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Offline CellarDweller115

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The Daily Sheet - January to March 2022
« on: January 10, 2022, 01:59:32 PM »


Tuesday, January 11th, 2021




Anne Hathaway In NJ


Anne Hathaway stars in a film based on the 2015 novel, Eileen, by Ottessa Moshfegh, a New England-based fiction writer. Set in Massachusetts around Christmastime 1964, the story centers on a depressed 24-year-old woman who is trapped between two roles: taking care of her alcoholic father and working at a boys' prison. Eileen gets through her dreary days through perverse fantasies and dreams of escaping to the big city. When the beautiful and cheery Rebecca Saint John arrives as a new counselor at the prison, a friendship blooms… until she gets pulled into a crime that surpasses her wildest imaginings.

South Amboy's Lagoda Saloon was selected as a site to film a scene in the movie. Pre-production began earlier in the week, with the star on the set on Thursday and Friday.

“With our iconic downtown, it is no wonder we were chosen by the production company as a location for this film," said Mayor Fred Henry. "To have an A-list star in the city has generated quite a buzz, and we all anxiously await the release of Eileen.”

Hathaway has New Jersey roots. Born in Brooklyn on Nov. 12, 1982, Hathaway's family moved to Short Hills when she was age six. At Millburn High School, she played soccer and participated in several school plays. In addition to acting at Millburn High School, Hathaway performed at the Paper Mill Playhouse.

Anne Hathaway In NJ




Targeted With Gay Slurs


Josh Cavallo, the only openly gay top-flight male professional player currently playing in world football, has declared that "hate will never win" after he was the target of anti-gay slurs during Adelaide United's 1-1 draw with Melbourne Victory on Saturday.

In a post to his Instagram account, Cavallo revealed that he had been the subject of anti-gay slurs from individuals in the stands and on social media after making a 36-minute appearance off the bench on Saturday evening, which concluded with him being walked past Victory's active supporters after being withdrawn with a suspected concussion.

"I'm not going to pretend that I didn't see or hear the homophobic abuse at the game last night," Cavallo wrote.

"There are no words to tell you how disappointed I was. As a society, this shows we still face these problems in 2022. This shouldn't be acceptable and we need to do more to hold these people accountable."

"Hate never will win."

"I will never apologise for living my truth and most recently who I am outside of football. To all the young people who have received homophobic abuse, hold your heads up high and keep chasing your dreams. Know that there is no place in the game for this."


Targeted With Gay Slurs



Benedictine Monks vs. Catholic School


A group of Benedictine monks has cut ties with a Catholic school in a Chicago suburb after it hired a lacrosse coach who is in a same-sex marriage.

Abbot Austin G. Murphy, Benet Academy chancellor and head of St. Procopius Abbey, announced the monks’ decision Tuesday in a joint letter with Dennis M. Flynn, Benet Academy’s board chair. The letter said there would be “a transition in the sponsorship of Benet Academy” in the coming months.

“Events in recent months have been an occasion for the Benedictine monks of St. Procopius Abbey to examine their future relationship with Benet Academy,” the letter said. “After much deliberation, the monks as a community have discerned that they no longer have the resources needed for governance and oversight of the Academy. Currently, alternatives for the Academy’s governance are being studied. In the meantime, the Abbey will continue its role in the governance of the high school. The goal is that Benet Academy will continue to operate with an emphasis on academic excellence and Catholic identity within the Benedictine tradition.”

Stephen Marth, Benet Academy head of school, said, according to the statement, that “contrary to some reports circulating in the media” on Tuesday, “know of our steadfast commitment to ensuring that the Academy will maintain its Catholic identity, in the Benedictine tradition, for years to come.”

St. Procopius Abbey founded the high school more than 120 years ago and is one of its biggest donors, giving at least $50,000 to the school during the 2019-20 academic year.

Benedictine Monks vs. Catholic School





New Super Hero is Bisexual


There's a lot of superhero TV series to choose from out there, so it's vital to stand out among the pack when launching into the fray. As such, The CW's Naomi –– based on the comic book of the same name from writers Brian Michael Bendis and David F. Walker with art by Jamal Campbell –– revolves around the unique origin story of Naomi (Kaci Walfall), a teen, Black, bisexual superhero.

Framed first as a coming-of-age series, executive producer Ana DuVernay told reporters at the Television Critics Association winter virtual press tour on Thursday that the whole show is an example of normalizing the types of stories they want to see in the world. "There are muscular things [addressed in the series] but we're playing it normal," DuVerney explains. "We show a different hero, a black girl, and we're making it normal and that's radical/revolutionary."

The series is set in the Pacific Northwest and follows Naomi, a popular high school student and Superman blogger as she discovers that her well-adjusted life as the adopted daughter of loving parents, Greg (Barry Watson) and Jennifer (Mouzam Makkar), might be obscuring a much more complicated past than she ever could have imagined.

While her origin will be revealed in a slow drip, Naomi's active social life and comfort with her own alternate sexuality will be extremely noticeable right from the pilot. In the show, it quickly becomes apparent that Naomi has three love interests that she will explore as the season unfolds. And to be authentic with their normalized storytelling, showrunner/executive producer Jill Blankenship said they looked to this generation to influence the tone and approach to telling Naomi's story.

New Super Hero is Bisexual




Support For Transgender Swimmer


The Ivy League and the University of Pennsylvania issued statements in support of Lia Thomas, a transgender swimmer whose recent record-breaking wins put her at the center of the debate over trans inclusion in competitive sports.

The statements were released on Twitter just two days before Thomas’ return to the pool Saturday, when Penn will host Dartmouth College and Yale University.

“Over the past several years, Lia and the University of Pennsylvania have worked with the NCAA to follow all of the appropriate protocols in order to comply with the NCAA policy on transgender athlete participation and compete on the Penn women’s swimming and diving team,” the Ivy League, the athletic conference for eight universities in the Northeast, said in a statement. “The Ivy League reaffirms its unwavering commitment to providing an inclusive environment for all student-athletes while condemning transphobia and discrimination in any form.”

Penn released a similar statement affirming its “commitment to being a welcoming and inclusive environment for all” student-athletes. The statement added that Thomas has “met or exceeded” all the NCAA protocols for transgender female athletes over the last two years.

“She will continue to represent the Penn women’s swimming team in competition this season,” the statement reads.

Support For Transgender Swimmer



Bill Withdrawn


A bill that would have banned certain surgeries performed on intersex children under the age of 12 was withdrawn less than two days into the new January 2022 session.

Th bill, formerly known as SB 225 and SB 201, and authored by Senator Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco)m would have postponed physicians and surgeons from performing genitalia modification procedures on intersex individuals below the age of 12. An exception would only be made if the surgery was required in events of a risk of immediate physical harm to the child in question. With the child being over 12 and having enough knowledge of their situation, they could participate in the decision on whether to have surgery or not.

Wiener has attempted to pass the bill since 2019. The closest it has come to passage was in 2020, when the bill reached the Senate Business, Professions and Economic Development Committee but was voted down 4-2. The next year, Wiener withdrew the bill due to lack of support and amendments to the bill that Wiener did not agree with.

On Tuesday, Wiener withdrew the bill at it’s earliest point to-date because of a continued lack of support from committee members over the bill. However, he also made it clear that he is not giving up on the bill and would likely try it again in the future.

“For three years, we’ve worked to advance legislation, and it’s become apparent that we continue to lack the votes to pass a meaningful bill — one that actually protects intersex people — through committee,” said the Senator in a statement on Tuesday. “Pausing medically unnecessary genital surgeries until a child is old enough to participate in the decision isn’t a radical idea. Rather, it’s about basic human dignity. I’m not giving up, and I stand in solidarity with the intersex community in its fight for bodily autonomy, dignity and choice.”

Bill Withdrawn



Allies of 2021


Over 20 million Americans identify as LGBTQ people.

Even with that total, we need (and love) our allies.

Allyship is so important in raising awareness of issues affecting LGBTQ people and helping the community feel supported.

Let’s take a moment to appreciate the celebrities who had the backs of LGBTQ people this past year.

Here is a list of celebrities who proved themselves to be LGBTQ allies in 2021.

Allies of 2021



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by killersmom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - January to March 2022
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2022, 12:49:46 PM »


Tuesday, January 18th, 2021




MGM Gets Ritchie/Gyllenhaal Film


MGM has acquired the U.S. rights to the next film from Guy Ritchie, an untitled Afghanistan war movie that will star Jake Gyllenhaal, an individual with knowledge of the deal told TheWrap.

Amazon Prime Video has also taken the majority of the film’s international rights from STX International, which handled sales on the film and first presented it to buyers at AFM under the title “The Interpreter.” The film is pursuing a hybrid release strategy of both a domestic theatrical rollout and a streaming component that gave Ritchie and his partners more creative and financial control over the film’s distribution.

Filming is now expected to begin on Ritchie’s project on Jan. 24 in Spain, with additional casting set to be revealed soon.

Gyllenhaal in the film will play a sergeant on his last tour of duty who is teamed with a local interpreter, to survey the region. When their unit is ambushed on patrol, he and the interpreter are the only survivors, and the interpreter ends up risking his life to carry Gyllenhaal’s character across miles of grueling terrain to safety. But the film resumes back on U.S. soil when the sergeant learns that his hero was not given passage to America as promised. He’s now determined to repay his debt and protect his friend and family before the local militias reach them first.

Ritchie will direct from a script he co-wrote with Ivan Atkinson and Marn Davies. Ritchie and Atkinson are also producing the film via their Toff Guys production banner alongside Josh Berger and STXfilms’ John Friedberg. Olga Filipuk will executive produce for Yandex-owned Kinopoisk, who is also the all-rights distributor in CIS territories, and marks the first time a Russian streaming service has played an instrumental role in the co-financing of a global film by a top international director.

MGM Gets Ritchie/Gyllenhaal Film




Murder of Activist In Florida


A gay rights advocate who was integral in legalizing same-sex marriage in Florida was found dead in a landfill in what authorities are investigating as a homicide, the Tallahassee Police Department said Wednesday.

Jorge Diaz-Johnston, 54, the brother of former Miami Mayor Manny Diaz, had been last seen alive on Jan. 3, Tallahassee police said. Shortly after a missing person alert was issued for him Saturday, his body was found in a trash pile at a landfill in Baker, Fla, about 60 miles east of the Alabama border, according to the Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office.

Diaz, who served as mayor of Miami from 2001 to 2009, released a statement on Twitter confirming his brother's death.

“I am profoundly appreciative of the outpouring of support shown to me, my brother-in-law Don, and my family after the loss of my brother, Jorge Diaz-Johnston," wrote. "My brother was such a special gift to this world whose heart and legacy will continue to live on for generations to come."

While he had a high-profile brother, Diaz-Johnston made a name for himself. In 2014, he and his husband, Don Diaz-Johnston, and five other same-sex couples sued the Miami-Dade County clerk’s office after they were barred from getting married.

“For us, it's not just only a question of love and wanting to express our love and have the benefits that everyone else has in the state, but it’s an issue of equality, and it’s a civil rights issue,” Jorge Diaz-Johnston told NBC Miami at the time.

Murder of Activist In Florida



A New Lesbian Anthem


It’s been another year of the world metaphorically being on fire, but at least now there’s a gay bop to keep us dancing through the flames. The lesbian Jesus Hayley Kiyoko has finally joined forces with our queer queen, FLETCHER. The two have collaborated to create the cheeky and flirty song that is “Cherry.” Not only have they given fans a song to dance to in their rooms after having a mental breakdown, but they’ve also created a cute ‘80s rom-com music video that captures its vintage quirkiness. “Cherry” is a single for everyone to enjoy, but more importantly the moment all the girls, gays and theys have been waiting for.

Hayley Kiyoko has been a part of many peoples’ queer journeys. Her music has transformed the pop world with Kiyoko just being herself, and having this representation has made so many queer people realize who they are and that it’s okay to be unapologetically themselves. She started as a Disney star, most popularly known for her role as Stella in “Lemonade Mouth.” A few years later, she directed her “Girls Like Girls” music video, which is an iconic video for the LGBTQ+ community. Personally, it was the video that made me start questioning my sexuality in the same way I had liked Shego from “Kim Possible” just a little too much. Kiyoko continues to create inspiring work to remind others that they are not alone.

Cari Fletcher (known professionally as FLETCHER) blew up a few years later, shortly after her appearance on “The X Factor.” FLETCHER influences audiences by normalizing being queer, which is how she identifies. Many people mistake her for being a lesbian (like Kiyoko), but she’s expressed how it never felt right to put a label on her sexuality. She shows that being in love is a shared experience and who you love doesn’t change the way we can all relate to being in love. Her EP “The S(ex) Tapes” is one of her most memorable works and describes raw emotions that FLETCHER experienced after going through a breakup.

A New Lesbian Anthem





Caroline Cruz Comes Out As Bi


Sen. Ted Cruz’s daughter Caroline Cruz, 13, has reportedly shared her feelings about bisexually and her father’s politics online.
Taking to social media, Cruz’s eldest daughter Caroline has gone viral for publicly sharing details of her personal life.

Cruz, who has since listed her TikTok account (@_caro_iguess_) as private, has become an internet sensation after online users realised she is the Texas senator’s daughter. The Senator has another daughter, Catherine, aged 11.

The senator teen daughter’s profile included pronouns as “she/her” and her sexuality listed as “bi”.

An online user questioned Cruz regarding her sexuality and asked whether her father knows about how she identifies.

Cruz replied below the comment: “I haven’t told him yet, I’m kinda nervous to tbh but I don’t think he would be mad about it.”

Alongside answering questions from online followers, the teen posted various videos expressing the realities of her life and has been vocal about disagreeing with her father’s well-known conservative values.

The 13-year-old recently shared a video breaking down the pros and cons of her life through a pros and cons list.

Caroline Cruz Comes Out As Bi




Using A Deadname


Back in 2020, the Supreme Court ruled that sex discrimination protections under the Civil Rights Act extended to sexual orientation and gender identity.

And a recent district court ruling reiterated that. Here’s a breakdown of the case.

Vivian Fulwood, a transgender woman, began working at a Georgia Walmart store post-transition. She dressed and presented herself as female, and requested the company call her Vivian. Walmart agreed to this, and her nametag used her requested name, however the company used her birthname on official documents.

During Fulwood’s employment, managers refused to use her requested name and instead used her deadname in both conversations with her and about her. This resulted in many employees using Fulwood’s deadname and purposely misgendering her. Fulwood would correct her colleagues, but they refused to use her requested name.

Some employees even told Fulwood they “disagreed” with her identifying as transgender and would give her a hard time about using the women’s restroom. Other colleagues would ask inappropriate questions about her transition.

Fulwood filed a complaint, but Walmart did nothing to stop the harassing behavior. Eventually, Fulwood was fired for unexcused absences — though she claimed those had been approved. She then sued Walmart for sex discrimination and harassment.

Using A Deadname



Delta's Lack of Gender Options


A mother from Arizona is calling out Delta Air Lines after she said she could not buy a plane ticket for her nonbinary child due to the airline’s lack of gender options during the booking process.

In a Twitter thread Thursday, Dawn Henry, 52, said she was trying to buy a surprise plane ticket for her adult child when she discovered Delta only provides male and female gender options. Henry’s 21-year-old child is nonbinary, meaning they identify as neither exclusively male nor female, and they have an “X” gender marker on their birth certificate and Washington state driver’s license.

This incident comes three years after Delta and other major U.S. airlines announced they would update their booking tools to be inclusive of nonbinary passengers. At least two of those other airlines — American and United — already provide a drop-down menu during the booking process that is inclusive of nonbinary travelers.

While Henry said she is still frustrated by the situation, she hopes speaking out will spark changes across the airline industry.

“I am committed to fixing this, not just for my child, but for everyone who holds legal ID with an X gender marker,” Henry told NBC News in a Twitter message. “My hope is that pressure on the airlines (not just Delta, but the others that have not updated their systems) will get this done.”

Delta's Lack of Gender Options



Spaces For Queer Students


As a University of Cincinnati (UC) economics and international affairs student, Sahana Sathiyanarayanan wanted a space to allow her to accept her sexuality. From India, Sathiyanarayanan never had the opportunity to talk about her sexuality or grow in her identity.

That changed when Sathiyanarayanan connected with her resident advisor at Morgen’s Hall, Andrew Niese, in spring of 2020. At the time, Niese had launched a new LGBTQ campus organization within UC’s Lindner College of Business, Pride at Lindner (PAL). Niese, an economics and business analytics student, encouraged Sathiyanarayanan to attend a meeting.

“I thought, this is going to my space,” said Sathiyanarayanan. “This is where I’m going to figure out who I am and I’m going to let myself accept me.”

Now, Sathiyanarayanan in her third year at UC and Niese in his fourth, PAL has expanded rapidly and welcomed LGBTQ students and allies across all of UC’s colleges. Niese and PAL’s executive team have created a community through engaging events that foster difficult discussions for LGBTQ students, including facilitating coming out conversations and issues LGBTQ campus leaders face today.

PAL’s advocacy for the LGBTQ community on campus culminated in “Loud and Proud on the Lawn,” a pride event hosted last fall on Sigma Sigma Commons in collaboration with other LGBTQ organizations at UC. With a drag show and activities for the whole UC community, the event raised money for the LGBTQ center in New Orleans.

Spaces For Queer Students



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by killersmom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

We count on you to send us your news items, questions, and nominations for posts of the day.
If you have items you’d like to see published, send them to CellarDweller115.

To subscribe to The Daily Sheet, click the “Notify” button at the top or bottom of the page.
When a new issue of TDS is posted, you will be notified by e-mail.

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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - January to March 2022
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2022, 02:12:46 PM »


Tuesday, January 25th, 2021




Remembering Heath


In 2008, Heath Ledger died just months before the release of The Dark Knight, the film which would see the actor's take on the iconic role of The Joker and deliver a performance that, for many, is the defining iteration of the DC Comics villain.  Now, 14 years after his tragic passing, fans of the actor are paying tribute to star on social media, honoring a talent gone too soon.

While Ledger is, for many, best known for his role as The Joker, a role which earned him a posthumous Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor, fans honored a wide range of his work, from lighthearted teen films such as 10 Things I Hate About You and A Knight's Tale, as well his more serious and mature roles, such as Monster's Ball and Brokeback Mountain. Many also noted how different movies might be today were Ledger still alive while others note how his influence—particularly when it comes to The Joker role—continues to this day.

Ledger may be gone, but it's clear he will not soon be forgotten. Read on to see how fans are remembering the actor on the anniversary of his passing.

Remembering Heath




Dodger Exec Marries Boyfriend on Pitcher's Mound


The Los Angeles Dodgers hosted a dream wedding for one of their own Friday and marked the progress the LGBTQ+ community has made in the sports world.

Erik Braverman, a senior vice president for the Los Angeles Dodgers, and his groom, software engineer and model Jonathan Cottrell, tied the knot at Dodger Stadium.

“We’re standing in my office right now. To be able to celebrate at Dodger Stadium and to have the biggest day of my life here, it’s like tying a nice bow around everything in my life,” said Braverman, 51.

Braverman, who joined the organization about 15 years ago, became one of the highest-ranking people in sports to publicly come out as gay in 2015.

In front of about 75 family and friends, the happy couple exchanged vows on the pitcher’s mound.

“To be able to come to the venue where I thought I would have to hide my identity, my private life, for so long and to be able to actually celebrate the biggest day of my life at the place where I work, Dodger Stadium, a historic venue, marrying the man that I love, I never envisioned this day would happen,” Braverman said.

Dodger Exec Marries Boyfriend on Pitcher's Mound



Golden Girls' Lesbian Joke


I didn’t really start watching Golden Girls until Betty White died. I mean, I am gay, so I knew enough to get along. I had the basic rubric covered, if you will: all the words to the theme song, that Blanche is… let’s say, sex positive, Sophia’s snark is legendary, Rose is ditzy and Dorothy has the all the quotable one-liners.

This is redundant to say about what’s considered one of the greatest sitcoms ever created, but I’ve been stunned — and I mean just straight up floored! — by how tight the jokes are in Golden Girls. Every refrain is a one-two punch. Watching it this month, I could barely recover from my first laugh when the next came barreling in, either a light cackled Huh or a straight up fucking screammmm. It’s also infinitely comforting — right from the earliest chords of “Thank You for Being a Friend,” which again, yes, I am the last one to the party here. I know it. Don’t judge me.

But not knowing Golden Girls isn’t the same as being lost to its looming legacy, right? I first heard the infamous “Lebanese joke” when Santana Lopez came out on Glee a decade ago. Her future girlfriend and wife, Britney, knew but the rest of the Glee Club didn’t yet. So when everyone went to perform Lady Gaga’s “Born This Way” proudly wearing black-and-white t-shits declaring what made them different, Britney makes a shirt for Santana that says “Lebanese” — Santana’s confused, “I’m Puerto Rican.”

More than a decade before that, when Ellen pretty much changed gay television as we know it (and it’s sad where we are with Ellen now, but it’s still true), she joked on the The Rosie O’Donnell Show in ’96 about coming out as “Lebanese”, even though neither comedian was out yet.

Golden Girls' Lesbian Joke





Religious Reactions to TV Character Coming Out


Mainstream media is raving about an 8-year-old boy coming out as bisexual on the popular television series “Law & Order: SVU,” but Christian organizations that specialize in entertainment believe that the development is “disappointing.” 

On last Thursday’s episode of the long-running NBC show, Capt. Olivia Benson (played by Mariska Hargitay) celebrated her on-screen son, Noah (Ryan Buggle), for sharing with her that he is bisexual.

A confrontation in school where a kid was bullied is what made Noah bring up the conversation with his mother.

“I said that I was bi,” Noah tells his mom. “And there’s no shame in being true to yourself.”

Benson replied, “That’s right, Noah,” and called his remarks to the bullies “incredibly brave.”

NBC’s “Today” show lauded the episode, suggesting that Hargitay deserved an Emmy Award for her response.

But Ted Baehr, founder of Movieguide and the Christian Film & Television Commission, a nonprofit organization dedicated to redeeming the values of the mass media, said the creators of "SVU" should know better.

Religious Reactions to TV Character Coming Out




Lia Thomas and Changing Policies


Shaking out her arms in bursts of circular punches into the air in front of her, Penn swimmer Lia Thomas stepped up to the starting blocks for her second race of the day, the 200-yard freestyle. On Saturday at Harvard's Blodgett Pool, it was quiet. And not just in the way it is before the start of a race.

Everything around Thomas had been so loud in recent weeks -- a cacophony of (mostly) criticism that began in December after her record-setting performance in Akron, Ohio, at the Zippy Invitational. Critics have argued that Thomas, a transgender woman, shouldn't be allowed to compete in the women's category.

Thomas plunged into the pool as the home crowd cheered on the Harvard swimmers and waved crimson and white pom-poms. There were no boos at the start, finish or anytime in between.

At the last meet Thomas swam, at her home pool at Penn, two protesters gathered outside with large posters. There were no protesters Saturday, though there was an increased security presence inside and outside the pool deck "out of an abundance of caution," a Harvard spokesperson said. Reporters were barred from speaking to swimmers and coaches from either team.

Thomas pushed off the wall for her final turn, and kicked toward home. She touched the wall for a time of 1 minute, 47.08 seconds, 1.36 seconds faster than second-place finisher Felicia Pasadyn of Harvard. Thomas would also finish first in the 100-yard free, and she anchored the third-place 200-yard medley team.

Lia Thomas and Changing Policies



My Partner is Asexual


As my partner Emily and I near the two-year mark of living together through myriad lockdowns, I can finally say we have found a way to manoeuvre through the tension when we circle back to that old chestnut of love life: sex. Specifically, that she functions happily as an asexual spouse and I function happily as a homosexual spouse. A mixed-orientation marriage that breeds a certain level of dysfunction. With a little help, my ace-fluid partner and I have found a few shiny little relationship devices to get us through our rockier conflicts.

Early in the pandemic, when our constant proximity to one another drove us both insane (for markedly different reasons), I ran to the store as an excuse to get some alone time. I came home with a special toy to help us both relax. Emily was well into her own excuse for alone time (a bath) when I knocked on the door, asking if we could talk. I waited the appropriate amount of time but no response. That’s when I turned the thing on and broke our angry stalemate with a bleating, comical fart sound.

Still, there are those agitations that even a fart machine doesn’t fix. Since Emily is both an extrovert and on the ace spectrum, and I am introverted and sensual, time with friends and personal space used to boost her and my mood, respectively. In the clutches of different lockdowns, I needed another avenue for support. Sadly, finding resources or even healthy depictions of asexuals in relationships can be difficult and more depressing than celebrating the holidays without your grandma.

Whether you are a supportive friend, brimming with questions or committed to an asexual (heyo!), the hunt for relationship tools is often discouraging. Fear not, though! As awareness of queer spectrum identities begins to saturate some media outlets, falling in love with an asexual person doesn’t necessarily mean the end of your relationship or your sex life.

My Partner is Asexual



R.I.P. Meat Loaf - Butch Lesbian Icon


Meat Loaf, arguably the most unlikely musician to have ever become a full-fledged pop star, has reportedly died at the age of 74. Otherwise known as Michael Lee Aday, the artist was known for his long, lush songs, largely produced in collaboration with Jim Steinman (as meticulously detailed by Chris Molanphy in a truly unmissable episode of Slate’s Hit Parade podcast). He was also known, at least by some of us, as an icon of queer masculinity—an inspirational and aspirational figure of manhood and butch lesbianism for people of all genders.

Gay and queer aesthetics are known for stepping outside of stereotypical categories for male/masculine and woman/feminine, but they often they make that step in one fairly predictable direction that we call androgyny. Androgyny is an aesthetic of masculine emotional detachment combined with feminine prettiness. What made Meat Loaf so special was that he bent these aesthetics along the opposite axis, in the way you’re not supposed to do it—sincerely, yearningly, with emotion permeating every line he sang. His trademark was an intense sincerity of delivery at war with his intentionally parodic lyrics. As a pop icon, he was the anti-Madonna; he was florid and baroque, with a solid, earthy physique grounding his excesses. Meat Loaf’s style was every bit as over the top as any pop diva, but he eschewed the ironic detached stance and sense of superiority that normally accompanies that style.

The artist’s body type—he was overweight for most of his career— was integral to this. On a thin or traditionally attractive pop star, we allow velvet, ruched, and/or ruffled costumes to be played, well, straight. These artists, dressed in melodramatic flourishes, are considered beautiful, royal, or even other-wordly. We’ve decided that we won’t force the beautiful people to reckon with just how extra all their extraness is; instead, we will celebrate them for their inhuman confidence. Meat Loaf wore these same sorts of beruffled and bedecked costumes in his stage shows, but as a fat dude, he didn’t have the option of coming across as a hot untouchable alien, and his art was so much better for it. Instead of unreachable perfection, he embraced the clownishness of his own grandiosity and, by proxy, all human grandiosity. He grounded that impulse to be grandiose in human vulnerability, emotionality, and yearning for connection.

R.I.P. Meat Loaf - Butch Lesbian Icon



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by killersmom, CellarDweller115

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Offline Annabelle

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Re: The Daily Sheet - January to March 2022
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2022, 11:15:05 PM »
Remembering Heath Ledger, a practical and down to earth person that can think through any situation or problem. Gone too soon but you will always be remembered.

Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - January to March 2022
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2022, 04:09:23 PM »


Tuesday, February 1st, 2022




William S. Hart, The Power Of The Dog, and Brokeback Mountain


Early in Thomas Savage's 1967 novel "The Power of the Dog," a fascinating sentence appears: "Phil had never seen a moving picture and by God never would, but these young fellows had magazines about the moving pictures in the bunkhouse, and a fellow name of W.S. Hart had got to be sort of their God." This would be William S. Hart, a silent film superstar who helped popularize Westerns as a genre. Through a happy accident, he looked a little like Benedict Cumberbatch, who plays Phil Burbank in Jane Campion's recent adaptation of Savage's novel by the same name.

If Phil had deigned to see any of Hart's films, he might have realized that much of the mythos that he has constructed his life around was actually a Hollywood product, one created in large part by Hart himself.

(If, unlike Phil, you want to see a moving picture starring Hart and understand why he was sort of a God, Hell's Hinges is available in full for free on YouTube. In addition to some great acting by Hart and several other silent film stars, it also features some truly impressive pyrotechnics by any standards, not just 1916s.)

Ronald L. Davis' uneven but intriguing biography "William S. Hart: Projecting the American West" is full of bonkers quotes from its subject, each more ridiculous than the last, and all obviously in the service of promoting his films as the Real Deal. Hart claimed at one point that, "I had to teach the picture people what the West was... Nobody in Hollywood knew how cowboys acted." In his own grandiose way, he wasn't lying; his fantasies of the "real" West and the cowboys who populated it did indeed become what the world knew them to be. Never mind that he had been born in upstate New York and lived in various places in the Midwest throughout his childhood, then relocated to New York City early in his acting career. Reporters were happy to print statements such as, "I know by personal experience much of the actual life of our frontier days," (in Illinois?) and didn't question his assertions that he spoke Sioux better than he did English as a child.

William S. Hart, The Power Of The Dog, and Brokeback Mountain




The Pope's Message to Parents


Pope Francis urged parents on Wednesday not to condemn their children if they are gay, in his latest gesture of outreach to the LGBTQ community which has long been marginalized by the Catholic hierarchy.

Francis spoke off the cuff during his weekly Wednesday general audience dedicated to the figure of St. Joseph, the father of Jesus. Francis said he was thinking in particular about parents who are confronted with “sad” situations in their children's lives.

Citing parents who have to cope with children who are sick, imprisoned or who get killed in car accidents, Francis added: “Parents who see that their children have different sexual orientations, how they manage that and accompany their children and not hide behind a condemning attitude.”

“Never condemn a child," he said.

Official church teaching calls for gay men and lesbians to be respected and loved, but considers homosexual activity “intrinsically disordered.” Francis, though, has sought to make the church more welcoming to gays, most famously with his 2013 comment “Who am I to judge?”

The Pope's Message to Parents



NZ Playwright Debuts Play


What does it mean to be black and gay and an immigrant living in Tāmaki Makaurau? Playwright Estelle Chout, an Afro-Caribbean queer actress attempts to answer that question in Po' Boys and Oysters, a comedy loosely based on her life.

The show was part of the Auckland Pride Festival, which has been cancelled due to the Omicron outbreak and the red traffic light setting, but will go ahead with vaccine passes and audiences of fewer than 100.

Chout also plays the starring role in the show, which was nominated for an Adam NZ Play Award last year, and will have its world premiere at Auckland’s Basement Theatre next month.

The comedy follows Mission Bay locals Flo and her wife Jo, who are in the final stages of adopting a child, and are ready to share the big news with Flo’s highly conservative big sister.

“I rarely see someone like myself – a proud black queer mother – represented on the stage,” said Chout, who was born on the Caribbean island of Martinique, and who moved to New Zealand from London six years ago.

When you’re not given a seat at the table, sometimes you have to get another table.

NZ Playwright Debuts Play





Religious Reactions to TV Character Coming Out


Mainstream media is raving about an 8-year-old boy coming out as bisexual on the popular television series “Law & Order: SVU,” but Christian organizations that specialize in entertainment believe that the development is “disappointing.” 

On last Thursday’s episode of the long-running NBC show, Capt. Olivia Benson (played by Mariska Hargitay) celebrated her on-screen son, Noah (Ryan Buggle), for sharing with her that he is bisexual.

A confrontation in school where a kid was bullied is what made Noah bring up the conversation with his mother.

“I said that I was bi,” Noah tells his mom. “And there’s no shame in being true to yourself.”

Benson replied, “That’s right, Noah,” and called his remarks to the bullies “incredibly brave.”

NBC’s “Today” show lauded the episode, suggesting that Hargitay deserved an Emmy Award for her response.

But Ted Baehr, founder of Movieguide and the Christian Film & Television Commission, a nonprofit organization dedicated to redeeming the values of the mass media, said the creators of "SVU" should know better.

Religious Reactions to TV Character Coming Out




Transgender Activist Dies


Kris Irvin was a quirky queer Latter-day Saint with an incomparable Twitter presence, a member who challenged the faith to be more accepting and showed up at church every Sunday wearing a bowtie in the colors of the transgender flag and a lapel covered with rainbow pins.

Some would question why Irvin continued to attend, especially after church leaders had threatened to oust them for going ahead with breast-removal surgery to give them a more masculine frame (although that discipline never came). Those who knew Irvin, though, say it was driven by a real belief — and a lot of stubbornness — that things would get better for LGBTQ members like them who love the faith.

Irvin died Sunday, Jan. 23, from causes unspecified by family. But they left behind a legacy of creating a space for members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who don’t feel like they belong.

“I’m there to show queer LDS kids that it’s possible to be trans and be LDS,” said Irvin, who used the nonbinary pronouns they and them, in an interview with The Salt Lake Tribune in September 2019, in comments not previously published. “Even when things are hard and even when people are transphobic or negative or judgmental, this is one reason why I’m still there.”

The 35-year-old Irvin accepted the contradiction of their identity and their faith and chose to live in the gray area, which they arguably made more colorful.

Transgender Activist Dies



Teaching Students About Pronouns


“Are you a boy or a girl?” My fifth grade student asked me earnestly at the end of the first day of the after-school game design class I teach.

I chuckled, caught off guard by the question. “Neither of those words really fits me,” I told her. “I’m non-binary, which means I don’t identify as a boy or a girl.”

“Is that like a tomboy?” she asked.

“Sort of like that. But sometimes tomboys identify as girls,” I explained. “I don’t fit in that category.”

Another student overheard our conversation and announced to the room: “Whatever you are, tomboy, tomgirl, gay, straight, you are welcome here!”

Though I identify as non-binary, I had not made a habit of sharing this information in my classrooms. I was not out at the school where I taught previously — after being mocked by former co-workers when I mentioned my discomfort with the gendered honorific “Ms.,” I felt exhausted by the prospect of being vocal about my identity at work. I still sought to be an advocate for queer students: I constantly corrected co-workers who misgendered trans and non-binary students. I confronted teachers who joked about queerness as a mental illness. I pushed for reading materials that included LGBTQ representation (unfortunately, to little avail). Ultimately, the fatigue of pressing for inclusivity in an unyielding environment led me to look for work elsewhere.

Teaching Students About Pronouns



LGBTQ Community And Allies Working Together


Back in 2008, in the wake of Proposition 8 and the loss of marriage equality in California, a group of friends in Los Angeles decided to take action.

Inspired by Harvey Milk’s message of reaching beyond the LGBTQ+ community through acts of service and kindness, Gay for Good has since expanded into a national organization.

Through its now 18 chapters across the country, Gay for Good unites LGBTQ+ people and their allies to local nonprofits, essentially providing volunteers to help meet the needs of each partner organization during specific service events.

Gay for Good’s Orange County and Long Beach chapter has worked with organizations including Long Beach Community Table, Love in the Mirror, and the AIDS Food Store. Volunteers have participated in Veterans Day events, rebuilt a community garden, and cleaned an animal shelter, just to name a few of their past endeavors.

“We try to mix it up so that there’s a nice mix of projects throughout the year and so we’re supporting a lot of different communities, and not just putting all of our efforts into let’s say, food insecurity, or all of our efforts into homelessness prevention,” said Anne Friedman, Gay for Good’s executive director.

Gay for Good aims to create lasting partnerships with other local nonprofits, often providing anywhere from 10 to 50 volunteers per event.

LGBTQ Community And Allies Working Together



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: lislis, fritzkep, CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by killersmom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - January to March 2022
« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2022, 04:30:02 PM »


Tuesday, February 8th, 2022




The Latest Joker at DC Comics


DC Comics debuted its newest Joker in Jurassic League, a limited series that reimagines the Justice League as dinosaurs.

Written by Daniel Warren Johnson (Extremity, Wonder Woman: Dead Earth) and drawn by Juan Gedeon (Pennyworth, Venom), Jurassic League is a six-issue limited series that reimagines the heroes of the Justice League as dinosaurs. Of course, where there are heroes, there are also villains, with this version of the Joker modeled after Ledger's iconic portrayal in The Dark Knight. "Joker had to be crazy, sneaky, colorful, unpredictable and dangerous. And cool but kinda disgusting to some degree, so I thought of Vertigo from Primal Rage," Gedeon told Polygon. "But since she's a made-up dino her 'real' equivalent to me would be a dilophosaurus or an oviraptor. I added the green hair and some sort of 'wings' inspired by Heath Ledger's Joker."

Gedeon explained that when designing the prehistoric heroes, he "tried to pick a dino that captured the essence of their human counterpart to use as base." While Joker is a violent and dangerous carnivore, Wonder Woman is represented as a triceratops, a herbivore that is strong enough to "defeat a T-rex." Superman is a "solid and strong" brachiosaurus, while Batman -- or "Batsaur" in the series -- is a carnivorous allosaurus.

"Jurassic League is all I want to draw: dinos and epic fights," said Gedeon. "My own version of a 90s cartoon or videogame. Expect a story about survival, unity and hope where the strong protect the weak in a world where danger lurks in every corner." Johnson and Gedeon said that the concept for the series was inspired by their shared love of franchises starring anthropomorphized creatures, like Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Street Sharks.

The Latest Joker at DC Comics




America's Acceptance of Gay People


The percentage of Americans who say they are satisfied with the acceptance of gay and lesbian people in the country has reached a new peak of 62%, according to a poll released Wednesday.

Gallup's annual Mood of the Nation poll asks people about their satisfaction with aspects of U.S. life and policy areas, ranging from the overall quality of life to the nation’s military strength and environmental issues.

Americans' satisfaction with the acceptance of gay and lesbian people stood out in the 2022 poll because it reached the highest level the nation has seen since Gallup started tracking the trend in 2001, though the peak is statistically similar to 2016 levels.

Poll respondents also reported a greater level of satisfaction with acceptance of gay and lesbian people than any of the 20 other issues Gallup tracked this year.

And while satisfaction on many of the other issues decreased this year, the numbers on gay and lesbian individuals grew substantially: In 2022, 62% of survey respondents said they were very or somewhat satisfied with the acceptance of gays and lesbians in the nation, up from 55% in 2021 and 56% in 2020. 

America's Acceptance of Gay People



Whitney Houston's Secret


Whitney Houston was the perfect face for the MTV-dominated 1980s, “a glamorous showgirl shaped by a Svengali” – the powerful Arista Records producer Clive Davis.

But she also possessed a deep, dark secret: she was a closeted lesbian, writes author Gerrick Kennedy in his new book, “Didn’t We Almost Have It All: In Defense of Whitney Houston” (Abrams Press), out Tuesday.

Feeling pressure to conform to her strict religious upbringing and the norms of the time, Whitney hid her sexuality from the public till her tragic death, which happened 10 years ago this week.

“Because her music didn’t fit squarely in the boxes expected of a Black girl making music in the ’80s, she was seen as not Black enough. She was ridiculed. Brandished ‘Whitey’ — and endured endless speculation on her sexuality,” the author notes.

Raised in Newark, NJ, Whitney was under the thumb of her mother, Cissy, a devout church member of Newark’s New Hope Baptist Church and a member of the gospel singing clan, the Drinkard Sisters.

The Drinkards played the “Chitlin’ Circuit,” performing at black venues throughout the South. Cissy was a star in her own right — singing backup to the King himself, Elvis Presley, and Aretha Franklin, the Queen of Soul.

Whitney Houston's Secret





Bisexual Representation In Movies


OutsideOutside of experiencing attraction to two or more genders, there is no universal bisexual experience. But our shared sense of self-inflicted humor can sometimes feel pretty close to one — community in-jokes abound about how we sit, what we wear, and what movies we watch. The memes about what it means to be bi seem endless, but they serve a purpose: They’ve created an online community in a world that encourages queer loneliness. People who are closeted, in a rural area, or disabled — or for that matter, in a pandemic — may not have access to a physical community. But making, liking, or sharing memes about being bi lets us in on a joke that suggests a common experience, and makes us feel less alone.

Similarly, we’ve been building a cultural canon. Bisexual people online often claim specific films as “bisexual movies,” regardless of the presence of bisexual plotlines, characters, or actors onscreen. There isn’t a comprehensive definition of a bi movie, because there isn’t one reason for films to be designated as bi movies, other than that bisexuals have watched them and claimed them, at least semi-jokingly. This weird tongue-in-cheek social-media movie canon is both a mirror showing us how we collectively connect to film, and a magnifying glass, showing us how film continues to fail us.

Two films in social media’s bi movie canon outshine the rest: 1999’s The Mummy and 2017’s Thor: Ragnarok. A multitude of headlines have lauded Thor: Ragnarok as a “bisexual anthem film,” “bisexual masterpiece,” and one of the “10 Most Bisexual Things You Can Watch on Netflix Right Now.” That puts it up against shows and movies with openly bi characters who kiss, have sex, and use the word “bisexual.” As one virally spread (but now deleted) tweet joked, “The gays have Love, Simon. The straights have To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before. The bisexuals have Thor: Ragnarok.” Other memes soon followed. Similarly, a new bisexual Mummy meme rolls around every few months. The most famous is perhaps “No one is ‘born bi,’ you watch The Mummy at a formative age and the whole cast turns you bi.”

Bisexual Representation In Movies




Environmentalist Groups and Transgender Rights


Max Wilbert, standing on a hill overlooking a wide plain of brush and farmland, walks over to a black banner that’s grabbed a lot of media attention.

In blood-red letters, the banner reads, “Lithium Lies.”

Here in Nevada, activists like Wilbert are fighting against the largest lithium mine set for development in the United States. The mine is in the final stages of permits, and the lithium pulled from the ground here could fuel batteries for electric vehicles sold in the United States.

But the grassroots movement against the project has been torn apart over an unrelated but volatile issue: transgender rights.

Two of the lead activists — Wilbert and fellow protester Will Falk — are part of a self-described “radical environmental” group, Deep Green Resistance, whose goal is to dismantle industrial civilization to save the planet.

But beyond its environmental agenda, Deep Green Resistance also identifies as a “radical feminist organization.” This means, for example, that members oppose opening up women-only spaces like bathrooms to transgender women, whom the group’s website refers to as “people born male.”

Environmentalist Groups and Transgender Rights



Growing Up As Asexual


My friends gathered in a circle and whispered amongst each other. We were sixteen, and they were talking about datable boys in our classes: who was the smartest, the funniest, or the tallest. This was a social ritual of being a teenager: talking about romantic interests and fawning over the idea of spending time with them. I felt pressured to be “normal” when I had no desire to date and little interest in physical intimacy. I assumed my perspective would change to reflect those of my peers.

In America, maturity as a young adult is equated with sexual experience. I felt immature and wondered if I was missing out. Sex is seen as an entry ticket to adulthood, you aren’t an adult until you’ve had sex. Contrary to what’s portrayed in pop culture, my time at college was not filled with sexual escapades. I was content to work on personal projects and hang out with a small group of friends. One of them tried taking me to the bar and another one referred to me as “alien-like” after being the last from our group to not be in a relationship.

I’m a Mexican immigrant raised in Catholic household. Despite my family’s views on sexuality, I did not have the same reservations. I just didn’t have an interest in sex, and that’s the simplest way I can explain it. It occasionally crossed my mind as something that I should want to explore, but felt like a chore part of my to-do list.

After my best friend got engaged, I started to worry and began to avoid the subject of sex when it was my turn to share. Was there something wrong with me? I tried attributing these emotions to depression or trauma. There must have been a logical explanation. I went to therapy and tried activities meant to encourage interest in sex. I tried having sex with strangers for the hell of it. I quickly learned that hookup culture was not for me. I had hoped each time would be better.

Growing Up As Asexual



Advocates Stand Against Bill


Activists are worried about the consequences that a proposed law could have on students in Florida public schools who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, or who are questioning their sexuality.

Florida’s proposed Parental Rights in Education bill, better known as the so-called “Don’t Say Gay” law, aims to ban talking about gender identity or sexual orientation at schools.

North Miami Councilmember Scott Galvin is the executive director of Safe Schools South Florida, an organization with the goal of preventing the bullying of LGBTQ youth.

“The legislation that is being proposed, the ones that we are here to fight tonight, are rolling back the clock,” Galvin said from behind a podium at a rally against the bill on Tuesday night in Wilton Manors.

Sen. Dennis Baxley, R-Ocala, filed it as SB 1834 on Jan. 7, and Rep. Joe Harding, R-Williston, filed it as HB 1557 on Jan. 11. The bill aims to allow parents to file lawsuits if the topics are discussed in school.

Jon Harris Maurer, Equality Florida’s public policy director, was at the House education and employment committee hearing that moved the bill forward on Jan. 21.

Advocates Stand Against Bill



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by killersmom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - January to March 2022
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2022, 03:52:10 PM »


Tuesday, February 15th, 2022




Gustavo Santaolalla At UCLA


UCLA's Center for the Art of Performance (CAP UCLA) presents Oscar-winning musician, film composer and producer Gustavo Santaolalla as part of the Desandando el Camino tour on Thursday, March 17 at 8 p.m. in Royce Hall. Tickets starting at $39 are available now at cap.ucla.edu, 310-825-2101 and the Royce Hall box office.

Accompanied by his band, SantaBanda (Barbarita Palacios, Javier Casalla, Nicolás Rainone, Pablo Gonzalez and Andres Beeuwsaert), Santaolalla will perform music from throughout his career. His style mixes genres ranging from traditional music of Argentina, tango to minimalism, electronica and progressive rock. The evening will feature work from some of Santaolalla's solo albums, contributions to movies, as well as music he composed for The Last of Us, recently voted one of the best video games in history. Santaolalla also composed the music for Finch (starring Tom Hanks). This event is an intimate survey of a towering artist.

A gifted multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, producer and composer, Santaolalla is recognized as one of the most highly acclaimed and prolific contemporary Argentine musicians in the world, distinguished for his work composing film scores, which combine South American Andean folk influences with his rock guitar roots to create sparse yet emotive compositions. The winner of two Oscars for Best Original Score for Brokeback Mountain and Babel, he has also written music for Alejandro González Iñárritu's Amores Perros and 21 Grams; Walter Salles' Motorcycle Diaries and On the Road; HBO's Deadwood; and Netflix's Narcos Mexico. Santaolalla has produced more than 100 albums by some of Latin America's most popular and relevant alternative musicians including Café Tacuba, Julieta Venegas, Molotov, Juana Molina and Juanes, and has received two Grammy and 18 Latin Grammy Awards.

Gustavo Santaolalla At UCLA




Don't Say "Gay" in Florida


Being an LGBTQ young person can be tough. Depending on where you live and whether or not you have access to a supportive community, the world can be a very lonely place.

As leaders in two LGBTQ organizations, we've been astonished to witness the progress we have made over the last decade. But it's also clear that our community's increased visibility has led to a backlash. There are currently more than 100 anti-LGBTQ bills -- the majority of which target transgender and nonbinary youth -- moving through state legislatures across the country, according to the American Civil Liberties Union.

One of the most extreme examples is a piece of legislation in Florida known as the "Don't Say Gay" bill. It states school districts "may not encourage discussion about sexual orientation or gender identity in primary grade levels or in a manner that is not age-appropriate or developmentally appropriate for students." The language, which is vague and could apply to K-12 classrooms across Florida, could be used to prohibit open discussions of LGBTQ people and issues.

If passed, it would effectively erase entire chapters of history, literature, and critical health information in schools -- and silence LGBTQ students and those with LGBTQ parents or family members. It's just one of several divisive and dehumanizing bills in Florida that use LGBTQ youth as political pawns to limit conversations about gender and sexual identity.

Let's be clear: The "Don't Say Gay" bill will do real and lasting harm. All students should learn about the LGBTQ community's important contributions to US history and culture. Landmark events, ranging from the Stonewall Riots to Supreme Court decisions in cases such as Obergefell v. Hodges and Bostock v. Clayton County, should be included in any comprehensive lesson plan on modern history and civil rights movements.

Don't Say "Gay" in Florida



China Censors "Friends"


Major Chinese streaming platforms have censored an LGBTQ plotline in the popular TV series "Friends," causing fans of the show to express their anger on social media.

In the first episode, conversations regarding the character Ross's ex-wife, Carol Willick, who divorces him after realizing she is a lesbian, were deleted. Other conversations that were sexually suggestive were also edited out.

In the original version, Ross mentions that "there was only one woman" for Carol, who leaves him for her friend Susan Bunch, while his friend Joey asks him if he ever knew she was a lesbian.

"Friends," which stars Jennifer Aniston, Courteney Cox, Lisa Kudrow, Matt LeBlanc, Matthew Perry and David Schwimmer as six friends living in New York City, is wildly popular in China with a hugely loyal fan base.

The show debuted on Chinese streaming platforms Sohu video and iQiyi in 2012 without any censorship, and this was available to watch until its streaming agreement ended in 2013.

Following the burgeoning popularity of the 2021 special 'Friends: The Reunion', which saw the six main actors come together to reminisce about the show, Chinese streaming platforms together purchased the broadcasting rights to the show.

China Censors "Friends"





Peacemaker Is Bisexual


First comes Loki, then comes Peacemaker.

In a pivotal scene from yesterday’s seventh episode of his eight-episode HBO Max series, Peacemaker (a.k.a. Christopher Smith, played by John Cena) is fighting his father, a white supremacist supervillain named The White Dragon. His father has hated him ever since he was a young boy, and during their fight, we finally find out why.

As the White Dragon is beating up Peacemaker while surrounded by a group of his racist cohorts, he starts shouting at Peacemaker, telling him everything he did wrong in his eyes.

“I knew you was unclean when you was born. And even more so when you killed your brother,” The White Dragon says. “I knew when you listened to that devil music. I knew when you shaved your body like a woman. I knew when you slept with the whores of polluted blood! And men!”

Yeah, he just said that.  Honestly, in the moment, we couldn’t help but be reminded of another antihero coming out from a recent show: Loki.

Just like Loki has both his “princesses and princes,” Peacemaker has his “whores of polluted blood and men.” Sometimes all it takes is a single line of dialogue to confirm your lead character is bi, and then you don’t have to do anything else. (Right, Disney?)

Peacemaker Is Bisexual




Republican Blocks Transgender Healthcare Ban


An Arizona Republican state senator broke with his party this week, blocking legislation that would have banned gender-affirming care for transgender youth.

State Sen. Tyler Pace voted Wednesday with three Democrats on the Arizona Legislature’s Health and Human Services Committee, splitting the vote 4-4 and effectively killing the bill. Pace said that while he sees "both sides," he was ultimately swayed by personal stories from LGBTQ youths and their families.

"The testimonies we heard today about the many people who are using these avenues of medical treatments to save lives, to improve lives," he said during the committee hearing, "I don't want my vote to stop those great things."

The lone Republican lawmaker's break from his party diverged from the nationwide push by conservative lawmakers to enact a series of bills that critics argue unfairly discriminate against gay and trans Americans.

Following what advocates described as the “worst year for anti-LGBTQ legislation” in modern history, Republican state lawmakers have filed more than 160 anti-LGBTQ bills this year, according to nonprofit Freedom for All Americans. The majority of the bills, 92 of them, target trans people.

Republican Blocks Transgender Healthcare Ban



First Openly Intersex Mayor


In 2011, Hobsons Bay councillor Tony Briffa became the world’s first openly intersex mayor.

Now Cr Briffa features on a new mural and interactive project in Fitzroy called Queer-ways – by artists LUCIANO and Georgia Keats – that maps important moments in history for Victoria’s LGBTQI+ communities.

“It was funny because I’d set up a website just for my local constituents and I’d had a quarter of a million hits within the first 24 hours of becoming mayor,” Cr Briffa says. “I was completely oblivious to the interest.”

Cr Briffa, who was born with male and female sex characteristics, was raised as a girl and had her underdeveloped internal testes removed without her consent when she was seven.

Growing up being made to feel like a freak, she decided after a serious motorbike accident when she was 27 to speak publicly about having an intersex variation known as androgen insensitivity syndrome.

“Until then, having intersex variation was something that I was told to not tell anyone. Even my twin sister didn’t know that I didn’t get periods and that I couldn’t have children. After that accident, I thought, ‘You know what, I’m not going to lie about this any more. I’m just going to be me’.”

First Openly Intersex Mayor



Rabbi Mike Moskowitz


Sharon Kleinbaum—senior rabbi of Congregation Beit Simchat Torah in New York, historically founded for LGBTQ Jews—first met Mike Moskowitz, an Orthodox rabbi, in January 2017 at a Washington, D.C., protest over the treatment of DACA recipients and other immigrants. They were both arrested in the Senate, along with almost 100 Jewish activists. The protesters were handcuffed and loaded into police vans. Kleinbaum ended up sitting across from Moskowitz and became curious about the Haredi man in front of her.

When the group decided to pass the time by sharing words of Torah, Moskowitz was the first to raise his hand. “I didn’t expect much from Mike,” Kleinbaum said. “But then he gave a pro-LGBTQ drash—specifically focused on trans issues, and connected it to Hanukkah. He blew me away.” By 2018, Kleinbaum hired him as the scholar-in-residence for trans and queer Jewish studies at CBST.

Moskowitz sees no contradiction being both a Torah-centric Jew and what he calls a “radical progressive.” He has been a persistent presence on the frontlines of allyship and advocacy for the LGBTQ community.

“It is no small thing to have a cisgender, ultra-Orthodox, straight rabbi on the staff of a queer synagogue,” said Idit Klein, president and CEO of Keshet: For LGBTQ Equality in Jewish Life. “Mike spoke out publicly, and he suffered the financial and professional consequences of becoming an outspoken activist for LGBTQ rights. Yet, he continues to do so in a way that is profoundly and consistently grounded in Jewish tradition.”

Rabbi Mike Moskowitz



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Re: The Daily Sheet - January to March 2022
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2022, 12:23:51 PM »


Tuesday, February 22nd, 2022




Tobey's Influence on Jake


Jake Gyllenhaal reveals Tobey Maguire's unique acting approach that inspired him on the set of Brothers. Released in 2009, Brothers tells the story of Army Captain Sam Cahill (Maguire), who is shot down and presumed dead while on a tour in Afghanistan, leading his brother, Tommy (Gyllenhaal), to begin caring for Sam's family. When Sam is revealed to still be alive, he returns home but has trouble reconnecting with his wife, played by Natalie Portman, due to the unthinkable experiences he endured while being held captive.

Made for $26 million, Brothers earned just over $43 million at the box office, making it a relative success. The film currently holds a 64% on Rotten Tomatoes, with critics praising the intensely emotional performances of Maguire, Gyllenhaal, and Portman. Maguire, in particular, goes to some dark places in the film's third act as he portrays Sam crumbling under the weight of the disturbing things he was forced to do while in captivity. Brothers is a remake of a 2004 Danish film of the same name and is written by David Benioff, who is now well known for his work on the hit HBO series, Game of Thrones.

In a new interview with Esquire, Gyllenhaal reflects on his experience making Brothers and reveals that his co-star, Maguire, inspired him to change his approach to acting. At the behest of director Jim Sheridan, Maguire immersed himself in the world of PTSD-stricken war veterans, going to great lengths to achieve his intense performance. After seeing the lengths Maguire was going in order to get into character, Gyllenhaal decided to emulate that for his own approach.

Maguire evidently went to some dark places to prepare for his role in Brothers, something that Gyllenhaal seems to have taken to heart not only for his own role in that film but in his films moving forward. Since appearing in Brothers, Gyllenhaal has similarly committed to a number of very intense performances in the likes of Prisoners, End of Watch, and Nightcrawler, all of which saw the actor fully immerse himself in the world of the character he was portraying, often involving exposing himself to various forms of trauma as preparation.

Tobey's Influence on Jake




LGBTQ Kids Feel 'Erased'


Students have repeatedly vandalized Pride posters at Spencer Lyst’s high school in Williamson County, Tennessee. Teachers have skipped over LGBTQ issues in class textbooks. Trans kids in his state have been legally barred from competing on school sports teams that align with their gender identity. Parents have called on school officials to remove books about sexual orientation and gender identity from the county’s elementary curriculum. And while leading his school’s Pride club at a September homecoming parade, Lyst and other LGBTQ students were booed by a group of parents.

“I’m so used to it, but it shouldn’t be something I have to think about,” Lyst, 16, said of the near-constant feeling of being attacked at school because of his identity.

He even said it’s “difficult” to walk into the school bathroom for fear of what or who “might be in there.”

“Like, can I go to the bathroom or am I going to get hate for just existing?” he said.

Lyst’s school experience is a far cry from an isolated case.

Since the start of the school year, school officials in states across the country have banned books about gay and trans experiences, removed LGBTQ-affirming posters and flags and disbanded gay-straight alliance clubs. In school districts throughout the nation, students have attacked their queer classmates, while state lawmakers have filed hundreds of anti-LGBTQ bills with many seeking to redefine lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer students’ places in U.S. schools.

LGBTQ Kids Feel 'Erased'



A Broadcast First


For the first time, lesbians outnumber gay men among broadcast television’s LGBTQ characters, according to a report released Thursday from the queer media advocacy group GLAAD.

In its annual “Where We Are on TV” report, GLAAD, which started analyzing LGBTQ representation on TV in 1996, found that queer women represent 56 of the 141 LGBTQ characters on scripted broadcast programs, or 40 percent, in the current 2021-2022 TV season. Gay male characters represent 49 of the total queer characters, or nearly 35 percent, on the five major broadcasters — ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX and The CW. The NBC broadcast channel and NBC News are both part of Comcast-NBCUniversal.

“It’s important to see equity even within our own marginalized community,” GLAAD President and CEO Sarah Kate Ellis told NBC News. “So to see women be so front and center is a sign for me that there is progress, that we are moving forward.”

Lesbian representation was given a boost on broadcast TV with the premiere of shows such as ABC’s “Queens,” CBS’ “NCIS: Hawai’i,” NBC’s “Law & Order: Organized Crime” and Fox’s “Pivoting” and “Our Kind of People.”

Javicia Leslie, a bisexual actor who plays the titular lesbian superhero in the CW series “Batwoman,” attributed the uptick in lesbian representation to the onset of the #MeToo movement in 2017.

A Broadcast First





John Cena Made Peacemaker Bi


HBO Max's Peacemaker just confirmed that Christopher Smith is bisexual, and James Gunn has credited John Cena for making that decision about his character.

In an interview with Empire magazine, hitting newsstands on February 17, per SlashFilm, Peacemaker creator James Gunn revealed that the idea to turn the series' titular anti-hero into a bisexual character was one that developed naturally when John Cena stepped back into the role of the violent vigilante to lead his own solo series on HBO Max.

"Peacemaker is an interesting character because he's so f*****-up in so many ways, and then in other ways, he is kind of weirdly forward-thinking," Gunn explained. "John does improv all the time, and he just turned Christopher Smith into this hyper-sexualized dude that is open to anything sexually. I was surprised by that. But I thought, 'I guess it makes sense that this guy isn't one-dimensional.'"

Cena determined that Peacemaker would be bisexual by reflecting on the history of his character and the struggles that he faced throughout his bleak upbringing, which is when the realization hit that his past experiences would most likely have broadened his mind and made him "willing to do anything" to a certain extent.

"We see in the show that he doesn't have any issues with sexuality," Gunn said, acknowledging that the series dropped more than a few hints about Peacemaker's bisexuality before confirmation arrived in the penultimate episode. "As long as you're not f****** animals — that he's not into. But besides that, he's pretty open. And yet other things he's completely close-minded on."

John Cena Made Peacemaker Bi




Judges Side With Transgender Man


An appeals court on Wednesday ruled in favor of a transgender man who sought to seal his name change from the public record, declaring transgender people deserve privacy and protection from the harms that could arise from publicizing their name changes.

Superior Court Judge Michael J. Haas, writing for a unanimous three-judge appellate panel, overturned a lower court’s 2020 decision that would have required the Mercer County man, identified as A.B.C. in court records, to publish his new name and deadname in a newspaper. The lower court judge also refused to seal court records to avoid public disclosure of the man’s name and transgender identity.

A.B.C.’s name change has “no meaningful public interest,” Haas wrote.

“It is difficult to imagine a more intimate, personal, and private matter than whether a person’s gender identity conforms with the sex they were assigned at birth, typically based upon the existence and appearance of their reproductive organs, and their chromosomal makeup,” the ruling says.

Attorney Celeste Fiore, who represented A.B.C., called the ruling an example of “New Jersey law being at the forefront of equal rights nationwide.”

“These are some of the strongest statements by the courts describing the privacy interests, but also the human rights interests, in a transgender person having control over who knows things about their identity,” Fiore said.

Judges Side With Transgender Man



Timothy LeDuc Makes History


Timothy LeDuc made history on Friday as the first openly non-binary Olympian to compete in the Winter Games, and the American pairs figure skater hopes to pave the way for others to enter the sport without being bound by gender stereotypes.

Competing in a discipline where the traditional male-female dynamic is usually unabashedly on full display had been a challenge for LeDuc as well as pairs partner Ashley Cain-Gribble, who has spoken about being "body shamed" as a taller-than-average female skater. 

"It was such a joyous moment for us out there today," LeDuc, who began using the they/them pronouns in 2021, said after the pair skated to their season's best score of 74.13 in the short program at the 2022 Winter Olympics.

"I think both Ashley and I have had to overcome so many different things so many times when people have told us no or that we don't belong," LeDuc said. The pair advance to the final free skate on Saturday after placing seventh in the short program.   "Both Ashley and I, we had something to prove today. I hope people watching us feel like maybe there is space for them to come into figure skating. And for them to be able to celebrate what makes them unique and different."

LeDuc said many people had reached out with words of support and gratitude.

Timothy LeDuc Makes History



Rabbi Mike Moskowitz


Sharon Kleinbaum—senior rabbi of Congregation Beit Simchat Torah in New York, historically founded for LGBTQ Jews—first met Mike Moskowitz, an Orthodox rabbi, in January 2017 at a Washington, D.C., protest over the treatment of DACA recipients and other immigrants. They were both arrested in the Senate, along with almost 100 Jewish activists. The protesters were handcuffed and loaded into police vans. Kleinbaum ended up sitting across from Moskowitz and became curious about the Haredi man in front of her.

When the group decided to pass the time by sharing words of Torah, Moskowitz was the first to raise his hand. “I didn’t expect much from Mike,” Kleinbaum said. “But then he gave a pro-LGBTQ drash—specifically focused on trans issues, and connected it to Hanukkah. He blew me away.” By 2018, Kleinbaum hired him as the scholar-in-residence for trans and queer Jewish studies at CBST.

Moskowitz sees no contradiction being both a Torah-centric Jew and what he calls a “radical progressive.” He has been a persistent presence on the frontlines of allyship and advocacy for the LGBTQ community.

“It is no small thing to have a cisgender, ultra-Orthodox, straight rabbi on the staff of a queer synagogue,” said Idit Klein, president and CEO of Keshet: For LGBTQ Equality in Jewish Life. “Mike spoke out publicly, and he suffered the financial and professional consequences of becoming an outspoken activist for LGBTQ rights. Yet, he continues to do so in a way that is profoundly and consistently grounded in Jewish tradition.”

Rabbi Mike Moskowitz



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by killersmom, CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - January to March 2022
« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2022, 03:34:41 PM »


Tuesday, March 1st, 2022




"Dark Knight" Deleted Scene


A deleted scene from Christopher Nolan’s iconic 2008 superhero film The Dark Knight has resurfaced and fans think it should have been kept in as it truly portrays how twisted Heath Ledger's Joker was.

The scene shows the Joker blow up the fictional Gotham General Hospital and escape in a school bus.

As the bus drives away, Ledger's character is seen sitting calm with a slight smile on his face as he passes more and more explosions that are causing utter devastation - none of which are phasing him at all. Some think the deleted scene captures The Joker’s character perfectly.

One wrote: “The way Ledger SMILES when the hospital is being blown up is definitely disturbing!!"

“I like Phoenix, but Ledger STILL takes the top spot for me."

“What a screwed up guy his Joker was! It's a real shame we never got a solo film from Heath.”

Fan Kekoa Eddington wrote: “That should've been in the movie that scene alone was marvellous."

“The way you can see the explosions in the windows of the bus and the way joker isn't even looking at the destruction he has caused is just epic as hell.”

"Dark Knight" Deleted Scene




"From Outside The Closet"


Anne Considine bristles when people tell her, if their child was gay, it'd be "no big deal".

She finds it diminishing. "It's well meaning, but I feel it disrespects what my boys went through," she says.

Anne should know. Not one, but two of her sons are gay. Chris, 33, came out to Anne when he was 19. His brother Anthony, 31, came out six years later.

Coming out to your parents is a huge moment in a child's life, but it can be a difficult mental and emotional shift for parents, too — even if they've gone through it before. Families like Anne's with several gay siblings often grapple with unique challenges as they navigate the coming out process — issues she explores in her new book, From Outside the Closet.

"Until that person is standing in my shoes, they have no idea how they'll react," Anne writes.

"As a mother, all I could think about at first was their mental health, discrimination, HIV, the party, alcohol and drug scene and the difficulty of finding a partner in a diminished dating pool."

"From Outside The Closet"



Lesbian Couple Force From Home


A lesbian couple suffered homophobic abuse in a hate campaign that forced them to leave their home after a neighbour spotted them kissing through their living room window.

Kim Armstrong, 63, harassed nurse Faye Mallon, 26, and her 27-year-old counsellor girlfriend Lydia Henshall to such an extent that Faye was forced off work with anxiety, and they quit their home in Stockport.

The dad-of-two would regularly hit the couple's car with his, while his other attempts to intimidate included filling their wheelie bin with medical waste and abusive comments like "fat lesbians", "f ** weirdos" and "naughty disrespectful girls".

Armstrong was ordered to obey a three-month electronically tagged 7pm-to-7am curfew, told to complete 20 days of rehab, given a 12-month community order and told to pay £395 in costs and surcharges by Stockport JPs after admitting harassment.

Lydia said their neighbour was "trying to make our lives as uncomfortable as possible in an attempt to make us move".

She said: "We loved our home and we have spent a lot of money on it and we should not feel like we are being forced out of it. I want to enjoy life without having to constantly check cameras and wonder what is going to happen next."

Lesbian Couple Force From Home





Navigating My Bisexuality


I’ve been obsessed with Audrey Hepburn for as long as I can remember. It started in the greenness of youth, sauntering around the bookstore the starting year of college, in the only proper mall Bangalore had back then. I would peruse the gold-trimmed editions in the classics aisle, and (guiltily) the poppy pink covers of the chick-lit shelves, eventually gravitating to the stationery floor. The fluorescent-lit space was peppered with spiral-bound notebooks, diaries with heart-shaped locks, posters of bygone boybands. And in the deluge of journals and postcards, I would pull out anything with Audrey’s face on it. A poster with her in her dark unitard from Funny Face. A pastel daybook with a line drawing with her signature frame from Breakfast at Tiffany’s. A photo journal about her growing years by Taschen. I began to create my own Audrey section, tucked away behind a badly illustrated children’s book that had gathered a thin sheen of dust. And whenever I could, I would come back and look at them.

It was 2009, a time in life when gay men were still treated as a moving punchline in Bollywood films, and gay women were perceived as buzzcuts with biker jackets. It was a world that seemed removed from mine, save the connection that came from having just one close, non-binary friend. I didn’t have the tools to know it then, but Audrey was my first real crush… on a woman.

It seemed then a quirk of my girlhood — women often idolise other women, especially women that embodied who they’d like to be. Audrey was, in many ways, that epitomisation: Beautiful, graceful, smart, compassionate. A role model, at eighteen, it certainly seemed like the right reason to be so terribly taken by her. And, to my friends, it was simply that — an adorable love that proved helpful when they had a birthday gift to give. Over a decade, I’ve raked up Audrey biographies, coasters, keychains, cups — wealth enough to open an unofficial gift shop. But it took me years to realise it was more than that. More than just simply admiration for a beautiful woman. More than platonic love.

Navigating My Bisexuality




Moving To Protect Her Daughter


A Texas mom is doing whatever it takes to keep her transgender child safe -- even if that requires picking up their lives, leaving family and friends behind and moving hundreds of miles west.

In a legal opinion released publicly on Tuesday, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton declared that gender-affirming surgical procedures in children and prescribing drugs that affect puberty are to be considered "child abuse," a claim many have viewed as an attack on transgender children.

Violet, who is a Dallas resident with her 6-year-old transgender daughter, Isa, said that news reaffirmed her decision to move her family to California to keep Isa safe and healthy.  CNN is withholding both Violet and Isa's last name to protect their privacy.

"There's pretty much nothing that could keep us here," Violet said. "The general feeling (in Texas) is just constant fear. I'm always worried that she's going to accidentally say something about her penis in public, because that has happened, and I see the way people react to us which is why Texas hasn't really ever felt safe...it's just time for us to get out and I want to be somewhere there are actually laws in the books that protect her instead of trying to erase her."

Paxton's opinion says anyone -- including parents, doctors or teachers -- who has "reasonable cause" to believe such "abuse" is taking place must report it to authorities within 48 hours. Failure to report it "is a criminal offense," the opinion states, citing Texas "family code."

Moving To Protect Her Daughter



Asexuality and Sex Ed


Last week, education ministers across the country agreed to a raft of national health curriculum changes that would explicitly address issues of consent in sexual relationships.

Such changes come after an explosion in the national discourse last year regarding issues of consent and rape culture, with figures such as Grace Tame, Brittany Higgins and Chanel Contos quickly becoming household names. The latter of these women, in particular, drew attention to the abysmal state of the national health curriculum and built an entire campaign dedicated to improving consent education.

‘Teach Us Consent’, Contos’ campaign demanded.

The concept of ‘consent’ has become fundamental to discussions surrounding sexual relationships. It has been invoked as both a moral and legal standard to ascribe value judgements to sexual encounters. And whilst there are important implications for definitions of consent that situate it within a sexual context, this move towards a sex-centric understanding of ‘consent’ also risks alienating communities of people who have never centered sex in their relationships.

As an ace (asexual) person, I watched last year’s discussions unfold from a strange position of both identification and disidentification with the struggles that Contos’ campaign sought to platform and overcome. A culture of deference and shame in the Catholic school I grew up in left me questioning my own (a)sexual identity for years, leaving gaps in my understanding of sexual relationships that would be filled with insecurities and self-loathing. But at the same time, the thousands of testimonies of cases of sexual violence that had become representative of the campaign’s core, although extremely valid, did not represent my grievances with the national curriculum on sex education.

Asexuality and Sex Ed



Tyler Perry & Madea Are Allies


Tyler Perry has paved his own lane in film, television, and theater, and on that lane he’s built his own 330-acre studio, reportedly the largest film production studio in the U.S. It’s no exaggeration to say that the mogul owes much of that phenomenal success to the enduring appeal of his most famous creation: Mabel Earline Simmons, the tough-talking, gun-toting grandma better known as Madea.

Introduced in Perry’s 1999 stage play I Can Do Bad All By Myself, and portrayed by Perry in full wig, makeup, housedress, and padded body-ody-ody, Madea made her leap to the big screen in the 2005 hit Diary of a Mad Black Woman, based on Perry’s play. Since then, Madea’s movies have generated more than half a billion dollars in domestic box office, establishing the character as a star in her own right.

Labeled by some a stereotype of Black womanhood, and criticized as a modern minstrelsy act, Madea undeniably speaks to an audience that has supported her — and Perry — across a range of sequels, spinoffs, and TV series.

Named one of Time‘s 100 Most Influential People in 2020, Perry clearly ascertains and appreciates the power that Madea wields as a cultural influencer. He didn’t become a billionaire by not understanding the concerns of his predominantly Black, predominantly female audience. Yet, while he’s used the character and her comically vast extended family to address crucial issues, from religion and racism to sexual harassment, Perry has conspicuously left one topic off the table — until now.

Tyler Perry & Madea Are Allies



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: brian, CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by killersmom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - January to March 2022
« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2022, 02:51:23 PM »


Tuesday, March 8th, 2022





Celebrating 50 - "Brokeback" & The Loft


You’d be hard-pressed to find your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man fighting the Green Goblin, Sandman or Dr. Octopus on screens at The Loft Cinema, 3233 E. Speedway.

The nonprofit, art house theater has nothing against the web slinger or the wildly popular film franchise that he swung in on.   “They are great and I go to see them, too,” said Jeff Yanc, The Loft’s program director. “But they play everywhere. We don’t feel the pressure to have to show them.”

What you get at the Loft instead: dramas, comedies and horror flicks from far-flung parts of the world; thought-provoking documentaries; independent movies from up-and-coming filmmakers, some from right here in Southern Arizona.

There is a long list of notable figures to attend screenings since 2002. Among some of the other visitors: actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, producer Ismail Merchant, and Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana, screenwriters of the neo-Western love story, “Brokeback Mountain.”

‘Brokeback Mountain’ was the film that turned us financially,” Johnson said. “We made so much money on the box office with that film that we dragged ourselves out of the red and never looked back.”

The event mentioned above took place in 2015, and was commemorating the 10th anniversary of "Brokeback Mountain".  A group of Brokies attended the event, and got the chance to meet Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana.

Celebrating 50 - "Brokeback" & The Loft



"Power of the Dog" Is Not Alone


The western tends to be macho fare, akin to the gangster movie in the genre universe. It gets dusty and brawny out there on the frontier, with all those cattle to drive and bandits to battle. It’s no accident that the movies’ exemplar of manliness, John Wayne, is also the face of the genre.

But genres are made to be subverted, and love takes many forms out on the prairie, where a certain type of machismo is expected but not always delivered. Jane Campion’s “The Power of the Dog,” which leads all movies this year with 12 Oscar nominations, is just the latest example of the queer western. These are westerns that focus on gay relationships, overtly or thematically. Their key theme is often loneliness: If the closet seems desolate in modern times, imagine what it was like on the frontier.

And despite Sam Elliott’s derision of the film (the actor, known largely for starring in westerns, took exception to “all these allusions to homosexuality throughout the f— movie,” on Marc Maron’s podcast this week), it’s a theme that’s been explored before. This subgenre can be quirky (1995’s “Dead Man”), heartrending (2005’s “Brokeback Mountain”) and can even put women at its fore (1954’s “Johnny Guitar”), however subtly.

Based on Thomas Savage’s 1967 novel, “The Power of the Dog” trades in ambiguity as it explores what the New Yorker’s Brandon Taylor describes as “Jane Campion’s gothic vision of rural queerness.” The time is the 1920s. The main players are Phil (Benedict Cumberbatch), a cruel, caustic man who owns a Montana ranch with his brother, George (Jesse Plemons); and Peter (Kodi Smit-McPhee), the thin, delicate son of George’s new wife, Rose (Kirsten Dunst). (All four actors are Oscar nominees.) Phil obsessively oils the saddle of the late Bronco Henry, who once saved Phil’s life by warming him up in a sleeping bag. He mocks Peter’s lisp and encourages the gay epithets hurled by his ranch hands.

The plot and characterizations deepen as Peter stumbles upon an old male nudie cache that apparently belonged to Bronco Henry, and Phil begins wooing Peter, at one point stopping just short of kissing him. But the aesthetics here are more important than the screenplay.

"Power of the Dog" Is Not Alone




LGBTQ Refugees Face Discrimination


Late on Thursday night, Viktória Radványi, communications director for Budapest Pride, drove with her girlfriend to the border between Hungary and Ukraine. They were picking up four LGBTQ refugees and taking them back to Budapest to provide them with safe housing, food and mental health resources.

But Radványi isn't part of any humanitarian group, nor does she have experience with refugee resettlement. She never thought she'd have to witness a war so close to her home country. Yet, when she heard about the Russian invasion in Ukraine, she immediately knew she had to help.

"We know that people who say that everybody suffers from war the same way, that that's not true. And we know that in situations of huge crisis, vulnerable groups of society will become especially vulnerable. So that was already in our hearts and minds," said Radványi.

She added that LGBTQ people in her country have been giving anything they can to help — a spare room, a couch.

Armed conflict and war aggravate the vulnerability of many minority populations, and increase the likelihood that they will be exposed to abuse. According to a 2021 report by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, LGBTQ people are likely to face violence, denial of basic services, arbitrary detention and abuse by security forces, among other kinds of discrimination.

LGBTQ Refugees Face Discrimination



Lesbian Couple Force From Home


A lesbian couple suffered homophobic abuse in a hate campaign that forced them to leave their home after a neighbour spotted them kissing through their living room window.

Kim Armstrong, 63, harassed nurse Faye Mallon, 26, and her 27-year-old counsellor girlfriend Lydia Henshall to such an extent that Faye was forced off work with anxiety, and they quit their home in Stockport.

The dad-of-two would regularly hit the couple's car with his, while his other attempts to intimidate included filling their wheelie bin with medical waste and abusive comments like "fat lesbians", "f ** weirdos" and "naughty disrespectful girls".

Armstrong was ordered to obey a three-month electronically tagged 7pm-to-7am curfew, told to complete 20 days of rehab, given a 12-month community order and told to pay £395 in costs and surcharges by Stockport JPs after admitting harassment.

Lydia said their neighbour was "trying to make our lives as uncomfortable as possible in an attempt to make us move".

She said: "We loved our home and we have spent a lot of money on it and we should not feel like we are being forced out of it. I want to enjoy life without having to constantly check cameras and wonder what is going to happen next."

Lesbian Couple Force From Home





Sydney, Mardi Gras, and Bi-Superman


The bisexual status of DC Comics' new Superman has inspired a huge response at the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras celebration.

This past October, Superman Jon Kent came out as bisexual in the fifth issue of writer Tom Taylor's Superman: Son of Kal-El series. Now, posted on Twitter are sights of many people wearing Superman and Supergirl outfits for the Mardi Gras celebration, with the shield of hope that actor Henry Cavill wore across films like Man of Steel and Justice League appearing to be a predominant choice of attire. Taylor also posted photos on Twitter, spotlighting that some of the participants held up fictional copies of DC Comics' Daily Planet newspaper, breaking the news that Jon Kent had come out as bisexual.

The sight highlights the impact and popularity of the character decision for Jon Kent. Jon's coming out issue not only received a second printing due to increased sales, but the first four issues of Son of Kal-El also received additional printings bearing DC's LGBTQ+ Pride logo in the top left corner. Of course, not everyone was on board with the change to the character.

When the news broke that Jon would be coming out as bisexual, many chimed in online with their thoughts. Arizona State Senator Wendy Rogers posted on Twitter to call out against the decision, insisting that "Superman loves Louis Lane," confusing Jon for his father, Clark Kent, and misspelling "Lois" Lane. Lois & Clark's Dean Cain also commented on Jon Kent's sexuality, labeling it as "bandwagoning" being that previous characters in comics -- such as Robin Tim Drake -- and live-action had come out as members of the LGBTQ+ community.

In January 2022, Taylor responded to a tweet claiming that Son of Kal-El was performing poorly because of Jon Kent's sexuality. The writer went on to cite how Son of Kal-El #5 and other issues had topped charts for comic sales and bestseller lists, and poked fun at the arguments claiming the title was a flop.

Sydney, Mardi Gras, and Bi-Superman




Biden Condemns Texas Investigations


President Joe Biden put Texas officials “on notice” in a strongly worded statement Wednesday, calling recent investigations into the families of transgender youths “discriminatory actions” that “put children’s lives at risk.”

The statement, which was released alongside a list of actions that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said it would take to protect trans youths and their families in Texas, was the first time Biden directly addressed a recent directive from Gov. Greg Abbott that calls on the general public and “licensed professionals” to report the parents of trans minors if it appears the children are receiving gender-affirming medical care.

The directive also ordered the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services, the state’s child protective services agency, to investigate such claims.

Civil rights groups intervened, filing a lawsuit Tuesday after the department opened an investigation last week into one of its own employees who has a transgender child. On Wednesday evening, hours before Biden’s statement, a judge temporarily blocked the state’s investigation into that family, but other similar investigations were unaffected.

Abbott has not returned a request for comment regarding the lawsuit or Biden’s statement, and the Department of Family and Protective Services declined to comment.

Biden Condemns Texas Investigations



Asexuality and Sex Ed


Last week, education ministers across the country agreed to a raft of national health curriculum changes that would explicitly address issues of consent in sexual relationships.

Such changes come after an explosion in the national discourse last year regarding issues of consent and rape culture, with figures such as Grace Tame, Brittany Higgins and Chanel Contos quickly becoming household names. The latter of these women, in particular, drew attention to the abysmal state of the national health curriculum and built an entire campaign dedicated to improving consent education.

‘Teach Us Consent’, Contos’ campaign demanded.

The concept of ‘consent’ has become fundamental to discussions surrounding sexual relationships. It has been invoked as both a moral and legal standard to ascribe value judgements to sexual encounters. And whilst there are important implications for definitions of consent that situate it within a sexual context, this move towards a sex-centric understanding of ‘consent’ also risks alienating communities of people who have never centered sex in their relationships.

As an ace (asexual) person, I watched last year’s discussions unfold from a strange position of both identification and disidentification with the struggles that Contos’ campaign sought to platform and overcome. A culture of deference and shame in the Catholic school I grew up in left me questioning my own (a)sexual identity for years, leaving gaps in my understanding of sexual relationships that would be filled with insecurities and self-loathing. But at the same time, the thousands of testimonies of cases of sexual violence that had become representative of the campaign’s core, although extremely valid, did not represent my grievances with the national curriculum on sex education.

Asexuality and Sex Ed



Cricket Legend Shane Warne Was An Ally


Australian cricket legend Shane Warne died aged 52 of a suspected heart attack on Friday night in Koh Samui, Thailand

While tributes flowed from across the cricketing world for the legendary spin bowler for his contributions to the game, Australia’s LGBTQI community remembered the cricketer as an ally for his support for marriage equality and more recently the use of gender-neutral pronouns in cricket.

“The outpouring of grief today shows that Shane Warne was deeply loved by many and will be sorely missed by people around the world,” Melbourne-based LGBTQI activist Nevena Spirovska told Star Observer.

“Seeing members of the LGBTIQA+ community share their personal stories and reflections about the man – how he supported and encouraged all young cricketers to have a go, advocated publicly as an ally, and stood up against homophobia even when there were no cameras around – demonstrates why many of us connected with him and will be mourning his passing,” said Spirovska. 

Out trans handball player and 2018 Victorian LGBT Sportsperson of the Year Hannah Mouncey paid tributes to the cricketer and recalled an interaction with Warne on social media.

Cricket Legend Shane Warne Was An Ally



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: killersmom, CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by killersmom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - January to March 2022
« Reply #10 on: March 14, 2022, 06:10:08 PM »


Tuesday, March 15th, 2022





20 Years of Focus Features


Focus Features unveiled a special 20th anniversary logo and reel looking back on their acclaimed films today, alongside the announcement of a special theatrical re-release for several of their iconic features.

Founded by David Linde and James Schamus, the film studio previously existed as USA Films, Universal Focus and Good Machine before becoming Focus Features in 2002 after a divisional merger. Owned by NBC Universal, Focus Features has helped distribute a number of acclaimed indie and international films around the world, including multiple Oscar nominees and winners, some of which include Lost in Translation, The Pianist, Brokeback Mountain, Milk and BlacKkKlansman.

To celebrate their successful Hollywood tenure, Focus Features has unveiled a special 20th anniversary logo and reel of some of their various films over the years, including current Oscar nominee Belfast.

Additionally, the studio is partnering with AMC Theaters for a week of special theatrical re-releases of seven films with Downton Abbey, Brokeback Mountain, Darkest Hour, Burn After Reading, Atonement, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and Harriet.

Click the link below for a statement from Focus Features Chairman Peter Kujawski, the official 20th Anniversary Reel.

20 Years of Focus Features




Students Protest "Don't Say Gay"


Friday, students at multiple schools in Colorado walked out in solidarity with LGBTQ+ students in Florida.

In Denver, students at West High School and the Girls Athletic Leadership Schools (GALS) protested the so-called "Don't say gay" bill.

"We say gay! We say gay!" chanted students at GALS as they walked out of their school and down Galapago Street.

"It felt great marching today," said 15-year-old 9th grader Alex Pacheco.

The entire middle and high school, about 300 students, their teachers and administrators all rallied together.   Cars honked and waved at them, showing their support.

"It actually made me know that people care," said 12-year-old 6th grader Max Walters.

Students were protesting the Parental Rights in Education bill in Florida. It would prohibit talking about gender identity and sexual orientation with students in kindergarten through third grade.

"It felt really empowering to be marching with so many other students that feel the same way," said 15-year-old 10th grader Keena Hatsell.

Students Protest "Don't Say Gay"



Retirement Planning For Lesbians


I opened the message and saw the two vertical lines.

The left line was a soft, faint pink — the first hello from her little girl. The photo didn't need an announcement. My best friend was going to be a mother. "We weren't even trying," she said.

As a lesbian, "it just happened" isn't in my vocabulary.

Big life events, such as having a baby, are more practical and planned than romantic. The trifecta of house, marriage, and kids requires creativity and patience to pull off. The promise of a lifestyle of freedom and acceptance attracts us to cities. Unaffordable cities. San Francisco, New York, and Los Angeles embrace and celebrate self-expression, in a way that smaller, cheaper communities don't — or won't. Society's structures don't bend as nicely for queer communities.

Our finances, our families, and our futures suffer because of it.  And it's that future after the working and family-life stages that we need to think about now: retirement.

While progress has made space for women in leadership roles, the gender wage gap continues. Men still earn more and work more. For gay women, the low wages and high expenses inadvertently slows down retirement planning.

Retirement Planning For Lesbians





Bisexuality & Non-Monogamy - A Personal Journey


I didn't come out to myself, or anyone else, until I was in my early 20s. I am queer and always have been queer but I was raised in a world that assumed my heterosexuality, so it took a lot of time to think of myself as anything beyond that.

I identify with both bisexuality and pansexuality, but because I do have romantic and sexual attraction to people who are the opposite sex to me, I kind of fumbled through my teenage years. It was OK to fancy boys openly, and so I did and they were the people I dated and had sex with. It's only on reflection that I realize quite how many queer experiences I had as a teenager; from making out with and sleeping with women to all sorts of nuances beyond that. But they were going pretty much unacknowledged by me and the other people I was interacting with.

I didn't grow up in a space that was actively queerphobic or homophobic; my parents are very warm and welcoming people. But throughout my childhood and teenage years I can't think of a single bisexual character who wasn't demonized or oversexualized. I didn't hear the term non-binary until I was 20 and I never heard the word consent in my sexual education growing up.

My sibling, who is also queer, and I have a fun game of looking back at our childhood and discussing moments where neither of us realized we were queer. I remember wanting to be smooshed in between Hercules and his wife Meg, and that my crush on Meg was actually bigger.

Bisexuality & Non-Monogamy - A Personal Journey




Texas Judge Blocks State Investigations


A Texas state district judge on Friday temporarily blocked a directive by Gov. Greg Abbott to have state authorities investigate gender-affirming medical care for transgender youth as child abuse.

The ruling by District Judge Amy Clark Meachum in Travis County came after Abbott's order led to the investigation of a state employee's family after their daughter received such care, prompting the American Civil Liberties Union and Lambda Legal to sue over the directive.

Last month, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton issued a non-binding opinion that some "sex-change" procedures and the prescribing of puberty-blockers to certain children is "child abuse" under Texas law.

Paxton's opinion was followed by a directive from Abbott to the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services "to conduct a prompt and thorough investigation of any reported instances of these abusive procedures in the State of Texas."

Meachum said the plaintiffs would likely succeed after a trial on the merits of the case and ordered that hearing to begin in July. Meachum said the directive exceeded Abbott's authority under the Texas Constitution and the type of care it targeted never triggered an investigation prior to the directive.

Texas Judge Blocks State Investigations



Models At NWA Fashion Week


NWA Fashion Week's opening night saw a wide variety of artists and models take to the runway to show off their designs, but one collection was focused more on the models than the fashion.

“I never thought that I would be a model in my wildest dreams…and just being here today is like a dream come true more so than anything I’ve ever experienced," said Skylar Conover, model in NWA Fashion Week.

The event kicked off Thursday, March 10th, with the spotlight on a cast of all transgender, non-binary, and intersex models. The show’s organizer, INTERFORM partnered with the Transgender Equality Network and The Transition Closet to bring visibility to this diverse cast with the models wearing clothes from The Transition Closet, a Fayetteville-based non-profit that provides free clothing to people transitioning genders. 

“I’m one of 13 transgender, non-binary, and intersex models that will be walking today featuring clothes from the transition closet," said Transition Closet organizer Amare Roush.

Roush says the Thursday night show was also a fundraiser that benefited The Transition Closet.

“10% of the proceeds from ticket sales are going to be going to The Transition Closet and we are going to be using that to help fund our Big Binder Project which ships binders all over the US and the World," said Roush.

Models At NWA Fashion Week



Dan Reynolds - An Unlikely Ally


The straight, cisgender frontman of a rock band may not be the first person you’d expect to be an outspoken advocate and ally for the LGBTQ community.  But then there’s Imagine Dragons lead singer Dan Reynolds.

Imagine Dragons has become one of this generation’s most popular music groups, boasting nearly 57 million monthly listeners on Spotify. In 2018, it was the most streamed group on the platform, and three of its songs —“Believer,” “Thunder” and “Demons” — have received more than a billion streams. But talking to Reynolds, one doesn't experience any of the cockiness or ego that may come through when talking to other rock superstars.

Instead, he centers himself on his mission as an ally.

Reynolds, who is not part of the LGBTQ community, said his advocacy stems from growing up in a very conservative Mormon family where he witnessed some of his family members struggling to reconcile their sexuality with their religious teachings.

In 2018, Reynolds produced "Believer," a documentary that examined the “intersection between LGBT people and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.” In 2019, he used his band’s acceptance speech for the top rock artist award at the Billboard Music Awards to speak out against conversion therapy. Last year, he donated his childhood home to be converted into a youth center for vulnerable LGBTQ youth. And this year, his LoveLoud Fest returns after a two-year hiatus due to the pandemic

Dan Reynolds - An Unlikely Ally



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by killersmom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - January to March 2022
« Reply #11 on: March 21, 2022, 04:29:11 PM »


Tuesday, March 22nd, 2022





Greatest Oscar Injustices


Each year, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts And Sciences attempts to award Oscars to the “best” film or artist in each category that year, and each year it fails at least a few times.


There is always room for disagreement on what constitutes “best”: how can we possibly compare Toy Story 3, Inception and The King’s Speech? And yet voters did just that in 2010.


It is similarly impossible to nail down all the egregious choices in academy history, but here are a few of the most glaring errors. Starting with the granddaddy of them all...

Greatest Oscar Injustices




Kim Davis Violated Rights


Kim Davis — the former clerk in Kentucky whose refusal to sign marriage certificates for same-sex couples grabbed national headlines in 2015 — violated their constitutional rights, a federal judge found.

The decision leaves open the question of whether the former clerk is responsible for the legal fees of the two couples who sued and other monetary damages that have accrued over the nearly seven years of legal back-and-forth.

A jury will decide whether Davis is liable for those fees and other damages, which likely stands around hundreds of thousands of dollars.

"After S-E-V-E-N years, Judge Bunning finally ruled that Kim Davis intentionally violated our constitutional rights," David Ermold tweeted. He is one of the people initially denied a marriage license by Davis.

"Now, the question is will they hold her financially responsible for the insensitive and irrational legal mess that SHE created," he said. "It feels like seven years of legal purgatory."

The Liberty Counsel, which represents Davis, says it "will continue to argue that she is not liable for damages because she was entitled to a religious accommodation (which Governor Mat Bevin and the legislature granted)."

Kim Davis Violated Right



Artist Janet Cooling Has Died


Janet Cooling, who imagined a style of figurative painting built on lesbian and feminist symbologies during the 1970s and ’80s, died in Richmond, Virginia, on February 25 at the age of 70 from breast cancer. Her partner and wife of 40 years, Jackie Corlin, confirmed her death.

Among the first artists to be an out lesbian in the American art world, Cooling fearlessly painted works that went against popular taste and normative social mores. Among her earliest proponents were New Museum founder Marcia Tucker, feminist art historian and Woman’s Building cofounder Arlene Raven, and curator Dan Cameron who, in 1982, included Cooling in “Extended Sensibilities: Homosexual Presence in Contemporary Art” at the New Museum, the first museum show in the U.S. to address gay and lesbian themes in contemporary work. (Disclosure: In 2019, I curated a solo show of Cooling’s work at Jack Hanley Gallery in New York.)

“Janet Cooling was a courageous and groundbreaking artist, whose work in the early 1980s laid the groundwork for how female painters, especially those who are not heterosexual, would develop a range of imagery that contradicted centuries of the male gaze in pictorial art,” Cameron wrote in an email. “Years from now, I believe historians will recognize how prescient her development of a woman-focused aesthetic really was. Janet was also steadfast in her belief that ‘Extended Sensibilities’ was a necessary and important advance in the curatorial field, and she never wavered in her personal support of my efforts.”

Janet Cooling was born in Chester, Pennsylvania, in 1951, but grew up in the New Jersey suburbs. In 1969, she moved to Brooklyn to attend Pratt, where she received her B.F.A. in 1973, immediately going on to complete an M.F.A. at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1975. After graduation, Cooling worked at Artemisia, the women’s cooperative gallery in Chicago, which was then newly opened. Artemisia helped bring Cooling into the emergent worlds of feminist art spaces and lesbian politics. It was at the gallery that she met Raven, who offered Cooling her first solo show at Canis Gallery in the Woman’s Building in Los Angeles in 1976.

Artist Janet Cooling Has Died





Bisexuality & Non-Monogamy - A Personal Journey


I didn't come out to myself, or anyone else, until I was in my early 20s. I am queer and always have been queer but I was raised in a world that assumed my heterosexuality, so it took a lot of time to think of myself as anything beyond that.

I identify with both bisexuality and pansexuality, but because I do have romantic and sexual attraction to people who are the opposite sex to me, I kind of fumbled through my teenage years. It was OK to fancy boys openly, and so I did and they were the people I dated and had sex with. It's only on reflection that I realize quite how many queer experiences I had as a teenager; from making out with and sleeping with women to all sorts of nuances beyond that. But they were going pretty much unacknowledged by me and the other people I was interacting with.

I didn't grow up in a space that was actively queerphobic or homophobic; my parents are very warm and welcoming people. But throughout my childhood and teenage years I can't think of a single bisexual character who wasn't demonized or oversexualized. I didn't hear the term non-binary until I was 20 and I never heard the word consent in my sexual education growing up.

My sibling, who is also queer, and I have a fun game of looking back at our childhood and discussing moments where neither of us realized we were queer. I remember wanting to be smooshed in between Hercules and his wife Meg, and that my crush on Meg was actually bigger.

Bisexuality & Non-Monogamy - A Personal Journey




Missing Transgender Activist Found Dead


The body of a woman found in Lake Michigan on Thursday has been identified as missing transgender rights advocate Elise Malary, officials in Illinois say.

The fire department recovered a woman's body from the Lake Michigan shoreline and transported her to the Cook County Medical Examiner's Office, according to a statement from the Evanston Police and Fire Departments.

The body was "positively identified" as 31-year-old Malary on Saturday.  Malary was reported missing by a family member on March 11, according to police. She last had contact with her family two days prior.

The woman was last seen near her apartment in Evanston, and her car was found by police in a nearby parking lot Tuesday, CNN affiliate WLS reported.

While authorities discovered Malary's apartment had been left unlocked, police said they found nothing at her home or car to indicate foul play. No cause of death has been released yet.


Missing Transgender Activist Found Dead



Support for Graphic Novel "Gender Queer"


A parent who objected to the inclusion of a specific book in the Hudson High School Library is seeking to meet with the Board of Education after a panel that was requested to review the book raised no objections to keeping it in circulation.

The book, "Gender Queer" by Maia Kobabe, was recently reviewed by a seven-member committee consisting of two teachers, a librarian, three parents and the district's assistant superintendent. Interim Superintendent Steve Farnsworth said the committee recommended keeping "Gender Queer" on the library shelf and noted he agreed with their recommendation.

The parent who first requested the review, however, continues to appeal for its removal and has asked to discuss the issue with the Board of Education, Farnsworth said.

Farnsworth told the school board on Monday that this discussion would have to occur in an open session.

Once the board meets with the parent, Farnsworth said he believes the board can decide to confirm, modify or contradict his recommendation.

Farnsworth said he read "Gender Queer" and spoke to all seven members of the committee before he made his decision. He noted all but one of the committee members felt strongly about keeping the book in the library collection.

Support for Graphic Novel "Gender Queer"



Vaani Kapoor - LGBTQ+ Ally


There is a scene in Chandigarh Kare Aashiqui where Vaani Kapoor’s character, Maanvi, decides to go on a dating app. Her fingers tremble slightly as she is asked to fill her gender. The camera pans and you see Vaani Kapoor’s face, the trembling lips, the unsure eyes, the sorrow in those eyes…It isn’t something grand that makes Vaani Kapoor’s Maanvi stand out. Maanvi steals your heart solely through these subtle gestures. And, perhaps, that is the mark of a good actress.

To be able to tell a story like that of Maanvi’s without resorting to some booming background score or emotional dialogue. Few expected such a fine performance from Vaani Kapoor. She made her debut in 2013 and in these 10 years, she’s done six movies. Her debut film, Shuddh Desi Romance earned her the Best Debut (Female) award at the Filmfare Awards but she went on to star in Befikre which didn’t perform well and in movies like War and Bell Bottom where her skill set was woefully underused.

With Chandigarh Kare Aashiqui, Vaani has clearly shown that she is not just another pretty face and here’s hoping filmmakers take note.

Vaani Kapoor - LGBTQ+ Ally



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by killersmom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

We count on you to send us your news items, questions, and nominations for posts of the day.
If you have items you’d like to see published, send them to CellarDweller115.

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« Last Edit: March 21, 2022, 04:45:06 PM by CellarDweller115 »

Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - January to March 2022
« Reply #12 on: March 28, 2022, 06:26:55 AM »


Tuesday, March 29th, 2022





"Brokeback" - A True Story?


"Brokeback Mountain" received critical acclaim when it was released in 2005 and continues to be one of the most beloved films from the early 21st century. The neo-western featured career-highlight performances from lead stars Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal, resulting in Academy Award nominations for both. While the drama didn't win Best Picture — it lost out to "Crash"— Oscar voters were surveyed in 2015 to see who they would have voted for, and they deemed "Brokeback Mountain" that year's retroactive winner (via The Hollywood Reporter).

The tortured romance begins in the early '60s and takes place in the beautiful mountain range of Wyoming. The Ang Lee-directed film focuses on Ennis del Mar (Ledger) and Jack Twist (Gyllenhaal), two ranchers who are hired to herd sheep for the summer. After some time, they begin a complex emotional and sexual relationship. Summer passes and they both say goodbye and reluctantly start their own families. As the years go by and their marriages fall apart, the men continue to meet on fishing trips to be with each other.

The film's immense realism in depicting homosexuality in the west, as well as its rich and intricate details of cowboy culture, have led many audience members to wonder if "Brokeback Mountain" is based on true events. Here's what really inspired the film.

The tragic story of "Brokeback Mountain" isn't based on true events but is, in fact, adapted from a short story of the same name. Written by Annie Proulx, the short story first appeared in the New Yorker in 1997. The meditation on love and grief was immediately met with praise, winning Proulx a series of acclaims, including the National Magazine Award for Fiction.

"Brokeback" - A True Story?




"Gay" Dog Adopted By Gay Couple


A dog who made national headlines this month after being abandoned by his owners for being “gay” has been adopted by a same-sex couple.

Last week, WCCB-TV in Charlotte, North Carolina, reported that 5-year-old Fezco was surrendered to Stanly County Animal Protective Services by his owners after the pup “humped another male dog.” The shelter shared the unfortunate news on its Facebook page.

Fezco’s story quickly made national headlines and caught the attention of Steve Nichols and his husband, John Winn, who live just outside Charlotte, not far from the shelter.

“I was in shock,” Nichols said of first reading about Fezco in the news. “I flipped through and passed to the next story, and then something snapped inside of me.”

He said he went back and reread the story and watched WCCB’s video coverage and then approached Winn with an idea.

“We’ve been together for 33 years, and in 33 years, we’ve faced the same ignorance, bigotry, but we talked about it, and we thought, ‘This time we’re going to do something about it.’”

"Gay" Dog Adopted By Gay Couple



Am I A Lesbian?


My life changed when I read the “Am I a Lesbian? Masterdoc.”

The “Lesbian Masterdoc” is a document that asks you to consider the nuances behind one simple question: Are you a lesbian? Written like a blog post, the document whisks you through bullet points to help you decipher the difference between heterosexuality and compulsory heterosexuality.

American essayist, queer theorist and poet Adrienne Rich first introduced the idea of “compulsory heterosexuality” in the 1980s when she published her essay “Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Existence.” But what exactly is compulsory heterosexuality? It’s the idea that heterosexuality is assumed and forced upon women, and therefore women feel forced into being attracted to men, even when they might not be.

This is where the lesbian master doc comes in. Angeli Luz, the author of the master doc, originally posted the document in 2018, anonymously, with the intention of helping women reflect upon the influences of compulsory heterosexuality in their lives. She surely achieved her purpose when it came to me. Though I’ve still got a while to go to dismantle compulsory heterosexuality in my life, the document opened my eyes. I began to understand that the idea of men I had in my head didn’t necessarily correlate with reality.

I appreciated the document so much that I started to share it — if my friends were questioning their sexuality, I suggested they read it and really absorb what it says. Their reaction was often the same: “Oh no, I’m not a lesbian. I know that.”

Am I A Lesbian?





Supreme Court Sides With Bisexual Lawyer


The Supreme Court says it won’t review the case of a Seattle-based Christian organization that was sued after declining to hire a bisexual lawyer who applied for a job. A lower court let the case go forward, and the high court said Monday it wouldn’t intervene.

Two justices, Justice Samuel Alito and Justice Clarence Thomas, agreed with the decision not to hear the case at this stage but said that “the day may soon come” when the court needs to confront the issue the case presents.

The case the high court declined to hear involves Seattle’s Union Gospel Mission. In addition to providing food and shelter to the homeless the organization offers addiction recovery, job placement and legal services. In 2016 it was looking for an attorney to help staff its legal-aid clinic.

One of the applicants was Matthew Woods, who had volunteered at the clinic for more than three years. Woods identifies as bisexual and was in a same-sex relationship. He was told before he applied that his application would be rejected because the organization’s “code of conduct excludes homosexual activity.” Woods sued, arguing that the organization violated state law by discriminating against him on the basis of his sexual orientation.


Supreme Court Sides With Bisexual Lawyer




Firing Squad For Supporters


Robert Foster, a former Mississippi House lawmaker who lost a 2019 bid for governor, is using his social-media platform to call for the execution of political foes who support the rights of transgender people.

“Some of y’all still want to try and find political compromise with those that want to groom our school aged children and pretend men are women, etc,” the former Republican representative from Hernando, Miss., wrote in a Thursday night tweet. “I think they need to be lined up against (a) wall before a firing squad to be sent to an early judgment.”

Foster, who runs Cedar Hill Farm, an agritourism business in DeSoto County, Miss., served as a state representative from 2016 until 2020, where he authored the state’s current death penalty law in 2017, allowing for executions by gas chamber, electrocution and firing squad. He placed third in the 2019 Republican primary for governor after making national headlines for refusing to allow women journalists to ride along in his truck on the campaign trail despite allowing male journalists to do so.

Despite winning less than 18% of the GOP primary vote, Foster’s farm venue has become a prime destination for Republicans since 2019, with GOP officials like U.S. Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith, U.S. House Rep. Trent Kelly and House Speaker Philip Gunn attending fundraisers and other events on the property.

In 2020, the Hernando Main Street Chamber of Commerce gave him its “Spirit of Main Street” award even as he spent much of the pandemic era tweeting COVID-19 and anti-vaccine conspiracy theories.

Firing Squad For Supporters



Embracing My Asexuality


Two years ago, a 14-year-old girl sat in her garage Googling the term “asexual.” She had heard the term colloquially, but never knew what it meant. Now, in a moment of uncertainty, she grasped at it to see if it could help her understand the swirl of distress she felt when she considered other people’s bodies. She was right: she had never felt sexual attraction in her life and didn’t want to. This realization might have been a godsend, but she didn’t know that her confusion about the body hadn’t disappeared. In time, it would just transfer over to her own.

This girl was me, but it wasn’t just me. These mixed feelings about people’s bodies are an extremely common part of the asexual experience. As soon as we’re old enough to grasp even the concept of attraction, we’re bombarded with the understood standard of sex appeal. It’s most uniform for women: long lashes, thin waist and thick thighs, a rack big enough to cast a shadow, and a sufficiently seductive personality to match. Of course, these qualifications vary based on others’ preferences, but that’s just it. We’re taught to define our beauty by what other people like, and it becomes so entrenched that sometimes, we attribute that subjective perspective to our self worth. Beauty becomes mandatory. Everyone has to find us appealing, or we’re not appealing at all.

So, where does that leave a group of people that, depending on their end of the spectrum, don’t find anyone appealing, ever?

At first, it was easy. I didn’t feel the need to be particularly attractive, especially as a minor, so why should I make an effort to be? And that mindset worked when I was fourteen. But, as I got older, I started asking myself questions that were more difficult to answer. Did it bother me that my chest was flat? Would I be open to dating people who weren’t asexual themselves? Was I comfortable wearing the skimpier pieces in my wardrobe, like shorts and crop tops? 

Embracing My Asexuality



Disney Employees Stage Walkout


LGBTQ workers and employee allies at The Walt Disney Company staged a walkout in protest of Florida's Parental Rights in Education bill, dubbed the "Don't Say Gay" bill by opponents.

Some employees have been walking out each day since March 15 from 3 to 3:15 p.m.

On Tuesday, more than 100 employees in different parts of the company joined a full-length walkout and protest.

"The Walt Disney Company’s (TWDC) LGBTQIA+ community and their allies are determined to take a stand against TWDC’s apathy in the face of the bigoted 'Don’t Say Gay' bill put forth by the FL state legislature," the protest's website states.

"The recent statements and lack of action by TWDC leadership regarding the 'Don’t Say Gay' bill have utterly failed to match the magnitude of the threat to LGBTQIA+ safety represented by this legislation," the website says.

Opponents of the bill say it would shame and silence LGBTQ youth and could have major negative consequences on their mental health.

Disney Employees Stage Walkout



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