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Offline CellarDweller115

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The Daily Sheet - July to September 2022
« on: July 04, 2022, 09:48:57 AM »


Tuesday, July 5th, 2022





Almodovar's Answer to Brokeback


Pedro Almodóvar has spent decades avoiding the allure of American studio projects, from “Sister Act” to “Brokeback Mountain,” and still doesn’t trust the system. “It’s kind of a contradiction,” he told IndieWire during a recent afternoon in his office in Madrid. “Hollywood wants to bring in outside talent, but they don’t always let them do what they want to do.”

These days, Almodóvar has addressed that conundrum by making the talent come to him. Continuing his toe-dip into English language filmmaking that started with his Tilda Swinton-starring short film “The Human Voice” in 2020, the 72-year-old director is on the verge of taking another step.

“Strange Way of Life,” which begins production in late August, will star Ethan Hawke and Pedro Pascal as a pair of middle-aged gunslingers at the center of a 30-minute Western. Much of the action will take place in the desert region of Spain’s Almería region, where Sergio Leone famously shot “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly,” though Almodovár was not thinking of the story as a throwback to Spaghetti Westerns. “I’m not consciously referencing those movies,” he said. “I don’t know what it will be like, except that it will be mine.”

Almodóvar has maintained autonomy on his projects over the years by producing them with his in-house production company El Deseo, a team that includes his brother, producer Agustín. For “Strange Way of Life,” he has gained another partner-in-crime with Saint Laurent, whose head designer Anthony Vaccarello will serve as an associate producer on the project as well as the costume designer. Saint Laurent has supported several recent short films and features from major filmmakers, including Gaspar Noé’s “Lux Aeterna,” which recently opened in the U.S. “It’s very convenient for me,” Almodóvar said. “I feel much freer to do things in English this way.”

Almodovar's Answer to Brokeback




Fight For Military Burial


In Willamette National Cemetery in Oregon, lines of marble rise row on row above acres of vivid green. Retired Air Force Lt. Col. Linda Campbell knew the view well. She had chosen her nearby waterfront apartment so that she could see, from a distance, the place where her wife silently waited for her.

Nancy Lynchild died of cancer in 2012. It was too soon. Too soon for Campbell, who lived another six years without the love of her life. Too soon for a nation that had not yet federally legalized same-sex marriage, leaving Campbell with little recourse when Veterans Affairs denied her request for Lynchild's burial on the same hallowed ground to which other military spouses were entitled.

Still, Campbell fought. Oregon state leaders helped her convince Veterans Affairs to allow Lynchild's remains to be interred at Willamette. When Campbell died in 2018, her ashes were buried with her wife's and sealed behind a stone carved with a sandhill crane, a symbol for their undying love.

Campbell was the first gay veteran to secure burial rights for her spouse, and the pair were the first same-sex military couple to be buried together at a US national cemetery.

Campbell put their legacy into words in 2013: "Our nation will know and everyone who passes by here will know that we lovingly, proudly and legally were wed, and that we have earned the right to be here in this hallowed space."

The right to a military burial for gay spouses was guaranteed nationwide with the legalization of same-sex marriage in 2015, but only a handful of known same-sex military couples are buried across the 172 national cemeteries in the US -- grounds reserved chiefly for military members and selected family.

Fight For Military Burial




Meet Esmae and Mala


Esmae and Mala are inseparable, says Mikayla Raines, a founder of SaveAFox Rescue in Faribault, Minn.

Taking the internet by storm, the two black-and-white bonded female foxes have been dubbed the “lesbian goth foxes.”

“They happened to bond with each other, which is super-rare for two unrelated female foxes to do,” Raines says.

Esmae and Mala have even inspired fan art and become a staple of the internet queer community.

Raines said the two foxes often exhibit behavior that is usually reserved for only a fox’s mate. Foxes are often monogamous, and for Esmae and Mala, there is no one else they’d rather be with.

“When we let them out in the morning they're just really excited to see each other and then they spend all day together — like they lay together and make calls to each other, so it's just very sweet,” Raines said.


Meet Esmae and Mala





Disaster Bisexuals


Wait, my friend Alicia texted me, have you ever identified as a disaster bisexual? We’d been exchanging jokes and memes about disaster bisexuals, noting which characteristics described us. (Excessive use of hand gestures? Getting fixated on a subject and dragging it into every conversation? A childhood mermaid phase?)

Urban Dictionary lists several definitions of disaster bisexual, among them “a person whose pure chaos has led you to the correct conclusion that they are bisexual,” “a very chaotic person who is quite visibly bisexual,” and “a person who is attracted to every hot person they meet but is a total mess about it, either by coming on way too strong or being unbearably awkward.” According to my cursory online research, the term originated on Tumblr (of course) in one of those D&D alignment chart memes (you know the ones: lawful good, chaotic neutral, etc). In fandom culture, and on the Internet in general, it has become a humorous self-identifier referring to the “disaster” traits some bisexuals claim to share, like social awkwardness and an inability to sit properly in a chair. According to a random sampling of self-proclaimed disaster bisexuals on Twitter, they are “painfully aware of [their] own flaws but wildly naïve about the flaws of others,” have “an exact 50% success rate when determining if someone is in love with [them] or not,” are “the living embodiment of that Alice in Wonderland quote about giving good advice but literally never following it,” and behave like “a flustered woman in an infomercial.”

To Alicia’s question, I replied: jokingly, I guess? I identify as bisexual, but the disaster part seemed like a stretch. I have my shit together, mostly. I’ve been in a stable, loving relationship for over a decade. I have a career. Fulfilling friendships. A retirement account. A therapist.

Disaster Bisexuals




Defending A Medicine Ban


The Alabama Attorney General’s Office is using the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision to strike down Roe v. Wade to defend a ban on medical treatments considered life-saving by transgender individuals and physicians.

In a 76-page brief filed with the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Monday, the state invoked or referenced the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Dobbs v. Jackson’s Women’s Health Organization at least nine times, invoking Justice Samuel Alito’s majority opinion that said the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution does not protect any right “not deeply rooted in the nation’s history and traditions.”

“The Legislature determined that transitioning treatments in particular are too risky to authorize, so it is those treatments Plaintiffs must show the Constitution protects,” the brief says. “But no one — adult or child — has a right to transitioning treatments that is deeply rooted in our nation’s history and tradition. The State can thus regulate or prohibit those interventions for children, even if an adult wants the drugs for his child.”

A message seeking comment was left Wednesday with Melody Eagan, an attorney representing families with transgender youth who sued to block the law.

The state’s brief, filed just three days after the Dobbs decision struck down the constitutional right to an abortion, reflects a new tactic for the state and the fears of critics of the Dobbs decision that it would be used to attack rights outside of abortion.

Defending A Medicine Ban



Intersex Inclusivity in London


In celebration of 50 years of Pride in the UK, The Crown Estate has commissioned a hundred Pride flags to hang above Regent Street.

Pride in London will commemorate the anniversary of 1972’s historic march by retracing its route during this year’s event.

It will commence at Hyde Park Corner and end at Whitehall Place. The route will see those participating pass historic LGBTQI+ sites in the capital, including Trafalgar Square, which was the terminus for the 1972 march.

The original march 50 years ago saw around 2,000 people march down Regent Street in London in the name of Gay Pride. Up to 40 members of the Gay Liberation Front had organised the protest, hoping it would serve as an antidote to widespread gay shame prevalent throughout the community.

Same-sex sexual acts had only been decriminalised in England and Wales five years earlier, so the LGBTQI+ community was still dealing with the trauma they’ve suffered during the decades before.

“They were ashamed of their sexuality and gender identity so our counter to gay shame was Gay Pride,” Peter Tatchell – one of the people who organised that 1972 Pride march – recently told GAY TIMES.

Intersex Inclusivity in London



LGBT Ally - Johnny Stanton IV


Johnny Stanton IV spent a perfect Saturday in June attending the Pride in the CLE March.

He used the NFL’s My Cause My Cleats initiative last season to support Athlete Ally, whose mission is to end “rampant homophobia and transphobia in sport” and to champion “LBBTQI+” equality.

He lists his pronouns (he/him) in his Twitter bio.

As the only fullback on the Browns roster, the 6-foot-2, 250-pound Stanton is no stranger to head-on collisions and embracing a supporting role. His work as an ally to the LGBTQ community requires much of the same.

“It’s classically known that LGBTQ athletes don’t always feel comfortable coming out to their teammates,” Stanton told The Chronicle-Telegram in a recent interview. “And I want to be part of the culture that changes that. I want sports to become a place for everyone actively, not just passively.”

He’s motivated by the fact that LGBTQ kids drop out of sports at a much higher rate.

LGBT Ally - Johnny Stanton IV



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - July to September 2022
« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2022, 07:34:16 AM »


Tuesday, July 12th, 2022





David Harbour and Method Acting


David Harbour was trained in “classical American method acting,” but he no longer believes in the process or uses it during filming. While he’s best known these days for playing Jim Hopper on Netflix’s blockbuster series “Stranger Things,” Harbour got his start in the theater and in film courtesy of character actor roles in the likes of “Brokeback Mountain” and “Revolutionary Road.”

“When I was younger — it’s so embarrassing — but I remember playing that famous Scottish King,” Harbour told GQ magazine. “And being like, ‘I’m gonna kill a cat’ or something: ‘I’m gonna go murder something to know what it feels like to murder.’ I didn’t actually do it, obviously. Not only is that [method acting] stuff silly, it’s dangerous, and it actually doesn’t produce good work.”

When GQ cited three-time Oscar winner Daniel Day-Lewis as the “preeminent, respectable example” of method acting, Harbour noted, “He’s an extraordinary actor who I’m captivated and fascinated by. [But] when he explains his process it sounds like nonsense to me.”

Harbour joins a handful of actors in recent months who have spoken out against method acting. “Hannibal” favorite Mads Mikkelsen railed against the process in an April interview, saying, “It’s bullshit. But preparation, you can take into insanity. What if it’s a shit film — what do you think you achieved? Am I impressed that you didn’t drop character? You should have dropped it from the beginning! How do you prepare for a serial killer? You gonna spend two years checking it out?”

David Harbour and Method Acting




73 Years for Luther's Café


Luther's Cafe, now on Main, has been around since 1949. To put things in perspective, that's about two decades before the Tower of the America's emerged in our skyline, even before the commercial development of the River Walk as we know it. It's the year Oscar-winner Meryl Streep and Billy Joel were born.

Much like the two stars, at 73 years old, Luther's Cafe is still kicking.

It's been a long journey for the San Antonio College-area eatery. While people of all walks of life eat and drink at Luther's — it is certainly not explicitly a gay restaurant and it never has been — its history is inextricable from the revitalization of what is known today as San Antonio's "gay strip." A major operator in the redevelopment is Luther's current owner, Randy Cunniff, who also owns Heat Nightclub and bars Sparkey's and Knockout.

Before Cunniff started opening businesses on Main Street and it became a colorful nightlife destination, the area looked a lot different.

Luther's first began cookin' on the corner of Locust Street and Main Ave in 1949, and ran operations there until about 1976. From there, it relocated to Main and Evergreen to colonize an old 1,150 square-foot Texaco station that had recently closed down. In the early days, Luther's was the sort of roadside joint where folks get something called a "red top." They would bring in their old coffee cans and have them fill it half with chili and half with beef stew, then would bring it back home to feed their families.

73 Years for Luther's Café




Gateways


For 50 years, down an unassuming side street in the exclusive borough of Chelsea, West London, “the bohemian hung out, the artists drank—and naughty sex happened.”

So explains former Great British Baking Show host Sandi Toksvig in a new film, Gateways Grind, a documentary that charts life behind closed doors at the longest running lesbian club of all time—and, as Toksvig says, “the most famous lesbian club in the world.” Opened first as a mixed-gender venue in 1931 before men were duly barred 35 years later, the green door of the Gateways club ushered in regulars from Patricia Highsmith to British artist Maggi Hambling.

The Killing of Sister George, the 1968 film adaptation of Frank Marcus’ 1964 play about an aging lesbian soap opera diva, was shot there with the club’s real clientele dancing alongside its stars Beryl Reid and Susannah York. Mick Jagger once tried to convince the owner to bend the women-only policy for him, promising to wear a dress if he were to be allowed down the rickety steps and into the throbbing basement beneath.

Trudy Howson, LGBT poet laureate, was a teenager in Lancashire, northern England, when she first came across mention of Gateways. She was reading a review of The Killing of Sister George—one that decried the “terrible club” in which it was filmed—“and I just read it and thought, I’ve *got* to go to that.” Howson knew she was a lesbian, but “I’d never even met a gay person… so for me, it was like a beacon.”

Gateways





Interview With Christian Weissmann


An actor on the rise, Christian Weissmann is a charming queer star who’s been popping up everywhere lately.

Between the Tubi original rom-com Crushed and guest spots on Netflix‘s Dear White People series and Peacock’s Saved By The Bell reboot, Weissmann’s becoming something of a streaming regular.

Later this year, he’ll have his splashiest role yet in Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story, Netflix’s star-studded portrait of the infamous serial killer from super-producers Ryan Murphy and Ian Brennan.

Meanwhile, Weissmann has been moonlighting as an op-ed writer for the Los Angeles Times, penning thoughtful essays about quarantine relationships and bisexuality’s place within the LGBTQ community, which prove he’s a multi-hyphenate to look out for in the coming years.

Weissmann recently took the time to connect with Queerty and be the inaugural subject for “Dishin’ It,” our new Q&A interview series where we talk to some of our favorite queer stars about, well, anything and everything!

Game to play along, he fielded our random questions to share stories about his longtime Hannah Montana stan-dom, explain why tennis kids become anxious adults, and ask what we’ve been wondering for years: Why wasn’t the butler in The Parent Trap gay?

Interview With Christian Weissmann




Comments from Bette Midler and Macy Gray


In the aftermath of the Supreme Court’s decision last month to overturn the constitutional right to an abortion, many celebrities have spoken out about what they see as a loss of reproductive rights and bodily autonomy.

Then came Bette Midler.

The entertainer, in a tweet posted Monday, wrote that women around the world “are being stripped of our rights over our bodies, our lives and even of our name!”

“They don’t call us ‘women’ anymore; they call us ‘birthing people’ or ‘menstruators,’ and even ‘people with vaginas’! Don’t let them erase you! Every human on earth owes you!” she added.

The same day, an interview between media personality Piers Morgan and singer Macy Gray aired in which Morgan brought up the controversy over trans athletes competing in women’s sports.

“I will say this, and everyone’s going to hate me, but as a woman, just because you go change your [body] parts, [it] doesn’t make you a woman. Sorry,” Gray said.

Both entertainers were trending on social media this week as transgender advocates and allies called out what they saw as transphobic remarks.

Comments from Bette Midler and Macy Gray



Defining Genderqueer


While some members of the LGBTQ community may be familiar with the term, “genderqueer” isn’t as well-known in society at large. So, what does the term “genderqueer” mean and how is it different from other identities it’s often confused with?

Read on to learn more about the term, its origins, and what it means to be genderqueer.

Many genderqueer people have different explanations of what the term means to them. But, in the general sense, genderqueer is a gender identity that falls outside the categories of male and female. Some may define it as their gender belonging somewhere in the middle of the gender binary, while others are beyond the binary completely.

The origins of the word “genderqueer” are unclear, although it is believed to have been used as early as the 1980s during the rise of queer zine culture. Back then, queer writers and activists were challenging the notions of gender and wanted a term that existed beyond the gender binary.

Now, people often think of the word genderqueer as an umbrella term for people who are in between or outside the “male” and “female” binary, people who are fluid in their gender, or people who are of a third gender.

It’s important to note that not every genderqueer person uses they/them pronouns, so it’s best to ask them what pronouns to use.

Defining Genderqueer



"Y'all Means All"


Season 6 of Queer Eye premiered on Netflix in December 2021, and country artist Miranda Lambert helped create an original song for the season. The sixth season of Queer Eye was filmed in Texas, Lambert’s home state. For the show, Lambert made an inclusive country song called “Y’all Means All.” In an interview with Esquire, Lambert shared why she was driven to make the song.

When brainstorming the song, Lambert reached out to her brother who is openly gay for advice.

“I was like, ‘Give me some like cool phrases—what are the cool kids doing right now?'” Lambert recounted to Esquire. “And he’s like, ‘Well, there’s a hashtag going around right now that’s “y’all means all.'” And I was like, ‘Oh, my God, that’s it! I’m taking you on a beach trip, you totally gave me the song title!'”

Esquire published an interview with Lambert in April 2022. In the interview, Lambert shared that her brother is helping her become more politically aware, especially when it comes to LGBTQ rights.

“I don’t usually do politics at all,” Lambert told Esquire. “My brother and his husband and their group of friends have really taught me a lot.”

In her conversations with her brother, Lambert came to the realization that she needs “to be more vocal” about certain topics.

"Y'all Means All"



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

We count on you to send us your news items, questions, and nominations for posts of the day.
If you have items you’d like to see published, send them to CellarDweller115.

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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - July to September 2022
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2022, 03:09:11 PM »


Tuesday, July 19th, 2022





Heath and His Self Doubts


Heath Ledger is remembered as one of the greatest actors of his generation, but Ledger wasn't as sure of himself as his reputation might suggest. Some of Ledger's more memorable performances include his role as the Joker in Christopher Nolan's "The Dark Knight," his romantic leading role opposite Jake Gyllenhaal in "Brokeback Mountain," and his cynical character in a teen movie take on a Shakespearean classic, "10 Things I Hate About You." Ledger's electricity onscreen is undeniable, and his performances are brimming with life. That's because the actor was able to harness all of his natural nervous energy and gift-wrap it for the audience.

The late actor's friends and ex-partners remember him as a rolling stone. Michelle Williams, with whom Ledger shared a daughter, described him as having an "uncontrollable energy" to Interview Magazine. "For as long as I'd known him, he'd had bouts with insomnia. He just had too much energy," she revealed. When Ledger passed away from an overdose on sleeping pills, this energy was re-interpreted as anxiety. His fellow actor Philip Seymour Hoffman saw things differently. Hoffman says that Ledger's "constant state of movement... didn't see[m] like anxiety to me. It seemed like excitement."

The actor was well aware of his own nervousness, and in fact consciously used it to his advantage. "My nervous energy is usually the easiest form of energy to tap into," Ledger told Blank on Blank. "It's a pattern for me, going into any job carrying a certain level of anxieties and doubt... I recognize it as necessary because without it I wouldn't try as hard to overcome it."


Heath and His Self Doubts




Early LGBTQ Pioneers


Two progressive, upper-crust women who hosted a former president and first lady at their home at the edge of Balboa Park. A spiritualist who channeled famous composers and built one of the most stunning mansions in San Diego for himself and his companion. A celebrity female impersonator who’s still the talk of East County history buffs. And a La Jolla physician whose stunning secret made front-page news from coast to coast.

Meet the early LGBTQ – or at least LGBTQ-adjacent – pioneers of San Diego. They each lived here about a century ago, long before most people thought “gay” was anything other than festive. We know nothing about their intimate physical relationships, but it’s clear they lived lives that would be considered alternative in their time – and ours.

In honor of San Diego Pride this week, here’s a closer look at six LGBTQ pioneers:

Alice Lee & Katherine Teats
Jesse Shepard & Lawrence W. Tonner
Julian Eltinge
Dr. Eugene Perkins

Early LGBTQ Pioneers




Legal Challenge to Foster Children


In light of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) letting a lawsuit alleging discrimination go unchallenged, an unmarried lesbian will be able to foster children. However, the move by the USCCB raises questions about whether the organization will permit single LGBTQ+ adults to foster through Catholic organizations while still discriminating against same-sex couples.

In 2020, Kelly Easter expressed interest in becoming a foster parent to a refugee child through a federal program. Her inquiry to the U.S. Office of Refugee Resettlement was forwarded to Bethany Christian Services, the only agency handling the program in her area. Bethany turned her down because she is a lesbian, citing its policy against placing children with LGBTQ+ people.

She complained about the discrimination and asked if there might be an exception because the program is federally funded, but Bethany officials said they were bound by the policy of the USCCB, for which it is a subcontractor. She also contacted the Office of Refugee Resettlement, where staffers said they would look into the matter.

Bethany announced this year that it was lifting its discriminatory policy, and Easter made inquiries again. After some back-and-forth, she was told that the Bethany office most convenient to her home would still not allow her to foster a child because of the contract with the bishops’ conference. Bethany officials referred her to another location that is not connected with the Catholic group, but that did not work out for her because the necessary travel was incompatible with her work schedule as a real estate agent. So she filed the suit.

Legal Challenge to Foster Children





Matt Gaetz on Bisexual Women


Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) had a heated exchange with HRC legal director and out bi woman Sarah Warbelow that left Gaetz accusing Warbelow of redefining bisexuality.

“If a woman is with men and women, then they’re bisexual, right?” Gaetz asked Warbelow at a House Judiciary Committee hearing on the effect that overturning Roe v. Wade will have on individual rights in the U.S.

“That is not true, sir,” Warbelow responded. “An individual who is attracted to people of both sexes – both men and… male and female – is someone who’s bisexual. They can be in long-term, monogamous relationships.”

“I don’t ask this to be dismissive, but you’re saying that lesbian women are also capable of being into men?” Gaetz asked.

“That is not what I said. I said bisexual-” Warbelow answered before Gaetz cut her off.

While the discussion was bizarre and off-topic – Gaetz was arguing that LGBTQ people should oppose abortion so that more people will be forced to carry pregnancies to term and gay couples will have more babies to adopt, which is already pretty strange – Warbelow’s point was clear and not new at all: sexual orientation is about a person’s attraction to one, many, or no genders, not about who they are currently having sex with.

Matt Gaetz on Bisexual Women




Transgender Inmate Impregnates Two


A transgender inmate who impregnated two women while incarcerated at Edna Mahan Correctional Facility for Women has been moved to a new facility, according to the Department of Corrections.

Demi Minor, 27, was transferred to Garden State Youth Correctional Facility, a prison for young adult offenders in Burlington County, last month, Dan Sperrazza, a Department of Corrections spokesman, said.

He said the DOC moved Minor to the vulnerable unit at the facility and that she is currently the only woman prisoner on the site. Sperrazza said he could not comment on the DOC’s specific housing actions in Minor’s case because of policies around privacy.

According to the corrections department, Minor is serving a 30-year sentence for manslaughter and is eligible for parole in 2037.

Neither she nor her attorney could be reached for comment Friday.

But a July 5 post on Minor’s website claims corrections officers forcibly removed her from Edna Mahan and beat her during the transfer to Garden State Youth Correctional facility.

Transgender Inmate Impregnates Two



Asexual and Aromantic Added to Sims


The Sims 4 publisher Electronic Arts continues to update the game’s gender and sexuality options with its High School Years expansion coming later in July. During a press preview Wednesday, The Sims 4 developers detailed new options for sexual orientation in the Create-A-Sim menu — players can choose who their Sim is romantically or sexually interested in.

The limitation there is that the options are limited to a binary: Men or Women. The Sims 4 lead designer Jessica Croft explained that the High School Years free update is a first version of the intended feature — the team recognizes that the language here does not reflect the addition of nonbinary pronouns for Sims that came in May. The system was built to be expandable to include nonbinary Sims in the future.

Croft explained further in a developer blog published Friday:

I’ll try to be very transparent with this one. This is due to technical limitations. As stated above, mechanically, non binary Sims don’t yet exist in TS4. You still have to make a binary gender selection for your Sim at creation, regardless of pronoun settings. We hope that we’ve shown our commitment to improving representation of gender identities with features such as Gender Customization, which allows you to modify physical frame, clothing preferences, pregnancy and toilet use options. We look at the pronouns update as another important step toward better representation of non binary genders, but we also acknowledge that pronouns are not the same thing as gender identities.

Asexual and Aromantic Added to Sims



Ally Charles Barkley


Charles Barkley has a strong message for LBGTQ fans.

“I want to say this,” the NBA star-turned-commentator said in a video posted earlier this week by TikTok user l._banana . “If you’re gay or transgender, I love you. Hey, and if anybody gives you shit, you tell ’em Charles said fuck you!”

Barkley made the comments onstage at an event at Nevada’s Harveys Lake Tahoe Hotel during the 2022 American Century Championship celebrity golf tournament. The video has since gone viral on multiple social media platforms, including TikTok, Twitter and Reddit.

The comments are in line with previous remarks made by the former pro basketball player. In 2020, Barkley said on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” that he was never going to let anti-LGBTQ discrimination “happen on my watch.” He then recounted how he had convinced the NBA to move its 2017 All-Star Game out of Charlotte, North Carolina, in protest of the state’s “bathroom bill” that effectively blocked cities from allowing trans people to use restrooms in line with their gender identity.

“Black people know what discrimination is like,” he told DeGeneres. “If you’re in a position of power, you’ve got to always stand up against discrimination. I’ve been blessed.”

Ally Charles Barkley



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

We count on you to send us your news items, questions, and nominations for posts of the day.
If you have items you’d like to see published, send them to CellarDweller115.

To subscribe to The Daily Sheet, click the “Notify” button at the top or bottom of the page.
When a new issue of TDS is posted, you will be notified by e-mail.

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Re: The Daily Sheet - July to September 2022
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2022, 11:43:38 AM »


Tuesday, July 26th, 2022





Annie Proulx on Jack's Death


“Brokeback Mountain” author Annie Proulx on what people misunderstand about the story.

This interview is part of a series about the 50 greatest fictional deaths of all time.

Slate: What’s challenging about writing the death of a character you’ve come to like? What’s rewarding about it?

Annie Proulx: I generally like the characters I construct. But they are characters, elements in a story, and they have a job to do to make the story work. It is my work to guide their actions, thoughts, and dialogue to achieve a strong, coherent story with meaning. (Entertainment is more of a side dish.) The relationship I have with a character is different than the relationship a reader might have.

Slate:  Jack’s death in “Brokeback” occurs not only off the page, but in fact really is delivered to us via Ennis’ imagination, as he tries to decide whether the story Jack’s wife tells him is true.


Annie Proulx on Jack's Death




Pete Buttigieg Vs. The GOP


Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg had sharp words for the Republicans opposing a bill codifying the right to same-sex marriages, urging them to support the legislation's passage in the Senate after it won bipartisan House approval.

Buttigieg, the first openly gay person to be confirmed to a Cabinet position, underscored during a CNN appearance on Sunday what it would mean for the legislation to become law, recounting a typical weekend morning in which he said he tries to take on household duties to give his husband, Chasten, a break.

"That half hour of my morning had me thinking about how much I depend on and count on my spouse every day. And our marriage deserves to be treated equally. I don't know why this would be hard for a senator or a congressman," Buttigieg said.

"I don't understand how such a majority of House Republicans voted 'no' on our marriage as recently as Tuesday hours after I was in a room with a lot of them talking about transportation policy, having what I thought were perfectly normal conversations with many of them on that subject only for them to go around the corner and say my marriage doesn't deserve to continue," he said.

"If they don't want to spend a lot of time on this, they can vote 'yes' and move on," he continued, "and that would be really reassuring for a lot of families around America, including mine."

Pete Buttigieg Vs. The GOP




Chicago Lesbian Bar Reopens


A ’70s-themed lesbian cocktail bar is reopening — for the second time — in the basement of a Ukrainian Village restaurant and art gallery this weekend.

Dorothy, 2500 W. Chicago Ave., will reopen its doors Saturday in a renovated space underneath the Split-Rail restaurant and The Martin art gallery.

The bar was started in February 2020 by Split-Rail owner Zoe Schor and business partner Michelle Szot, who has since left the business.

Dorothy was only open for a few weeks before COVID-19 shut down the state’s hospitality industry in March 2020.

Dorothy reopened almost two years later in January 2022. But COVID numbers were again on the rise, leading owners to close the bar for a second time.

“We were only open for a few weeks in January. The timing wasn’t right. Omicron was raging, it was just a challenging time,” Schor said.

Six months later, Schor feels like the time is finally right to reopen the bar for good.

A former Ukrainian sports bar, Dorothy features retro ’70s furniture, a conversation pit and a vintage bar top left by the space’s previous tenant.

Chicago Lesbian Bar Reopens





Bisexuals Can't Sit?


Do bisexual people really sit weird? Well, according to the internet, it’s a resounding yes. Since 2017, it’s been a running joke in the bisexual community that bi people can’t sit properly to save their lives. But why is the bi sitting stereotype even a thing? And where did it even come from?

Grab a chair and get comfortable because we’re about to take a deep dive into the bisexual sitting meme.

If you’re not online much, the stereotype that bisexual people sit weird may be a little confusing to you. After all, it is an oddly specific trope that doesn’t seem to have any connection to bisexuality, which is defined as an attraction to people of the same and opposite gender.

The stereotype posits that bisexual people, for whatever reason, don’t know how to sit in chairs properly. They’ll drape one leg over the arm of a chair, sit half off a chair with their legs up, or cross their legs with one leg under the other – basically they’ll do anything but sit upright with their backs flush against the back of their chair.

The exact origins of this meme are unknown, but one theory states that, because bisexuals aren’t straight, they’re incapable of doing anything straight – including sitting in a chair.

Some internet users attribute the meme to Twitter user @eIektranatchi, who was one of the first people to write “bi culture is not sitting properly” in 2017. Since then, the meme took off and has been rehashed online with various first-person accounts of sitting strangely.

Bisexuals Can't Sit?




The Public And Trans Rights


In his concurring opinion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, Justice Clarence Thomas wrote that he views not only abortion precedent as wrong but also precedents involving LGBTQ rights. Public opinion, however, is largely against restricting LGBTQ rights. Over the past few decades, these rights have steadily gained backing from the American public — for example, support for same-sex marriage has doubled since the late 1990s. And laws intended to protect LGBTQ people from discrimination in jobs, public accommodations and housing garners the support of about 8 in 10 Americans, including majorities of Republicans and white evangelicals.

At the same time, however, policies curbing certain aspects of LGBTQ rights — particularly those pertaining to transgender people — have gained traction in state legislatures across the nation. A number of states have already implemented policies affecting transgender Americans, and more states are introducing similar measures. And despite widespread support for general nondiscrimination policies, many Americans actually do support restricting rights for transgender people.

For example, the Public Religion Research Institute, where I’m the research director, found last year that 47 percent of Americans favored “bathroom bills” that would require transgender people to use the bathroom of their sex assigned at birth, not their gender identity.1 Meanwhile, 52 percent of Americans said they were opposed to transgender boys’ participating in high school sports for their gender identity; 61 percent said the same of transgender girls.

For some Americans — especially members of the LGBTQ community — supporting restrictive bathroom bills and opposing participation in sports of one’s gender identity are forms of discrimination and should be incompatible with broader support for nondiscrimination protections. Yet in that same survey from PRRI, we found that a considerable share of Americans held seemingly opposing views. Forty-six percent of Americans, for instance, said they both supported general nondiscrimination protections and opposed allowing transgender girls to participate in girls’ sports. Meanwhile, 37 percent supported nondiscrimination protections and opposed allowing transgender boys to participate in boys’ sports. Finally, 36 percent supported nondiscrimination protections and supported bathroom bills requiring transgender people to use the bathroom of their sex assigned at birth.

The Public And Trans Rights



Greece Bans Surgeries


Greece's parliament has banned "sex-normalising" surgeries on babies born intersex, with atypical chromosomes that affect their bodies in a way that does not fit with the normative definitions of male or female.

Under a new law approved by parliament on Tuesday, surgeries that seek to ensure a child ascribes to traditional notions of male and female on people under the age of 15 years are banned in Greece, unless there is a court decision stating otherwise.

The bill stipulates fines and a prison term for doctors conducting such surgery.

Operations, including corrective surgeries or hormonal therapies to change face or body characteristics, on intersex people over the age of 15 years will be permitted if the teenagers consent, according to the law.

Rinio Simeonidou, mother of an intersex teenager and secretary general of Intersex Greece, told parliament before the vote that the approval of the bill would be "a truly historic moment for all intersex children in Greece" and a good start in eliminating violations of intersex people's rights.

Malta, Portugal and Germany have already banned such surgeries, which in the past have led intersex people to sterilization, loss of sexual sensation, psychosomatic trauma and health problems, Simeonidou said.

Greece Bans Surgeries



Celebrating Clela Rorex


The Boulder community celebrated Saturday the life of Clela Rorex on what would've been her 79th birthday.

"It was very moving, very touching, mostly because I was living a whole lot of my own memories, listening to other people talking about her," longtime resident Neil Fishman said.

The former Boulder County clerk died this past June. She cemented her place in history as the first in Colorado to issue a marriage license to a gay couple back in 1975.

"I don't know that I remember hearing her name back in 1975, but I certainly felt her influence when she issued those marriage licenses," Fishman said.

He was one of dozens of esteemed guests gathered at the Boulder Jewish Community Center to honor Rorex's legacy.

"Clela did not want a service. She was very clear she wanted a celebration of life, and what a life it was," Mardi Moore, executive director at Out Boulder County, said.

Celebrating Clela Rorex



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: lislis, CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - July to September 2022
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2022, 05:27:01 PM »


Tuesday, August 2nd, 2022





Where Are They Now?


2005’s Brokeback Mountain is one of the most culturally significant LGBTQ+ movies in history, and it also featured a star-studded cast of actors who became Hollywood A-listers over the years.

Directed by Ang Lee and based on a 1997 short story by Annie Proulx, Brokeback Mountain was set in the 1960s and told a story of forbidden love between two cowboys: Ennis Del Mar (Heath Ledger) and Jack Twist (Jake Gyllenhaal). Throughout the film, Ennis and Jack’s intense-but-reluctant relationship ends up having several repercussions on the people in their lives.

LGBTQ+ stories in mainstream media are much more common in 2022. Back in 2005, though, it seemed unimaginable that a queer movie could be so well-received by critics and audiences. Against the odds, Brokeback Mountain was nominated for a whopping eight Academy Awards, including the highly-coveted Best Picture award. The film ultimately won three Oscars – Best Director (Ang Lee), Best Adapted Screenplay (Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana), and Best Original Score (Gustavo Santaolalla) – and an outcry took place when it didn’t win Best Picture over Crash.

In hindsight, Brokeback Mountain featured some of the most talented and famous actors in Hollywood. However, most of these stars were still up-and-coming actors when they worked in this movie – which makes their post-Brokeback Mountain trajectory so fascinating.


Where Are They Now?




Adam Graham Resigns


Oklahoma city’s youngest and first openly gay mayor has resigned just two months after being elected, saying that he no longer feels safe after facing targeted harassment.

Adam Graham, the former mayor of The Village, a small city encircled by Oklahoma City, shared his resignation letter last Monday on Twitter. He wrote that it was “an honor to serve” The Village over the past five years of being on the city council, then being elected mayor. “Since 2018, I’ve fought against ageism, racism and homophobia at every step,” Graham wrote. “I was proud that The Village was ready for a young voice and for new ideas.”

But Graham also wrote that “certain elements of the population” had “recently become emboldened to pursue threats and attacks bordering on violence.” He shared instances of this alleged harassment in the letter: “In the last month, I’ve been followed home from meetings, threatened while walking my dog, harassed at Starbucks and have had my tires slashed,” Graham wrote. The incidents have ultimately led him to feel unsafe to serve as mayor, and he ended his letter with a resignation effective immediately.

The harassment began after an incident two months ago in which he intervened in a traffic stop, Graham tells Them in a phone interview. He says he was driving home when he noticed two police officers from the adjacent city of Nichols Hills, which is 93% white and has the highest per capita income in Oklahoma, detaining two Black people in a car. “I pulled over to simply ask them if they knew they were outside their jurisdiction,” Graham says. “They told me to leave, they were pretty much yelling at me.”

“Everyone in Oklahoma knows Nichols Hills… they’re just gonna pull you over if you’re not old, rich and white,” Graham says.

Adam Graham Resigns




The Truth About The League


When Maybelle Blair joined the women’s baseball league that inspired the film and TV series “A League of Their Own,” she wondered if she’d be the only gay woman there. It didn’t take long for her to learn she’d truly found a league of her own.

“Out of 650, I bet you 400 was gay” in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, Blair said at a recent screening of the Amazon Studios series at the Frameline San Francisco International LGBTQ+ Film Festival. Blair, who was a pitcher for the league’s Peoria Redwings in 1948 and later played pro softball, came out publicly when the series premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival days before the Frameline screening.

Blair recounted that when she fell in love with a girl in high school, “I thought we were the only two in the world that were gay.” They had to be careful, she noted, and when she went off to play pro baseball, “I thought, Oh, my God, I’m gonna be the only one here,” she said.

“But it took me about 24 hours to find out I like somebody,” recalled Blair, who was nicknamed “All the Way Mae” for her prowess on the diamond. “But it was wonderful. … So many of the girls came in from the farms and they came in from all over the United States. And a lot of them thought they were alone too. And we had quite a time. There were so many gays in the league. It was amazing. Oh, but you know, you let’s face it, we’re good athletes,” she told the packed crowd at Frameline’s opening night.

While the women still had to be careful, being in the league was like a party, Blair said. “On our days off, we found the gay bars, and we danced, and we had one heck of a party that wouldn’t end,” she said.

The Truth About The League





Returning To The Ukraine


Morning turned into afternoon. A scorching sun blanketed the concrete of the local sports hall belonging to the community of Zolochiv, a frontline village just minutes from the Russian border.

There, over the course of several hours, the International Committee for the Red Cross, with the help of local residents, unloaded over 20 tons of supplies for the besieged townsfolk. The town’s mayor, Viktor Kovalenko, who for the preceding five months valiantly rallied the community against Russian aggression, oversaw the delivery.

An unassuming bisexual journalist who had returned to the city where she was born just days prior reported on the mission. Natalie Vikhrov shadowed Kovalenko and his team, covering the delivery and interviewing members of the community’s health, humanitarian, and security apparatuses. She was there, next to the mayor, as the Red Cross pulled away and the Russian rockets fell.

As Kovalenko barked out orders and headed into the bomb shelter to help lead the response against the early afternoon attack, she stayed by his side.

As a bisexual woman, Vikhrov has learned how to “make tough decisions.” Born in Kharkiv when Ukraine was still a part of the Soviet Union, Vikhrov’s working class parents made the decision to leave for Adelaide, Australia when she was 8 years old. As the USSR crumbled around them, her parents “wanted a better life for me and my sister.”

Now comfortable with using both queer or bisexual to describe her sexuality, in high school “it didn’t click,” for her that she was sexually different in any way.

Returning To The Ukraine




Honoring Cherry Bush


Cherry Bush lived in the Sylmar neighborhood of Los Angeles. Cherry was loved by her family. Her brother called her his “oldest friend” on social media. Cherry, a 48-year-old transgender woman, was experiencing homelessness when she was shot and killed on July 5 after being targeted and disparaged based on her perceived gender identity. Cherry’s death is at least the 22nd violent killing of a transgender or gender non-conforming person in 2022. We say “at least” because too often these deaths go unreported — or misreported.

A suspect has been arrested and charged with one count each of murder and attempted murder, with a hate crime allegation, according to the LA County District Attorney.

People in the transgender and gender non-conforming community often experience homelessness and financial insecurity at a disproportionate level. One study using data from 2016-2019 found that over 8% of transgender adults had experienced homelessness at least once in the previous year, more than six times that of cisgender/straight adults (1.4%). Among youth, a report from HRC Foundation found that over one-fifth (22%) of transgender high school students were “usually sleeping somewhere that is not the home of their parent or guardian,” compared to 3% of non-LGBTQ+ youth. This is an epidemic that has been growing in recent years in the United States; according to the National Alliance to End Homelessness transgender individual homelessness is up 57% since 2017. The roots of homelessness start in childhood, particularly among transgender youth, who experience higher rates of family rejection and childhood abuse–but it is also tied to factors in adulthood such as inequal shelter access and lack of anti-discrimnation protections for transgender and gender non-conforming people in employment, housing, social services, education and health care–the latter of which also translates to higher rates of poverty and financial insecurity, further increasing risk for homelessness. In 2021, transgender women earned just 60 cents for every dollar earned by the average American worker (and non-binary, genderqueer, genderfluid, and two-spirit workers earned just 70 cents on the dollar), translating to transgender women earning almost $21,000 less a year than the median American salary.

Honoring Cherry Bush



The Nonbinary Symbol


People who identify as non-binary reject the concept of gender as, well, binary. For non-binary people, the world isn’t divided into just male or female. Instead, they view gender as a spectrum in which one can identify somewhere in the middle or even outside of it altogether. As such, non-binary people do not strictly identify as either men or women.

So, if men have the male symbol or ♂ and women have the female symbol or ♀, what symbol would a non-binary person use to identify themselves?

Before we talk about the non-binary gender symbol, let’s get a few basics out of the way first. What are gender symbols in the first place? And where did they originate?

Gender symbols are glyphs or graphics that are designed to represent a particular gender. The most popular gender symbols – the male ♂ symbol and the female ♀ symbol – came into use in the 16th century, when a botanist named Carl Linnaeus used the glyphs to denote the genders of flowers in his books Mantissa Plantarum and Mantissa Plantarum Altera.

Linnaeus also used the symbol ☿, also known as the symbol for Mercury, to denote “hermaphroditic” flowers or flowers that had both stamens and pistils. All these symbols are rooted in Greek astronomy, which associated certain gods with planets, metals, and traits.

The Nonbinary Symbol



Disney Supports Same-Sex Marriage


Just months after Disney faced backlash for its public stance on Florida’s “Don’t Say Gay” bill, the House of Mouse has signed a letter supporting the passage of the Respect for Marriage Act.

The House of Representatives recently passed the bill, which would codify the right to same-sex marriages into federal law.

“Americans from all walks of life, across demographics, geographies, and party lines agree that loving, committed couples have the right to be respected and protected under the law,” the letter reads. “As many of us highlighted in our support for Marriage Equality in 2015, a patchwork of inconsistent and discriminatory state marriage laws goes against our company values and makes it harder for us to do business and to recruit and retain top talent.”

The bill, which passed in the House, would also grant federal protections for interracial marriages. Every single Democrat in the House, 220 in total, voted to approve the bill while only 47 Republicans supported it.

“Codifying a consistent and inclusive federal standard conferred by the Loving, Windsor, and Obergefell rulings will help to ensure marriage equality, eliminate confusion for employers and enable us to retain and attract talent,” the letter continues. “No person, including same-sex couples and interracial couples protected by this bill, should fear their marriage will not be recognized by the federal government or their employment benefits threatened.”

Disney Supports Same-Sex Marriage



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Re: The Daily Sheet - July to September 2022
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2022, 05:40:20 AM »


Tuesday, August 9th, 2022





Oscar Hopes For Michelle


Is Michelle Williams (“The Fabelmans”) about to receive her fifth Oscar nomination and first win? Yes, according to our extra super ultra early odds for Best Supporting Actress, which are based on the combined predictions of thousands of Gold Derby users who have already placed their bets here in our predictions center. Do you agree that Williams will be the woman to beat?

“The Fabelmans” hasn’t screened anywhere yet, so the size, scope, and impact of Williams’s role remain to be seen, but we know she plays the mother of a boy based on director and co-writer Steven Spielberg himself. Playing a maternal figure is often a good way to win an Oscar, whether the mother is a positive influence (Patricia Arquette in “Boyhood,” Yuh-Jung Youn in “Minari”) or a negative one (Mo’Nique in “Precious,” Allison Janney in “I, Tonya”).

Williams also has an overdue narrative: she has been nominated four times over the past 16 years without a win, for “Brokeback Mountain” (2005), “Blue Valentine” (2010), “My Week with Marilyn” (2011), and “Manchester by the Sea” (2016). Along the way she also picked up an Emmy for playing dancer and actress Gwen Verdon in the FX limited series “Fosse/Verdon,” further demonstrating her consistency and dramatic range.

For years Spielberg movies were kryptonite for actors at the Oscars. It took decades for even a single performer to win for one of his movies. It took an actor of the stature of Daniel Day-Lewis to break that curse: he won Best Actor for playing the title president in “Lincoln” (2012) Then Mark Rylance won Best Supporting Actor for “Bridge of Spies” (2015). And just this past year Ariana DeBose became the first woman to win an acting Oscar for a Spielberg film, taking Best Supporting Actress for the his remake of “West Side Story.”

Oscar Hopes For Michelle




Searching For Remains


Nearly a half-century after arson killed 32 people in a New Orleans gay bar, the City Council has renewed the search for the remains of four victims, including three who were never identified.

The UpStairs Lounge burned on June 24, 1973, killing 31 men, including two whose mother died with them, and injuring another woman and 14 men.

Ferris LeBlanc, 50, a World War II veteran who fought in the Battle of the Bulge, and three bodies burned past identification were buried next to each other in the city's unmarked "potter's field."

The motion passed Thursday directs the city attorney, property management director and chief administrative officer to provide "all reasonable assistance" toward recovering the remains.

"The City's callous and deeply inadequate response ... rooted in pervasive anti-gay sentiment" made suffering worse for victims' families and friends, states the motion written by Councilmember J.P. Morrell.

And, he wrote, "Poor record-keeping and indifference continue to hamper the efforts of surviving family members to reclaim the bodies of victims and to provide them the dignity of a proper burial."

Searching For Remains




Lesbian Bed Death


If you’re a lesbian or if you align with the lesbian community in some way, you might fear lesbian bed death. Maybe you feel like the reputation of lesbian sex rests upon your strong, lesbian (or lesbian-adjacent) shoulders and therefore YOU MUST HUMP A LEG AT LEAST ONCE A DAY FOR THE CAUSE! Let’s cut to the chase: “bed death” doesn’t only happen in lesbian relationships. Most relationships — regardless of the genders and orientations of the people involved — experience “bed death,” or, to use gentler terms, a temporary or longer-term decrease in sexual activity at some point.

So where did this idea of lesbian bed death come from? Put on your Lesbian Sweater Vests, ’cause we’re about to do some research.

Between 1978 and 1979, social psychologist Philip Blumstein and sociologist Pepper Schwartz — more recently known as a relationship expert on the reality series Married at First Sight — mailed out relationship surveys to couples in major US cities. 12,000 couples volunteered to fill out their questionnaires, including 788 lesbian couples. In 1983, Blumstein and Schwartz published their findings in American Couples: Money, Work, Sex.

The research duo concluded that lesbian couples (in this case, they meant cisgender women in relationships with other cisgender women) have sex less frequently than the other types of couples they studied (heterosexual married couples, heterosexual cohabitating couples and gay male couples) and that lesbian couples’ sexual activity decreases over the course of their relationships.

Lesbian Bed Death





Is Everyone Bisexual?


“Everyone is bisexual these days!” “Is everyone bisexual???” “We’re all bisexual!”

As more and more people take to social media and text to share their (bi)sexuality, these sayings are becoming commonplace. Heck, maybe you’ve even uttered one when yet another pop star or pal, family member, or foe came out as bisexual.

But is everyone bisexual? Ahead, bisexuality experts and activists answer this question. They also explain why these one-liners — even when they come from a good place — can be problematic.

No, not everyone is bisexual.

Everyone is not any other sexual orientation or label, either.

Each person has their own unique experience of their sexuality, and each person likes a different label or set of labels for putting their sexuality and sexual orientation into words. (Some people even prefer no label at all).

Is Everyone Bisexual?




Social Influence on Transgender Youth


“Social contagion” is not driving an increasing number of adolescents to come out as transgender, according to a new study published Wednesday in the journal Pediatrics.

The study also found that the proportion of adolescents who were assigned female at birth and have come out as transgender also has not increased, which contradicts claims that adolescents whose birth sex is female are more susceptible to this so-called external influence.

“The hypothesis that transgender and gender diverse youth assigned female at birth identify as transgender due to social contagion does not hold up to scrutiny and should not be used to argue against the provision of gender-affirming medical care for adolescents,” study senior author Dr. Alex S. Keuroghlian, director of the National LGBTQIA+ Health Education Center at the Fenway Institute and the Massachusetts General Hospital Psychiatry Gender Identity Program, said in a statement.

The “social contagion” theory can be traced back to a 2018 paper published in the journal PLOS One. Dr. Lisa Littman, who at the time was a professor of behavioral and social sciences at Brown University, coined the term “rapid onset gender dysphoria,” which she described as adolescents experiencing a conflict between their birth sex and gender identity “suddenly during or after puberty.” These adolescents, she wrote, “would not have met the criteria for gender dysphoria in childhood” and are experiencing dysphoria due to social influence. 

Littman also hypothesized that adolescents assigned female at birth are more likely to be affected by social contagion and, as a result, are overrepresented in groups of adolescents experiencing gender dysphoria when compared to those who were assigned male at birth.

Social Influence on Transgender Youth



Gender Expansive


Issues regarding transgender and non-binary people’s rights have become a hot-button topic these days. In navigating these discussions, you may come across words that may be new or unfamiliar to you – including the term “gender expansive”.

Here, we break down the term and why it’s become an important part of the conversation.

According to PFLAG, the “first and largest organization dedicated to supporting, educating, and advocating for LGBTQ+ people and their families”, the phrase “gender expansive” describes a wide range of people who don’t adhere to gender stereotypes or “expand ideas of gender expression of gender identity.”

The “gender expansive” definition as per the Diversity Style Guide – a resource created for journalists and media professionals reporting on issues affecting the LGBTQ community, – is “people who challenge cultural expectations regarding gender roles, identities, expressions or norms.”

Gender expansive is different from the term “non-binary”, which describes people who identify as neither male nor female and who do not subscribe to the gender binary. That said, it is still often used to refer to non-binary and gender non-conforming people. Cisgender people, or people whose assigned sex at birth aligns with their gender identity, can identify as gender-expansive as well.

Gender Expansive



Disney Supports Same-Sex Marriage


Just months after Disney faced backlash for its public stance on Florida’s “Don’t Say Gay” bill, the House of Mouse has signed a letter supporting the passage of the Respect for Marriage Act.

The House of Representatives recently passed the bill, which would codify the right to same-sex marriages into federal law.

“Americans from all walks of life, across demographics, geographies, and party lines agree that loving, committed couples have the right to be respected and protected under the law,” the letter reads. “As many of us highlighted in our support for Marriage Equality in 2015, a patchwork of inconsistent and discriminatory state marriage laws goes against our company values and makes it harder for us to do business and to recruit and retain top talent.”

The bill, which passed in the House, would also grant federal protections for interracial marriages. Every single Democrat in the House, 220 in total, voted to approve the bill while only 47 Republicans supported it.

“Codifying a consistent and inclusive federal standard conferred by the Loving, Windsor, and Obergefell rulings will help to ensure marriage equality, eliminate confusion for employers and enable us to retain and attract talent,” the letter continues. “No person, including same-sex couples and interracial couples protected by this bill, should fear their marriage will not be recognized by the federal government or their employment benefits threatened.”

Disney Supports Same-Sex Marriage



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

We count on you to send us your news items, questions, and nominations for posts of the day.
If you have items you’d like to see published, send them to CellarDweller115.

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Re: The Daily Sheet - July to September 2022
« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2022, 06:50:49 PM »


Tuesday, August 16th, 2022





Focus Features' 20th, and Brokeback


On March 6, 2006, Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana stood up in the Kodak Theater in Hollywood to receive the Academy Award® for Best Adapted Screenplay for Brokeback Mountain. In addition to pointing out Annie Proulx, the author of the short story the two screenwriters adapted, Ossana thanked “Ang Lee and our brilliant cast for breathing life into our words.” The tale of two Wyoming cowboys—Jack (Jake Gyllenhaal) and Ennis (Heath Ledger)—who fall in love one summer herding sheep quickly became an American classic. Nominated for eight Oscars, Brokeback Mountain would win three prizes that night. To celebrate Focus Features' 20th year anniversary, we’re highlighting this August remarkable films like Brokeback Mountain which won an Academy Award for Best Screenplay.

In October, 1997, while staying with her writing partner, Larry McMurtry, in Texas, Diana Ossana read Annie Proulx’s short story “Brokeback Mountain” in The New Yorker. “Two-thirds of the way through reading the story, I began to sob, and I sobbed all the way to the end,” remembers Ossana. “I took the magazine downstairs and asked Larry to read the story.” Within weeks, the two contacted Proulx about optioning Brokeback Mountain. “I would likely have said no to any other screenwriter(s) who approached me on this story,” Proulx admits. “I trusted them with the story, especially Larry McMurtry, whose ear and eye for Western America is equaled by none.”

In tackling the adaptation, Ossana saw their challenge as two-fold: “We were extremely concerned about staying true to the tone of the story and determined not to veer off into sentimentality nor to lose the language of the characters and the time and place.” As different directors and actors signed up, and then had to back out, the project took over seven years to be realized. During that time, the filmmakers had what many considered “the best non-produced screenplay in Hollywood.” Eventually producer—and then Focus Features president—James Schamus and director Ang Lee stepped up. Lee, who remembers having “tears in my eyes” while reading Proulx’s short story, found the screenplay “a very faithful and great adaptation.”

Focus Features 20th, and Brokeback




Online Hate Surges


Anti-LGBTQ hate surged online following the passage of a Florida law that limits classroom instruction on sexual orientation and gender identity, a new report found.

This particular surge involves rhetoric implying that lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer people are “grooming” children and includes such slurs as “groomer,” “pedophile” and “predator” in relation to the LGBTQ community.

The month after the Florida Senate passed the Parental Rights in Education bill, or what critics have dubbed the “Don’t Say Gay” bill,  on March 8,  tweets mentioning the LGBTQ community  alongside these slurs increased 406%, according to the report, which was conducted by the LGBTQ advocacy group Human Rights Campaign and the nonprofit Center for Countering Digital Hate.

The law, which took effect July 1, bans instruction about sexual orientation and gender identity “in kindergarten through grade 3 or in a manner that is not age appropriate or developmentally appropriate for students in accordance with state standards.”

To evaluate the increase in rhetoric related to “grooming”, researchers collected a sample of 989,547 tweets that were posted between Jan. 1 and July 27 and that mentioned the LGBTQ community alongside words including “groomer” and “pedophile.” They found that an average of 6,607 tweets a day used such rhetoric in the month after the bill passed, a significant increase from 1,307 tweets the month before.

Online Hate Surges




Elana Dykewomon Has Died


“Beyond the Pale,” Elana Dykewomon’s award-winning 1997 novel, traced the intertwined stories of Jewish lesbians from Kishinev, Moldova, to the Lower East Side, in a saga that included both Russian pogroms and the deadly Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire.

“It can’t be that we are the first generation of Jewish lesbian activists on the planet,” Dykewomon said at the time. “So part of what the novel is about is searching for our ancestors and ancestral community as Jewish lesbians.”

The book won the 1998 Lambda Literary Award for lesbian fiction and was reissued in 2013. It remains a classic in the genre, where Dykewomon, who died this week at 72, was a pioneer.

Dykewomon’s death Sunday in Oakland, California, where she had lived for many years, was caused by esophageal cancer, according to her family. It came just minutes before her first play, inspired by the 2016 death of her wife, was to be performed in an elite festival.

“We mourn the loss of Elana Dykewomon, a queer activist, author, and teacher with a fiercely dedicated readership,” the Jewish Women’s Archive said in a tweet, in one of many tributes to come after Dykewomon’s death. “May her memory be a blessing.”

Born Elana Nachman in New York City in 1949, Dykewomon changed her name after the publication of her first novel, “Riverfinger Women,” in 1974. She wanted to distance herself from the Nachman line of rabbis from whom she descended, she told J. The Jewish News of Northern California, in 1997. She adopted Dykewoman, then Dykewomon, to demonstrate her allegiance to the lesbian community — but later regretted not using her name to assert her Jewish identity, too.

Elana Dykewomon Has Died





Is Everyone Bisexual?


“Everyone is bisexual these days!” “Is everyone bisexual???” “We’re all bisexual!”

As more and more people take to social media and text to share their (bi)sexuality, these sayings are becoming commonplace. Heck, maybe you’ve even uttered one when yet another pop star or pal, family member, or foe came out as bisexual.

But is everyone bisexual? Ahead, bisexuality experts and activists answer this question. They also explain why these one-liners — even when they come from a good place — can be problematic.

No, not everyone is bisexual.

Everyone is not any other sexual orientation or label, either.

Each person has their own unique experience of their sexuality, and each person likes a different label or set of labels for putting their sexuality and sexual orientation into words. (Some people even prefer no label at all).

Is Everyone Bisexual?




Florida to Enact Ban


Florida will soon bar transgender residents from using Medicaid to pay for gender-affirming care, according to the state's Agency for Health Care Administration. The rule goes into effect Aug. 21.

Several accredited medical institutions, including the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, alongside the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services say gender-affirming care can improve the mental health and overall well-being of gender-diverse people.

These organizations recommend gender-affirming care for the treatment of "gender dysphoria" -- when a person experiences emotional distress because their assigned sex at birth and gender identity don't align.

"Because gender-affirming care encompasses many facets of healthcare needs and support, it has been shown to increase positive outcomes for transgender and nonbinary children and adolescents," reads guidance from HHS. "Gender-affirming care is patient-centered and treats individuals holistically, aligning their outward, physical traits with their gender identity," the guidance continues.

However, the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration changed its rules Thursday. Medicaid can no longer be used to pay for medications and surgeries of those diagnosed with gender dysphoria in the state.

Florida to Enact Ban



Play on Joan of Arc Causes Uproar


A debate is raging online after a British theater venue announced an upcoming play about Joan of Arc would feature a non-binary person in the lead role.

Shakespeare's Globe Theatre in London announced that the upcoming production, I, Joan, will feature a Joan who uses the pronouns "they/them."

A statement made by a venue spokesperson explained their decision at length, but it didn't prevent the decision from becoming a controversial talking point across social media.

Many are questioning why the French patron saint and feminist icon is going to be played by non-binary person. Joan of Arc achieved fame in France for her heroism as she led the French army in victory over England in 1429 during the Hundred Years' War.

The play has been written by Charlie Josephine, and the performance description reads: "The men are all fighting, again. An endless war. From nowhere, an unexpected leader emerges. Young, poor and about to spark a revolution. This is Joan. Rebelling against the world's expectations, questioning the gender binary, Joan finds their power and their belief spreads like fire."

Play on Joan of Arc Causes Uproar



Losing An Ally - Olivia Newton-John


In an announcement on Facebook Monday, John Easterling, the husband of singer and actress Olivia Newton-John relayed the news that she had died at age 73.

Newton-John had been battling breast cancer for over three decades, her first cancer diagnosis in 1992 when she was 44. Although she had previously seen her cancer in remission, in 2017 she was diagnosed again.

In October of 2020 in an interview with The Guardian the pop star and actor spoke about her third diagnosis of cancer. “Three times lucky, right?” she smiles warmly. “I’m going to look at it like that. Listen, I think every day is a blessing. You never know when your time is over; we all have a finite amount of time on this planet, and we just need to be grateful for that.” She genuinely sounds as if she means every word.

The cancer’s return in 2017 was, she told The Guardian, not unexpected. “It’s been a part of my life for so long. I felt something was wrong. It’s concerning when it comes back, but I thought: ‘I’ll get through it again.’”

What of her health problems? “I don’t think of myself as sick with cancer,” she says firmly. “I choose not to see it as a fight either because I don’t like war. I don’t like fighting wherever it is – whether it’s outside or an actual war inside my body. I choose not to see it that way. I want to get my body healthy and back in balance. Part of that is your mental attitude to it. If you think: ‘Poor me,’ or ‘I’m sick,’ then you’re going to be sick.”

Losing An Ally - Olivia Newton-John



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - July to September 2022
« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2022, 04:49:03 PM »


Tuesday, August 23rd, 2022





Fen, Bog, & Swamp


Pulitzer winner Proulx (Barkskins) sounds the alarm on the place of Earth’s wetlands in the climate crisis in this stunning account. In an attempt to “understand some of what has disappeared,” Proulx lays out how “the history of wetlands is the history of their destruction.” They’ve largely been drained for agricultural and housing purposes, she writes, and continuing that trend risks calamity, as wetlands’ peat layers contain huge quantities of methane and carbon dioxide that will be released if they’re destroyed. Her dire warnings are leavened with glimpses of potential hope, but the bigger picture is bleak: “The world needs the great swamps we have drained away and the few that still exist but the human impetus to develop and drain continues,” she writes. Proulx’s prose is, as ever, stunning—in bogs, “black pools of still water in the undulating sphagnum moss can seem to be sinkholes into the underworld,” and the Earth’s peatlands “resemble a book of wallpaper samples, each with its own design and character—some little more than water and reeds, others luxuriously diverse landscapes of colors we urban moderns never knew existed.” This resonant ode to a planet in peril is tough to forget.

Esquire magazine has included Fen, Bog & Swamp on their list of Best Books of Fall of 2022.

Fen, Bog, & Swamp

Best Books of Fall of 2022



Gay Sex Decriminalized in Singapore


Singapore announced Sunday it will decriminalize sex between men by repealing a colonial-era law while protecting the city-state's traditional norms and its definition of marriage.

During his speech at the annual National Day Rally, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said he believed it is the “right thing to do now” as most Singaporeans will now accept it.

“Private sexual behavior between consenting adults does not raise any law and order issue. There is no justification to prosecute people for it nor to make it a crime," Lee said. “This will bring the law into line with current social mores and I hope provide some relief to gay Singaporeans.”

Lee vowed the repeal will be limited and not shake Singapore’s traditional family and societal norms including how marriage is defined, what children are taught in schools, what is shown on television and general public conduct.

He said the government will amend the constitution to ensure that there can be no constitutional challenge to allow same-sex marriage.

“Even as we repeal Section 377A, we will uphold and safeguard the institution of marriage,” Lee said. “We have to amend the Constitution to protect it. And we will do so. This will help us repeal Section 377A in a controlled and careful way.”

Gay Sex Decriminalized in Singapore




Beware The Lesbian Breakup Curse


It started with Sedona and Rylee, who announced their split in a TikTok video that now has 8.5 million views. Then Alissa and Sam quietly announced they had separated. By the time Avery and Soph broke up, TikTok users began worrying that a fabled "lesbian breakup curse" would affect their relationships, too.

In recent weeks, the supposed curse, also referred to as the “breakup plague” and the “breakup apocalypse,” has consumed many TikTok users' lives.

“Remixing my attitude to avoid the lesbian breakup curse that’s going around,” one user captioned their video. “It really is contagious right now isn’t it,” another user wrote in the comments.

Some have joked that the supposed curse is why so many popular women-loving-women, or WLW, creators have split with their girlfriends in the past few weeks. Others warn that the curse is moving into “straight” TikTok, after several heterosexual couples announced their breakups, too.

“Wtf is in the air why are all the tiktok wlw couples breaking up?” one TikTok user posted.

Artist King Princess even joked that the break up curse inspired her to write a new song, which she posted on TikTok on Thursday.

Beware The Lesbian Breakup Curse





Radio Play During Bisexual Awareness Week


Lost Girls Theatre and the Incomparable Radio Theater are partnering to produce Where or When? - a brand new audio drama podcast with live performances at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Miami and ArtServe in Fort Lauderdale during Bisexual Awareness Week. Live performances at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Miami will happen on September 18 and 17 and performances at ArtServe will happen on September 24 and 25. The podcast launches on the Incomparable podcast network on August 23, with episodes releasing twice a week in the lead up to the live performances.

Co-written by Andie Arthur and David J. Loehr, Where or When? is a story that blends time travel, farce, science fiction, romance, and Miami's unearthed LGBTQ history - or as writer Loehr calls it, "a beach read for your ears."

"What makes two people fall in love? What if a person falls in love with more than one other person at a time? How do they resolve that? These questions were interesting to us even before throwing in the time-travel angle. And what if what is linear to one person is all out of order for the other? These aren't even unique questions, but I think we bring our own sensibilities and idea to them, that's what makes the story interesting. How are we going to answer these questions? You'll have to listen to find out," says Loehr.

Liv and Will are living the "happily ever after." Or so they thought until they met Tess. Once the time agents showed up...well, there's "it's complicated..." and "it's... complicated..."

Radio Play During Bisexual Awareness Week




Rights Expanded for Transgender Workers


Transgender workers will gain broadened legal protections in the wake of a recent federal appeals court decision that gender dysphoria is covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Many transgender people suffer from gender dysphoria, which describes the distress caused by a person’s gender identity not matching that person’s sex assigned at birth. About three-quarters of transgender people who participated in a 2020 Cedars-Sinai study experienced gender dysphoria by age seven.

Transgender workers gained protections against job discrimination with the US Supreme Court’s landmark 2020 ruling that said LGBT employees are covered by Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

But the ADA goes beyond just prohibiting bias to requiring that employers provide reasonable accommodations. For workers with gender dysphoria, that could mean getting leave for medical procedures or hormone therapy, as well as modifications to bathroom or dress-code policies, legal observers said.

“If somebody notifies their employer of the fact that they’re transitioning, then there’s a method in place to ensure they can continue to do their job with appropriate accommodations,” said Jennifer Levi, director of GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders’ Transgender Rights Project.

Rights Expanded for Transgender Workers



Kenya and Intersex Rights


A new law that took effect late last month in Kenya has granted equal rights and recognition to intersex people

Intersex people are now recognized as Kenya’s third gender with an ‘I’ gender marker in response to the Children Act 2022. Kenya is the first African country that has granted the intersex community this universal right.

The new law requires intersex children to be treated with dignity and have equal access to basic services like medical treatment and education, in addition to social protection services as a special need. It also requires the accommodation of intersex children in child protection centers and other facilities.

Courts are also required to consider the needs of intersex children who are on trial — including the calling of an expert witness — before they issue any ruling. The law further stipulates that anyone can be a foster parent without restrictions of gender, age or marital status.

It also protects intersex children from so-called sex normalization surgeries, and such procedures will only be done with a doctor’s recommendation. Those who violate the law will face at least three years in jail and a fine of at least $5,000.

“This is a great and major milestone globally for Kenya. We are now way ahead and can teach our neighbors and the whole globe good practices,” said Jedidah Wakonyo, a human rights lawyer and former chair of the Intersex Persons Society of Kenya.

Kenya and Intersex Rights



Losing An Ally - Olivia Newton-John


In an announcement on Facebook Monday, John Easterling, the husband of singer and actress Olivia Newton-John relayed the news that she had died at age 73.

Newton-John had been battling breast cancer for over three decades, her first cancer diagnosis in 1992 when she was 44. Although she had previously seen her cancer in remission, in 2017 she was diagnosed again.

In October of 2020 in an interview with The Guardian the pop star and actor spoke about her third diagnosis of cancer. “Three times lucky, right?” she smiles warmly. “I’m going to look at it like that. Listen, I think every day is a blessing. You never know when your time is over; we all have a finite amount of time on this planet, and we just need to be grateful for that.” She genuinely sounds as if she means every word.

The cancer’s return in 2017 was, she told The Guardian, not unexpected. “It’s been a part of my life for so long. I felt something was wrong. It’s concerning when it comes back, but I thought: ‘I’ll get through it again.’”

What of her health problems? “I don’t think of myself as sick with cancer,” she says firmly. “I choose not to see it as a fight either because I don’t like war. I don’t like fighting wherever it is – whether it’s outside or an actual war inside my body. I choose not to see it that way. I want to get my body healthy and back in balance. Part of that is your mental attitude to it. If you think: ‘Poor me,’ or ‘I’m sick,’ then you’re going to be sick.”

Losing An Ally - Olivia Newton-John



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

We count on you to send us your news items, questions, and nominations for posts of the day.
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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - July to September 2022
« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2022, 04:41:40 PM »


Tuesday, August 30th, 2022





Anna Faris' Best Performances


Anna Faris is a successful television and film actor who has delivered several memorable performances throughout her career. She is rightfully known for her brilliant comedic performances. Notably, Faris was the center of the Scary Movie franchise and has worked with big named directors including Ang Lee. Faris has a sheer charisma on screen, and gives everything she has with every performance that she takes on. She completely transforms into her characters, and has proved that she is a master of comedy. Faris has been on successful television shows including Friends and Mom. Although she is known for her comedy, she can also deliver effective dramatic performances.

Faris was born in Baltimore, Maryland and had a love for acting from a very young age. Her career started with independent films such as Lovers Lane. Her breakout role was in Scary Movie, where she proved that she was a great comedic talent. From there, Faris continued to earn comedic roles and worked with several prominent filmmakers. She has acted opposite several amazing actors including Diane Keaton, Bill Murray, and Ryan Reynolds. She has proved, throughout her career, that she is one of the best comedic actors working in Hollywood. Next, per Variety, Faris will star opposite Toni Collette and Thomas Haden Church in The Estate. According to Collider, filming began earlier this year. Until further details are released, let's dive into Faris' best performances, ranked.

Anna Faris' Best Performances



Will "Don't Say Gay" Come to New York?


Rep. Lee Zeldin may want to bring a version of Florida’s Parental Rights in Education Act – also referred to as the “don’t say gay” bill – to New York.

While speaking Thursday at the church of former New York City Council Member and state Sen. Rubén Díaz Sr. – a Bronx Democrat infamous for past anti-gay comments and his opposition to same-sex marriage – Zeldin said that teachers should not be allowed to answer sex education questions asked by students as old as 13 in the seventh grade. Instead, the GOP candidate for governor said that teachers should notify the student’s parents about the question and leave it up to them to answer it. “The teacher, instead of trying to answer (and) us(ing) that as an opportunity to try to get all the other kids an education of whatever that teacher wants to say to that student and the rest of that class, instead the teacher should be required to go to the parent… and deal with that issue at home,” Zeldin told the New York Hispanic Clergy Organization at their weekly meeting according to a recording of the event at the church obtained by City & State.

The controversial Florida law that recently went into effect prohibits teachers from discussing sexual orientation and gender identity with students in third grade and below. Although Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and other Republicans pitched it as a means to increase the rights of parents in their kids’ education, critics on the left have said the law will lead to discrimination towards LGBTQ students and teachers. They dubbed it the “don’t say gay” bill and have decried it as both homophobic and transpobic.

On the surface, Zeldin’s suggestion seems slightly different. Sex education does not necessarily equate to sexual orientation and gender identity, which the Florida law explicitly refers to. But both often fall under the umbrella term of sex ed. Before describing his idea, Zeldin spoke against “divisive” topics being taught in school. “We have a lot of kids who do a really good job getting along with each other before some educators bring in their own biases and start pitting the kids against each other,” Zeldin said.

Will "Don't Say Gay" Come to New York?




Where Are The Lesbian Bars?


New York City is widely regarded as a hub for the LGBTQ community.

That's why I was so confused when, after coming out in 2020, my Google search result showed just three lesbian bars in my city: Henrietta Hudson and Cubbyhole (both in Manhattan's West Village), and Ginger's Bar (in Park Slope, Brooklyn, which was once a popular neighborhood for lesbians).

I was dumbfounded — how could this be true when entire neighborhoods take on the identity of "gayborhoods" and rainbow flags hang in windows year-round?

I learned quickly that almost everything I thought I knew about queer culture was actually just what I knew about cisgender male gay culture.

This discrepancy in nightlife and the disheartening lack of permanent-fixture spaces for other members of the queer community is widely known. There were an estimated 200 known lesbian bars across the US in the late 1980s, according to documentary company The Lesbian Bar Project. Now, there are around 20.

After walking past Henrietta's and Cubbyhole and seeing lines wrapped around the block day after day, I'd get frustrated that everyone waiting couldn't just walk a block to the next bar the way anyone looking for a hetero space could.

While this revelation was hardly news on the grander scale, it's not something I, or many others I've spoken with, realized until we went looking for these places ourselves.

Where Are The Lesbian Bars?





Sanjaya Malakar


Former American Idol star Sanjaya Malakar has come out as bisexual and has revealed that he was pressured by his publicists to be "ambiguous" about his sexuality.

Appearing on the Adam Sank Show podcast, he said that while he was on American Idol he was in a serious relationship with a woman and was "exploring" his life.

"Then American Idol happened," he revealed, "and everyone was like, 'Oh, he's gay', and I was like, 'Ok well now I have to say no', because at this point they are forcing me to make a decision and define myself."

Malakar was bullied relentlessly during his appearance on the show back in 2006, where everyone made assumptions about his sexuality. He was 17 at the time.

"I identify as bisexual, at the time I did not know – which was why it was so weird," he said of his experience on the show.

"I grew up in a time when being called a f****t in school was the worst thing that could ever happen to you. You had to be as hyper-masculine as possible to fit in, and coming up in 2007, it was like 'being gay is OK but you have to define yourself and there's 'this' or 'that'."

Sanjaya Malakar




Feeling Excluded


Mikiko Galpin still feels the impact of being sexually assaulted by someone he thought he could trust -- and the tough decisions he was forced to make after multiple pregnancy scares.

When Roe v. Wade was overturned in June, it was a sad and heavy moment for the 29-year-old transgender man. He was taken back to the first time he took a pregnancy test prior to transitioning. He recalls crying in the passenger seat of a friend's car at 2 a.m. trying to search for a pharmacy that was still open so he could buy a pregnancy test.

At the time, Galpin said he felt trapped and didn't know where to turn while navigating the complexities of a pregnancy scare resulting from a traumatic experience. An anxious Galpin feared the potential of upending his life to care for a baby at a young age.

"I just wanted to get a pregnancy test and know if I was pregnant at that point, and just feeling that complete sense of having no control over this really big part of your life," Galpin said. "I think when the decision came down, I had that same feeling of not having control over this very momentous and personal thing that myself and other people who have reproductive abilities are going to go through in the coming months and years."

Although Galpin turned out not to be pregnant, those fears about who gets to decide his reproductive rights still linger.

Amid discourse surrounding women's rights and bodily autonomy in the two months since the federal reversal of the right to an abortion, Galpin and other transgender and nonbinary advocates say their communities are often excluded from conversations about abortion care and other forms of reproductive healthcare.

Feeling Excluded



Jena Malone Comes Out As Pansexual


Jena Malone is sharing her journey coming out as pansexual.

Accompanied by a video of her dancing to the song "Book of Bringhi," the "Hunger Games" actor said that she felt like a "heterosexual man in a woman's body."

"I visualized his desires and placed them on to me," she wrote. "But this, was never the whole of the story that was meant for me. So I’ve been learning a new way to tell it. Using words to guide me not define me. That my sexual identity has more to teach and to tell me. Finding words that feel more right to explore in my telling. Pansexuality. Sapiosexuality. Polyamory. A fuller spectrum of understanding that my story is demanding of me. And I’m honoring it today with this soft and sleepy little stretch of a dance."

Malone added, "I love humans. So there's that," along with red hearts and flags representing the LGBTQ community.

The star said she intended to publish the post on Pansexual Awareness Day, which is May 24, but explained that she's a mom and "always a few months late for everything." (Malone has a six-year-old daughter named Ode Mountain.)

Malone told The Hollywood Reporter in an interview that coming out "felt so nice." She added, "I’ve been thinking about it for a while. The sexual journey is so beautiful."

Jena Malone Comes Out As Pansexual



Personal Journey of a Catholic Therapist


In a recent essay for Faith on View Daily, a Catholic pediatric therapist wrote eloquently on the need to care for LGBTQ+ youth.

Julie Nichols explained how her background as a pediatric specialty therapist and a convert to Catholicism have helped her understand that affirming the identities of LGBTQ+ young people is a life issue.

“While I remain faithful to my church I feel that it is time to speak out in favor of affirming the identities of LGBTQIA+ youth,” Nichols wrote. “My eyes started opening two years ago when I encountered suicidal LBGTQ youth from conservative Christian homes whose suicidal ideations occurred at higher rates than their non-religious/progressive Christian peers.”

Since then, her journey towards understanding experiences of trans and queer youth has continued. The current political climate, in particular recent legislation that aims to block access to gender-affirming care for young transgender people, further galvanized Nichols to speak out.

She drew on her professional background, particularly her work with neurodiverse and disabled children, to gain a better understanding of LGBTQ+ people’s experiences. People’s lives are rarely organized by binaries, she realized, but more often according to spectra.

Personal Journey of a Catholic Therapist



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

We count on you to send us your news items, questions, and nominations for posts of the day.
If you have items you’d like to see published, send them to CellarDweller115.

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« Last Edit: August 29, 2022, 04:47:56 PM by CellarDweller115 »

Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - July to September 2022
« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2022, 10:22:11 AM »


Tuesday, September 6th, 2022





Why Michelle Did "Showman"


Even the most celebrated actors are at risk of being typecast. And Michelle Williams is no exception to this tendency. She is a gifted and multifaceted performer, but most of her best roles occur in probing dramas about women in difficult circumstances. But she needs a reprieve from these movies every now and then. Michelle Williams would not have been the first choice of many people to be in The Greatest Showman, but she had an understandable reason for joining the film.

Williams’ first big break was as part of the ensemble in Dawson’s Creek. But she quickly found her lane as an actor in more sensitive fare, starting with her work in Brokeback Mountain, which earned her the first of her four current Oscar nominations.

She became a star in indie movies, such as in her trio of films with underground filmmaker Kelly Reichardt, the romantic drama Blue Valentine, and the psychologically disturbing Synecdoche, New York. She garnered even more acclaim from critics and award shows for her performances in My Week with Marilyn and Manchester by the Sea. These movies are deeply affecting, carefully crafted, and worth seeking out. But it can be tough to sit through even the most evocative exploration of heartbreak.

Given her track record, Williams’ decision to play Charity Barnum in The Greatest Showman surprised some. But, as she explained to the NZ Herald in 2017, it was a detour she sorely needed.

Why Michelle Did "Showman"



Death Sentences For Activists


The Islamic Republic of Iran imposed the death penalty on two LGBTQ activists for allegedly promoting homosexuality, human rights organization Hengaw reported on Sunday.

According to Hengaw, an organization that documents human rights violations in Kurdistan, “Zahra Sediqi Hamedani, known as ‘Sareh,’ 31, from Naqadeh, and Elham Chubdar, 24, from Urmia, both activists of the LGBT community, were sentenced to death by the Revolutionary Court of Urmia in a joint case on the charge of ‘Corruption on Earth’ through the promoting of homosexuality.”

The Hengaw Human Rights Organization added that “the sentence has been announced to them in the past few days in the women's ward of Urmia Central Prison.”

Urmia is a city in the West Azerbaijan Province of Iran.

The independent Iranian news Twitter feed 1500tasvir also reported the sentencing, writing on Sunday that “Homosexual rights activists #Zahra_Seddighi (31) and #Elham Choobdar (24) have been sentenced to death.”

Iran’s regime has executed between 4,000 and 6,000 gays and lesbians since the nation’s Islamic revolution in 1979, according to a 2008 British Wikipedia cable.

Death Sentences For Activists




TikTok Lesbians Cursed?


Pop culture experts are convinced there is something in the water that has been causing a slew of break ups among lesbian couples who are influential on TikTok.

Morgan Sung, culture reporter for NBC News, told Rolling Stone she believes we are in the midst of a “TikTok lesbian breakup apocalypse.”

Couples who have fallen victim to the alleged curse over the past few months include JoJo Siwa and Kylie Prew, Avery Cyrus and Soph Mosca, as well as Sedona Prince and Rylee LeGlue, who became popular on the site due to their massive height difference (6′ 7″ vs. 4′ 9″ respectively).

And many believe it all started with one ex-couple: music artist Cari Fletcher and YouTuber Shannon Beveridge. After the pair’s recent break up, Fletcher released a song called, “Becky’s So Hot,” about Beveridge’s new girlfriend Becky Missal.

Fletcher said the song (whose chorus says, “Becky’s so hot in your vintage t-shirt”) was inspired by an Instagram photo she saw (and accidentally liked) of Missal wearing one of Beveridge’s vintage t-shirts – a shirt that she, Fletcher, used to wear.

The song prompted drama across social media as fans argued over whether it was inappropriate for Fletcher to use Missal’s real name in the song without her permission or knowledge. While Missal and Beveridge claimed to be upset about the song, they also launched a line of t-shirts in response.

TikTok Lesbians Cursed?





Sanjaya Malakar


Former American Idol star Sanjaya Malakar has come out as bisexual and has revealed that he was pressured by his publicists to be "ambiguous" about his sexuality.

Appearing on the Adam Sank Show podcast, he said that while he was on American Idol he was in a serious relationship with a woman and was "exploring" his life.

"Then American Idol happened," he revealed, "and everyone was like, 'Oh, he's gay', and I was like, 'Ok well now I have to say no', because at this point they are forcing me to make a decision and define myself."

Malakar was bullied relentlessly during his appearance on the show back in 2006, where everyone made assumptions about his sexuality. He was 17 at the time.

"I identify as bisexual, at the time I did not know – which was why it was so weird," he said of his experience on the show.

"I grew up in a time when being called a f****t in school was the worst thing that could ever happen to you. You had to be as hyper-masculine as possible to fit in, and coming up in 2007, it was like 'being gay is OK but you have to define yourself and there's 'this' or 'that'."

Sanjaya Malakar




Medicaid Claims In Florida


Florida saw the number of transgender Medicaid recipients seeking gender-affirming treatment almost double in recent years — yet the state still banned its program from covering such medical care.

The number of adults and children who received Medicaid coverage for behavioral therapy, hormone treatments and, in rare cases, surgery for gender dysphoria increased from 593 enrollees in 2018 to 1,209 in 2021, according to new data from Florida’s chief Medicaid regulator. Gender dysphoria refers to the feelings of discomfort or distress some transgender people experience when their bodies don’t align with their gender.

Michael Haller, chief of pediatric endocrinology at the University of Florida, said the data only bolsters claims that the state’s ban on Medicaid payments for gender affirming treatment is nothing but political theater that blocks people from accessing critical care.

“Our state health leadership is acting like this is the most important issue facing our state, and our kids’ health right now,” Haller said during a Tuesday phone interview. “It’s infuriating because it’s actually affecting people’s access to care.”

Haller spoke on behalf of the Florida Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, of which he is a member.

Florida’s Medicaid regulator, the Agency for Health Care Administration, released the data about three weeks after it blocked coverage for transition-related medical care in early August. The agency’s Medicaid chief released a report in April claiming that there isn’t enough information to confirm the treatments were effective. The agency is responsible for much of the state’s $36.2 billion program, which covers almost 5.4 million people.

Medicaid Claims In Florida



What Is the Asexual Spectrum?


The asexual spectrum, commonly abbreviated as “ace-spec” or “a-spec,” refers to sexual identities and orientations that fall under the asexual umbrella. Just as there are many different ways to experience sexuality, there is a variety of ways people might experience asexuality.

It’s hard to tell how many people in the world identify as asexual, but a widely cited 2004 national survey suggested that asexual people make up about one percent of the population. More recently, a 2017 study conducted by UCLA’s Williams Institute indicated that at least 1.7 percent of the LGBTQ population identifies as asexual. All these people may identify as ace, but their experiences may take different forms beneath the asexual umbrella, or fall in different places along the asexual spectrum.

While there’s still a lot of confusion about what it means to be asexual, we can at least agree that sexuality is a spectrum. In some cases, it can be set in stone, but for many, it’s fluid and has the potential to evolve. This is the case for asexuality too. As psychotherapist Rachel Wright, MA, LMFT previously told Cosmopolitan, “Under the asexual umbrella, or on the asexual spectrum, there are a plethora of identities.”

Some people who identify within the asexual spectrum may not feel sexual attraction at all, yet still desire to have a romantic partner. Others may only feel a little sexual attraction. Some may experience sexual attraction on specific occasions, like after they’ve cultivated a strong bond with someone over an extended period of time. Like all forms of sexuality, asexuality manifests in different ways, so there is no single way to experience it.

What Is the Asexual Spectrum?



Angels Arrive to Block Protestors


The angels stood quietly while protesters yelled “pedophile” and “groomer” and pushed signs quoting the Book of Mormon toward their faces.

“You’re going against God,” one man spat. Another told them to “stop protecting the homos” at Brigham Young University.

The dozen people dressed in white didn’t flinch. Hand in hand, they formed a shield between the 100 people rallying in front of them and the LGBTQ students, alumni and friends from BYU who gathered off campus to find and show support for each other Saturday night.

The angel’s wings, made of white sheets draped over PVC pipe that extended 3 feet above their shoulders, blocked most of the posters at the “Back to School Pride Night” at Kiwanis Park in Provo.

“I’m doing this because I want our LGBTQ community to feel like they can be themselves and know we have their backs,” said Sabrina Wong, a BYU student and ally who stood as one of the angels at Kiwanis Park in Provo.

Clubs for queer students who attend BYU are not allowed to meet on campus; the school operated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints forbids it, as well as any same-sex romantic partnerships or displays of affection among LGBTQ students.

Angels Arrive to Block Protestors



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

We count on you to send us your news items, questions, and nominations for posts of the day.
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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - July to September 2022
« Reply #10 on: September 12, 2022, 02:10:56 PM »


Tuesday, September 13th, 2022





Four Minute Review of Proulx Book


Welcome to “Book Bytes” for High Plains Public Radio; I am Dr. Mary Scott, Professor of Biology at Dodge City Community College. I want to share with That Old Ace in the Hole by Annie Proulx. This work of fiction has stories within the main story which is a complexity I enjoy; however, I found the strength of Proulx’s writing was her ability to paint landscapes with her words. I enjoyed the descriptions of the Oklahoma and Texas panhandle.

As Bob Dollar drives to the town of Woolybucket, the reader is taken on a journey across the grasslands where the towns are far apart. Proulx describes beauty in the seasonal changes from green to brown, as well as the challenges of wind, hail, blowing dust, and tumbleweeds. Being from Kansas, and having crossed the panhandle of Oklahoma, I enjoyed these descriptions. In my mind, I can see the deserted, decaying houses and dying towns described. This same talent is used to paint a picture of the farmers and ranchers trying to survive in modern times. Between the descriptions of landscapes and the depiction of classic “pioneer or cowboy spirit,” I hope some might come see that we are more than just “flyover states.”

Proulx has also captured the speech, food, and life found in this area of the United States. Descriptions of the “Barbwire festival” may have you recalling other celebrations you have attended, complete with quilt raffles and a rodeo. Proulx has captured the dialect of this part of the United States. Not full southern but the start of the southern drawl. If you will hear in your head how she has written words such as “graindad” for “grandad,” you will hear some of the sounds of the panhandle. I enjoy this type of writing. It brings the characters alive for me.

Four Minute Review of Proulx Book



Fundraising Event Leaves Florida Over "Don't Say Gay"


A video game charity fundraiser announced Thursday that it would not hold its next event in Florida because of a state law that limits classroom instruction on sexual orientation and gender identity, also citing a "disregard" for Covid safety in the state.

In a statement posted to its website, Games Done Quick, also known as "GDQ," said Florida's Parental Rights in Education law, colloquially known as "Don't Say Gay," is part of an "increased aggression" directed at LGBTQ people by the state. GDQ did not specify the city in Florida or the venue that had been the originally planned destination for the event.

"While we would love to return in-person, we’ve determined that to provide a safe and welcoming event to all it was best that we move away from our originally planned location in Florida," the statement reads.

Additionally, GDQ said state laws that do not require either event attendees or employees to be vaccinated against Covid, coupled with the anti-LGBTQ attitudes, led organizers to say they "do not believe it is a safe place for our community at this time." GDQ has prominently featured LGBTQ gamers during past events.

NBC News has reached out to GDQ for further comment on the decision to pull out of Florida.

Fundraising Event Leaves Florida Over "Don't Say Gay"




First U.S. Lesbian Governor


Maura Healey, currently the attorney general of Massachusetts, easily won the Democratic nomination for governor in Tuesday’s primary, making her one of two lesbian candidates who could make history in November by being elected governors.

As of 9 p.m. local time, Healey was leading Sonia Chang-Díaz 84 percent to 16 percent, and the Associated Press had called the race for her. Chang-Díaz, a state senator, ended her campaign in June but was still on the ballot.

The Republican primary has not been called yet. The two competitors are Geoff Diehl, a former Massachusetts legislator who has Donald Trump’s endorsement, and Chris Doughty, a businessman who is more moderate. The incumbent, moderate Republican Charlie Baker, is not seeking reelection.

Healey is likely to win in November, but Massachusetts, although heavily Democratic, has sometimes elected Republican governors in the past few decades, including Baker, Mitt Romney, and William Weld. “Whether Healey faces Diehl or Doughty, the attorney general will be the prohibitive favorite in the general election,” The Sun of Lowell, Mass., reports.

In 2014, Healey became the first out member of the LGBTQ+ community to be elected attorney general of any state. As AG, she has led lawsuits against opioid makers, the Trump administration, and oil companies. She was previously a civil rights lawyer in the AG’s office, where she fought the Defense of Marriage Act.

First U.S. Lesbian Governor





Will Jon Kent Be Bi?


Superman & Lois has found its new Jonathan Kent!

It was announced in early August that Jordan Elsass, who had portrayed one of the titular hero’s sons, would not be returning to the show for its third season. He ultimately cited struggles with his own mental health over the last two years as his reason for departing, even noting that he was unsure he would continue acting at all.

And while fans were sad to see him go, the last remaining connection to The CW’s Arrowverse committed to recasting the character rather than writing him off the show altogether.

Michael Bishop is now slated to step into the role, fresh off his American film debut in the Disney Channel Original Movie Spin last year.

Amidst the shake-up, some have been wondering if any changes will be made to the character of Jon Kent himself, rather than just a different actor taking over behind the scenes.  In Superman: Son of Kal-El, Jon has not only picked up the mantle of Superman, but has come to embrace his own identity in the process. The comics revealed him to be canonically bisexual last year, and allowed him to start exploring his feelings for Jay Nakamura, his now-boyfriend.

As soon as a queer Superman happened on the page, fans speculated as to whether that shift might be seen in the TV series.

“There's always that possibility,” Elsass said at the time, “but it's looking like Jonathan Kent this version is most likely straight. We don't even know if he has powers at this point.”

Will Jon Kent Be Bi?




Montana Institutes Block


Montana health officials on Friday made permanent a rule that blocks transgender people from changing their birth certificates even if they undergo gender-confirmation surgery.

The move by Republican Gov. Greg Gianforte's administration comes just days before a court will hear arguments over the legality of a similar rule that's been in effect on an emergency basis since May. The ACLU of Montana has asked state Judge Michael Moses to strike down the emergency rule.

Moses in April had temporarily blocked a 2021 Montana law that made it difficult for transgender people to change their birth certificate.

The law said people had to have a "surgical procedure" before they could change the sex listed on their birth certificate. Gianforte's administration then went further and blocked changes to birth certificates even after surgery.

Over the last several years, conservative legislators in numerous states have sought to limit the rights of transgender people.

Only Tennessee, Oklahoma and West Virginia have similar sweeping prohibitions against birth certificate changes, advocates for transgender rights say. Bans in Idaho and Ohio were struck down in 2020.

Montana Institutes Block



"About Sasha"


“I am neither a girl nor a boy. I’m neither of the two, I’m a little of both”: in a world that insists on putting people in boxes, that decided there were only two genders, the heroine of the series “About Sasha” (Chair tendre) feels invisible.

Sasha (played by Angèle Metzger) is 17 and has just discovered that she was born intersex. She has decided to live as a girl from now on, after being raised as a boy. In her childhood, she went through hell having to undergo numerous forced operations, including a hysterectomy, to conform to the gender assigned by doctors.

To allow her to start a new life under her new identity, the whole family moves away from Paris. In her new school, Sasha wants no one to know her secret.

Presented to buyers at Unifrance Rendez-vous in Biarritz this week by France TV Distribution, the moving and powerful French series “About Sasha,” created, written and codirected (with Jérémy Mainguy) by Yaël Langmann, is one of the rare shows to feature an intersex person as the main character. The show was named Best Series at the Séries Mania festival last March.

“I was made aware of intersexuality at an early age,” Langmann tells Variety. “The word didn’t even exist back then. When I was at high school, there was a student whose background was similar to Sasha’s: he was assigned a boy at birth, but during a medical exam, he learned that what he had been told since childhood was false. I was deeply moved to witness how this news completely destabilized him. I was also revolted to see all that he already had, and still would have, to endure. The idea for the script came from there.”

"About Sasha"



Angels Arrive to Block Protestors


The angels stood quietly while protesters yelled “pedophile” and “groomer” and pushed signs quoting the Book of Mormon toward their faces.

“You’re going against God,” one man spat. Another told them to “stop protecting the homos” at Brigham Young University.

The dozen people dressed in white didn’t flinch. Hand in hand, they formed a shield between the 100 people rallying in front of them and the LGBTQ students, alumni and friends from BYU who gathered off campus to find and show support for each other Saturday night.

The angel’s wings, made of white sheets draped over PVC pipe that extended 3 feet above their shoulders, blocked most of the posters at the “Back to School Pride Night” at Kiwanis Park in Provo.

“I’m doing this because I want our LGBTQ community to feel like they can be themselves and know we have their backs,” said Sabrina Wong, a BYU student and ally who stood as one of the angels at Kiwanis Park in Provo.

Clubs for queer students who attend BYU are not allowed to meet on campus; the school operated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints forbids it, as well as any same-sex romantic partnerships or displays of affection among LGBTQ students.

Angels Arrive to Block Protestors



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

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Offline CellarDweller115

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Re: The Daily Sheet - July to September 2022
« Reply #11 on: September 19, 2022, 02:50:59 PM »


Tuesday, September 20th, 2022





Kate Mara - Her Best Performances


Kate Mara has been working as an actress in TV and movies since she was a teenager. Both her sister (Rooney Mara) and she have had interesting careers. Kate’s always been a pretty memorable presence; someone you don’t forget easily, who used to be great as a supporting player in all kinds of roles (daughter, love interest, co-worker). In the last few years, finally, she’s started to lead some movies and shows, proving all her talent at showing complex characters.

From Sue Storm to Zoe Barnes, Kate Mara always gives interesting performances. Here are her best, ranked.


Kate Mara - Her Best Performances



All About "Bros."


We love romantic comedies – the chance meetings, and of course the against-all-odds happy endings.

Comedian and actor Billy Eichner loves rom-coms, but he has one complaint: "They never made one about a gay couple. We weren't in those movies at all. We weren't even the best friend at that point. We just were nowhere to be found."

Eichner thinks it's time for a change. With director and co-writer Nicholas Stoller and producer Judd Apatow (no strangers to rom-coms themselves), Eichner has co-written and stars in what's being billed as the first gay romantic comedy ever released by a major film studio, and also the first to feature an all-LGBTQ principal cast. It's called "Bros."

Correspondent Jonathan Vigliotti said, "I went to the screening with my husband and halfway through, we had this moment where we looked at each other, recognizing that this was the first time we had seen ourselves represented: two gay men fronting a romantic comedy on the big screen."

"Yeah, and what's amazing is that our priority when we wrote the movie was to make a hilarious movie," said Eichner.

All About "Bros."




Coming Out At A Christian University


Kristi Holt was shaking when she hit send.

She was about to reveal something to the entire faculty and staff of Seattle Pacific University, the Christian institution where she worked, risking her job in the process.

“My name is Kristi Holt and I am a lesbian,” her message began.

She was making a statement even to herself, one that couldn’t be erased the next day. “It was liberating as much as it was terrifying,” recalled Holt, 27.

That pretty much sums up her mindset as she begins a new school year as an SPU chemistry lab coordinator and adjunct instructor, plunging back into activism targeting a school policy against hiring people in same-sex relationships — a push that has become a huge part of her life since she wrote that email in June 2021.

Holt is among 16 staff, faculty, students and alumni who filed suit this week, claiming a group of trustees backing the policy is violating their fiduciary duty and pushing the school to the brink of ruin as it loses students, faculty, staff and dissenting board members.

Coming Out At A Christian University





Will Jon Kent Be Bi?


Superman & Lois has found its new Jonathan Kent!

It was announced in early August that Jordan Elsass, who had portrayed one of the titular hero’s sons, would not be returning to the show for its third season. He ultimately cited struggles with his own mental health over the last two years as his reason for departing, even noting that he was unsure he would continue acting at all.

And while fans were sad to see him go, the last remaining connection to The CW’s Arrowverse committed to recasting the character rather than writing him off the show altogether.

Michael Bishop is now slated to step into the role, fresh off his American film debut in the Disney Channel Original Movie Spin last year.

Amidst the shake-up, some have been wondering if any changes will be made to the character of Jon Kent himself, rather than just a different actor taking over behind the scenes.  In Superman: Son of Kal-El, Jon has not only picked up the mantle of Superman, but has come to embrace his own identity in the process. The comics revealed him to be canonically bisexual last year, and allowed him to start exploring his feelings for Jay Nakamura, his now-boyfriend.

As soon as a queer Superman happened on the page, fans speculated as to whether that shift might be seen in the TV series.

“There's always that possibility,” Elsass said at the time, “but it's looking like Jonathan Kent this version is most likely straight. We don't even know if he has powers at this point.”

Will Jon Kent Be Bi?




Virginia Puts Restrictions In Place


Virginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin's administration has proposed new policies for the state's schools regarding how they treat transgender students, including restricting which bathrooms they can use and which pronouns they may go by.

The Virginia Department of Education released its 2022 Model Policies online Friday, effectively rolling back the work of Youngkin's predecessor, Democrat Ralph Northam. The new rules will effected the more than 1 million children enrolled in the state's public school system.

The revamped rules explicitly state that students must only use bathrooms and locker rooms associated with the sex assigned to them at birth. If a student wants to participate in a sport or other extracurricular activities, they must, again, only participate in teams that align with the sex assigned at birth.

Further, the legal name and sex of a student can't be changed "even upon written instruction of a parent or eligible student" without an official legal document or court order. Teachers and other school officials can only refer to a student by their pronouns associated with their sex at birth. But they also don't have to refer to a student's preferred names regardless of paperwork if they feel doing so "would violate their constitutionally protected rights."

Virginia now joins a growing number of state legislatures across the U.S. that have adopted new restrictions on gay and transgender students. Like Virginia, these policies often limit conversations about sexuality and gender identity in schools.

Virginia Puts Restrictions In Place



SNL's First Non Binary Cast Member


Molly Kearney, the actor and comedian will join the cast of Saturday Night Live starting the show's 48th season, and she'll become the first nonbinary cast member in the show's history.

Kearney uses gender-neutral pronouns and among her most recent work we can find Amazon's "A League of Their Own" and Disney+'s "The Mighty Ducks".

As well as her participation in Comedy Central's "Up Next" showcase around three years ago.

Saturday Night Live will have four new faces rostered for this new season of the show, as not only Molly Kearney will be added, she'll be joined by Marcello Hernandez, Michael Longfellow and Devon Walker.

SNL's First Non Binary Cast Member



Fired For Being An Ally


A Smithtown High School East teacher claims he was fired because he was an ally to the LGBTQ community.

Josh Tilton on Instagram wrote that he was denied tenure because of his personal beliefs and support of the LGBTQ community.

"When I was denied tenure this past school year, my district tried to manipulate me into believing it wasn’t personal… that it was just business," Tilton said.

Tilton also claimed that an LGBTQ-friendly mural created by his students was painted over once he was out of the building, and that both his firing and the painting over of the mural were targeted bigotry. The mural took 75 hours to paint, according to Tilton.

Superintendent Dr. Mark Secaur responded to Tilton's claims, saying that the Smithtown School District has supported the LGBTQ community.

"Although the district will not comment on a former employee, it is important to know that the claims this individual is making are extremely concerning and inaccurate," Secaur said in a statement. "It is unfortunate that he is trying to tarnish our reputation as the district has been and will continue to be strong advocates for all our students including our LGBTQ population."

Fired For Being An Ally



Your Laugh For The Day!








Contributors: CellarDweller115





The Daily Sheet is a production of The Ultimate Brokeback Forum at http://www.ultimatebrokebackforum.com.

Today's edition by KillersMom, CellarDweller115

Editors emeritae: CactusGal, Marge_Innavera, tellyouwhat, Stilllearning, MissYouSoMuch, gnash

We count on you to send us your news items, questions, and nominations for posts of the day.
If you have items you’d like to see published, send them to CellarDweller115.

To subscribe to The Daily Sheet, click the “Notify” button at the top or bottom of the page.
When a new issue of TDS is posted, you will be notified by e-mail.

The Daily Sheet Archives
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