn’t everybody straight?

Increasingly, people think that sexuality is biologically innate. Sexual preferences shouldn’t be changed and they can’t be, simple as that. Per the famous Gaga refrain, we are “born this way.” Indeed, scientists may have helped to promote these beliefs. Some say not only that genes largely decide your sexuality, but also that genes help to explain why gay people exist at all.

Case in point: A recent paper published in Nature Human Behavior looked to see whether genes associated with having gay sex are also associated with having more reproductive sex. Specifically, its scientists were curious whether ‘gay genes’ in straight people could help straight people to have sex with more partners. They found that they do, as the genetic markers found in gay people were also found in those who see themselves as open to new experiences and risk-takers. In a nutshell, gay genes may exist because they help straight people get over their inhibitions and get laid more. This might explain why evolution hasn’t gotten round to pruning away the gays yet.

Gay Genes?



NHS Challenged By Lesbian Couple


Influencers Megan and Whitney Bacon-Evans say they are required to undergo 12 rounds of costly private treatment before they can get NHS support.

Heterosexual couples have to try to conceive for two years before becoming eligible for NHS-funded treatment.  CCG Frimley, the subject of the review, says its policies comply with guidance.

The social media stars, who were featured on TV show Say Yes To The Dress, and run a lifestyle and travel blog, have been together for 13 years and married for four.

They say they were "shocked and devastated to discover the discrimination that lesbian couples, bisexual women and individuals with wombs face in starting their family".

"For many years we have been talking about wanting to create our family - we've had our children's names picked out for a decade," Megan told the BBC.

"There isn't much information out there so everything was new for us, and as we went along we found out there were a lot of barriers and discrimination.  With equal marriage coming in, we thought we were equal in the eyes of the law, but not when it comes to starting a family."

NHS Challenged By Lesbian Couple





Bisexuality and Reality TV


Reality TV staple The Bachelor, and its various franchises, has been described as a “primetime harem fantasy” even though it ultimately presents a fairly conservative portrait of romance.

In its latest iteration, The Bachelorette Australia (Network 10 2021) is attempting to offer something refreshingly different through the casting of Brooke Blurton, a First Nations bisexual woman. Such casting necessitates a first for the franchise — casting both male and female contestants to vie for Blurton’s affections.

Having both male and female suitors was sold as a groundbreaking moment of representation. One contestant even says “we’re doing so much for our community” in the second episode. Is this indeed the case? The volume and quality of representation we have seen of LGBTIQ+ individuals, characters and communities has undoubtedly improved, though it is still rare enough for each one to be notable.

Of course, the stereotypes and issues surrounding representing bisexuality are different from, say, those surrounding gay men. And it is well established by decades of research that television representation plays a role in informing attitudes towards LGBTIQ+ individuals.

The Bachelorette is not the first series to present a bisexual individual on the small screen. 1990s bisexual representation on television was largely made up of ratings boosting kisses between a major female character and a non-recurring female character. In these cases, the major character’s interest in women was generally never mentioned again (think Ally McBeal, Picket Fences and even Friends). It was generally seen as a titillating or scandalous storyline, but not one that took representation or sexuality seriously.

Bisexuality and Reality TV




2021 - The Deadliest Year


Today, with news of the killing of Marquiisha Lawrence in Greenville, South Carolina, the Human Rights Campaign Foundation, the educational arm of the nation’s largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer civil rights organization, has now officially recorded more violent deaths of transgender and gender non-conforming people than any year prior.

At least 45 transgender or gender non-conforming people have been killed this year; HRC Foundation uses “at least” because too often these stories go unreported or misreported. Previously, the highest number of fatal deaths of transgender or gender non-conforming people that HRC Foundation has tracked over a 12 month period was just last year in 2020, when at least 44 transgender or gender non-conforming people were killed.

This year, the transgender community has faced the dual threats of an unprecedented number of anti-transgender bills in state legislatures—ten states so far have passed anti-transgender legislation—as well as a resurgence of stigmatizing and demeaning rhetoric from cultural, social and political figures domestically and internationally. Recent data shows that public opinion and attitudes about transgender and gender non-conforming people have direct impacts on rates of violence against these communities. It is not enough to grieve the loss of victims of anti-transgender violence— we must honor their memories with action.

2021 - The Deadliest Year



Including Intersex People


If you were to estimate the size of the intersex community based solely on the attention they receive, you may never guess that they make up nearly 2 percent of the population. You’re about as likely to run into an intersex person on the street as you are a natural redhead. Still, the serious and sometimes life-threatening issues faced by intersex people are rarely discussed in our culture — and cultural erasure is just the beginning.

“Intersex” is an umbrella term for differences in sex traits or reproductive anatomy, like genitalia, hormones, internal anatomy, or chromosomes, that may be present at birth or manifest later in life. Not unlike the challenges facing bisexual people (1.8 percent of American adults) and transgender people (0.6 percent of Americans), intersex issues have long been neglected. But the oppressions that intersex people face are rooted in the same sexist, homophobic, and transphobic stereotypes that harm all LGBTQ+ people. The imposition of traditional gender norms and the propagation of anti-scientific beliefs about binary sex are the driving force behind the most pernicious type of discrimination against the intersex community: physical erasure through irreversible, nonconsensual, and medically unnecessary procedures.

Before they can consent and often before they can even talk — intersex children are routinely subjected to irreversible surgeries to “normalize” their bodies. Parents are rarely given a full understanding of the risks before they send their newborn into the operating room, including lifelong conditions. As they grow, intersex people often contend with infertility, acute pain, loss of sensitivity, and psychological trauma. Many of these surgeries amount to sterilization without consent, and some can require lifelong hormone replacement therapy. As to the psychological toll, there are countless stories of people who endured years of pain and confusion before discovering that their intersex identity had been kept secret from them.

Including Intersex People



Jade Thirlwall Wants To Be A Better Ally


Little Mix star Jade Thirlwall is determined to become a real ally for her gay fans after spending years just enjoying their company.

The singer admits it has become more and more apparent the girl group has a big LGBTQ+ fan base, and now she wants to do more than show up and perform for them.

"If you're going to benefit from a fan base, you have to show them exactly that you support them and you stand with them, no matter what," she tells Interview magazine.

"I would say, up until maybe five years ago, I was what I would call a 'basic bitch' ally. As in, I would go to the gay bars, I was there, doing the thing, and I was obviously an ally of some sort, but I wasn't doing enough to advocate or really show what allyship truly meant (sic)."

Jade Thirlwall Wants To Be A Better Ally



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by killersmom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Re: The Daily Sheet - October to December 2021
« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2021, 04:10:23 AM »


Tuesday, November 23rd, 2021




David Harbour in "Violent Night"


Things are looking less than strange for David Harbour, as he has just been cast in a new thriller for Universal called Violent Night. Harbour will star in the film directed by Norwegian director Tommy Wirkola (Dead Snow, Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters). The script is being written by Sonic the Hedgehog scribes Pat Casey and Josh Miller.

The film is being produced by 87North, which is headed by David Leitch, Chad Stahelski and Kelly McCormick. The company might be a recognizable name to close-eye viewers as they are the production company behind the John Wick franchise, Atomic Blonde starring Charlize Theron, and the reboot of the series Kung Fu, which currently airs on the CW.

The announcement of Harbour's casting didn't provide much information, but said that Violent Night is said to be a dark holiday thriller. Based on the resume of 87North and what Harbour showed off while donning the Red Guardian outfit in Black Widow, it might be safe to assume that this film will be heavy on the thrills and brutal action sequences.

Wirkola is no stranger to playing within darker material, as Dead Snow dealt with zombie Nazis climbing out from their graves to run amok on a group of students in the remote mountains of Norway. The film was brutal in its kills and didn't shy away from gore. Despite the more horrific elements, the film also played with a bit of comedy of the situation, which may lend itself to Harbour acting style, as he has been known to showcase comedic chops in his work.

David Harbour in "Violent Night"




Lawmaker's Comment Questioned


A Republican state senator’s comment that appeared to condone violence against gay couples in Montana should be clarified and, if necessary, retracted, her gay colleagues at the Legislature said Friday.

But Sen. Theresa Manzella, R-Hamilton, told MTN News that her statement at a Wednesday night rally in Clinton was reported out of context, and that she wasn’t condoning or encouraging violence against gay Montanans.

“I did not say anything about violence or hate,” she said.

Manzella was among several speakers Wednesday at a Clinton church, in support of a church pastor accused of “hate speech” because he withdrew the church this summer from a food-distribution program that included a flyer supporting gay rights.

The Missoulian reported that Manzella noted that gay couples have said they fear violence, if they walk down the street in Montana holding hands.

In a transcript provided by the Missoulian, Manzella said:

“Now, they (gay people) like to play the protected class card and they’re the minority and they’re discriminated against, and they’re scared to walk down the street hand in hand. I’ve got to tell you, I think those are normal consequences associated with the choices they made. We can’t prevent them from doing that.”

Lawmaker's Comment Questioned



Lesbian Denied Surgery


A married lesbian woman was left in tears after her doctor rejected a hysterectomy — saying she could eventually decide to leave her wife for a man, according to a report.

Rachel Champ, 27, of Longwood, Ireland, has suffered from period pain since she was just 10 years old and was prescribed painkillers and oral contraceptives two years later, the UK’s Mirror reported.

But her symptoms only got worse as she struggled with cramps, lower back and leg pain, as well as migraines and nausea, the news outlet said.

When she was 25, a male gynecologist dismissed her complaints and told her she just needed pain meds.

Last year, Champ spent almost a month in bed due to her condition, as her partner Karen – whom she married this past June – brought her food and pain medication.

When she was finally admitted to a hospital, an imaging test found that she had ovarian cysts.

“I feel like I’m missing out on a lot in my life because of the pain that I am in,” Champ said, according to the Mirror.  “The pain I experience impacts every aspect of my life. I miss work, college and social events. My life, including my wedding, is planned around when I have my period, because I know I won’t be able to leave my bed,” she added.

Lesbian Denied Surgery





"Greedy" - A Bisexual Journey


Share, and share alike.

That may, in retrospect, be the most ridiculous thing you’ve ever heard. You’re not asking for the stars and the moon; you just want what you want and why pass it around? As in the new book “Greedy” by Jen Winston, who’d ever think that getting what you deserved to have was wrong?

Back in the “aughts,” when Jen Winston was rocking her AIM handle and pretending to be boy-crazy, she had no word for liking boys and girls – though she knew she did. Had she questioned anyone, she would have been told that it was a phase, an experiment, or a matter of confusion but she never asked. She instinctively knew that doing the “gay stuff” was hard.

As she grew up and learned the word for what she felt, the idea of being with a woman became more appealing but not quite comfortable. Yes, Winston quietly told herself she was bisexual, but bisexuality “never felt queer enough.” Besides, dating straight men was like the equivalent of “comfort food,” though it never worked and was really not much fun.

Various roommates through the years indulged in her search for love, though, by crowdsourcing answers to questions posed by online dates. They also looked the other way as Winston learned that self-pleasure could be ugly, and she didn’t want to be “U-G-L-Y.” She tried threesomes but they were loaded with potential rejection; she tried chatrooms but they were scary. She learned that “we” is a painful word when you’re not part of it.

"Greedy" - A Bisexual Journey




Transgender In The Workplace


In 2014, Time magazine splashed a glamorous photo of the actress Laverne Cox on its cover, with a headline announcing that society had reached “The Transgender Tipping Point” at last. “Transgender people,” the article proudly declared, “are emerging from the margins to fight for an equal place in society. This new transparency is improving the lives of a long misunderstood minority and beginning to yield new policies, as trans activists and their supporters push for changes in schools, hospitals, workplaces, prisons, and the military.”

To be sure, the Time cover story, seven years ago, was a watershed moment for the visibility of transgender women and men in the mass media. But that hasn’t translated into actual improvements for the transgender experience in the United States—despite the long-standing struggle for comprehensive LGBTQ+ rights. As we will show, being transgender today often means facing not only stigma but also increasing threats to safety and existence, whether it’s record-high levels of deadly violence or a higher-than-typical likelihood of encountering employment or housing discrimination.

The challenges of being transgender extend to the workplace. In recent years, there have been fits and starts for the advancement of LGBTQ+ rights at work in the United States—including an executive order President Biden signed in January, implementing a landmark 2020 Supreme Court ruling that protected LGBTQ+ people from workplace discrimination. But those efforts can face roadblocks. Moreover, some employers focus more on supporting sexual-orientation diversity in the workplace than on gender identity or expression. All too frequently, the transgender experience may not even register on the radars of employers when they work on corporate diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts.

Transgender In The Workplace



Non Binary Pronoun Added


The decision by a major French dictionary to include a gender-inclusive pronoun in its online edition has triggered angry reactions from lawmakers and defenders of the nation's language.

French dictionary Le Robert decided to add the entry "iel" -- a combination of "il" and "elle," which means "he" and "she" in French respectively -- into the online version of its dictionary in October.

It's a "personal subject pronoun of the third person singular and plural, used to refer to a person regardless of gender," the dictionary entry reads.
Together with its plural and feminine form, called collectively as "iel, ielle, iels, ielles," this new addition to the French language has triggered strong opposition from some French politicians.

"The Petit Robert, a dictionary that we thought was a reference, has just integrated on its site the words "iel, ielle, iels, ielles," said French lawmaker François Jolivet, from French President Emmanuel Macron's party La République en Marche, in a tweet on Tuesday.

"Its authors are therefore militants of a cause that has nothing to do with France: #wokisme," Jolivet said.

Non Binary Pronoun Added



Retired Police Officer Becomes Ally


Coming out as a member of the LGBTQ community is often the hardest decision for young people to make, especially coming out to their families.

After retired Scottsdale police officer Johnnie Ghiglia's son Chase came out to him nearly eight years ago, he decided to not only love and accept him but to do something more for the LGBTQ community as a whole.   Johnnie said that Chase was concerned his father would not accept him because of his profession.

“He did have a concern that I was currently a cop," said Johnnie. "He’s like, 'well dad you have friends that I think have big egos and are macho guys.'” 

Johnnie's response was that nothing could stop his love for Chase.

“'Chase you are my son; I love you unconditionally, it’s very easy for me,'" said Johnnie. "If those people can’t accept my son for who he is, then they are no longer a friend of mine.”

His support turned into action in 2018.

Together, Chase and Johnnie launched their non-profit Out Is The New In. The organization sells brand apparel to give back and support the LGBTQ youth regarding suicide prevention, mental health and homelessness.

Retired Police Officer Becomes Ally



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





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